2008-2009
Reports on Plans and Priorities



Public Safety Canada






The Honourable Stockwell Day, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety




Table of Contents

I. Departmental Overview

II. Program Activities

III. Supplementary Information

IV. Other Items of Interest



Minister's Message

The Honourable Stockwell DayPublic Safety Canada continues to establish and implement sound policies and effective programs that help ensure a safe and resilient Canada. As the Minister of Public Safety, I am pleased to present to Parliament this Report on Plans and Priorities for 2008-09.

Canadians can take pride in the achievements of Public Safety Canada over the past year. We brought greater focus to the Department's National Crime Prevention Centre to target investments toward specific crime concerns and community-based crime prevention projects that help those most at risk. We continued to support intervention for youth in gangs or at risk of joining gangs through the newly created Youth Gang Prevention Fund. The Department also played a key role in rolling out both the law enforcement and prevention components of Canada's National Anti-Drug Strategy.

Public Safety Canada was also instrumental in the preparation of important legislation related to the Government's commitment to abolish the long-gun registry and respond to the Supreme Court's decision on security certificates. With the coming into force of the Emergency Management Act, the Department's roles and responsibilities were clarified which will help enhance federal readiness in preparing for and responding to emergencies. The Department also helped Canadians prepare themselves in the event of an emergency through the 72-hour Awareness Campaign. Finally, Public Safety Canada was involved in supporting the work of various external inquiries and reviews.

In the coming year, the Department will build on this success and focus on a number of strategic priorities. We will address the growing impact of crime on Canadians by targeting more directly drug-related crime, property crime, and crime committed by youth. The addition of 1,000 RCMP personnel, a process now well underway, will assist in that effort. We will improve the effective management of our borders, in part by enhancing cooperation both within Canada and with international partners. We will strengthen Canada's national security policy and legislative frameworks. And we will work to maximize the resilience of Canada and its population against the risks they face.

I remain confident that Public Safety Canada will continue to enhance the safety and security of Canada in the years to come.

The Honourable Stockwell Day, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety

Management Representation Statement

I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) for Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide for the Preparation of Part III of the 2008-09 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

Suzanne Hurtubise
Deputy Minister of Public Safety

I. Departmental Overview

Role of the Department

Public Safety Canada (PS)[1] was created in 2003 to provide leadership and coordination across all federal departments and agencies responsible for the safety of Canadians. The Department delivers a range of programs related to national emergency preparedness, critical infrastructure protection and community safety. Working towards a safe and resilient Canada, the Department provides leadership, coordinates and supports the efforts of federal organizations responsible for the national security and safety of Canadians. The Department also works with other levels of government, first responders, community groups, the private sector and other countries to achieve its objectives.

To keep Canadians safe from a range of threats, the Department provides strategic policy advice and support to the Minister of Public Safety on issues related to public safety, including: national security; emergency management; policing and law enforcement; interoperability and information-sharing; border management; corrections and conditional release; Aboriginal policing; and, crime prevention.

Providing strategic public safety leadership, the Department works within a portfolio consisting of five agencies and three review bodies. These entities, including the Department, are united under the Public Safety Portfolio and report to the same minister, resulting in enhanced integration among federal organizations dealing with public safety issues. The Department supports the Minister in all aspects of his mandate and plays a national public safety leadership role while respecting the separate accountability of each Portfolio agency.

Also situated within the Department is the Office of the Inspector General of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), which carries out independent reviews of CSIS' compliance with the law, Ministerial direction and operational policy.

Further information on the Department can be accessed on the organization's website: www.ps.gc.ca.

Portfolio Overview

The Public Safety Portfolio is responsible for public safety within the Government of Canada and consists of five agencies: the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Correctional Service of Canada, the National Parole Board, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). It also includes three review bodies: the RCMP External Review Committee, the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP, and the Office of the Correctional Investigator.

For the fiscal year ending March 31st, 2008, the Portfolio's organizations had just over 63,000 employees and total net expenditures of over $7.4 billion. Each Portfolio agency, with the exception of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), prepares an annual Report on Plans and Priorities. Owing to national security concerns, CSIS does not publicly report on its plans and priorities. Information on the reports of the other Portfolio agencies can be found on each organization's website.

While Public Safety Canada plays a key role in developing policies, delivering programs and enhancing cohesion, integration and information-sharing across the Public Safety Portfolio, the agencies and review bodies contribute individually and collectively to Canada's public safety agenda.

Portfolio Resource Summary


2008-09 to 2010-11
  ($ million)
Planned Spending 2008-09 Planned Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11
Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2,742.8 2,708.3 2,659.4
Correctional Services Canada 2,231.4 2,106.8 2,080.4
Canada Border Service Agency 1,508.9 1,467.6 1,350.2
Canadian Security Intelligence Service 449.7 487.8 470.8
Public Safety Canada 432.8 394.4 390.1
National Parole Board 45.9 44.7 47.2
Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP 8.7 5.2 5.2
Office of the Correctional Investigator 3.8 3.2 3.1
RCMP External Review Committee 1.5 1.1 1.1
Total 7,425.5 7,219.1 7,007.5

Due to rounding, figures above may not add to the totals shown.

Portfolio of Public Safety

Chart: Portfolio of Public Safety

Detailed image of the chart: Portfolio of Public Safety

Organizational Information

Chart: Organizational Information

Detailed image of the chart: Organizational Information

Our Strategic Priorities

In pursuit of the Department's Strategic Outcome of a safe and resilient Canada, Public Safety Canada will direct its efforts towards six priorities in 2008-09:

Strategic Priorities

Management Priorities

The Department continues to make effective delivery of policies and programs its top priority in the advancement of the Government of Canada's commitment to safe and secure communities, a safe and secure world through international cooperation, as well as a strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership.

Implementing strategies to tackle crime and make communities safer

In 2006, the national crime rate reached its lowest point in 25-years. However, as we recognize this important milestone for Canada and Canadians, many neighbourhoods and families continue to be shaken and affected by serious and often violent crimes. The determination of government at every level, community leaders and front-line professionals in tackling crime is certain, but if we are to make our streets safer, we must be even more committed to reducing crime.

Due to the growing impact of crime on Canadians and neighbourhood safety, Public Safety Canada will target more directly drug-related crime, property crime, and crime committed by youth. The Department will support the repositioned National Crime Prevention Centre and a transformation of the federal corrections system in partnership with the Correctional Service of Canada. In addition, Public Safety Canada will continue to advance important law reforms with Justice Canada while working with the RCMP to improve policing policies and programs to combat national and international crime.

Improving effective management of our borders

Canada's approach to border security focuses on developing and implementing effective and efficient public security, emergency management and law enforcement measures while facilitating and expediting legitimate trade and travel. In order to achieve this, Public Safety Canada will continue to work strategically toward the development of "smart and secure" border management approaches in consultation with Public Safety Portfolio agencies, other government departments, and our international partners. These approaches make use of technology, information sharing, threat and risk analysis, and collaborative undertakings. In sustaining partnerships and through ongoing dialogue with other departments and with the United States, effective border management will result in a border that is as efficient and secure as possible, thereby ensuring the safe, secure and efficient flow of goods and people.

Strengthening Canada's National Security Framework

The national security framework is comprised of laws, policies and programs that together ensure that Canada and Canadians are protected and that Canada is not a base for threats to our allies.

Public Safety Canada's priority will be to strengthen Canada's national security framework by coordinating the government's responses to a number of external reviews. The department will also enhance its engagement of Canadians on national security issues by renewing the mandate of the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security and by focusing this group's agenda and outreach activities on Canada's national security priorities.

Strengthening the resilience of Canada and Canadians in relation to emergencies

Public Safety Canada develops national polices, response systems and standards to reduce the impact of emergencies that could affect Canada's population and infrastructure. The Government Operations Centre provides strategic-level coordination and direction on behalf of the Government of Canada in response to events that affect the national interest. An integrated federal response that is harmonised with provincial activities is supported through: 24/7 monitoring and reporting, providing national level situational awareness, producing integrated risk assessment and warning products, conducting national level planning, and providing whole-of-government response management. Potential threats to public safety are also monitored around-the-clock by the Government Operations Centre, an advanced communication centre capable of coordinating the federal response to a disaster.

To help Canadian communities respond and recover from disasters, Public Safety Canada also provides financial assistance to provincial and territorial governments through the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA). Through the Federal Disaster Assistance Initiative (FDAI), the Department is creating an updated web-based inventory of existing federal and provincial programs, policies and legal tools for disaster assistance and recovery.

Public Safety Canada works closely with federal departments, other levels of government, and the owners and operators of critical infrastructure, to strengthen Canada's critical infrastructure to minimize disruptions to essential services for Canadians.

Implementing Public Service Renewal through recruitment, development and retention

Renewal is key to the future of the Public Service as a national institution that is central to the governance and development of our country. Public Safety Canada, like other federal departments, is working to ensure that it can attract, retain and further develop its employees. As part of its recruitment efforts, the Department will work to ensure that its workforce is increasingly representative of Canada's diverse population.

