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SECTION 4 OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

4.1 Additional Data on Correctional Results

Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Offenders: Comparative Data

The following tables present reintegration results for Aboriginal and for non-Aboriginal offenders during community supervision and post-sentence completion (post-WED). Summary versions of these tables, showing the gap in results between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders, appear in Section 1.6: Departmental Performance.

Re-Offending with Any Conviction while on Supervision


Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

All Convictions

year

237

240

228

220

228

3-year average

250

245

235

229

225

Release Flowthrough

year

2516

2429

2471

2564

2631

3-year average

2529

2502

2472

2488

2555

Rate

year

9.4%

9.9%

9.2%

8.6%

8.7%

3-year average

9.9%

9.8%

9.5%

9.2%

8.8%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.


Non-Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

All Convictions

year

937

916

860

874

830

3-year average

978

980

904

883

855

Release Flowthrough

year

14095

13953

13697

13592

13737

3-year average

14341

14154

13915

13747

13675

Rate

year

6.6%

6.6%

6.3%

6.4%

6.0%

3-year average

6.8%

6.9%

6.5%

6.4%

6.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Re-Offending with Violent Convictions while on Supervision


Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Violent Convictions

year

61

48

59

60

49

3-year average

57

56

56

56

56

Release Flowthrough

year

2516

2429

2471

2564

2631

3-year average

2529

2502

2472

2488

2555

Rate

year

2.4%

2.0%

2.4%

2.3%

1.9%

3-year average

2.3%

2.2%

2.3%

2.2%

2.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.


Non-Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Violent Convictions

year

188

202

187

172

143

3-year average

209

206

192

187

167

Release Flowthrough

year

14095

13953

13697

13592

13737

3-year average

14341

14154

13915

13747

13675

Rate

year

1.3%

1.4%

1.4%

1.3%

1.0%

3-year average

1.5%

1.5%

1.4%

1.4%

1.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Re-Offending with Non-violent Conviction while on Supervision


Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Non-violent Convictions

year

176

192

169

160

179

3-year average

193

189

179

174

169

Release Flowthrough

year

2516

2429

2471

2564

2631

3-year average

2529

2502

2472

2488

2555

Rate

year

7.0%

7.9%

6.8%

6.2%

6.8%

3-year average

7.6%

7.6%

7.2%

7.0%

6.6%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.


Non-Aboriginal

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Non-violent Convictions

year

749

714

673

702

687

3-year average

769

773

712

696

687

Release Flowthrough

year

14095

13953

13697

13592

13737

3-year average

14341

14154

13915

13747

13675

Rate

year

5.3%

5.1%

4.9%

5.2%

5.0%

3-year average

5.4%

5.5%

5.1%

5.1%

5.0%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Return to Federal Custody for Any Conviction within 2 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for any type of offence

year

95

70

96

100

113

3-year average

87

86

87

89

103

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

805

776

754

730

794

3-year average

751

766

778

753

759

Rate

year

11.8%

9.0%

12.7%

13.7%

14.2%

3-year average

11.6%

11.2%

11.2%

11.8%

13.6%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for any type of offence

year

342

357

389

379

381

3-year average

336

336

363

375

383

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

3831

3914

3880

3793

3749

3-year average

3778

3809

3875

3862

3807

Rate

year

8.9%

9.1%

10.0%

10.0%

10.2%

3-year average

8.9%

8.8%

9.4%

9.7%

10.1%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return to Federal Custody for Violent Conviction within 2 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a violent offence

year

62

41

54

59

67

3-year average

54

51

52

51

60

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

805

776

754

730

794

3-year average

751

766

778

753

759

Rate

year

7.7%

5.3%

7.2%

8.1%

8.4%

3-year average

7.1%

6.7%

6.7%

6.8%

7.9%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a violent offence

year

171

181

188

174

204

3-year average

174

170

180

181

189

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

3831

3914

3880

3793

3749

3-year average

3778

3809

3875

3862

3807

Rate

year

4.5%

4.6%

4.8%

4.6%

5.4%

3-year average

4.6%

4.5%

4.6%

4.7%

5.0%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return to Federal Custody for Non-violent Conviction within 2 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a non-violent offence

year

33

29

42

41

46

3-year average

34

34

35

37

43

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

805

776

754

730

794

3-year average

751

766

778

753

759

Rate

year

4.1%

3.7%

5.6%

5.6%

5.8%

3-year average

4.5%

4.5%

4.5%

5.0%

5.7%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a non-violent offence

year

171

176

201

205

177

3-year average

161

166

183

194

194

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

3831

3914

3880

3793

3749

3-year average

3778

3809

3875

3862

3807

Rate

year

4.5%

4.5%

5.2%

5.4%

4.7%

3-year average

4.3%

4.4%

4.7%

5.0%

5.1%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return to Federal Custody for Any Conviction within 5 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for any type of offence

year

142

165

147

171

159

3-year average

147

153

151

161

159

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

607

730

718

805

776

3-year average

611

654

685

751

766

Rate

year

23.4%

22.6%

20.5%

21.2%

20.5%

3-year average

24.0%

23.4%

22.1%

21.4%

20.7%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for any type of offence

year

675

641

577

640

644

3-year average

693

673

631

619

620

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

4043

3820

3683

3831

3914

3-year average

4122

3993

3849

3778

3809

Rate

year

16.7%

16.8%

15.7%

16.7%

16.5%

3-year average

16.8%

16.8%

16.4%

16.4%

16.3%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return to Federal Custody for Violent Conviction within 5 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for violent offence

year

92

108

85

121

98

3-year average

96

101

95

105

101

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

607

730

718

805

776

3-year average

611

654

685

751

766

Rate

year

15.2%

14.8%

11.8%

15.0%

12.6%

3-year average

15.8%

15.5%

13.9%

13.9%

13.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for violent offence

year

370

348

292

317

314

3-year average

373

361

337

319

308

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

4043

3820

3683

3831

3914

3-year average

4122

3993

3849

3778

3809

Rate

year

9.2%

9.1%

7.9%

8.3%

8.0%

3-year average

9.0%

9.0%

8.7%

8.4%

8.1%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return to Federal Custody for Non-violent Conviction within 5 years post-WED


Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for a non-violent offence

year

50

57

62

50

61

3-year average

50

52

56

56

58

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

607

730

718

805

776

3-year average

611

654

685

751

766

Rate

year

8.2%

7.8%

8.6%

6.2%

7.9%

3-year average

8.2%

7.9%

8.2%

7.5%

7.5%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Non-Aboriginal

 

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission for a non-violent offence

year

305

293

285

323

330

3-year average

320

312

294

300

313

Offenders Reaching WED for any type of offence

year

4043

3820

3683

3831

3914

3-year average

4122

3993

3849

3778

3809

Rate

year

7.5%

7.7%

7.7%

8.4%

8.4%

3-year average

7.8%

7.8%

7.6%

7.9%

8.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Men and Women Offenders: Comparative Data

The following tables present reintegration results for men and women offenders during community supervision and post-sentence completion (post-WED).

Re-Offending with Violent Convictions while on Supervision


Men

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Violent Convictions

year

245

245

242

229

187

3-year average

260

258

244

239

219

Release Flowthrough

year

15756

15539

15344

15307

15453

3-year average

16020

15801

15546

15397

15368

Rate

year

1.6%

1.6%

1.6%

1.5%

1.2%

3-year average

1.6%

1.6%

1.6%

1.6%

1.4%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.