Public Safety Canada is still a relatively new department with an expanding workforce. As a result, it is important to have focused and measurable goals with respect to planning, recruitment, and employee development. Recruitment efforts will seek to capitalize on our already notable use of student employment programs, our increased use of leadership and development programs and initiatives such as the Recruitment of Policy Leaders Program. We will reinforce existing developmental arrangements as well as pursue new approaches to orientation, learning and development, and we will further develop the Department's corporate infrastructure to support renewal efforts.

Implement integrated departmental business planning

Building upon recent progress, the Department will continue to refine its integrated business planning framework. Integrated planning is an important building block which supports the Department's capacity to deliver results for Canadians.

A new Integrated Planning Framework was launched in 2007-08 and the Department will continue its implementation. The framework will help align the Department's planning process with the Government's planning cycle to facilitate the production of meaningful reporting documents for Canadians, such as Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports. For 2008-09, the Department will build on Branch-level Integrated Business Plans focussing on results and structured around the recently approved Program Activity Architecture. The Department will also have an Integrated Departmental Strategic Plan posted on its Intranet site that will:

Public Safety Canada will also continue the implementation of the Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) Policy through the development and continuous improvement of its Performance Measurement Framework and governance structure.

Program Activity Architecture

Program Activity Architecture

Detailed image of the chart: Program Activity Architecture

Program Activity Architecture Crosswalk


2008-09 (thousands of dollars)
  NS EM LE Cor CP BM Inter Total
Emergency Management and National Security 9,453.7 227,610.0 - - - 1,680.4 - 238,744.1
Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability 338.5 - 13,228.8 - - 576.2   8,564.6 22,708.1
Community Safety and Partnerships Branch 401.8 - 121,258.0 9,536.2 39,506.6 683.9 - 171,386.5
Total 10,194.1 227,610.0 134,486.8 9,536.2 39,506.6 2,940.4 8,564.6 432,838.6

The figures above have been rounded to the nearest thousands of dollars. Due to rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

Voted and Statutory Items displayed in the Main Estimates


Vote or Statutory Item Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording (thousands of dollars) 2008–09
Main Estimates
2007–08
Main Estimates
1 Operating expenditures 121,588 115,432
5 Grants and contributions 281,315 301,315
(S) Minister of Public Safety—Salary and motor car allowance 76 75
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 12,003 11,228
  Total Department 414,982 428,050

The net increase of $6.2M in Vote 1 is due to an increase of $23.7M for various initiatives of which $22.9M is for Emergency response capacity; an increase of $3.0M for the implementation of the Government Advertising Plan: "72 hours- Is your family prepared?"; a decrease of $9.8M due to the sunsetting of the Emergency Management Initiative - Secret communications project; a $6.6M decrease due to the sunsetting of a portion of the National Crime Prevention Centre funding; a decrease of $3.0M due to transfers to other government departments of which $1.5M is for the First Nations Organized Crime initiative and finally a decrease of $1.1M due to the re-profiling of the Cyber-Security Task Force.

The Vote 5 decreased by $20M of which $10M relates to a reduction in the anticipated payments to provinces and territories for assistance related to natural disasters under the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements and $10M in spending reductions for the National Crime Prevention Centre.

Departmental Planned Spending Table and Full-time Equivalents


(thousands of dollars) Forecast Spending
2007-08
Planned Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11
National Security 6,755.9 6,837.1 6,667.2 6,702.3
Emergency Management 200,529.6 218,606.0 184,185.2 181,482.4
Law Enforcement 132,663.1 131,867.3 130,299.1 130,419.3
Corrections 9,003.7 9,536.2 9,653.1 9,144.5
Crime Prevention 59,887.0 39,506.6 39,400.9 39,422.6
Border Management 2,903.9 2,940.4 2,866.6 2,881.4
Interoperability 16,306.4 5,688.6 5,583.8 5,605.5
Total Main Estimates 428,049.7 414,982.2 378,656.0 375,658.0
         
Adjustments:        
Supplementary Estimates (A)        
Public Security Initiatives (horizontal item) 23,010.1      
Funding related to government advertising programs (horizontal item) 3,000.0      
Funding for furthering connectivity of federal partners to the National Integrated Interagency Information System 1,123.6      
Funding to provincial partners for the National Flagging System to identify and track high-risk violent offenders who jeopardize public safety 500.0      
Funding for activities that are essential to the continued implementation of the Public Service Modernization Act (PSMA) (horizontal item) 411.2      
Funding for Commission of Inquiry into the actions of Canadian officials in relation to Adbullah Almalki, Ahmad Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin (horizontal item) 253.0      
Funding in support of the Federal Accountability Act to evaluate all ongoing grant and contribution programs every five years (horizontal item) 181.5      
Funding for enhanced enforcement activities relating to the National Anti-Drug Strategy that are aimed at reducing the supply and demand for illicit drugs (horizontal item) 168.0      
Funding to establish counterfeit enforcement teams as part of the National Counterfeit Enforcement Strategy (horizontal item) 112.0      
Commission of Inquiry into the investigation of the bombing of Air India Flight 182 and resources to permit departments to support the work of the Inquiry (horizontal item) 93.6      
Less: Spending authorities available within the Vote (500.0 )      
Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For the cost of the independent investigation on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police pension and insurance plans 1,882.7      
Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For the Task Force established to provide advice on strengthening the accountability and governance of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1,500.0      
Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For the initial planning related to policing and security for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games 200.0      
Transfer to Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada - To support the National Managers' Community (7.2 )      
Transfer to Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For the participation of Aboriginal youth in a training program designed to encourage a career in law enforcement (200.0 )      
Transfer to Foreign Affairs and International Trade - To provide support to departmental staff located at missions abroad (251.5 )      
Transfer to Correctional Service - For the Public Education and Citizen Engagement Strategy (260.0 )      
Transfer to Fisheries and Oceans ($425), Foreign Affairs and International Trade ($156), National Parole Board ($272) and Canadian Security Intelligence Service ($181) - For furthering connectivity to the National Integrated Interagency Information System (1,033.6 )      
Transfer to Industry Canada ($694) and Royal Canadian Mounted Police ($1,500) - For Public Security Initiatives (horizontal item) (2,194.0 )      
Transfer to Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For First Nations community policing services (31,000.0 )      
Total Supplementary Estimates (A) (3,010.7 )      
         
Supplementary Estimates (B)        
Reimbursement of additional security-related costs incurred by provincial and municipal partners in connection with the North American leaders' summit held in Montebello, Québec, August 2007 15,000.0      
Additional funding to strengthen current activities to combat sexual exploitation and trafficking of children 1,490.6      
Less: Funds available within the Vote (frozen allotment) (1,448.0)      
Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For the cost of the Task Force established to provide advice on strengthening the accountability and governance of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1,000.0      
Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - In support of the development and negotiation of the longer-term DNA and biology casework analysis agreements with provinces and territories 196.9 337.5    
Transfer from Agriculture and Agri-Food - In support of the recently acquired responsibilities related to the Minister's Regional Office in British Columbia 164.0      
Transfer to Foreign Affairs and International Trade - For a joint contribution to CICAD (Spanish acronym for Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission) and to provide to hemispheric law enforcement organizations on specialized investigative techniques (100.0 )      
Transfer to Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For First Nations community policing services (5,500.0 )      
Total Supplementary Estimates (B) 10,803.5 337.5 0.0 0.0
         
Other adjustments        
Collective Agreements 537.1      
Internal Audit 53.3      
2006-07 Carry Forward 7,419.1      
Total Other adjustments 8,009.5      
         
Earmarked Items        
Strengthening enforcement Budget 2003   225.0 225.0 225.0
Protection of Children from sexual exploitation on the internet   1,527.0 1,927.0 1,927.0
National Security Policy - Government Operations Centre   597.0 1,620.0 1,475.0
2010 Olympics Vancouver -Security   300.0 300.0 200.0
Modernizing Investigative Techniques - Lawful Access - Administration   2,030.0 2,230.0 2,430.0
Core Emergency Capacity   8,000.0 8,000.0 7,554.0
Other initiatives (tbd) - Contributions (First Nations Policing/Policy Program) and Operating   230.0 180.0 180.0
Firefighters Training   500.0 500.0 500.0
Response to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision - a bill to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act   730.0 730.0  -
National Integrated Interagency Information System   2,876.0 - -
Cyber Security Task Force   504.0 - -
Total Earmarked Items 0.0 17,519.0 15,712.0 14,491.0
         
Total Adjustments 15,802.3 17,856.5 15,712.0 14,491.0
Total Planned Spending 443,852.0 432,838.5 394,368.0 390,149.0
Plus: Cost of Services received without charges 13,800.0 12,012.7 12,147.5 13,016.8
Net Cost of the Program 457,652.0 444,851.2 406,515.5 403,165.8
Full Time Equivalents 995 1,015 1,010 1,000

The figures above have been rounded to the nearest thousands of dollars. Due to rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

The decrease in the total Main Estimates portion of the planned spending over the planning period is primarily due to the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements funding, based on an estimated cost over three planning years, and reflecting a $30M reduction in 2009-10. There are also other decreases in funding due to a $3M reduction for the Campaign "72 hours-Is your family prepared?", a reduction of $2.8M due to the sunsetting of the Action Plan to enhance Passenger Rail, a reduction of $1.4M as a result of funding sunsetting for the Cyber Security Task Force.