Women

 

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Violent Convictions

year

4

5

4

3

5

3-year average

6

4

4

4

4

Release Flowthrough

year

855

843

824

849

915

3-year average

850

855

841

839

863

Rate

year

0.5%

0.6%

0.5%

0.4%

0.5%

3-year average

0.7%

0.5%

0.5%

0.5%

0.5%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Return to Federal Custody for Violent Offence within 2 years post-WED


Men

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a violent offence

year

229

218

236

231

265

3-year average

224

217

228

228

244

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

4408

4444

4386

4279

4351

3-year average

4329

4349

4413

4370

4339

Rate

year

5.2%

4.9%

5.4%

5.4%

6.1%

3-year average

5.2%

5.0%

5.2%

5.2%

5.6%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Women

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a violent offence

year

4

4

6

2

6

3-year average

4

4

5

4

5

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

228

246

248

244

192

3-year average

200

227

241

246

228

Rate

year

1.8%

1.6%

2.4%

0.8%

3.1%

3-year average

1.8%

1.8%

1.9%

1.6%

2.0%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Mental Health Cases

Revocation while on Supervision


Men

 

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

Revocations

year

259

372

424

453

547

3-year average

166

269

352

416

475

Release Flowthrough

year

469

640

725

825

949

3-year average

320

482

611

730

833

Rate

year

55.2%

58.1%

58.5%

54.9%

57.6%

3-year average

51.9%

55.8%

57.5%

57.0%

57.0%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.


Women

 

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

Revocations

year

27

26

40

45

69

3-year average

20

25

31

37

51

Release Flowthrough

year

48

55

81

111

123

3-year average

38

46

61

82

105

Rate

year

56.3%

47.3%

49.4%

40.5%

56.1%

3-year average

54.0%

54.7%

50.5%

44.9%

48.9%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Mental Health Cases

Return to Federal Custody for New Offence within 2 years post-WED


Men

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission

year

4

7

17

32

31

3-year average

1

4

9

19

27

Offenders Reaching WED

year

16

101

170

215

249

3-year average

6

40

96

162

211

Rate

year

25.0%

6.9%

10.0%

14.9%

12.4%

3-year average

22.2%

9.2%

9.8%

11.5%

12.6%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).


Women

 

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission

year

0

0

3

0

2

3-year average

0

0

1

1

2

Offenders Reaching WED

year

5

12

19

16

18

3-year average

2

6

12

16

18

Rate

year

0.0%

0.0%

15.8%

0.0%

11.1%

3-year average

0.0%

0.0%

8.3%

6.4%

9.4%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Re-Offending Data

Section 1 presented tables displaying statistics on rates of violent re-offending convictions during community supervision and post-sentence completion (WED). The following tables show corresponding rates for non-violent convictions for the same period.

Re-Offending with Non-violent Conviction while on Supervision


   

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

Non-violent Convictions

year

925

906

842

862

866

3-year average

962

962

891

870

857

Release Flowthrough

year

16611

16382

16168

16156

16368

3-year average

16870

16656

16387

16235

16231

Rate

year

5.6%

5.5%

5.2%

5.3%

5.3%

3-year average

5.7%

5.8%

5.4%

5.4%

5.3%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007). Release Flowthrough as of April 8, 2007.

Return to Federal Custody with Non-violent Conviction 2 years post-WED


   

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Re-Admission
for a non-violent offence

year

204

205

243

246

223

3-year average

195

200

217

231

237

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

4636

4690

4634

4523

4543

3-year average

4529

4576

4653

4616

4567

Rate

year

4.4%

4.4%

5.2%

5.4%

4.9%

3-year average

4.3%

4.4%

4.7%

5.0%

5.2%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

Return Federal Custody with Non-violent Conviction within 5 years post-WED


   

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

Re-Admission
for a non-violent offence

year

355

350

347

373

391

3-year average

371

363

351

357

370

Offenders Reaching WED
for any type of offence

year

4650

4550

4401

4636

4690

3-year average

4734

4648

4534

4529

4576

Rate

year

7.6%

7.7%

7.9%

8.0%

8.3%

3-year average

7.8%

7.8%

7.7%

7.9%

8.1%


Source: Corporate Reporting System (April 8, 2007).