Summary Information

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
432,839 394,368 390,149

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
1,015 1,010 1,000

Public Safety Canada Priorities


Strategic Priorities
1. Implement strategies to tackle crime and make communities safer
2. Improve effective management of our borders
3. Strengthen Canada's National Security Framework
4. Strengthen the resilience of Canada and Canadians in relation to emergencies
Management Priorities
5. Implement Public Service Renewal through recruitment, development and retention
6. Implement integrated departmental business planning

Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


(thousands of dollars) Expected Results Planned Spending Contributes to the following priorities
2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
Strategic Outcome             A Safe and Resilient Canada
National Security Strong policies and legislation which advance Canada's National Security objectives 10,194 10,594 9,699 2, 3
Emergency Management Canadians are safe and better prepared to respond to natural and human-induced disasters 227,610 193,338 190,444 4
Law Enforcement Safer Communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies 134,487 132,931 132,951 1, 2, 3
Corrections Safe and effective reintegration of eligible offenders into Canadian communities 9,536 9,653 9,145 1
Crime Prevention Reduced offending among targeted populations 39,507 39,401 39,423 1
Border Management Efficient and secure borders which facilitate legitimate trade and travel and address risks off-shore to the extent possible 2,940 2,867 2,881 2
Interoperability Information sharing is facilitated to promote public safety and security objectives 8,565 5,584 5,606 1, 2, 3, 4
Total 432,839 394,368 390,149  



II. Program Activities

This section of the report provides information on Public Safety Canada's Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture (PAA); two fundamental elements of the Treasury Board Secretariat's Management, Resources and Results Structure Policy (MRRS).

The MRRS Policy supports the development of a common, government-wide approach to planning and managing the relationship between resource expenditures and results, while serving as a consistent and enduring foundation for collecting, managing and reporting financial and non-financial information to Parliament.

Public Safety Canada's Program Activity Architecture is divided into seven activities that support our strategic outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada. This strategic outcome guides all departmental activities.

A Safe and Resilient Canada

Consistent with the Government's priority of tackling crime, strengthening the security of Canadians and addressing Canada's emergency management requirements, the Department's Strategic Outcome reflects our key role of providing effective leadership and coordination across the Department of Public Safety and portfolio agencies.

The principles that guide the Department in achieving this Strategic Outcome are:

  1. Effective engagement, collaboration and communication with Portfolio agencies, departments and agencies at all levels of government, as well as external stakeholders
  2. Effective planning and priority setting
  3. Portfolio-wide cohesion and integration

Our seven Program Activities are: National Security, Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, Corrections, Crime Prevention, Border Management, and Interoperability.

National Security


Highlights
  • Development of policies and legislation to strengthen the means to respond to issues of national security
  • Work with domestic and international partners to develop policies and legislation that respond to national security issues in a manner that advances Canadian values

Emergency Management

Law Enforcement

Corrections

Crime Prevention

Border Management

Interoperability

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
10,194 10,594 9,699

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
75 77 73

National Security Results and Performance Indicators

National Security Policy

National Security Policy activities include the development of policies and legislation to ensure the protection of Canada and Canadians. While respecting the values of democracy, human rights and respect for the rule of law, to enhance national security, Public Safety Canada coordinates policy and legislative reviews with numerous domestic partners and works with international partners and stakeholders on multi-lateral initiatives.


Results Performance Indicators
Strong policies and legislation which advance Canada's National Security objectives
  • Policies and legislative proposals developed and addressed on National Security matters
  • Level of participation in governmental activities that focus on national security matters
  • Carry out three to four CCRS meetings per year
  • Number of successful CCRS outreach activities

Emergency Management


Highlights
  • Collaboration with provincial/territorial, and private sector partners to clarify roles, establish priorities and set the strategic direction for critical infrastructure protection in Canada
  • Support implementation of the National Disaster Mitigation Strategy
  • Implementation of revised Disaster Financial Assistance Guidelines (effective January 1, 2008)
  • Development of a National Public Alerting System
  • Building a common federal, provincial and territorial approach to planning for a pandemic influenza
  • Providing this year, and on a yearly basis, Business Continuity Planning (BCP) assessment information to the Treasury Board Secretariat on the evaluation of BCP in Federal departments

The Emergency Management activity addresses all hazards (natural, technological and human-induced) through the development of an integrated emergency management system, legislation and national strategies, as well as training and standards for those who serve to protect Canada and its population. Through a close relationship with international counterparts, federal departments, provinces, territories, first responders and industry, this activity also aims to achieve effective policy and program coordination and delivery across the four pillars of emergency management: prevention/ mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

In August of 2007, a new Emergency Management Act came into force establishing the Minister of Public Safety's leadership role for emergency management and critical infrastructure protection activities at the federal level. The Act also outlines an integrated approach to emergency management activities that is based on the four pillars of emergency management. Under the new Act, Canada's emergency management commitments include cross-border collaboration.

Emergency management priorities for 2008-2011 reflect the Government of Canada's primary responsibility for protecting the safety of its citizens. Key activities for emergency management, as described below, are established in part through federal, provincial and territorial collaboration mechanisms.

Emergency Management Policy

Critical infrastructure protection is about protecting essential services that are vital to the well-being of Canadians. Canada's critical infrastructure (energy and utilities, communications and Information Technology (IT), finance, health care, food, water, transportation safety, government, and manufacturing) is interdependent and interconnected across sectors, with responsibility for its continuity shared among the federal government, provinces, territories, owners and operators of critical infrastructure in Canada and in the United States. Potential threats to Canada's critical infrastructure include both physical and cyber threats. Public Safety Canada is working with provincial, territorial and private sector partners to clarify roles, establish priorities and set the strategic direction for critical infrastructure protection in Canada. Progress to date is reflected in the ongoing development of a National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure Protection and its supporting Action Plan. Canada's approach is based on partnerships, information sharing and risk management to reach a high level of readiness and an effective capacity to respond to disruptions.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina (2005), it became evident that there may be situations when the Government of Canada must act quickly to respond to major emergencies in the United States. As noted earlier, new authorities under the Emergency Management Act give the Minister of Public Safety responsibility for coordinating Canada's response to emergencies. This includes emergencies in the United States, in collaboration with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Recently established Canada-U.S. consultation mechanisms will encourage a more integrated approach to managing Canada-U.S. cross border issues relating to critical infrastructure protection and emergency management.

Disaster mitigation measures eliminate or reduce the impacts of risks or hazards through proactive measures taken before an emergency or disaster occurs. Public Safety Canada is working closely with other federal departments and the provinces and territories on the implementation of a National Disaster Mitigation Strategy. Initiatives include public awareness and outreach, knowledge and research and the leveraging of new and existing mitigation-related initiatives that address structural and non-structural measures.

Emergency Preparedness

In order to effectively pursue and execute our emergency management priorities, business continuity is viewed as an essential part of the risk management process. The aim of the Business Continuity Planning Program is to help the Government of Canada prepare for the continued availability of its critical services and assets.

Federal, provincial and territorial emergency management officials are working with the private sector to develop a National Public Alerting System. This System will provide a warning to the Canadian public, announcing an imminent or unfolding danger to the safety of Canadians. Consultations between the public and private sectors are taking place to validate each component of such an alerting system.

Pandemic planning is also an important agenda item that works towards building a common federal, provincial and territorial approach to planning for a pandemic influenza and a means to address identified gaps, perceived or real, between health and emergency management plans. This will, in turn, help governments better respond to the needs of Canadians in times of a possible pandemic.

Emergency Response Support

Improving the ability of Canadians to respond to and recover from disasters is also a priority. In concert with the provinces and territories, the Department is supporting the development of modernized disaster recovery instruments. Revised terms and conditions for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements were approved in 2007. Further work is underway to develop a common framework and best practices for disaster recovery, and to update a web-based inventory of federal, provincial and territorial disaster recovery programs and services.

Finally, through the National Emergency Response System (NERS), the Department will develop a common model for emergency response among Canada's varied jurisdictional authorities. Multi-jurisdictional exercise activities will be developed to validate the NERS, which provides the requisite linkages among the federal, provincial and territorial emergency response management systems through common components (such as governance, roles and responsibilities, federal regional structures, and response activities).

Through the pursuit of these emergency management initiatives, Public Safety Canada will help to improve Canada's response to and recovery from nationally significant emergencies, whether security, public health, natural or human-induced disasters.

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
227,610 193,338 190,444

Human Resources


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
593 584 581

Emergency Management Results and Performance Indicators

Emergency Management Policy

On behalf of the Government of Canada, Public Safety Canada exercises leadership by promoting an integrated approach to emergency management and critical infrastructure protection. Key activities for guiding comprehensive emergency management and strengthening the resilience of critical infrastructure include: the development of legislation, identification and implementation of emergency management policies, setting national priorities and conducting related training, exercises, as well as research activities that support a unified approach to emergency management and critical infrastructure protection across sectors and jurisdictions. Emergency Management Policy establishes and maintains partnerships with key federal departments, provinces/territories, the voluntary sector, the private sector and international partners. Additional activities include the development of cyber security policy and planning, facilitating cooperation among all levels of government, between business and government and with international partners. Cyber Security Policy also integrates public safety science and technology developed in partnership with provinces and territories and international partners.