4.2 Incident Investigations

CSC's investigations process includes national and local investigations of incidents and issues affecting its operations. Investigations into inmate deaths or serious bodily injury are convened under section 19 of the CCRA, at either the national or the local level. CSC's Commissioner can also convene investigations under section 20 of the CCRA to report on any matter relating to the operations of CSC.

Other than investigations convened under section 19 and section 20 of the CCRA, the Director General, Incident Investigations and heads of operational units may convene investigations under Commissioner's Directive 041, Incident Reports, to report on incidents and issues affecting CSC's operations.

During fiscal year 2006-07, CSC convened 126 national investigations, including 32 investigations convened under Section 20 of the CCRA, and 94 Tier II Investigations--either convened under Section 19 of the CCRA (death or serious bodily injury) or under paragraph 9 of Commissioner's Directive 041. As indicated in the following tables, 72 investigations involved institution-related incidents, 49 investigations related to community incidents, 4 investigations related to a Community Correctional Centre, and 1 related to a Community-based Residential Facility.

Section 20 Investigations


Incident Type

Community

Institutional

Total

Accessory to Murder

1

0

1

Assault on Inmate

0

1

1

Death Unknown Causes

0

1

1

Deaths by Natural Cause

0

2

2

Major Disturbance

0

1

1

Murder

5

3

8

Murder and Attempted Murder

1

0

1

Sexual activity between patients

0

1

1

Sexual Assault Causing Bodily Harm

1

0

1

Sexual assault on a Minor

1

0

1

Suicide

0

11

11

Attempted Murder

0

1

1

Death by Possible Suicide or Overdose

0

1

1

Missing Weapon, Ammunition and Suicide of Officer

0

1

1

Grand Total

9

23

32


Tier II Investigations


Incident Type

Com-munity

Instit-utional

Instit-utional /CCC

Instit-utional /CRF

Total

Accident, Attempted Escape

0

1

0

0

1

Aggravated Assault Charges

1

0

0

0

1

Aggravated Assault, Assault with Weapon etc.

1

0

0

0

1

Aggravated Assault, Robbery, Unlawful Confinement etc.

1

0

0

0

1

Assault on Inmate

0

9

0

0

9

Assault on Staff

0

4

0

0

4

Attempted murder,
Aggravated assault

1

0

0

0

1

Attempted Murder, Assault with Weapon, Robbery with Violence

1

0

0

0

1

Attempted Murder, Robbery with Firearm etc.

1

0

0

0

1

Attempted suicide

0

4

0

0

4

Attempted Suicide, Self-Inflicted Injuries

0

1

0

0

1

Charges of Production of Marijuana for purposes of trafficking

1

0

0

0

1

Charges Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking

1

0

0

0

1

Death by Overdose

1

1

1

0

3

Death by Suspected Overdose

2

0

0

1

3

Death Natural Cause

3

14

2

0

19

Death Unknown Cause

0

4

0

0

4

Escape (single offender)

0

2

0

0

2

Escape and subsequent robberies

0

1

0

0

1

Escapes (multiple offenders)

0

2

0

0

2

Inmate Fight

0

1

0

0

1

Inmate Injury

0

2

0

0

2

Multiple Assault and Weapons charges

1

0

0

0

1

Multi-vehicle collision

1

0

0

0

1

Offender Suicide

4

0

0

0

4

Robbery

1

0

0

0

1

Self-Inflicted Injury

0

2

0

0

2

Sexual Offence

15

0

0

0

15

Suicide

2

0

0

0

2

Suspect in shooting

1

0

0

0

1

Being Unlawfully at Large (UAL)

0

0

1

0

1

UAL on Day Parole and new charges

1

0

0

0

1

Use of Force

0

1

0

0

1

Grand Total

40

49

4

1

94


4.3 Glossary

Aboriginal

First Nation, Mtis or Inuit.

Aboriginal community

Aboriginal community is a First Nation, tribal council, band, community, organization or other group with a predominantly Aboriginal leadership.

Administrative segregation

Administrative segregation is confinement to keep the offender from associating with other inmates in order to maintain the security of the institution. Inmates may be segregated involuntarily or voluntarily.

Community-based Residential Facilities (CRF)

Facilities contracted from outside agencies or organizations to house federal offenders in the community.

Community Correctional Centre (CCC)

CCCs primarily house offenders on day parole and are designated as minimum-security institutions. In these, the director, parole officers and support staff work as a team, often in co-operation with community partners, to supervise and provide programs for offenders and prepare them for full parole.

Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA)

The legislative framework governing Correctional Service Canada.

Conditional Release

Conditional release helps inmates make a gradual, supervised return to society while serving their sentence. Regardless of the type of conditional release, all offenders are supervised until their Warrant Expiry Date.

  • Temporary Absences (TAs)
    Temporary Absences may be granted to offenders for medical, administrative, community service, family contact, and personal development reasons.
    • Escorted temporary absence (ETA) may be granted at any time during the sentence .
    • Unescorted temporary absence (UTA) may be granted after an offender has served one-sixth of the sentence or six months, whichever is greater.
  • Work Release (WR)
    Work release allows an offender, classified as minimum or medium security and who is judged not to pose an undue risk, to do paid or voluntary work in the community under supervision.
  • Day Parole (DP)
    Day parole allows an offender to participate in community-based activities to prepare for release on full parole or statutory release.
  • Full Parole (FP)
    Inmates are normally eligible to be considered for full parole by the National Parole Board, after serving one-third of their sentence, or seven years, whichever is less.
  • Statutory Release (SR)
    By law, most offenders who are serving sentences of fixed length, and who have not been granted parole or had their parole revoked, must be released on statutory release after serving two-thirds of their sentence.

CORCAN

A Special Operating Agency (SOA) that employs federal offenders for its workforce and, in doing so, provides them with working skills and working habits necessary to compete in the workforce.

Correctional Programs

Correctional programs are designed to improve offenders' current knowledge and skill level, improving the likelihood of successful reintegration into the community upon release.

Healing Lodge

These types of facilities may or may not be located on First Nations' reservation land. There are two distinct types of Healing Lodges available to offenders under the care and custody of CSC.

A Section 81 Healing Lodge is an Aboriginal community based correctional facility where the community has entered into an agreement with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada for the provision of correctional care and custody to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders. The second type is located on CSC property and run by CSC with the assistance of community Aboriginal people.

Ion scanner

An ion scanner is an electronic device that has the ability to detect residual amounts of particular drugs on personal items such as money or credit cards.

Long Term Supervision Order (LTSO)

A Long Term Supervision Order is an order imposed by the court. The offender who has received such an order is supervised in accordance with the CCRA. The Long Term Supervision Order commences when the offender has finished serving all sentences for offences for which he or she had been convicted. The period of supervision to which the offender is subject at any time must not total more than 10 years.

Maximum Security Institutions

House offenders who pose a serious risk to staff, other offenders and the community. The perimeter of a maximum-security institution is well defined, highly secure and controlled. Offender movement and association are strictly regulated and directly supervised.

Medium Security Institutions

House offenders who pose a risk to the safety of the community. The perimeter of a medium-security institution is well defined, secure and controlled. Offender movement and association is regulated and generally supervised.

Minimum Security Institutions

House offenders who pose a limited risk to the safety of the community. The perimeter of a minimum-security institution is defined but not directly controlled. Offender movement and association within the institution are regulated under minimal supervision.

Multi-level Institutions

House offenders of different security classifications in different secure areas of the institution.

Offender Management System (OMS)

The automated information system used by CSC as its main database for offender information.

Revocation

If parolees violate the conditions of their conditional release, or have been charged with a criminal offence, their conditional release (day parole, full parole) is suspended and they are re-incarcerated. Upon reviewing the case at a formal hearing, the National Parole Board may then decide to revoke parole and have the offender remain incarcerated. If the offender is not revoked, the conditional release is reinstated.