Results Performance Indicators
A strong legislative and policy foundation for integrated emergency management and critical infrastructure protection A national strategy and action plan on critical infrastructure are finalized

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness provides resources to support preparedness through cost-shared programming with provinces and territories (e.g., Joint Emergency Preparedness Program). It enhances the ability of first responders and emergency management personnel to respond and recover from emergencies. It also contributes to Canada's disaster resiliency by ensuring that proper emergency management plans are in place within the federal government, including the development and review of business continuity plans.


Results Performance Indicators
Institutions continuously provide critical services to Canadian citizens during a disruption
  • Number of departments providing PS with lists of critical services
  • Number of departments to whom advice is provided respecting the preparation and maintenance of their Business Continuity Plan
Federal, provincial and territorial officials, first responders and emergency management personnel are prepared through education and exercises to respond to emergencies
  • Participation at emergency management training courses by provincial and territorial community and further course development undertaken in collaboration with provincial/territorial partners
  • Participation at exercises that engage multi-jurisdictional partners
  • Production and use of after-action reports
  • Comments received in evaluations following courses or exercises
Public is alerted in case of imminent threat to life (natural, technological and human-induced)
  • Number of provinces and territories in the Public Alerting system
Canada is better prepared in the event of avian or pandemic influenza
  • Participation in training sessions and exercises by other government departments, provinces and territories related to the Government of Canada Coordination Contingency Plan for Avian and Pandemic Influenza
  • Number of key elements of the North American Plan for Avian and Pandemic Influenza that have been implemented trilaterally (Canada, US, Mexico)
Communities are prepared for emergencies
  • Number of projects funded under the Joint Emergency Preparedness Program
  • Production and use of after action reports on projects funded under the Joint Emergency Preparedness program

Emergency Response Support

On behalf of the Government of Canada, Emergency Response Support promotes an integrated federal emergency response to events of national significance (including cyber). This is done through continuous monitoring and reporting of events of national interest; situational awareness, risk assessment, alerting and warning product development; planning document creation (to develop a "whole of government" integrated response, including logistics planning, and the preparation and implementation of appropriate public communications in an emergency); and plan implementation. It also includes the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA), which provide the federal government with a consistent and equitable mechanism for sharing the costs of disaster response and recovery with provincial or territorial governments, where such costs would place an undue burden their economy.


Results Performance Indicators
Provinces and Territories receive financial assistance for response and recovery from natural disasters
  • Implementation of new approved DFAA guidelines and number of requested training sessions provided to provinces and territories
The Government of Canada supports the emergency preparedness and response activities of provincial/territorial emergency management authorities and the 10 critical infrastructure sectors
  • Number of provincial authorities and national level representatives of the 10 critical infrastructure sectors that receive daily or event driven situational awareness products from the Government of Canada that assist their emergency preparedness and response activities
Effective management of cyber security emergencies within the Government of Canada and its agencies
  • Level of participation at federal cyber security fora
  • Level of warnings and information products related to cyber security risks in Canada
  • Participation in cyber-security exercises by stakeholders
An integrated Government of Canada response to events/emergencies
  • Participation in orientation/training activities and exercises by stakeholders related to the Federal Emergency Response Plan

Emergency Management Outreach

Emergency Management Outreach works with provinces, territories, foreign governments, the private sector, the voluntary sector and first responders to enhance the horizontal and complementary development of emergency management policy, initiatives and planning at the regional level. Emergency Management Outreach facilitates information exchange between stakeholders; the implementation of operational plans, planning, logistical, financial and administrative support; and the exchange of subject matter expert advice. It also supports communication initiatives that disseminate information to individuals to enhance their level of preparedness through public awareness campaigns, exhibits and the targeted distribution of communications products.


Results Performance Indicators
Canadians are informed of risks, provided information to mitigate those risks by enhancing level of personal preparedness.
  • Participation rate for annual Emergency Preparedness week
  • Number of Canadians with emergency kits and/or personal emergency plans as measured through public opinion research
  • Number of information requests

Law Enforcement


Highlights
  • Coordination and leadership of the drug enforcement component of the National Anti-Drug Strategy
  • Enhancements to the Integrated Market Enforcement Teams Initiative
  • Strengthening the work of the National Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime
  • Establishment of interim federal, provincial, and territorial agreements in support of DNA biology casework analysis
  • Continued work with the provinces and territories to advance the 2,500 police officer initiative
  • Responding to the findings of the Task Force on Governance and Cultural Change in the RCMP
  • 168 First Nations Policing Program (FNPP) agreements serving 405 aboriginal communities with a total population of 318,143

The Department's commitment to safer communities guides the activities of its Law Enforcement Program. Through this program, the Department provides leadership to the Canadian law enforcement community in the advancement of strategic national and international responses to crime. Policies are developed with a view to addressing evolving threats to public safety and security.

Law Enforcement Policy

Through collaborative efforts with federal, provincial, territorial and international partners in the law enforcement community, Public Safety Canada will continue to provide advice, as well as develop and coordinate focused strategies, to achieve results in the following key Law Enforcement policy areas.

Serious and organized crime

In support of the National Agenda to Combat Organized Crime, the Department works closely with Portfolio agencies and federal, provincial and territorial partners to share information, as well as develop effective policies and law enforcement tools that assist in the fight against serious and organized crime. Accordingly, the Department will continue to support the National Coordinating Committee (NCC) on Organized Crime [2] and its regional/provincial coordinating committees. The NCC convenes semi-annually, or as required, to discuss emerging issues and national policy priorities related to the problem of organized crime, and to build on existing work already undertaken in important areas.

Additionally, the Department maintains a leadership role in coordinating, monitoring, and providing policy advice on a number of key initiatives focused on serious and organized crime.

The Department will continue to lead Canada's National Strategy for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation on the Internet. Launched in 2004, the Strategy is aimed at enhancing law enforcement capacity, supporting public education and reporting, and forging partnerships with industry and non-government organizations. The Strategy is being enhanced with an additional $6 million. Portions of this additional funding will be used to support efforts to address human trafficking through the work of the Interdepartmental Working Group on Trafficking in Persons, which is co-chaired by Public Safety Canada and Justice Canada.

The Department will also continue to provide policy support and coordination regarding the Enforcement Action Plan of the new Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS). NADS contributes to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. [3]

Other key initiatives for which the Department provides policy leadership and support include: the Integrated Proceeds of Crime Initiative, the First Nations Organized Crime Initiative, and efforts to combat the violation of intellectual property rights. The Department will also support the implementation of enhancements to the Integrated Market Enforcement Teams Initiative.

Key overarching policing issues

Over the next three years, the Department will work to address a variety of key overarching policing issues. Many of these issues require national leadership by Public Safety Canada, and close collaboration and consultation with provinces and territories. A key mechanism for this role is the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Assistant Deputy Ministers' Committee on Policing Issues, which the Department directly supports.

The work of this group will be instrumental in the examination of the use of conducted energy weapons. It will also support efforts to establish interim and long-term federal/provincial/territorial cost-sharing agreements to better enable law enforcement to effectively exploit the use of DNA technology.

The Department will continue to support and consider legislative and regulatory approaches that protect public safety and meet the government's firearms control objectives. It will also provide policy support to facilitate the Parliamentary review of the DNA Identification Act.

Front-line policing capacity will remain the subject of collaborative efforts. In support of the October 2007 Speech from the Throne commitment to recruit 2,500 officers to police our streets; the Department will continue to work with provinces and territories to advance this initiative.

Security needs associated with the 2010 Olympics and Paralympics in British Columbia will be another area of focus for the Department. Additionally, the Department will re-examine the federal policy governing the reimbursement of extraordinary security costs incurred by provincial/territorial/municipal partners during certain federally-hosted major international events in Canada.

Ministerial responsibility for the RCMP

The Department will continue to provide sound policy advice to support the Minister in his responsibility and accountability for the RCMP. In particular, this will require working with the RCMP and other partners, such as provinces and territories, to respond to the recommendations and findings of the Task Force on Governance and Cultural Change in the RCMP, those of Justice O'Connor's 2006 report and other recent task force and Parliamentary Committee reports. A key element of this work will be the development and implementation of proposals to provide for a modern review and complaints body for the RCMP.

In collaboration with the RCMP, the Department is also preparing for the re-negotiation of the Police Services Agreements, which will expire on March 31, 2012. Under these agreements, the RCMP provides policing services to eight provinces (except Ontario and Quebec), three territories and some 200 municipalities. The renewal of these agreements will require extensive consultation with all stakeholders, analysis of a variety of issues and preparation of recommendations for new agreements. It is estimated that the contract renewal preparations and negotiations may take up to two years to complete, with an additional year required for ratification by all concerned governments.

Aboriginal Policing

In addition to the above-mentioned policing policy areas, the Law Enforcement Program will also focus on the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP). Although provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for the administration of justice, including policing, the FNPP provides enhancements to funding of dedicated police services in order to enhance the level and quality of policing in First Nations communities.

By implementing and administering the FNPP, Public Safety Canada is committed to increasing the resiliency of First Nations Communities by building and maintaining relationships, negotiating and renewing policing agreements, and monitoring and evaluating the First Nations Policing Policy. Through the FNPP, the Department negotiates partnership agreements (between the Government of Canada, Inuit and First Nations, provinces and territories) to provide First Nations and Inuit communities with access to police services that are professional, effective, culturally appropriate and accountable to the communities that they serve.