Sections 81/84 of CCRA

Section 81 enables CSC to enter into agreements with Aboriginal communities for the provision of correctional services to Aboriginal offenders. These agreements permit CSC, with the consent of the offender and the Aboriginal community, to transfer the care and custody of the offender to an Aboriginal community. Under Section 84 of the CCRA, CSC gives the Aboriginal community an opportunity to propose a plan for the inmate's release to, and integration into, the Aboriginal community.

Security Classification

Each offender is reviewed initially on admission and then periodically throughout their sentence and is classified as a maximum, medium or minimum security risk and normally placed in an institution of the same classification. The security risk level is based on an assessment of factors related to public safety, escape risk and institutional adjustment.

Warrant Expiry Date (WED)

The date the sentence imposed by the courts officially ends.


4.4 Further Information

Correctional Service of Canada Internet site: www.csc-scc.gc.ca

CSC Contacts:

Bill Staubi
Director General
Performance Management
340 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P9
Telephone: (613) 992-8723
Facsimile: (613) 995-5064
Email: StaubiBH@csc-scc.gc.ca

Jennifer Wheatley
Acting Assistant Commissioner
Performance Assurance
340 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P9
Telephone: (613) 996-1710
Facsimile: (613) 943-9292
Email: WheatleyJM@csc-scc.gc.ca


1 This is the Strategic Outcome as per the PAA that appears in the 2006-07 RPP. In the most recent RPP (2007-08) the wording was modified to: "Offenders are safely and effectively accommodated and reintegrated into Canadian communities with due regard to public safety."

2 More information on CSC is available in its 2007-08 RPP at: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/0708/csc-scc/csc-scc_e.pdf

3 For more information, see the Glossary at the end of this report.

4 Source: CSC Offender Management System. Note that, within a given year, many offenders move between incarceration and conditional release. In such cases, the offender is counted only once in each category.

5 A Reference Level is the current dollar balance of funding available to an organization for each year as approved by Treasury Board and/or statutory estimates related to statutes of Canada.

6 Corporate management costs are factored into the above 72-28 percent distribution.

7 CSC has changed its definition of 'employee' to be consistent with the definition used by the Canada Public Service Agency. Previously, casual employees, employees on leave without pay and suspended employees were included. Source: CSC Human Resources Management System (March 31, 2007).

8 Source: CSC Human Resources Management System (Employment equity data, March 31, 2007).

9 As per the latest data released by Statistics Canada (2001 Census Data).

10 Source: CSC Research Branch. For more information, see "The Changing Federal Offender Population" (August 2006). Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/rsrch/special_reports/highlights-2006_e.shtml

11 Ibid.

12 Ibid.

13 The annual average cost per offender has increased by 4.1% from 2004-05 ($68,216) to 2005-06 ($71,004). Source: CSC Comptroller Branch.

14 Parole offices, typically being rented facilities, do not present the same maintenance issues as correctional institutions.

15 Planned Spending includes Main Estimates plus adjustments already supported by TBS. Total Authorities includes Planned Spending as well as Supplementary Estimates and access to the TB contingency Vote 5. For more information, see Section 3.2: Financial Information.

16 CSC is currently developing performance measures for all levels of its Program Activity Architecture. These will be used for 2008-09 reporting.

17 Since they provide a more reliable indicator, the three-year moving averages (of rates) will be the primary method used by CSC to measure long-term improvements in performance. At the same time, annual objectives have been established and annual results are closely monitored to provide early indications of potential shifts in trends. CSC is committed to achieving improvements in its results, as reflected in both the annual results and the three-year moving averages.

18 Result commitments were not set for 2006-07.

19 CORCAN operates through a revolving fund, with operating costs offset by revenues.

20 While not a Program Activity, Corporate Management supports all program activities, and costs associated with it are distributed throughout the PAA in other financial tables, as reflected in the Main Estimates.

21 In view of the fiscal restraint measures introduced in November 2006, CSC adjusted these performance expectations as reflected in its 2007-08 RPP.