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
134,487 132,931 132,951

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
202 203 203

Law Enforcement Results and Performance Indicators

Law Enforcement Policy

Through this activity, the Department coordinates policy and program development for law enforcement to tackle crime and make communities safer. Efforts to combat serious and organized crime focus on the development and coordination of national and international strategies and initiatives with key partners. These initiatives include the implementation of key elements of the Government's National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS), the prevention of child sexual exploitation over the internet, and the First Nations Organized Crime initiative. The policing policy area focuses on the development of strategic independent advice on the advancement of legislative initiatives, policy development and management issues relating to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to support the Minister in his responsibilities and accountability for the RCMP. This includes a strategic focus on three policy areas: RCMP policing (including National Police Services, contract and federal policing), international policing (including summit security), and firearms and operational policing. 


Results Performance Indicators
Law enforcement agencies are supported in the fight against serious and organized crime, and key overarching policing issues are addressed Strategies (e.g., legislation, policy and technologies) developed and implemented that support law enforcement efforts against serious and organized crime, as well as address key overarching policing issues
Minister is supported in his responsibilities and accountability for the RCMP Provision of independent advice and appropriate policies developed and coordinated

Aboriginal Policing

This activity provides funding for on-reserve policing services through contribution agreements on a cost shared basis with the provinces. The objectives of the First Nations Policing Program are to: (a) provide enhanced policing services to First Nations communities and (b) provide policing services that respect First Nations' culture and beliefs.


Results Performance Indicators
Enhanced accessibility to police services in First Nations communities
  • Number of negotiated officers in participating communities under the FNPP
  • Number of participating communities served
  • Total aboriginal population served
Aboriginal policing matters receive enhanced collaboration from First Nations and provinces
  • Number of Aboriginal Policing products used to inform/educate, gather information, discuss/involve, engage and partner

Corrections


Highlights
  • Federal funding is provided to the provinces and territories to enhance the National Flagging System for high-risk offenders
  • Improved predictive accuracy through updated risk assessment instruments
  • Implementation of culturally sensitive pilot projects in Aboriginal communities
  • Evidence-based correctional policy advice
  • A robust and sound legislative framework for corrections that is sensitive to the needs of victims

Public Safety Canada provides advice and support to the Minister's public policy leadership role for corrections and criminal justice. It develops a broad range of programs, policies, and legislative proposals governing corrections, conditional release, and related criminal justice issues. It also develops and implements innovative approaches to community justice and provides research expertise and resources to both the corrections community and the public.

These activities support the Department's strategic priority of tackling crime and making communities safer by providing evidence-based policy advice. The Corrections program activity supports research, evaluation and policy development that strengthen effective corrections and promote successful reintegration of eligible offenders into the community. The goal is to increase successful reintegration of offenders and protect society against chronic and dangerous offenders.

The Department disseminates research findings through research and technical reports about corrections and criminal justice issues, as well as issues relating to Aboriginal people and the criminal justice system. With the aim of increasing the community's capacity to work with victims, offenders and families, knowledge gained through pilot projects (implemented by community organizations, Aboriginal communities and organizations, other levels of government and Canadian universities) is disseminated by the Department. Knowledge-sharing activities enhance public education on correctional and criminal justice issues, and increase Canadians' confidence that the corrections and justice system are responsive to the needs of victims, offenders and the general public.

Corrections Policy Development

An important priority for Corrections for 2008-11 is to address the over-representation of Aboriginal Canadians in the criminal justice system through the development of culturally relevant healing models of justice and corrections in Aboriginal communities.

Corrections Programs

In addition, the Department will strive to improve community safety by strengthening the management of high-risk offenders, including violent offenders, sex offenders, and chronic offenders.

Key initiatives for the protection of society and the improved coordination and improved integration among federal, provincial and territorial criminal justice agencies and organizations include a focus on firm responses to high-risk violent offenders and the development of revised policies and program initiatives. The latter includes the recent implementation of the new federal grant program for enhancing the existing National Flagging System for high-risk offenders.

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
9,536 9,653 9,145

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
46 46 43

Corrections Results and Performance Indicators

Corrections Policy Development

Corrections Policy Development provides policy leadership advice and support to the Minister related to corrections and criminal justice. It is responsible for providing advice on the strategic priorities of federal correctional agencies, on national correctional and criminal justice research, as well as a broad range of policies, legislative issues and activities.


Results Performance Indicators
Protection of society against high risk offenders Effectiveness of specific measures for the management of high risk offenders
Successful reintegration of eligible offenders in Canadian Communities through evidence-based policy advice Success rates of conditional release as reported by the annual Departmental Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical Overview
Accurate risk assessment instruments that respond to the needs of the evaluators Extent of use of empirically supported risk tools in applied decision making
Aboriginal communities assume responsibility for corrections and healing Percentage of Aboriginal communities that have assumed responsibility for corrections and healing

Corrections Programs

The Corrections Program funds, develops and implements projects that support comprehensive, restorative and innovative approaches to corrections and utilizes lessons learned to improve criminal justice policies. Its activities include the National Office for Victims, the National Flagging System for high-risk offenders, grants and contributions program funding, as well as the Sustaining Funding Program for National Voluntary Organizations (NVOs) that work in the area of criminal justice and whose objectives and activities both support and promote Public Safety Canada's mandate and priorities.


Results Performance Indicators
Communities are involved in corrections and conditional release matters Number of community corrections projects implemented
High-risk offenders are identified and tracked on the Canadian Police Information Centre's database Number of offenders flagged by the National Flagging System
Victims are aware of their rights and available resources Level of use of victims services
Offenders have access to community resources to help with their successful reintegration Number of offenders utilizing services offered by National Voluntary Organizations

Crime Prevention


Highlights
  • In 2008-09, funds will be focussed on initiatives aimed at:
    • addressing early risk factors among children, youth and young adults at risk of offending;
    • responding to priority crime issues, such as youth gangs, and drug-related crime;
    • preventing recidivism among high-risk or chronic offenders; and
    • fostering prevention in Aboriginal communities.
  • Efforts will be made to continue building and improving awareness and access to the knowledge base of crime prevention models, as well as developing and strengthening involvement of stakeholders in crime prevention initiatives
  • Launching of the Communities at Risk: Security Infrastructure Pilot Program

Crime Prevention encompasses a wide range of funding activities designed to reduce the likelihood of criminal behaviour. Working in close collaboration with provinces, territories and community partners, Crime Prevention supports innovative, promising and model programs that are specific and appropriate to regions and communities. It also provides communities with knowledge and support to implement effective prevention programs at the local level.

While law enforcement, courts and corrections are important in achieving safer communities, a critical component of Public Safety Canada's priority to make communities safer is the pursuit of crime prevention measures to prevent criminal behaviour before it has a chance to take root.

The National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS) provides a policy framework for the implementation of crime prevention interventions in Canada. The NCPS is jointly managed with provinces and territories and is administered by Public Safety Canada's National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC).

The NCPC provides national leadership on effective and cost-effective ways to prevent and reduce crime by addressing known risk factors in high-risk populations and places. In doing so, the NCPC concentrates on developing and providing:

To obtain optimal results, the NCPC considers that crime prevention interventions should be integrated with the activities of other programs and services, build on the knowledge of known risk and protective factors and use evidence-based practices. They should also be able to generate measurable results, and be focused on specific priorities.

Crime Prevention Policy and Initiatives

For the planning period of 2008-09, efforts will be made to continue building and improving awareness and access to the knowledge base of crime prevention models, as well as developing and strengthening involvement of stakeholders in crime prevention initiatives.

Crime Prevention Funding and Support

For the planning period of 2008-09, funds will be targeted to crime prevention projects which reflect current priorities, including:

Projects targeting youth who are already members of gangs or at the greatest risk of joining gangs where community-based organizations and municipalities have worked together to assess needs and who have developed a coordinated, integrated response to the gang phenomenon they face;

Community-based projects that are likely to have a successful impact on substance use/abuse and related crime problems among at-risk children and youth who are using substances, former juvenile and adult offenders addicted to substances, and Aboriginal people addicted to substances and exhibiting problem behaviour; and

Promising and model crime prevention practices that focus on individuals or groups with multiple risk factors known to be related to offending—including children, youth and young adults at risk of offending and re-offending, as well as Aboriginal communities with crime-related problems.

Also, the Communities at Risk: Security Infrastructure Pilot Program will seek to improve the safety of communities at risk of hate-motivated crime by providing support to enhance security infrastructure for those not-for-profit institutions most central to any community (provincially recognized institutions, places of worship, and community centres). Working in partnership with Canadian communities, the pilot program will distribute up to $3 million in funding by the close of 2008-09 fiscal year. [4]

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
39,507 39,401 39,423

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
36 36 36

Crime Prevention Results and Performance Indicators

Crime Prevention Policy and Initiatives

This activity involves the development of practice-oriented crime prevention knowledge and policy, as well as the collaboration required for the implementation of effective crime prevention interventions in communities. Knowledge acquired through research and the evaluation of effective projects informs the development of the evidence base which is essential to effectively support and implement the National Crime Prevention Strategy's strategic directions. Collaborative work with federal, provincial/territorial and municipal stakeholders, as well as with non-governmental organizations, is based on the recognition that this is a domain of shared responsibility and that local implementation of projects requires the involvement of all stakeholders. In turn, knowledge from practice and evaluation continuously informs the development and adaptation of crime prevention policies and activities.