22 Results that are more detailed are presented in Section 2.1.1. Major Institutional Incidents include staff murders, inmate murders, hostage taking/forcible confinement, escapees from institutions or escorts, suicides, as well as any assaults on staff, assaults on inmates or inmate fights that result in a major injury.

23 "Institutional Flowthrough" refers to the number of offenders who spend at least one day during the fiscal year in an institution.

24 Data includes "Commit", "Attempt to commit", "Threaten to commit", "Suspected of committing", "Conspire to commit" and so on.

25 "Institutional Staff" reflects the number of CSC employees in institutions at a given point in the year. This number is thus a snapshot, rather than a flowthrough (see footnote 23).

26 The data in the two tables below include "minor" and "major" injuries.

27 Although the Report on Plans and Priorities 2006-07 described CSC's Mental Health Strategy as having six components, one component (providing coordination and leadership in the delivery and development of mental health services) has been subsumed under the other components of the Strategy. The five components are: Implement clinical screening and assessment process at intake; Provide primary mental health care in all CSC institutions; Create intermediate mental health care units in selected men's institutions; Ensure consistent standards and approach in CSC mental health treatment centres; and, Implement community mental health initiative.

28 The creation of intermediate mental health care units in selected men's institutions is the only remaining unfunded component of CSC's Mental Health Strategy.

29 The Community Mental Health Initiative received five-year funding starting in 2005-06.

30 In view of the fiscal restraint measures introduced in November 2006, CSC adjusted these performance expectations as reflected in its 2007-08 RPP. In the short term, CSC is limited to reporting results based on the mental health condition of offenders at admission. In the longer term, CSC will work toward improving its capability of reporting correctional results based on the mental health condition of offenders prior to their release into the community.

31 Revocation statistics require a case-by-case analysis in order to determine the appropriateness of any given case. As a result, revocation data, while it will continue to be monitored closely, will not be used as a result indicator in future years.

32 This mental health indicator was not available at intake for most of the offenders who reached the end of their sentence five to ten years ago. The few that had a completed intake mental health assessment are not representative of the offender population over the past ten years. For this reason, CSC is not able to report at this time on the re-offending rate of offenders with mental health disorders at five years past Warrant Expiry Date (WED).

33 Highlights and recommendations available at: www.parl.gc.ca/39/1/parlbus/commbus/senate/com-e/soci-e/rep-e/pdf/rep02may06high-e.pdf

34 There has not been a formal Government response to the Senate Committee report.

35 Source: CSC 2004-05 Departmental Performance Report.

36 In view of the fiscal restraint measures introduced in November 2006, CSC adjusted these performance expectations as reflected in its 2007-08 RPP.

37 It is important to note that while CSC contributes to reducing the long-term rate of offenders returning to federal custody, several external factors influence this result, including the profile of the offenders, legislation, sentencing trends, law enforcement capacity, and events that happen to offenders following sentence completion and when they are no longer under CSC's jurisdiction.

38 CSC's 2006-07 RPP also referred to the percentage of offenders charged with a new offence; however, after further analysis, conviction data is considered to be a more results-based indicator of reoffending. Charge data will continue to be monitored.

39 CSC has implemented a one-year delay in reporting new convictions for offenders in order to allow time for the judicial process. Reporting these results at the end of each fiscal year would misrepresent the actual results since the courts would not have had the opportunity to process the charges.

40 For more information, see the following research report: "The Safe Return of Offenders to the Community" (CSC: April 2005), available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/rsrch/safe_return2005/safe_return2005_e.pdf

41 Information on the continuum of care model for Aboriginal offenders is available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/prgrm/correctional/abissues/plan06_e.shtml#6

42 The data source for the following tables is the Offender Management System (April 8, 2007).

43 In view of the fiscal restraint measures introduced in November 2006, CSC adjusted these performance expectations as reflected in its 2007-08 RPP.

44 Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/prgrm/correctional/abissues/documents/spac06_e.pdf

45 Available at: www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-002-XIE/85-002-XIE2006003.pdf

46 There were no corporate level employee surveys conducted in 2006-07.

47 For more information on the MAF, see: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/maf-crg/index_e.asp

48 The Whole-of-Government Framework is used for whole-of-government reporting, as reflected in documents such as the annual Canada's Performance reports: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/report/govrev/06/cp-rc_e.pdf

49 CSC's management improvement agenda, while not a Sub-Activity, is included in this column.

50 Institutional Services is another Sub-Activity; however, there are no RPP plans associated with it.

51 Information of an extremely sensitive and personal nature.

52 Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/PA/audit_druginterdiction2006/druginterdiction2006_e.pdf

53 "Oleoresin Capsicum" spray, also known as pepper spray.

54 Assaults on staff, assaults on inmates and inmate fights are included only if they result in a major injury.

55 The data presented below includes, but is not limited to, incidents that involve charges or convictions.

56 Revocations can be for new offences or for other reasons, such as non-compliance with release conditions.

57 CSC Management Control Framework: Health Services ( Nov 30, 2006 ).

58 See "The Budget Plan 2007", available at: www.budget.gc.ca/2007/pdf/bp2007e.pdf

59 As per the PAA, Inmate Pay is a Sub-Activity as well. There were no RPP plans or priorities associated with Inmate Pay.

60 Dynamic Factor Identification and Analysis directs the Parole Officer/Primary Worker towards areas of concern that may be unique to an offender.

61 Under Section 84 of the CCRA, CSC gives the Aboriginal community an opportunity to propose a plan for the inmate's release to, and integration into, the Aboriginal community.

62 Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/rsrch/reports/r130/r130_e.pdf

63 The Pathways unit re-opened on June 1, 2007

64 Results concerning reintegration of offenders can be found in Section 1.6: Departmental Performance , under the Community Transition priority. Additional data on correctional results is presented in Section 4.1 .

65 Due to expenditure reduction measures, training had to be curtailed, and not all Parole Officers were trained. As a result, this initiative was carried over to the subsequent year as reflected in the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities.

66 "Outcomes" include all program assignments that ended within the fiscal year, whether as a result of successful completion, the offender dropping out of the program, transfer of the offender to another institution, and so on.

67 Further information on CORCAN can be found on CSC's website at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/prgrm/corcan/home_e.shtml

68 As per the Program Activity Architecture.

69 An offender may earn more than one certificate.

70 Employee data: Human Resource Management System (March 31, 2007).

71 Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/sphrm07_10/StrPlaHRMn_e.pdf

72 The Offender Management System is used to gather, store and retrieve information on federal offenders.

73 Available at: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/sphrm07_10/StrPlaHRMn_e.pdf

74 Source: CSC Human Resource Management System (March 31, 2007).

75 Available at: www.psagency-agencefp.gc.ca/survey-sondage/2005/index_e.asp

76 Four groups are designated as Employment Equity groups, as per the Employment Equity Act: women, Aboriginal peoples, members of visible minorities and persons with disabilities.

77 A Results-based Management and Accountability Framework provides Program Managers with a concise statement or road map to plan, monitor, evaluate and report on the results throughout the lifecycle of a program, policy or initiative.

78 Available at: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pol/doc-eng.aspx?id=12340

79 Although not a member of the Executive Committee, the Chief Audit Executive reports directly to the Commissioner. Also, in Summer 2007, a new Health Services sector, led by an Assistant Commissioner, was added to CSC's organizational structure.

80 As mentioned, in 2007-08 a new Health Services Sector was added to CSC's organizational structure, taking over accountability for health services from Correctional Operations and Programs. The new sector, which includes new directorates at headquarters and in regions, will help support and continually improve the quality of health services provided to inmates, while ensuring that policies are applied consistently. It will also ensure standardized practices and provide greater integration of physical and mental health services.

81 Includes 58 institutions as well as Community Correctional Centres, displayed in italic.

82 Includes the Special Handling Unit.