Results Performance Indicators
Relevant stakeholders—both governmental and non-governmental organizations—are involved in crime prevention initiatives Number of initiatives in which stakeholders have been engaged
Dissemination of model crime prevention interventions Number of evidence-based crime prevention practices disseminatedNumber of information and sessions delivered
The knowledge base is used in calls for proposals for projects and interventions Number of calls for proposals which integrate elements of model practices

Crime Prevention Funding and Support

Targeted interventions that are evidence-based, have measurable results, and which focus on specific priorities receive funding and support from the National Crime Prevention Strategy. Current priorities include:

In addition, the Department manages a pilot project that provides funds to communities at risk of hate-motivated crime to enhance their security infrastructure.


Results Performance Indicators
Reduced offending by targeted groups in funded, local crime prevention projects
  • Number of projects that addressed early risk factors among children, youth and young adults at risk of offending or re-offending
  • Number of anti-gang projects for youth who are in gangs or at risk of joining gangs
  • Number of projects aimed at reducing substance use/abuse and related crime problems
  • Number of projects funded in Aboriginal communities
Funded crime prevention projects use elements of the knowledge base of promising and model programs
  • Number of funded projects which integrated elements of knowledge base
  • Number of proposed projects that included a logic model
Not-for-profit educational institutions, places of worship, and community centres who receive support under the Communities at Risk Program have increased security
  • Number of applications received for Communities at Risk Program
  • Number of applications approved for Communities at Risk Program

Border Management


Highlights
  • Initiate and/or coordinate domestic and international activities to advance an efficient and secure border agenda
  • Develop a framework agreement to govern integrated cross-border maritime law enforcement operations, also known as Shiprider

Public Safety Canada provides federal policy leadership and coordination on a variety of border issues such as customs/immigration enforcement and cross-border law enforcement, in order to ensure that security objectives are achieved in a manner that facilitates the flow of legitimate trade and travel and reduces security-related risks. Border Management is inextricably linked to the effective management of the Canada-United-States border agenda.

Effective border management, a departmental priority, is best achieved through adequate and well-placed infrastructure; the development and use of new technologies; risk-based programs, protocols and procedures; and seamless, cooperative enforcement. These objectives will be pursued by Public Safety Canada through coordination with Portfolio agencies, as well as other government departments and the United States.

Border Operations Support

A smart border is one that pushes border activities as far away from the physical border as possible (either offshore or within Canada) and ensures that enforcement activities at our ports of entry are carried out as efficiently as possible and, to the extent possible, integrated with partners, such as the U.S. Pursuing the development of seamless and secure North America borders will contribute to strengthening the competitiveness of Canada's economy.

The Department is actively engaged, along with federal partners and U.S. counterparts, in seeking ways to further improve the strong cross-border law enforcement cooperation that already exists between our two countries. This includes the pursuit of new and seamless policing models that enhance the capacity and flexibility of law enforcement to identify, pursue and interdict transnational crime groups seeking to exploit the Canada-U.S. border.

Integrated cross-border maritime law enforcement operations are essential to the security of the Canadian border. A recent pilot project, known as Shiprider, authorized specially designated Canadian and U.S. law enforcement officers to transit back and forth across the maritime border to enforce the law on both sides of the international boundary line, while working together on the same vessel. This type of initiative helps give law enforcement agencies the appropriate tools, policies and frameworks to facilitate their day-to-day operations along and across the border and is an integral objective of the Canada-U.S. Cross-Border Crime Forum (CBCF). The Department both participates in and supports the CBCF by serving as the Canadian CBCF secretariat.

Strategic Border Management

The Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) is a key mechanism for pursuing Canada's security and prosperity objectives. In August 2007, Canadian, U.S and Mexican leaders met in Montebello, Quebec to refocus and streamline the SPP agenda and to agree on key initiatives for the coming year. While Industry Canada is responsible for overall Government of Canada SPP coordination, Public Safety Canada is responsible for coordinating the development and delivery of the SPP security agenda. This includes supporting the implementation of the security initiatives identified at the Montebello Leaders' Summit and recommending new priorities for consideration at the next Leaders' Summit.

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
2,940 2,867 2,881

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
23 23 23

Border Management Results and Performance Indicators

Border Operations Support

Public Safety Canada coordinates and develops operational policies, programs and procedures to enhance border integrity and efficiency. Through close working relationships with counterparts in foreign governments, particularly the United States, the Department develops, either cooperatively or jointly, threat and risk assessments as well as bilateral operational agreements to support cooperative cross-border law enforcement and border management, including during and after emergencies.


Results Performance Indicators
Enhanced cooperative cross-border law enforcement

 

  • Canada-US Cross Border Crime Forum held to address impediments to cross-border law enforcement
  • Joint Canada-U.S. threat and risk assessments (e.g. Border Drug Threat Assessment, IBET Threat Assessment, Report on Mass Marketing Fraud) produced in partnership with other government departments and the U.S.
  • Framework agreements negotiated and implemented to govern integrated Canada-U.S. law enforcement operations at the border (e.g., Shiprider) leading to the ability to track year-over-year seizures

Strategic Border Management

The Department provides federal policy leadership on broad border management strategies and initiatives. This includes leading and/or coordinating the development and government-wide implementation of policies and programs to address cross-cutting current and emerging border management issues, irritants, and the overall border management agenda with the United States and Mexico.


Results Performance Indicators
A better managed Canada-U.S. border
  • Number of cooperative arrangements developed and negotiated with North American and other partners that advance smart, secure borders
  • Number of Canadian positions included/adopted within U.S. rules/policies for border management programs
  • Satisfaction of stakeholders consulted on border management issues between Canada and its North American partners
  • Extent to which SPP continues to reflect and advance Canada's border management agenda

Interoperability


Highlights
  • Development of a collaborative framework to govern and oversee interoperability projects in the public safety and security sector
  • Development of technological solutions to facilitate the sharing of information

Effective interoperability ensures that people, processes and systems work in a collaborative fashion to share information. Within the public safety and security sector, it refers to ensuring that government agencies and organizations can share the right information at the right time to keep Canadians safe. Through its Interoperability Program, the Department is working to promote the safety and security objectives of the Government of Canada by maximizing information-sharing opportunities among federal departments and agencies and minimizing security risks.

Efforts to enhance information-sharing include supporting the collaboration of partner organizations to align their policies, programs, services and standards to facilitate both information-sharing and the development of technological tools to improve the accessibility of information and the promotion of information system compatibility. All such improvements are to be undertaken in a manner that respects the privacy of Canadians and the principle of accountability.

As the activities carried out under the Interoperability Program cut across the public safety and security sector, results achieved will support and better enable all of the Department's strategic priorities.

Information Sharing Framework Implementation

To better coordinate interoperability efforts, the Department will continue to actively engage public safety and security partners in an on-going dialogue to identify opportunities for improved information sharing, and to develop and implement interoperable solutions. This will include the development and promotion of the Information Sharing Framework, which is intended to provide public safety and security partners with a decision-making structure and criteria for assessing interoperability project proposals, as well as overseeing the performance of those projects that have been undertaken to improve information sharing. By strengthening the governance and accountability of interoperability endeavours within the public safety and security sector, this framework will ultimately support the objective of public safety organizations in Canada accessing and sharing reliable and timely information in key areas.

There are a number of important areas within the public safety and security environment where the Department is already leading projects to improve information sharing. These initiatives include:

Technical Advisory Services

In its leadership role in these and future projects, the Department will continue to provide advisory services to partner organizations on both the policy and technological aspects of project implementation.

Financial Resources ($000's)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
8,565 5,584 5,606

Human Resources (FTE)


2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
40 40 40

Interoperability Results and Performance Indicators

Information Sharing Framework Implementation

Through the development and implementation of a framework, the Department is enhancing cooperation, collaboration and information-sharing across the federal government's public safety sector and among other levels of government. This activity strengthens the capacity of public safety organizations in Canada to access and share reliable and timely information and creates a more robust and focused environment for horizontally managing the Government of Canada's information sharing proposals in support of public safety and security objectives.


Results Performance Indicators
Cooperation, collaboration and information sharing across the public safety and security sector
  • Development of tools to assess interoperability projects and proposals
  • Decision-making structures and criteria established to provide guidance and oversight to the selection and management of interoperability projects
  • Governance and accountability framework established

Technical Advisory Services

The Department provides technical and policy advisory services to support information sharing initiatives undertaken by other departments and Portfolio agencies, or as part of the Department's own policy and project initiatives, involving information sharing, technical and/or business process planning aspects.


Results Performance Indicators
Interoperable solutions are developed and implemented, including processes and technological tools that improve information sharing amongst federal departments and agencies
  • Fora created to promote dialogue and facilitate the development of interoperable solutions in key areas
  • Development of technical policies, guidelines, standards, and processes to enhance information sharing in key areas of the public safety and security sector
  • Development of technology that promotes government-wide information sharing in key areas of the public safety and security sector



III. Supplementary Information

Financial Tables

Table 1: Departmental Links to the Government of Canada Outcomes


Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada
Program Activities Expected
Results
Planned Spending Alignment of Canada Outcome Area
2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
National Security Strong policies and legislation which advance Canada's National Security objectives 10,194 10,594 9,699
  • Safe and secure communities
  • Safe and secure world through international cooperation
Emergency Management Canadians are safe and better prepared to respond to natural and human-induced disasters 227,610 193,338 190,444
  • Safe and secure communities
  • Safe and secure world through international cooperation
Law Enforcement Safer Communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies 134,487 132,931 132,951
  • Safe and secure communities
Corrections Safe and effective reintegration of eligible offenders into Canadian communities 9,536 9,653 9,145
  • Safe and secure communities
Crime
Prevention
Reduced offending among targeted populations 39,507 39,401 39,423
  • Safe and secure communities
Border Management Efficient and secure borders which facilitate legitimate trade and travel and address risks off-shore to the extent possible 2,940 2,867 2,881
  • Safe and secure communities
  • Safe and secure world through international cooperation
  • A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership
Interoperability Information sharing is facilitated to promote public safety and security objectives 8,565 5,584 5,606
  • Safe and secure communities

Table 2: Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS)


1. SDS Departmental Goals:

  1. Reduced energy consumption and green house gas (GHG) emissions
  2. Reduced Departmental vehicle usage and GHG emissions
  3. Most products and services procured are 'green'
  4. Maximize departmental contribution to sustainable communities

2. Federal sustainable development goal, including greening government operations (GGO) goals

The department will contribute to federal sustainable development by adhering to federal environmental quality and sustainable development management goals.

The relevant goals for the department are :

  1. Clean air
  2. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions
  3. Sustainable communities
  4. Sustainable use of natural resources

3. Performance measurement from current SDS

Building Energy:

  1. Reduction in use of paper for printing/copying
  2. Reduction of office electricity use
  3. Completion of energy audits for PS offices located in NCR by 2007-08 and by 2008-09
  4. Completion of GHG emissions reduction strategy for PS offices located in NCR by 2007-08 and 2008-09

Vehicle Emissions:

  1. Increase in number of green or fuel-efficient vehicles leased or rented by PS staff
  2. Increase in number of new users of public transit services
  3. Reduction of fuel purchased on PS business per kilometre driven

Green Procurement:

  1. Reduced energy use in offices
  2. Increase in percentage of "green products" procured
  3. All toner cartridges used are remanufactured or recycled
  4. Reduction in the number of toner cartridges sent to landfill (waste)
  5. Increase in volume of computer and office equipment diverted to E-waste depots or returned to manufacturers.
  6. Increase in volume of recycled materials diverted to recycling programs

Sustainable Communities:

  1. Emergency management legislation in force
  2. National critical infrastructure plan implemented
  3. Number of youths engaged in gang prevention activities
  4. Number of projects aimed at reducing substance-related crime
  5. Number of projects funded to lower risk factors for at-risk families and children

4. Department's expected results for
2008–09

  1. Public Safety offices will have improved energy conservation performance
  2. Reduced vehicle fleet and staff private vehicle GHG emissions
  3. Products and services purchased have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment
  4. Community sustainability is enhanced



IV. Other Items Of Interest

Grants and Contributions Programs Administered by Public Safety Canada

Legislation Administered by the Department and Portfolio Agencies


The Minister of Public Safety Canada has sole responsibility to Parliament for the following Acts:
  • Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
  • Charities Registration (Security Information) Act
  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Records Act
  • Customs Act
  • Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act
  • DNA Identification Act
  • Emergency Management Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
  • Sex Offender Information Registration Act
  • International Transfer of Offenders Act
  • Witness Protection Program Act
Public Safety Canada or its Agencies administer or are impacted by the following Acts in whole or in part. Some contain specific functions of the Minister that the Minister exercises solely or in conjunction with other Ministers:
Public Safety Canada
  • Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act
  • Emergency Management Act

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

  • Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
  • Charities Registration (Security Information) Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal Act
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Criminal Records Act
  • DNA Identification Act
  • Excise Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act
National Parole Board
  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Criminal Records Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act

Correctional Services of Canada

  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Extradition Act
  • Old Age Security Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act
  • International Transfer of Offenders Act
  • National Defence Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
  • Security Offences Act
  • Sex Offender Information Registration Act
  • Witness Protection Program Act
Canada Border Services Agency
  • Aeronautics Act
  • Anti-Personnel Mines Convention Implementation Act (through EIPA)
  • Blue Water Bridge Authority Act
  • Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act
  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Canada Border Services Agency Act
  • Canada Customs and Revenue Agency Act
  • Canada Grain Act
  • Canada Post Corporation Act
  • Canada Shipping Act
  • Canada-Chili Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canadian Dairy Commission Act
  • Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
  • Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act
  • Canadian Wheat Board Act
  • Carriage by Air Act
  • Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (though EIPA)
  • Civil International Space Station Agreement Implementation Act
  • Coastal Fisheries Protection Act
  • Coasting Trade Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act
  • Controlled Drug and Substances Act
  • Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
  • Copyright Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Cultural Property Export and Import Act
  • Customs Act
  • Customs and Excise Offshore Application Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Defence Production Act
  • Department of Health Act
  • Department of Industry Act
  • Energy Administration Act
  • Energy Efficiency Act
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Act, 2001
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Explosives Act
  • Export Act
  • Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act
  • Feeds Act
Canada Border Services Agency (continued)
  • Fertilizers Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Fisheries Act
  • Foods and Drugs Act
  • Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act
  • Freshwater Fish Marketing Act
  • Hazardous Products Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Importation of Intoxicating Liquors Act
  • Integrated Circuit Topography Act
  • International Boundary Commission Act
  • Manganese-based Fuel Additives Act
  • Meat Inspection Act
  • Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act (not in force)
  • Motor Vehicle Safety Act
  • National Energy Board Act
  • Navigable Waters Protection Act
  • North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Nuclear Energy Act
  • Nuclear Safety and Control Act
  • Pest Control Products Act
  • Pilotage Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Precious Metals Marking Act
  • Preclearance Act
  • Privacy Act
  • Privileges and Immunities (North Atlantic Organization) Act
  • Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act
  • Provincial Trade Act
  • Quarantine Act
  • Quebec Harbour, Port Warden Act
  • Radiation Emitting Devices Act
  • Radiocommunication Act
  • Seeds Act
  • Special Economic Measures Act
  • Special Import Measures Act
  • Statistics Act
  • Telecommunications Act
  • Textile Labelling Act
  • Trade-Marks Act
  • Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
  • United Nations Act
  • United States Wreckers Act
  • Visiting Forces Act
  • Wild Animals and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act
Other
  • Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Act
 

Contacts for Further Information

For further information about this Report on Plans and Priorities, you may communicate with our departmental contacts as follows:


Name Title Telephone
Suzanne Hurtubise Deputy Minister of Public Safety (613) 991-2895
Myles Kirvan Associate Deputy Minister of Public Safety (613) 949-0322
Chantal Bernier Assistant Deputy Minister, Community Safety and Partnerships (613) 993-4325
J. Scott Broughton Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Emergency Management and National Security (613) 991-2820
Lynda Clairmont Associate Assistant Deputy Minister,
Emergency Management and National Security
(613) 990-4976
Daniel Lavoie Director General, Communications (613) 990-2743
Elisabeth Nadeau Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management (613) 990-2615
Kristina Namiesniowski Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy (613) 949-6435
Eva Plunkett Inspector General of CSIS (613) 949-0675
Richard Wex Assistant Deputy Minister, Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability (613) 990-2703

For more information on Public Safety Canada, please visit our web site at: www.publicsafety.gc.ca.



Table 3: Details on Transfer Payments Programs


Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS)
Start Date: 1998/1999 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The National Crime Prevention Strategy, which is jointly managed with the provinces and territories and administered by the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) provides national leadership on effective and cost-efficient ways to prevent and reduce crime by addressing known risk factors in high risk populations and places. The NCPC works in close collaboration with key partners, including police, academics, and communities, to support the development and implementation of evidence-based crime prevention projects, and the dissemination and use of practical knowledge.
Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada
Expected results: Further to the repositioning of the NCPC in June 2007, it is expected that activities under the NCPS will lead to positive changes in risk and protective factors among high risk children and youth; youth at risk of gang involvement; youth at risk of drug involvement; and high risk offenders returning to the community. Ultimately, it is expected that these changes will lead to a reduction in offending among these targeted populations. The NCPC is currently revising its Accountability, Risk and Audit Framework (ARAF) to reflect these new directions.
    Forecast Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending
  2007-08   2008-09   2009-10   2010-11
Program Activity Crime Prevention
Total Grants $ 18,960,000 $ 18,960,000 $ 18,960,000 $ 18,960,000
Total Contributions $ 23,072,000 $ 12,572,000 $ 13,572,000 $ 13,572,000
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments    -    -    -    -
Total Program Activity $ 42,032,000 $ 31,532,000 $ 32,532,000 $ 32,532,000
Planned Evaluations   Summative Evaluation: March, 2010
Planned Audits   5 - 7 contribution audits per year; projects to be selected through applying risk matrix at end of fiscal year


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA)
Start Date: 1970 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Assist provinces and territories with response and recovery costs as a result of large-scale natural disasters.
Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada
Expected results: Through financial assistance, assist provinces and territories return damaged infrastructure and personal property to pre-disaster condition.
    Forecast Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending
  2007-08   2008-09   2009-10   2010-11
Program Activity Emergency Management
Total Grants    -    -    -    -
Total Contributions $ 140,000,000 $ 130,000,000 $ 100,000,000 $ 100,000,000
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments    -    -    -    -
Total Program Activity $ 140,000,000 $ 130,000,000 $ 100,000,000 $ 100,000,000
Planned Evaluations    
Planned Audits   All provincial and territorial DFAA claims are submitted to Audit Services Canada for audit prior to issuance of any payments.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: First Nations Policing Program (FNPP)
Start Date: 1991/1992 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Under the First Nations Policing Policy (FNPP), Public Safety negotiates, administers and monitors tripartite agreements for policing services in First Nations communities. These policing services are culturally appropriate and responsive to the particular needs of First Nations and Inuit communities and are cost-shared 52% by Canada and 48% by the province/territory. Presently, Public Safety has 1,217 Aboriginal police officers under the FNPP and 168 tripartite agreements are in place covering 318,143 people or 71.9% of the on-reserve population of Canada.
Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada
Expected results: Enhanced accessibility to professional police services in First Nations communities; Aboriginal policing matters receive enhanced collaboration from First Nations and the provinces/territories.
    Forecast Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending
  2007-08   2008-09   2009-10   2010-11
Program Activity Law Enforcement
Total Grants                
Total Contributions $ 67,349,000 $ 104,279,000 $ 104,229,000 $ 104,229,000
Total Program Activity $ 67,349,000 $ 104,279,000 $ 104,229,000 $ 104,229,000
Planned Evaluations (APD)   Internal evaluation to assess risk associated with each file.
Planned Audits   13 audits planned in 2007-08 representing a total (estimated) value of $462,000


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Joint Emergency Preparedness Program (JEPP)
Start Date: 1980 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Contributions to enhance the national capability to manage all types of emergencies and ensure a reasonably uniform emergency response and recovery capacity across Canada. National capabilities are enhanced through training activities, the purchase of emergency response equipment and joint emergency planning.
Strategic Outcome: A safe and resilient Canada
Expected results: JEPP's ultimate goal is to enhance the national emergency response capacity to meet emergencies of all types by providing contributions, on a cost-shared basis, to provinces and territories in order to: increase the number of emergency preparedness equipment and personnel to respond to all emergencies; ensure emergencies plans are updated, encourage partnerships and the dissemination of information to facilitate emergency response among stakeholders; ensure the wise investment in critical infrastructure protection activities involving provincial/territorial/municipal governments; and promote public awareness of emergency management through JEPP. Outputs used to achieve JEPP's ultimate goal are: the annual update instructions to provinces and territories; the JEPP manual and funding criteria/guidelines; the annual provincial and territorial progress reports; audit reports and the project related press releases.
    Forecast Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending   Planned Spending
  2007-08   2008-09   2009-10   2010-11
Program Activity Emergency Management
Total Grants    -    -    -    -
Total Contributions $ 8,471,000 $ 8,471,000 $ 8,471,000 $  8,471,000
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments    -    -    -    -
Total Program Activity $ 8,471,000 $ 8,471,000 $ 8,471,000 $  8,471,000
Planned Evaluations   The next evaluation is planned for 2008.
Planned Audits   All projects exceeding a JEPP contribution of $50,000.00 are audited by provincial/territorial auditors prior to a payment being issued. Also 5% of the total projects are selected annually for auditing by the federal auditors.



Table 4: Evaluations


1. Name of Evaluation 2. Evaluation Type 3. Status 4. Expected Completion Date
Public Safety and Anti-Terrorism Initiative CBRN Training Summative Evaluation Ongoing 2008-09
Cross Cultural Roundtable on Security Formative Evaluation Ongoing 2008-09
National Strategy for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation on the Internet Summative Evaluation   June 2008
Secret Communications Interoperability Project (SCIP) Summative Evaluation   June 2008
Joint Emergency Preparedness Program (JEPP) Summative Evaluation   March 2009
Youth Gang Prevention Fund (YGPF) Interim Evaluation   March 2009
Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Forum on Emergencies Formative Evaluation   2008-09
Public Safety and Anti – Terrorism (PSAT) Mid-term Evaluation    
National Crime Prevention Strategy Summative Evaluation   2009-10



Table 5: Green Procurement


Green Procurement
1. Policies and initiatives have been established in order to meet the objectives of the Policy on Green Procurement. These are:
  1. Energy efficient office equipment procurement policy;
  2. Green procurement training;
  3. Toner cartridges replacement policy;
  4. E-waste initiative;
  5. Recycling expansion initiative.
2. Activity Target Performance indicator
  Energy efficient office equipment procurement policy 100% of new office equipment purchases have Energy Star accreditation when feasible and available on PWGSC Standing Offers by the end of 2008-09 Reduced energy use in offices
  Green procurement training 50% of materiel managers, procurement officers and acquisition cardholders have taken the Canada School of Public Service's Green Procurement training course by the end of 2008-09 Increase in percentage of "green products" procured
  Toner cartridges replacement policy 100% purchase and use of remanufactured or recycled toner cartridges when feasible and available by the end of 2008-09 All toner cartridges used are remanufactured or recycled when feasible
  E-waste initiative Computer and office equipment diverted to E-waste depots or returned to manufacturers by 2008-09 while adhering to Crown Asset disposal policy Increase in volume of computer and office equipment diverted to E-waste depots or returned to manufacturers
  Recycling expansion initiative Total volume of recyclable materials (e.g., paper, metals, glass, batteries and plastics) increased by 25% by 2008-09 Increase in volume of recycled materials diverted to recycling programs. Will be measured through a waste audit that PWGSC will conduct
3. Target Description
  100% of new office equipment purchases have Energy Star accreditation when feasible and available on PWGSC Standing Offers by the end of 2008-09 The Department will only buy equipment that have Energy Star accreditation where feasible and available on PWGSC standing offers.
  50% of materiel managers, procurement officers and acquisition cardholders have taken the Canada School of Public Service's Green Procurement training course by the end of 2008-09 As per the departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, Procurement Officers will be taking the Green Procurement Course offered by the Canada School of Public Service. The course will provide an overview of the Policy of Green Procurement and provide detailed strategies for applying its principles throughout the procurement process. Administrative Officers across the Department will also be encouraged to take the course.
  100% purchase and use of remanufactured or recycled toner cartridges when feasible and available by the end of 2008-09 The Department will only buy remanufactured or recycled toner cartridges where feasible and available on PWGSC standing offers.
  Computer and office equipment diverted to E-waste depots or returned to manufacturers by 2008-09 while adhering to Crown Asset disposal policy The Department will make use of Crown Asset Disposal to dispose of all office equipment and E-waste. E-waste may also be disposed of through approved re-use programs such as Computers for Schools.
  Total volume of recyclable materials (e.g., paper, metals, glass, batteries and plastics) increased by 25% by 2008-09 The Department will work with PWGSC to establish baselines for recyclable waste in 2008-09 on which to measure and build towards a 25% increase in subsequent years.



Table 6: Internal Audits


1. Name of Internal Audit 2. Audit Type 3. Status 4. Expected Completion Date 5. Electronic Link to Report
2008-09
Public Service mandatory training Assurance Engagement Planned June 2008 n/a
Employee Departure Process Assurance Engagement Planned July 2008 n/a
Accounts Payable Assurance Engagement Planned Sept. 2008 n/a
Travel Assurance Engagement Planned Feb. 2008 n/a
Hospitality Assurance Engagement Planned Dec. 2008 n/a
Government Security Policy Assurance Engagement Planned Aug. 2008 n/a
Follow-up Audit of National Crime Prevention Centre Assurance Engagement Planned Oct. 2008 n/a
Public Safety and Anti-Terrorism (PSAT) funding Assurance Engagement Planned March 2009 n/a
2009-10
HR information systems Assurance Engagement Planned June 2009 n/a
Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Assurance Engagement Planned Sept. 2009 n/a
Record Document Information Management Systems (RDIMS) Assurance Engagement Planned Dec. 2009 n/a
Management of Information Technology Security (MITS) plan and implementation Assurance Engagement Planned Dec. 2009 n/a
Policy Development Contribution Program Assurance Engagement Planned March 2010 n/a
Interoperability Project Assurance Engagement Planned May 2009 n/a
Financial Statements Preparation Readiness for an external audit Assurance Engagement Planned June 2009 n/a



Table 7: Services Received Without Charge


(thousands of dollars) 2008-09
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 5,343.1
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 5,492.5
Worker's compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada 6.8
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by the Department of Justice Canada 1,170.3
Total services received without charge 12,012.7



Table 8: User Fees


Name of User Fee Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Fee Type Other products and services (O)
Fee-Setting Authority Access to Information Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee N/A
Effective Date of Planned Change N/A
Consultation and Review Process Planned N/A

Date modified: