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TABLE 13: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs) for the Department of Canadian Heritage

CITIZENSHIP AND HERITAGE SECTOR

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Peoples’ Program
2) Start Date: 1971-72 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

For over 30 years, the Department of Canadian Heritage (and its predecessor the Department of the Secretary of State) has been delivering Aboriginal-specific programs and initiatives that support the full participation of Aboriginal people in Canadian life and supporting the continuation of Aboriginal living cultures as key elements of the Canadian cultural landscape.

Specifically they:

  • Strengthen Aboriginal cultural identity and languages;
  • Facilitate the inclusion of Aboriginal people in Canadian society in a manner that recognizes their cultures and fosters their contribution to Canada; and
  • Provide Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve with a representative voice and ensure that Aboriginal perspectives are reflected in government.

The Aboriginal Peoples’ Program is organized around three broad themes:

Aboriginal Organizations Component supports the capacity of national and regional Aboriginal organizations to represent the interests of their communities with the intent of reflecting Aboriginal perspectives in government policies and programs.

Aboriginal Communities Component supports the efforts of Aboriginal communities to develop innovative and culturally appropriate solutions to the social, cultural, economic and other obstacles that impede either community and personal prospects. It focuses specifically on the unique challenges faced by Aboriginal women, youth and urban communities with the intent of strengthening Aboriginal cultural identity and participation of Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian society.

Aboriginal Living Cultures Component supports the preservation, revitalization and promotion of Aboriginal languages and cultures. Specifically, this component focuses on access to programs and activities that preserve, revitalize and promote Aboriginal languages and cultures as well as the production and distribution of Aboriginal radio and television programming.

5) Strategic Outcome(s):

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation. Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Aboriginal Organizations

In 2006-07, $7M was provided to 30 representative and national women's organizations that represent approximately 70% of the Aboriginal population that live off reserve. Funding provided in 2006-07 builds on over 30 years of programming and has continued to provide the infrastructure to support the aspirations and representation of Aboriginal Peoples within Canadian society.

Aboriginal Communities

Friendship Centres, through a strong community focus and the provision of critical programs and services, have contributed to improving the life chances and socio-economic conditions of urban Aboriginal people. In 2006-07, $16,229,182 was provided to support 16 friendship centres, the National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC) and 7 provincial/territorial affiliated associations. This provides a stable base to the Friendship Centre network from which it is able to deliver a wide range of programs ad services to urban Aboriginal Canadians in partnership with federal, provincial and Aboriginal governments, and the non-profit sector.

Community-level youth projects focus on a wide range of Aboriginal youth issues, needs and goals such as encouraging youth to stay in school; improving life skills; increasing youth participation in health, cultural and recreational projects; creating activities that provide alternatives to negative environments; community outreach and prevention and intervention programs for street youth. In 2006-07, $22,152,010 was provided to The Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres (UMAYC) to support over 10,000 young participants. In their desire to improve Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth (YCWAUY) provides summer work experience and monies to help urban students to support their educational goals; support for scholarships to students and support for career fairs aimed at encouraging training in areas related to the departmental mandate.

In 2006-07, Canadian Heritage provided $1,395,090, which supported about 70 culturally relevant Aboriginal women’s community-based projects addressing leadership and women’s issues, family violence and self-government participation.

In 2006-07, $227,000 was provided to the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation to support the Post Secondary Scholarship Program bursaries and scholarships to Aboriginal students and to support one day career fairs in Yellowknife and Halifax to give Aboriginal students resources and information on career opportunities.

Aboriginal Living Cultures

The Territorial Aboriginal Languages Accords (TLA) and the Aboriginal Languages Initiative (ALI) provide support for the preservation and promotion of Aboriginal languages to address the challenges of language and cultural loss. In 2006-07, $9,342,543 was provided through these initiatives to support approximately 300 language projects organized by Aboriginal communities, organizations and governments.

Aboriginal broadcasting in the North has helped Aboriginal peoples reconnect with their cultural heritage, re-establish their linguistic capabilities and share their distinct ways and traditions among themselves and with the rest of the country. In 2006-07, $7,945,337 was provided to support 13 northern Aboriginal broadcasters for the production and distribution of television and radio programming. This ensured that over 900 hours of radio and television programming in 17 Aboriginal languages was produced and distributed.

In 2006-07, $60,000 was provided to support National Aboriginal Day events in the National Capital Region. These events assist in the recognition and celebration of Aboriginal cultures and contributions to Canada; foster the promotion of Aboriginal cultures and testify about its growing importance.

In 2006-07, $400,000 was provided to support the Four Host First Nations Society to ensure that First Nations’ cultures, protocols and traditions are acknowledged, respected and showcased throughout the planning, staging and hosting of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

In 2006-07, $113,000 was provided to support the annual National Aboriginal Achievement Awards that showcases the successes of Aboriginal peoples to all Canadians. The awards show was held in Edmonton and broadcast nationally by Global TV and The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending
2006–07
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.2          
Total Contributions 66.2          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Preservation of Canada’s Heritage            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   19.5 21.4 20.2 20.2 1.2
Total Program Activity (PCH)   20.4 21.7 20.5 20.5 1.2
Program Activity
(PA): Community Development and Capacity Building
           
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   21.6 8.6 5.1 5.4 3.2
Total Program Activity (PCH)   252.8 231.8 226.5 227.0 4.8
Program Activity
(PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life
           
Total Grants   0.3 1.4 0.6 0.6 0.8
Total Contributions   24.6 35.4 40.1 39.6 (4.2)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances

Overall variance of $1.0M is mainly explained by the following:

  • $0.2M was transferred to the Department of Indian and Northern Development Canada through Supplementary Estimates to support the Tr ’ondk Hwch’ in First Nation in the development and management of Yukon heritage resources.
  • $0.4M was reallocated to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation

An audit of the Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting (NAB) and Northern Distribution (ND) was approved on June 28, 2006. The audit noted that consideration should be given to consolidate ND and NAB elements under the responsibility of the same function.

The Report recommended that NAB d evelop and document: a risk management process supported by a risk assessment, recipients audit plan and monitoring as specified in the risk management strategy of the Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF)/Risk-Based Audit Framework (RBAF); and operational guidelines and procedures for assessment of applications and proposals, funding process, monitoring, performance reporting and measurement activities. It also recommended that NAB implement performance measurement framework with appropriate methods and tools to collect information for reporting purposes; streamline the applications and consider to enter into multi year funding arrangements to expedite the process; and review the applications guidelines and eligibility criteria to ensure transparency and fairness.

For ND, the Audit recommended that the program should ensure that the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payment requirements on advances to recipients are given based on monthly cash flow budgets and that holdback for payments is implemented.

Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program ( May 18, 2005)

Evaluation of Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program ( May 18, 2005)

Evaluation of Aboriginal Women's Program ( February 24, 2005)

Audit of the Aboriginal Languages Initiative ( October 20, 2004)

Audit of the Canada/Territorial Co-operation Agreements for Aboriginal Languages ( October 20, 2004)

Audit of the Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative (UMAYC) ( February 25, 2004)

Audit of the Aboriginal Friendship Centres Program (AFCP) ( February 25, 2004)

Evaluation of the Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative (UMAYC) ( October 22, 2003)

Summative Evaluation of the Northern Native Broadcast Access Program (NNBAP) & Northern Distribution Program (June 25, 2003)

Follow-Up Audit of the Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program ( June 25, 2003)

Follow-Up Audit of the Aboriginal Women’s Program ( June 25, 2003)

Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Languages Initiative ( February 26, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program (replaced by the Historical Recognition Programs in June 2006)
2) Start Date: 2005-06 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The objective of the Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program (ACE) is to acknowledge, commemorate and educate Canadians about the historical experiences of ethnocultural communities impacted by wartime measures and/or immigration restrictions. The ACE Program aims to focus on forward-looking measures that will highlight the valuable contributions made by these communities to Canadian society. This will help to build a better understanding among all Canadians of the strength of diversity and a shared sense of Canadian identity.

5) Strategic Outcome(s):

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

In June 2006, the Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program (ACE) was replaced by the Historical Recognition Programs.

ACE Program was cancelled, therefore no achieved results to report.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 0.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 10.0 0.1 0.0 10.0
Total Contributions   0.0 2.8 0.6 0.0 2.8
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances :

Overall variance of 12.8M is explained as follows:

  • $12.1M in planned funding for the Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program was never accessed. The Historical Recognition Programs replaced this program.
  • $0.7M for the Historical Recognition Programs was re-profiled to 2007-08.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation: N/A


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Partnerships Program
2) Start Date: 2002-03 3) End Date: 2006-2007

4) Description:

Through the Community Partnerships Program, the Department of Canadian Heritage works with other government departments and the voluntary sector to promote citizen participation and engagement in Canadian society. The principal program managed by the Community Partnerships Program is the Canada Volunteerism Initiative (CVI) which aims to improve the ability of organizations to recruit and retain volunteers; to encourage Canadians to participate in voluntary organizations; and to enhance the experience of volunteering.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

Fiscal year 2006-07 was the renewal year for the Community Participation Program (CPP) and the Canada Volunteerism Initiative (CVI). Toward that end, the CPP undertook a series of stakeholder consultations across Canada to gauge the success of the Program and to solicit input toward its renewal. A Summative Evaluation of the Program was also carried out in 2006-07.

As part of the Spending Restraint announcement made in the Fall of 2006, the Minister of Finance and the Treasury Board President announced the elimination of the CPP and the CVI. The Program relayed this decision to the three national centres and the thirteen Local Networks of the CVI and CPP clientele. In consultation with the clients of the CVI and the CPP, plans were made toward the orderly winding down of both Programs. The Local Networks of the CVI shortened their activity schedule and most closed down by February 2007. Promotional campaigns, like December 5 (International Volunteer Day) were still carried both nationally and locally. The three national centres consolidated the reports and fact sheets created under the CVI and put these resources up on their Websites so that the work undertaken would still be available to organizations. The CVI wound down operations as of March 31, 2007.

The CPP worked with recipient organizations to close out the files supported under the Program.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line BL:) Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 8.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   8.2 8.1 7.9 7.9 0.2
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $0.2M is as follows:

  • Funds were reallocated to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

A summative evaluation of the Community Participation Program (including the Canada Volunteerism Initiative) was approved in March 2007. The study found that CPP and CVI were no longer consistent with either the current stated priorities of the Government of Canada or the Department of Canadian Heritage’s strategic objectives. Although volunteer rates among Canadians varied over time, it was difficult to measure the direction and magnitude of the trend. There was broad consensus that voluntary organizations in Canada are under considerable stress and that the Government of Canada is in a position to influence their success. CPP/CVI helped improve the understanding of volunteerism and enrich the experience of volunteers, however a lack of evidence was noted. Given that the Program was deemed non-core and subsequently discontinued by the Government, recommendations were formulated in the event that a similar program be struck in the future.

Summative Evaluation of the Canada Volunteerism Initiative (October 19, 2005)

Evaluation of the 2001 International Year of Volunteer Initiative ( May 28, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Development of Official-Language Communities Program
2) Start Date: 2003-04 3) End Date: 2008-09

4) Description:

Foster the vitality of Canada's English- and French-speaking minority communities and enable them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. Through partnerships and agreements with community organizations, provinces, territories, municipalities and federal departments and agencies, enhance the capacity of minority official language communities to have greater access to quality education and different programs and services in their language in their communities.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

Community Life

Investments under the Community Life component led to the achievement of results that have enabled official‑language minority communities to have increased access to programs and services in their language.

A total of $17.4M in funding was allocated to the provinces and territories by Canadian Heritage as part of intergovernmental cooperation on minority-language services. These investments led to the development and implementation of concrete measures designed to increase the level of services provided in areas under provincial jurisdiction other than education, deemed to be priorities for minority communities. These include justice, health, the economy, social services and community services.

The Department continues to implement cooperation agreements with the community sector that seek to bring together all architects of minority community development. Over $34.5M has been allocated to community organizations to help them provide a wide range of activities that contribute to an increased use of the official language in the daily lives of Canadians living in official-language minority communities. Using the language is a way of preserving it. In addition to supporting initiatives based on local or regional needs, the Department of Canadian Heritage has also targeted cultural activities and networks as well as community radio stations.

Minority-Language Education

Under the Minority-Language Education component, Canadian Heritage cooperates with the provinces and territories to give official-language minority communities the opportunity to access education in their language, from preschools to post-secondary institutions. Over $169M has been allocated under this component, primarily for the implementation of bilateral federal / provincial / territorial agreements intended to maintain and improve regular education programs in the provinces and territories as well as their complementary strategies aimed at young people in order to pass on the language and culture to them and encourage them to achieve their full potential at school and in society. For instance, agreements have been concluded to renovate and build school and community spaces in Saskatchewan, the Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Quebec.

The following are some data from the 2006 PCH / Decima Research public opinion Survey on Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Canada's Official Languages with respect to the outcome seeking increased access for official-language minority communities to programs and services in their language, including education:

  • 73.8% of respondents living in minority communities say they are satisfied with the services provided in their language in their community;
  • 78.7% of respondents living in minority communities say they are satisfied with the services provided in their language in their community as concerns primary and secondary education; and
  • 30.6 % of respondents living in minority communities say that access to services in their language in their community has improved over the past five years.
Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line BL:) Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 4.6          
Total Contributions 204.7          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Community Development and Capacity-Building            
Total Grants   5.0 42.1 5.2 5.2 36.9
Total Contributions   226.2 181.1 216.3 216.3 (35.2)
Total for PA (PCH)   252.8 231.8 226.5 227.0 4.8
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $1.0M is mainly explained by the following:

  • $4.0M was transferred through Supplementary Estimates to other federal government departments and agencies to support Interdepartmental Partnerships with the Official Language Communities (IPOLC).
  • ($1.6M) was received from Operating funds through Supplementary Estimates.
  • ($0.9M) was received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Formative Evaluation of the Interdepartmental Partnership with Official Language Communities (IPOLC) Component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program ( October 22, 2003)

Evaluation of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program ( October 22, 2003)

Evaluation of the Support for Official Language Communities Program (A component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program) ( June 25, 2003)

Evaluation of the Official Languages in Education Program ( June 25, 2003)

Audit Official Languages in Education and the Intergovernmental Collaboration Component of the Promotion of the Official Languages Program ( June 25, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enhancement of Official Languages
2) Start Date: 2003-04 3) End Date: 2008-09

4) Description:

Promote among Canadians a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality. Through partnerships and agreements with the provinces and territories and non-governmental organizations in support of second-language learning and initiatives that foster understanding between Anglophone and Francophone Canadians, encourage the public to recognize and support linguistic duality as a fundamental value of Canadian society.

5) Strategic Outcome(s):

Canadians live in an inclusive society based on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the Department of Canadian Heritage invested over $114M under the Second‑Language Learning component, primarily for cooperation with the provinces and territories to improve core and immersion second-language programs, recruit and train teachers, and encourage the continuation of second-language learning at the post-secondary level. More specifically, the Department has supported a wide range of initiatives that, over the long term, will enhance young Canadians’ working knowledge of both official languages. These initiatives include activities that complement regular education programs, offered during either the school year or the summer. Among others, the Department has supported the Second Language Research Institute (formerly the Second Language Education Centre) of the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton to extend the scope of its research in order to provide second‑language teachers with improved tools so they are better able to help their students learn another language successfully.

The Department also granted over $4M to promotional and outreach activities to foster a better understanding of the advantages of knowing both official languages in Canada. The activities funded pertain to areas involving outreach between various groups of Canadians ; the promotion of second-language learning or contributions of the French language and culture to majority and minority communities; and, the development of bilingual capacities within various organizations.

The efforts of the Department of Canadian Heritage regarding the promotion of linguistic duality have yielded positive results. The Department commissioned a public opinion Survey on Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Canada's Official Languages conducted by PCH / Decima Research in 2006, which revealed that :

  • 59.9% of Canadians in majority communities (92.6% of the minority) believe that having two official languages is an important aspect of what being Canadian means to them. This is a slight increase compared to the PCH / GPC International survey in 2002, when 54.2% of Canadians in majority communities (91.6% of the minority) were of the same opinion.
  • 67.2% of Canadians in majority communities (92.5% of the minority) believe that speaking French and English in Canada improves job and business opportunities for all Canadians.
  • According to 69.7% of Canadians in majority communities (88.4% of the minority), services at all government levels should be provided in English and French throughout the country.
Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.5          
Total Contributions 90.5          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Promotion of Inter-cultural Understanding            
Total Grants   0.6 5.6 0.2 0.2 5.4
Total Contributions   106.5 100.2 115.1 115.1 (14.9)
Total for PA (PCH)   106.8 135.8 130.3 130.3 5.5
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   3.5 3.4 3.4 3.4 0.0
Total for PA (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of ($9.5M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Audit of the Support for Linguistic Duality Program and the Program for the Integration of Both Official Languages in the Administration of Justice ( September 18, 2002 )


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Exchanges Canada Program
2) Start Date: 2000-01 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The Exchanges Canada Program enables young Canadians to participate in one way forums and two way exchanges with youth from communities across the country. It also enables them to obtain information on opportunities for many different types of exchanges within Canada and abroad.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, Exchanges Canada offered approximately 15,204 youth the opportunity to learn more about Canada, its communities and its institutions, to connect with one another, to develop their skills, to generate solutions to issues that matter to them and to have a voice in public policy dialogue through participation in reciprocal exchanges, youth forums and summer work opportunities. Feedback from participant questionnaires continues to be very positive, and shows that participants in these activities have, as a result of their experience, a greater appreciation for Canada's diversity, greater comfort using their second language, and an increased desire to get involved in their own community. According to preliminary demographic data for 2006-07, the Program has achieved or surpassed the majority of its participation targets. Efforts were increased to reach out to visible minority youth, youth with disabilities and youth from Ontario.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 19.8          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Total Contributions   18.3 17.9 22.4 22.4 (4.5)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of ($4.5M) is explained as follows:

  • ($0.2M) were received through Supplementary Estimates from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada – Action Canada.
  • ($0.9M) were received through Supplementary Estimates to support outstanding financial obligations relating to the Canadian Unity Council.
  • ($3.4M) was received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Evaluation of Exchanges Canada Program ( February 24, 2005)

Audit of Exchanges Canada ( February 26, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Katimavik Program
2) Start Date: 1997-98 3) End Date: 2008-09

4) Description:

Katimavik's mission is to foster the personal development of young Canadians through a stimulating 39-week program of community volunteerism, training and group interaction. Katimavik contributes significantly to the personal, social and occupational development of its participants, who are between the ages of 17 and 21, by promoting community service and offering a unique experience that fosters a better understanding of life in Canada.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved

In 2006-07, the Katimavik program provided opportunities for 899 young people to be part of a unique experience that allowed them to develop their personal, social and professional skills; increase their knowledge of Canada and its diversity; and become more involved in communities across the country through service-learning projects. The youth participants' enthusiasm, passion and involvement benefited both communities, where projects took place, and host partner organizations, which were better able to respond to community needs.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants   0.0        
Total Contributions 19.8          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.8          
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   16.7 19.8 17.5 17.5 2.3
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $2.3M is explained as follows:

  • Funds were reallocated to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

A summative evaluation of the Katimavik Program was approved in May 2006. The study indicates that many of the conditions that gave rise to the Program continue to exist today (e.g., need to assist youth with transition from high school to post-secondary education, youth unemployment, and concern expressed about the environment). The evaluation also stated that the declining national volunteer rate for youth also points to the need for a program such as Katimavik. At the same time, the evaluation calls for the Government’s action on a number of issues: absence of targeting for certain groups; high cost per participant compared to other youth programs examined; large salary and wage budgets of the Katimavik-OPCAN organization; and, dependence of this organization on Government funds. The main recommendations coming out of the evaluation call for a re-focusing of the Program as it examines various approaches to promoting youth volunteerism and the need to undertake a number of actions to increase its efficiency.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Multiculturalism Program
2) Start Date: 1982-83 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The Multiculturalism Program of Canadian Heritage is one important means by which the Government of Canada pursues the 3 goals of the Multiculturalism Policy: identity; social justice; and civic participation. Funding provided under the terms and conditions supports these goals to achieve the following objectives:

  • Ethno-cultural/racial minorities participate in decision making (Civic Participation)
  • Communities in the broad public engage in informed dialogue and sustained action to combat racism (Anti-Racism, Anti-Hate, Cross Cultural Understanding)
  • Public Institutions eliminate systemic barriers (Institutional Change)

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the Multiculturalism Program funded 114 projects across the country. The Program supported the work of public institutions in a number of different sectors. For example, the Canadian Red Cross Society completed an organizational needs assessment to identify attitudes, behaviours, policies and procedural barriers. This assessment will help ensure that the organization reflects and meets the needs of Canada's multicultural population. To affect institutional change in the media industry, the Program provided support to the Young People's Press for Diversifying Canada's Newsrooms project that builds on a partnership with five universities to increase the number of racial minority undergraduate journalists and encourage news that reflects the diversity of Canadian society. The Program assisted ethno-cultural/racial communities to take action to resolve issues affecting their communities by supporting skills development for civic engagement that increased knowledge about emerging issues preventing full participation. For example, the Youth Employment Services Foundation received funding support to examine needs related to entrepreneurship issues affecting ethno-cultural/racial communities in Quebec. The National Alliance of Philippine Women in Canada also received support for the project Filipino Community and Beyond: Toward Full Participation in a Multicultural Canada.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 1.0          
Total Contributions 11.3          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.8          
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.8 7.7 0.6 0.6 7.1
Total Contributions   9.7 9.5 9.3 8.6 0.9
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $8.0M is mainly explained by the following:

  • The enhanced funding was only approved by Parliament in December 2006 in Supplementary Estimates A, which was too late to develop projects with community organizations.
  • Funds were also reallocated to other departmental programs to co-fund youth-related diversity projects and other initiatives.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program ( June 28, 2006)

Evaluation of the Family Violence Initiative - Multiculturalism Program ( September 18, 2002)

Evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program's March 21 Campaign for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination ( November 28, 2001)

Review of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation (November 28, 2001)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Museums Assistance Program
(Known as Grant/Contribution to Canadian museums and heritage organizations to promote professional management of, and access to, Canada's diverse heritage)
2) Start Date: 1972-73 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The Museums Assistance Program helps current and future generations of Canadians gain access to and develop a better appreciation of their heritage. The program provides project support to help exhibitions travel around the country, to foster the adoption of best museum management practices, to support Aboriginal peoples in protecting and presenting their heritage, and to improve museum associations' ability to serve their members.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life

In 2006-07, the Museum Assistance Program (MAP) received 225 project proposals, and funded 169 of these (75%). When multiyear projects are taken into consideration, a total of 223 projects received funding for a total estimated amount of $6.87M.

Note : These numbers do not include actual expenditures for MAP in 2006-07, as final project reports are still being submitted by recipients. Final figures will be provided by the third quarter.

Participation in Community and Civic Life (Young Canada Work (YCW) – Heritage)

A total of 882 summer students and graduate interns found work in heritage organizations in 2006-07 through YCW, a hiring rate that met annual program objectives and matched the achievements of preceding years.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004–05 8) Actual Spending 2005–06 9) Planned Spending 2006–07 10) Total Authorities 2006–07 11) Actual Spending 2006–07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 3.6          
Total Contributions 7.9          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA): Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (0.5)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA): Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life            
Total Grants   2.0 2.5 1.6 1.6 0.9
Total Contributions   5.4 6.5 4.7 4.6 1.9
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   3.4 3.0 3.0 3.0 0.0
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $2.3M is explained as follows:

  • These funds were cut from the program as part of the Spending Restraint announcement made in the Fall of 2006.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the Museums Assistance Program and Canadian Museums Association Program (May 18, 2005)

Audit of the Museums Assistance Program (June 23, 2004)


TABLE 13: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs) for the Department of Canadian Heritage

CULTURAL AFFAIRS SECTOR

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Arts Presentation Canada Program
2) Start Date: 2001-02 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The program supports arts presenters in the performing arts, arts festivals and their service organizations to help them strengthen their presentation practices by encouraging diverse programming, organizing audience development, diversification and outreach activities, developing initiatives that bring professional artists into contact with residents of their community, and supporting networking and professional development for presenters. It also supports the emergence of presenters and presenter networks for under-served communities or artistic practices. Its objective is to give Canadians direct access to a diversity of artistic experiences.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, 613 arts organizations received financial support from Arts Presentation Canada (APC) in more than 230 different communities. It is estimated that these arts organizations also coordinate outreach activities in over 450 communities. Moreover, 42% of communities funded are in rural and remote Canada, while 57% of communities funded are in small to large urban centres.

Support under APC is recurring (year after year) since expected program results require continuous efforts over a number of years. With APC support, arts festivals and other presenting organizations are enhancing the variety of programs offered to Canadians. Without program support, arts presenters would likely not be able to sustain the same level, nor the same richness of activities.

The APC program has been in a consolidation mode since 2005, seeking to provide appropriate resources to those presenters with the strongest capacity to deliver on program results and to impact the rest of the presenting milieu. Of the arts organizations receiving on-going support in 2006-07, 19% were provided with increased support for this reason. Simultaneously, close to 16% of all APC clients were provided with fewer resources. Program staff is making sure that all supported organizations understand program’s expected results.

Additionally, the two major national arts service organizations for presenters: CAPACOA (Canadian Arts Presenters/Association canadienne des organismes artistiques) and RIDEAU (Rseau indpendant des diffuseurs d'vnements artistiques unis), have received supplementary funding in 2006-07 for a collaborative initiative to improve access to the best professional development opportunities available. This investment is reflected in the quality programming offered to Canadians.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 26.9          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants     0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   20.7 14.4 22.2 22.1 (7.7)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances

Overall variance of ($0.7M) is explained as follows:

  • $1.3M was transferred to other federal organizations through Supplementary Estimates to support initiatives such as: the Quebec Scene and British Columbia Scene festivals (National Arts Centre), Governor General Performing Arts Awards (National Arts Centre), and the “Commission internationale du thtre francophone” (Canada Council for the Arts).
  • Transfers of ($2.0M) were received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation

Audit of the Arts Presentation Canada Program ( October 20, 2004)

Joint Formative Evaluation of Arts Presentation Canada, Cultural Spaces Canada and the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program ( October 22, 2003)

Evaluation of the Cultural Initiatives Program ( September 19, 2001)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program : Book Publishing Industry Development Program
2) Start Date : 1980-81 3) End Date : 2010-11

4) Description:

The Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP) supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry in order to ensure choice of and access to Canadian-authored books, which reflect Canada's cultural diversity and linguistic duality both at home and abroad. The BPIDP aims to meet that objective by fostering a strong, viable Canadian book industry that publishes and promotes Canadian-authored books.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the BPIDP supported 226 Canadian-owned publishers in more than 75 Canadian towns and cities. It also supported a broad range of collective projects in all regions aimed at connecting readers to Canadian-authored books and building skills and knowledge in the industry.

BPIDP-supported publishers produced 5,365 Canadian-authored titles and books by nearly 1,000 first-time authors. Support for publishers, coupled with almost $7 million in BPIDP funding for domestic and international marketing activities, ensured that the broad dissemination of these Canadian stories continued. Publishers funded by BPIDP in 2006-07 realized $334 million in book sales in Canada and $101 million in export sales for a total of $435 million. This high level of sales, a 7% increase over 2005-06, indicates that Canadian and international readers continue to access Canadian books in strong and growing numbers.

BPIDP continued to invest in building industry knowledge, skills and capacity to ensure that these successes continue. Among the important results in this area in 2006-07, BPIDP funding helped 151 Canadian-owned publishers to achieve bibliographic data quality certification, expanding the industry’s capacity to benefit from technological efficiencies in the book industry supply chain.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 14.9          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total Grants     0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   11.0 10.9 11.0 11.0 (0.1)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Program Activity (PA) : Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants     0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   4.4 5.2 4.6 4.6 0.6
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA): Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life            
Total Grants     0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   6.1 3.3 3.0 3.0 0.3
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $1.2M is explained as follows:

  • Funds were transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Book Publishing Industry Development Program ( June 23, 2004)

Audit of the Book Publishing Industry Program ( May 28, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Magazine Fund
2) Start Date: 1999‑00 3) End Date: 2010‑11

4) Description:

The Canada Magazine Fund provides support to Canadian magazine publishers and not-for-profit organizations representing periodical publishers in order to: foster the creation of Canadian editorial content in Canadian magazines, increase Canadian's access to Canadian magazines, enhance the quality and diversity of Canadian magazines; and to strengthen the infrastructure of the Canadian magazine industry. It achieves these goals by providing formula funding for magazines to support and enhance their editorial content, and to arts and literary magazines, and through project support for business development for small magazine publishers and for projects that develop the periodical industry as a whole.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the Canada Magazine Fund (CMF) contributed $10 million towards the costs of producing Canadian editorial content in Canadian magazines. Canadian content made up almost 95% of the total editorial content in these magazines compared to the previous year, CMF-funded magazines produced 13% more pages of Canadian editorial content.

The CMF also helped strengthen the industry’s infrastructure through 28 collective projects that dealt with professional development, promotion and marketing, newsstand sales building, research, and new technology.

Canadian readers had access to a wider diversity of Canadian magazines in 2006-07 as 71 new Canadian magazines were launched, versus 21 magazines that closed, 36% fewer than in the year before. Of the new titles, 60 were consumer magazines in 12 different subject categories, ranging from arts/culture, to city/regional and special interest.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 14.9          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA): Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   11.0 10.9 11.0 11.0 (0.1)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Program Activity (PA): Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   4.4 5.2 4.6 4.6 0.6
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $0.5M is explained as follows:

  • Funds were transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the Canada Magazine Fund (June 2006)

Post- Implementation Audit of the Canada Magazine Fund ( February 26, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Music Fund
2) Start Date: 2001‑02 3) End Date: 2009‑10

4) Description:

The Canada Music Fund provides Canadian music creators, artists and entrepreneurs with opportunities to produce, promote and make available high-quality Canadian sound recordings. The beneficiaries can record demo tapes and full-length albums, produce music videos, promote new products and artists, and defray touring costs.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the CMF support continued to ensure the production of varied Canadian music and the development of Canadian talent at home and abroad. Funding was provided to the production of over 400 albums by Canadian artists through the New Musical Works and Canadian Musical Diversity components. To ensure the broad dissemination of these and other Canadian works, over 700 projects received marketing, touring or showcasing support.

The Music Entrepreneur Component (formerly known as the Music Entrepreneur Program) supported 19 established Canadian sound recording firms in 2006-07. The funding helps ensure the existence of a diverse range of compelling Canadian musical choices as these companies become increasingly competitive at the national and international level and position themselves for success in a global economy. These firms released 137 albums and sold over 10 million units of physical and downloaded albums, singles and music DVDs. Downloads now represent 5.6% of these firms’ total album sales, up from 0.2% three years ago.

The Canadian sound recording industry has experienced sharp declines in sales this decade, due in large part to the Internet and the rapidly changing retail landscape. Despite this decline, Canadians continue to purchase and access more Canadian music. Since the inception of the CMF , the market share of Canadian artist albums sold in Canada increased from 16.0% in 2001 to 22.3% in 2006. The number of Canadian songwriters has also increased during that time, with 20,811 Canadian songwriters receiving performance royalties from SOCAN in 2005, up from 17,645 in 2001.

Millions of $

7) Actual Spending 2004-05

8) Actual Spending
2005-06

9) Planned Spending 2006-07

10) Total Authorities
2006-07

11) Actual Spending
2006-07

12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11

Business Line (BL):  Cultural Development and Heritage

           
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 22.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity
(PA): Creation of Canadian Content and
Performance Excellence
           
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   15.2 9.4 11.5 11.5 (2.1)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Program Activity (PA): Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   4.5 11.5 9.5 9.4 2.1
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA): Preservation of Canada’s Heritage            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0
Total Program Activity (PCH)   20.4 21.7 20.5 20.5 1.2
Program Activity (PA): Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   2.7 1.8 2.1 2.1 (0.3)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5
13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $0.3M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers of ($0.6M) were received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.
  • $0.3M was transferred to the Canada Council for the Arts through Supplementary Estimates to support the Canadian Musical Diversity component of the Canada Music Fund.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Audit of the Canada Music Fund  (June 23, 2004)

Evaluation of Canada Music Council  (May 18, 2005)

Formative Evaluation of the Canada Music Fund  (February 25, 2004)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program : Canada New Media Fund
2) Start Date : 2000-01 3) End Date : 2006-07

4) Description :

The Canada New Media Fund, administered by Telefilm Canada, supports the development, production, marketing and distribution of high-quality, original, interactive Canadian new media cultural products, in both official languages, and that are intended for the general public

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Through the Canada New Media Fund (CNMF), $14M in funding support was approved for 113 projects, including:

  • $12.5M in support of 86 content creation projects (Products Assistance component); and
  • $1.5M for 27 projects that facilitated the sustainability of the Canadian new media sector (Sectoral Assistance component).

Support was provided through the CNMF to a broad range of products, all of which attract different types and sizes of audiences.

Because of the volatility of current data gathering methodologies in an online universe, it is challenging to collect data consistently and report uniform results.

Results that are available at this moment are for those products/Web sites that have received funding in 2005-06 but which were launched in 2006-07, and have thus produced results.

Canadians have access to more innovative, interactive new media products developed by Canadian companies, which are accessible through various platforms and mobile devices. Some of these products have attracted broad audiences, particularly those associated with television programming. Examples include:

  • thisisdanielcook.com, created by Marblemedia. This is the companion website to a preschool television show This is Daniel Cook, a show that follows its host, seven-year-old Daniel Cook, in his discovery of the world. This site received more than 350,000 visits from February to November 2006.
  • Antartic Mission/Sedna.tv, a website created by Turbulent Mdia, is a window on a 14 months expedition in the Antartic, where sailors, filmmakers and scientists aboard the Sedna IV, a state-of-art research sailing vessel, braved the extreme conditions of the planet’s least-explored continent. This site received more than 150,000 visits over the period from February to November 2006;
  • Shipwreck Central , created by the Ghostship Studio, is the web home of the television series The Sea Hunters, and contains the largest selection of shipwreck footage on the web. This site received more than 105,000 visits from February to November 2006.

However, a majority of the projects reported more modest traffic statistics, which can be expected from sites that often target specific niche audiences, such as the Tshinanu.tv website. This website is a complement to the television series of the same name that provides a window on the social, economic and cultural aspects of contemporary Native life that allows for exchange between all the peoples of Quebec. This site received 13,000 visits over the period of February-November 2006.

Through the Fund’s Sectoral Assistance component, support is provided to developmental and capacity-building activities for the new media sector in Canada which have resulted in the development of initiatives such as workshops, internships, conferences and other networking events that helped build capacity in the new media sector. An example of a funded project is the next MEDIA event, where Canadian and international leading edge content creators, aggregators, and influential solution-providers meet to develop key business relationships.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 9.7          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA): Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   14.0 14.1 14.0 14.0 0.1
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $0.1M is explained as follows:

  • Funds were transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

The most recent summative evaluation of CNMF was approved by the Audit and Evaluation Committee in December 2006. The evaluation study found that evidence is mixed whether the government needs to continue to support the production of new cultural media content, or that more research on this topic is required. Canadians are supportive of the efforts by the government to fund the new media sector to reap the economic benefits of Internet-based products. The evaluation recommends further consultation with industry stakeholders to redesign the CNMF and develop an industrial strategy for Canada’s new media sector. It also recommended an increased role for Telefilm Canada in the administration and delivery of CNFM, in reporting on the compliance of CNMF recipients with contract repayment provisions; performance measurement enhancements and also a study on the usage by Canadians of Canadian and American cultural content on the Internet.

Audit of the Canada New Media Fund (June 23, 2004)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (CAHSP)
2) Start Date: 2001-02 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program is designed to strengthen organizational effectiveness, build operational and financial capacity within the arts and heritage sectors, and ensure that those organizations operate in communities which value their existence, see them as a key asset, and support them. There are six components: Stabilization Projects; Capacity Building; Endowment Incentives; Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations; Networking; and Cultural Capitals of Canada.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Capacity Building

In 2006-07, the Capacity Building component of the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (CAHSP) provided support totaling $4M to 138 projects. A client survey conducted in 2006-07 has demonstrated that support for capacity building has led to improved administrative or financial capacity for 95% of organizations surveyed.

The degree of impact the ongoing projects were having was reported as high. Types of projects supported included: business, strategic and human resources plans, fundraising campaigns, new financial and ticketing systems, employee training, and new marketing strategies. Of note is that once organizations worked on one aspect of their business, they felt that they could move on to improving other areas. For example, organizations with improved governance practices (i.e. strategic planning) felt they now had the capacity to work towards improving their financial autonomy and developing new audiences.

Endowment Incentives

While the number of organizations benefiting from the Endowment Incentives component of the CAHSP almost doubled in fiscal year 2005-06, the amount requested from the program more than doubled. This meant that for the first time, the program could not match dollar for dollar the resources raised by the private sector. In 2006-07, another increase in applications meant that the program matched 64 cents for every dollar raised for eligible arts organizations’ endowment funds. Increasing awareness of this program, complemented by the introduction of matching fund programs in British Columbia and Quebec, led to significant increases in applications from those provinces. Past experience and anecdotal evidence from both donors and recipients have demonstrated that donors respond well to having their donations doubled and sometimes tripled through government matching incentives. To date, the government has invested $58.8M in arts organizations’ endowment funds, to match private sector giving of $74.8M. This means that a total of $133.6M has been invested by the Federal Government and the Private Sector in endowment funds to contribute to the long-term sustainability of arts organizations.

Networking Initiatives

In 2006-07, the Networking component of CAHSP approved financial contributions totalling nearly $400,000 to two organizations. The Creative City Network, a recipient since 2002, continued to equip cultural professionals with materials and resources that strengthen municipal involvement and investment in culture. Through its resource centre, many smaller and more remote communities now have access to a wealth of material, and the Network is expanding its rural outreach, with 20 new member communities in Northern and Southern Alberta. It has also set up a flying squad pilot project to provide on-site training and longer-term mentoring to communities as they further their cultural development planning.

Les Arts et la Ville, another recipient of this component in Quebec, is reaching out to francophone communities in minority situations in the rest of Canada to share expertise and develop exchanges. In 2006-07, this network expanded its membership which now includes Francophone communities or organizations from British Columbia, Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Both organizations funded under the Networking component continue to expand their membership and develop a range of collaborative relationships with various organizations. They are reaching out to universities, elected officials and organizations with parallel or complementary objectives to expand the influence of cultural planning in communities. Since its creation in 2002, Creative City Network has created a Centre of Expertise on Culture and Communities, a resource centre that builds on its strengths in research, knowledge exchange and public awareness, which has generated numerous requests for research on cultural development.

Both Creative City Network and Les Arts et la Ville have developed cooperative partnerships with various organizations by participating in policy discussions and research projects, as well as by making presentations to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities' annual conference, to cultural organizations and other municipal professional organizations. Both are consistently solicited to assist with or become involved in conferences or projects on cultural development. Les Arts et la Ville is working closely with the Association franaise des municipalits de l’Ontario (AFMO), the Fdration culturelle canadienne-franaise (FCCF) et the Association des municipalits bilingues du Manitoba (AMBM) to further collaborations between communities and the cultural sector.

Cultural Capitals of Canada Awards

In 2006-07, total contributions approved under the Cultural Capitals of Canada (CCC) program amounted to $4.8M.

Proposals submitted by communities in 2006-07 continued to demonstrate the importance municipalities attach to arts and culture, as the quality, artistic merit and scope of the activities proposed in applications received by the program increase.

The CCC awards continued to have a leveraging effect on designated communities. Saskatoon , designated CCC in 2006, asked to augment its original proposal to access the maximum $2M award as partners came forward with additional projects and resources. Similarly, St. John's, also a CCC in 2006, indicated that its designation allowed it to leverage additional support.

CCC funding has also helped municipalities diversify their sources of funding for arts and heritage activities. Current applications to the program indicate that 72% of projects proposed include support from provincial governments, up from 33% in 2003; 79% of proposed projects include support from the private sector, up from 40% in 2003; likewise, 86% of projects include earned revenues, up from 23% in 2003.

Several winning municipalities have also reapplied for a future award, indicating that results already achieved through CCC are encouraging further municipal support, involvement and interest in arts and heritage activities.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 9.1          
Total Contributions 10.1          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA): Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   15.4 16.9 15.4 15.4 1.5
Total Contributions   5.1 5.3 4.9 4.9 0.4
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA): Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   1.6 4.9 3.2 3.2 1.7
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Program Activity (PA): Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   0.0 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $3.6M is explained as follows:

  • These funds were transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URLs to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Formative Evaluation of two Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program Components: Cultural Capitals of Canada and Networking Initiatives ( June 22 2005)

Audit of the Canadian Heritage Arts and Sustainability Program ( February 24, 2005)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Arts Training Contribution Program
2) Start Date: 1997-98 3) End Date: 2007-08

4) Description:

The program is designed to assist independent Canadian not-for-profit corporations that specialize in training Canadians seeking a professional career in the arts.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Recipient institutions depend on the National Arts Training Contribution Program (NATCP) funding, without which the quality and availability of their programs would be substantially diminished. On average, NATCP funding accounts for just over 40% of total revenue for the financial files reviewed. NATCP support also helps to leverage funds from other sources and provide additional credibility to the institution.

The NATCP is critical to the financial and human resource stability of arts training institutions. In addition, a variety of improvements have been made, which include more rigorous selection processes, increased length and/or breadth of training, increased outreach, and improved ability to respond to changing demographics.

In terms of outcomes, NATCP institutions (36 were funded in 2006-07) produce approximately 1,200 graduates per year, with another 2,200 participating in shorter-term workshops, and 80% are working professionally, of whom 20% work internationally.

Based on annual program surveys, nearly 50% of graduates of NATCP-funded institutions received an award in their first three years after graduation, and are more likely to receive honours, distinctions and awards than graduates of unfunded institutions. These awards include various arts council grants and prizes, Dora Mavor Moore Awards, the Clifford E. Lee award, and Chalmers Arts Awards.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 16.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   17.4 15.9 17.0 17.0 (1.1)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $1.1M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Evaluation of the National Arts Training Contribution Program and the National Training Program in the Film and Video Sector ( February 20, 2002)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Culture Online Program
2) Start Date: 2001-02 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

Canadian Culture Online Program (CCOP) includes three components: Access and Content, Research and Development and New Media Sector Development. These components replace and consolidate the former Partnerships Fund and the four components of the previous Canadian Culture Online Program: Gateway Fund, Canadian Works of Reference Fund, New Media Research Networks Fund and New Media Sector Development Fund. The objectives of the CCOP are to: provide Canadians access to and participation in interactive digital resources that reflect our diverse heritage, cultures, languages and history and to ensure that the program contributes to a supportive environment for the new media sector in Canada.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Through the Canadian Culture Online Program, $14.7M in funding support was approved in 2006-2007 for 64 projects, including:

  • $9.1M in support of 49 access and content creation projects ( Gateway and Partnerships Funds) that allow Canadians of all ages to access content that reflects our diversity of cultures and heritage;
  • $5.3M in support of 12 research and development projects and initiatives ( New Media Research Networks Fund and New Media R&D Initiative) that seek the development of new technological tools for the creation, management and delivery of cultural content; and
  • $290,000 for 3 projects ( New Media Sector Development Fund) that facilitates the development of the Canadian new media sector.

Support was provided through the Canadian Culture Online Program to a broad range of projects, in both official languages, all of which attract different types of audiences.

Because of the volatility of current data gathering methodologies in an online universe, it is challenging to collect data consistently and report uniform results.

Results that are available at this moment are for those products/Web sites that have received funding in 2005-06 but which were launched in 2006-07 and have thus produced results.

Projects with broad appeal have received as many as 6.8 million visits for The Canadian Encyclopedia Online site or one million visits each for the McCord Museum’s Keys to History and for the Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art’s sites. A majority of the projects reported more modest traffic statistics, which can be expected from sites that target specific niches or communities, such as the Muse de la civilisation’s Des fantmes au Muse site or Deafplanet’s site which received 88,000 and 8,000 visits respectively.

Support provided to new media R&D projects has helped to create an environment that is stimulating and conducive to the creation and distribution of yet more innovative cultural content. The creation of effective thematic research networks and partnerships have brought together 68 Canadian research institutions and new media organizations, which have actively collaborated on the development of numerous innovative tools and applications in support of the creation, management and distribution of digital cultural content.

Funding support provided to developmental and capacity-building activities for the new media sector in Canada resulted in the development of initiatives such as workshops, internships, conferences and other networking events that helped build capacity in the new media sector. An example of a funded project is the Canadian New Media Awards, a yearly event which recognizes and celebrates the accomplishments of individuals and companies in the Canadian new media industry, and serves as a unique platform for peer networking and knowledge sharing. The 2006 event hosted over 500 members from the industry and featured 19 awards.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 5.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.2
Total Contributions   4.2 3.6 5.0 5.0 (1.4)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA) : Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   1.2 8.7 9.6 9.5 (0.8)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of ($2.0M) is explained as follows:

  • ($2.9M) was transferred from Operating to Contributions in Supplementary Estimates to support activities to advance the creation of cultural content on-line and other digitization projects. This reallocation was done within the Canadian Culture Online Strategy.
  • $0.9M was transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation:
Formative Evaluation of Canadian Culture Online

Formative Evaluation of Canadian Culture Online Program (October 20, 2004)

Audit of Canadian Culture Online Program (June 23, 2004)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution in support of the Canadian Television Fund
2) Start Date : 1996-97 3) End Date : 2010-11

4) Description:

Supports the creation and broadcast of high-quality prime-time Canadian programs in both official languages. The types of programs supported by the Fund are dramas, youth and children's programs, documentaries, variety shows and performing arts. The Fund also supports minority Aboriginal and Francophone productions.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

The numbers for 2005-06 are not yet available. These numbers will be made available in the fall of 2007 in their Annual Report.

In 2006-07, the Canadian Television Fund (CTF) invested an amount of $250M in Canadian productions, which generated 2,165 new hours of Canadian television programming. Since its inception in 1996, the CTF has invested more than $2.3B, which generated the production of 23,141 hours of Canadian programs.

As per the Contribution Agreement between the Department and the CTF, the Fund must provide an Annual Report, containing analysis and data pertaining to the performance indicators identified in the Agreement, 183 days following the end of the fiscal year. This means that further CTF data for 2006-07 will be available in October 2007.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 99.6          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   99.6 99.6 120.0 120.0 (20.4)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of ($20.4M) is explained as follows:

  • As part of the renewal and the implementation of the new governance framework for the Canadian Television Fund, an amount of $20.4M was transferred from Telefilm Canada to Canadian Heritage. This amount was accessed through Supplementary Estimates in 2006-07.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Canadian Television Fund Program ( October 19, 2005)

Audit of the Canadian Television Fund ( June 23, 2004)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cultural Spaces Canada
2) Start Date: 2001-02 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The program supports the construction, renovation and improvement of not-for-profit facilities dedicated to arts and heritage. As a complement to the programs offered by Infrastructure Canada, it will help improve the physical conditions that foster creativity and artistic innovation.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results achieved:

Since its inception in 2001-02 the program has supported over 530 projects, in more than 210 different communities across Canada. In 2006-07, the Cultural Spaces Canada (CSC) program contributed to 126 infrastructure improvement projects across the country. These included funding to 51 construction and major renovation projects; 47 projects devoted specifically to the purchase and installation of specialized equipment; and 28 projects assisting organizations with the costs of a feasibility study for the creation or renovation of an arts or heritage facility. For every dollar invested by the program since its inception in 2001-02, close to 6 additional dollars are raised from other public and private sources.

These infrastructure improvement projects in arts and heritage facilities remove physical impediments to greater creativity and artistic innovation. For instance, a $1.3M contribution from CSC was approved in 2006-07 to help the Conseil de la Nation Huronne-Wendat in Wendake, Quebec to construct a museum and amphitheatre for artistic and cultural presentation and heritage preservation.

Similarly, CSC has approved a total of $307,300 to the Cultural Development Association of Red Deer in 2005-06 and 2006-07 for phases of its renovation project to transform a heritage building in downtown Red Deer into a rehearsal and performing arts space for theatre, dance, and music, as well as facilities for visual arts organizations.

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL) : Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 24.4          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity (PA) : Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   0.0 3.0 0.3 0.3 2.7
Total Contributions   12.5 23.9 22.6 19.8 4.1
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.4 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $6.8M is explained as follows:

  • $2.7M could not be spent in 2006-07 due to unforeseen construction and project delays. This amount was reprofiled to 2007-08.
  • The balance of $4.1M was transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation

Audit of the Cultural Spaces Canada Program ( October 20, 2004)

Joint Formative Evaluation of Arts Presentation Canada, Cultural Spaces Canada and the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program ( October 22, 2003)


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Publication Assistance Program
2) Start Date: 1996-97 3) End Date: 2009-10

4) Description:

The Publication Assistance Program (PAP) is delivered in partnership with the Canada Post Corporation and decreases the costs of eligible Canadian periodicals of mailing copies to Canadian readers. Assistance is provided to more than 800 publishers of almost 1200 different Canadian periodicals, supporting the delivery of 210 million eligible copies of periodicals including: general or special interest paid circulation magazines, non-daily community newspapers, unpaid request circulation periodicals, religious, scholarly, Aboriginal, ethnocultural, farm, and official language minority periodicals.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

In 2006-07, the Publications Assistance Program (PAP) provided Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers with postal subsidies of over $61M, representing an average of about 55% of their total mailing costs. The Program funded 1,161 different publications and supported the distribution of over 202 million copies of Canadian periodicals through the mail.

Canadian readers had access to a wider diversity of Canadian magazines in 2006-07 as 71 new Canadian magazines were launched, versus 21 magazines that closed, 36% fewer than in the year before. Of the new titles, 60 were consumer magazines in 12 different subject categories, ranging from arts/culture, to city/regional and special interest. (Source: Masthead, April/March 2007)

Millions of $ 7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending 2005-06 9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities 2006-07 11) Actual  Spending 2006-07 12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL): Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 49.9          
Total Contributions 0.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 364.4          
Program Activity (PA): Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total Grants   45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 0.0
Total Contributions   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Program Activity (PCH)   118.6 123.8 118.0 115.1 8.7
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances: N/A

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the Publications Assistance Program (June 22, 2005)


TABLE 13: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs) for the Department of Canadian Heritage

INTERNATIONAL AND INTEGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS AND SPORT SECTOR

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Athlete Assistance Program
2) Start Date: 1971 3) End Date: 2010-11
4) Description:

The overall objective of the Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) is to enable athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers without undue financial burden, while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances.

The main goal of the AAP is to contribute to improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events. To this end, the AAP identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top sixteen in the world.

The AAP has five specific objectives:
  • To identify and support Canadian athletes performing at or having the greatest potential to achieve top sixteen level at international sporting events;
  • To help Canada’s international-calibre athletes excel at the highest level of competition while enabling them to prepare for a future career or engage in full- or part-time work or post-secondary education activities;
  • To facilitate the attainment of athletes’ long-range goals of excellence in Olympic/Paralympic or world competition;
  • To complement support provided through other government and National Sport Organizations (NSO) programs; and
  • To contribute toward broad government policy objectives.
5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6) Results Achieved:

Although some data may be incomplete, Sport Canada was able to accomplish the following results in the first year’s work towards the revised expected results.

Sport Canada supported the continued meaningful offset of the incremental costs of training and competition for Canada’s carded athletes. As in the previous year, in 2006-07 Sport Canada provided over $25M in AAP grants and funded over 1,700 carded athletes.  

Sport Canada continued to provide Canada’s carded athletes opportunities to prepare for future career activities, through access to education and training.  As in the previous year, in 2006-07 Sport Canada provided tuition support for over 520 carded athletes.

Sport Canada has contributed to the opportunity for an increasing number of athletes to advance through the carding system. In 2006-07, 326 (19%) athletes progressed to the next stage of the carding system, up from 108 (8%) in 2005-06.

Sport Canada has contributed to the opportunity for improved performances by Canadian athletes at the highest levels of competition. In summer sports, Canadians won 10 medals out of the 152 events at World Championships held in 2006. As a result, Canada ranked 16th in total medals won among the countries that participated in these events. In summer Paralympic sports, Canadian athletes won 57 medals at the 2006 World Championships for athletes with a Disability. As a result, Canada was ranked 8th in summer Paralympic sports.  In Winter Sports, Canadian athletes won 27 medals at the 2007 World Championships in the various winter Olympic sports. As a result, Canada ranked 2nd in the winter Olympic sport medal standings in 2007. Canada placed 4th in the only World Championship for Winter Paralympic sport, wheelchair curling.
Millions of $   7) Actual Spending
2004-05
8) Actual Spending
2005-06
9) Planned Spending
2006-07
10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual Spending
2006-07
12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL):  Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 19.8          
Total Contributions 0.0          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity
(PA):  Creation of Canadian Content and Performance
Excellence
           
Total Grants   24.8 27.0 25.3 25.3 1.7
Total Contributions   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5
13) Comments on Variances:
Overall variance of $1.7M is as follows:
  • Funds were transferred to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.
14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URLs to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Athletes Assistance Program
  (June 25, 2003)

Compliance Audit of the Athlete Assistance Program
(November 28, 2001)

 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants/Contributions to TV5
2) Start Date: 1990-91 3) End Date: 2007-08
4) Description:

Contribute to the international showcasing of French-language Canadian television programs by participating in TV5 Monde, and offer Canadians a glimpse of the international Francophonie by participating in TV5 Qubec-Canada.  
5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6) Results Achieved:

The two operators, TV5 Monde and TV5 Qubec Canada, have exceeded the program’s expectations.

TV5 Monde

In 2006-07, the percentage of Canadian programs broadcast on TV5 Monde increased considerably. In return for a contribution of approximately 5% to TV5 Monde, Canada has successfully ensured the presence of 8.5% of its programs on TV5 Monde and enhanced the profile of its programming around the world. In addition, the diversity of productions presented on the various TV5 Monde networks has improved. 

This success is largely related to the higher volume of programs made available to TV5 Monde and to the $2M budget allocated by the Government of Canada in 2006–07, compared to $1.3M in 2005-06, for the purchase of Canadian programs for broadcast on TV5 Monde.  

TV5 Qubec Canada

From 2006 to 2007, TV5 Qubec Canada increased its market share among the 25-54 year-old age group (target audience) by 20.8% during day time and by 3.2% during prime time.

From 2006 to 2007, the number of subscribers rose again by 2.59% in Quebec and by 0.62% outside of Quebec. From 2004 to 2005, the number of subscribers increased by 3.9% in Quebec and by 0.2% outside of Quebec.

Generally, 85% of the TV5 Qubec Canada programming comes from all international partners, providing Canadians with a cross-section of the international Francophonie. In 2006-07, European programming consisted mainly of magazines, documentaries and variety. The network must also broadcast a minimum of 15% Canadian content. Accordingly, in 2006-07, TV5 Qubec Canada broadcasted mainly documentaries and magazines from Quebec producers and Francophone producers outside of Quebec, thus enhancing the profile of Canadian French-language televisual productions in Canada.     

The number of visitors to the Website rose by 19% compared to 2005-06.
Millions of $   7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending
2005-06
9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual Spending
2006-07
12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL):  Cultural Development and Heritage            
Total Grants 0.9          
Total Contributions 5.3          
Total Business Line (PCH) 367.4          
Program Activity
(PA): Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
           
Total Grants   4.2 4.8 4.1 4.1 0.7
Total Contributions   2.6 2.5 3.0 3.0 (0.5)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5
13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $0.2M is as follows:
  • Funds were reallocated to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.
14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URLs  to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Evaluation of Federal Participation in TV5  (February 20, 2002)
 
TV5- Single Recipient Audit  (February 26, 2003)

 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Hosting Program
2) Start Date: 1967 3) End Date: 2010-11
4) Description:

The Hosting Program offers Canada the potential to obtain direct and significant benefits in sport, economic, social and cultural areas for a broad range of government priorities.

Specific targets and objectives of Sport Canada that apply to the Hosting Program are:
  • High Performance Athletes and Coaches: to enhance the ability of Canadian athletes to excel at the highest international levels through fair and ethical means;
  • Sport System Development: to enhance the programming, co-ordination and integration of development activities aimed at advancing the Canadian sport system, through working with key partners;
  • Strategic Positioning of Sport: to advance the broader federal government objectives through sport, to position sport in the federal government agenda and to promote the contribution of sport to Canadian society; and
  • Access and Equity: to increase access and equity in sport for targeted under-represented groups.
5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

6) Results Achieved:

Although some data may be incomplete, Sport Canada was able to accomplish the following results in the first year’s work towards the revised expected results.

Sport Canada worked to increase:

  • Sport excellence and sport development impacts from realized planned events. In 2006-07, due to the Canada Games occurring in Whitehorse, 17 new and improved venues were made available for athletes’ development and for hosting competitions. Based on the first 21 event reports received (of 64), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 2,383 Canadian athletes to participate in international sporting events.
  • Opportunities for Aboriginal peoples and athletes with a disability to participate in planned events. Based on the first 21 event reports received (of 64), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 106 Canadian athletes with a disability to participate in international sport events.
  • Economic, social, cultural and community impacts supporting Government of Canada priorities from planned events.  The first three (of 21) event reports received in 2006-07 show the economic impact of those hosted events to total $8,244,809.
Millions of $   7) Actual Spending
2004-05
8) Actual Spending
2005-06
9) Planned Spending
2006-07
10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual Spending
2006-07
12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL):  Canadian
Identity
           
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 25.3          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity
(PA):  Creation of Canadian Content and Performance
Excellence
           
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   17.7 8.1 20.8 20.3 (12.2)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Program Activity (PA):  Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   33.9 145.5 130.0 106.2 39.3
Total Program Activity (PA)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA):  Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Program Activity (PA)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of  $27.1M is mainly explained by the following:

  • ($14.0M) in new funding was received through Supplementary Estimates ($2.0M for the 2007 FIFA Under-20 Men's Soccer World Cup, $0.5M for the 2008 North American Indigenous Games, $9.5M for travel costs relating to the 2007 Canada Games and $2.0M for the 2014 Commonwealth Games).  These amounts were not included in 2006-07 Planned Spending.
  • $39.8M was reprofiled to 2007-08.
14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation

Audit of the Contribution Agreements with the XI FINA World Championships - Montreal 2005 Organizing Committee  (March 15, 2006)

Audit of the Sport Hosting Program  (June 15, 2005)

Summative Evaluation of the Sport Hosting Program
  (February 5, 2004)  

 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Sport Support Program
2) Start Date: 1961 3) End Date: 2010-11

4) Description:

The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Canadian Sport Policy.

Specific objectives of the Program are to:

  • Increase the pool of Canadian athletic talent and systematically achieve world class results at the highest international competitions, through fair and ethical means;
  • Increase the proportion of Canadians from all segments of society, involved in quality sport activities at all levels and in all forms of participation;
  • Have in place the essential components of an ethically-based, participant/athlete centred development system that is continually modernized and strengthened as required; and
  • Have in place the components of the Canadian sport system that is more connected and harmonized as a result of the committed collaboration and communication amongst the stakeholders.
  
5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
  

6) Results Achieved:

Although some data may be incomplete, Sport Canada was able to accomplish the following results in the first year’s work towards the revised expected results.

Sport Canada continued to provide sport programs and services to the Canadian sport system by supporting National Sport Organizations (NSOs) and Multisport Service Organizations (MSOs). In 2006-07, Sport Canada supported 56 NSOs, 15 MSOs, 7 Canadian Sport Centres and 9 additional non-government organizations. 

A revised set of national accountability standards were introduced in 2006-07; NSOs receiving Sport Canada funding will be monitored with respect to their compliance with the standards.  The ‘first priority’ standards are expected to have been fully met by the end of the 2007-08 fiscal year and address the following subjects: multi-year planning; official languages services; bilingual website; harassment and abuse; bilingual communication with national teams; national teams – harassment and abuse awareness; national teams – athlete/coach leadership. In 2006-07, the first year of monitoring, 93% of NSOs have at least partially met all seven ‘first priority’ standards; 51% of NSOs have fully met at least five of those seven standards.

Sport Canada has worked to increase the number of NSOs with a sport specific Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) Model in place. In 2006-07, 10 NSOs completed their sport specific LTAD model. This is up from 2005-06 when only one NSO had completed their LTAD model. 

Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of NSOs that have implemented the revised National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).  In 2006-07, 22 NSOs implemented a new NCCP level. There are now 34 NSOs that have implemented a new NCCP level.

Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of coaches participating in the NCCP. In 2006-07, 37,930 coaches participated in a NCCP course, bringing the two year total to almost 80,000.

Sport Canada worked with partners towards support of a full complement of qualified coaches for targeted sports. In 2006-07, there were 408 NCCP level III, 15 NCCP level IV and 2 NCCP level V certified coaches working in targeted sports with National Team athletes.

Sport Canada worked to advance Canadian interests, values and ethics in sport at home and abroad. In 2006-07, 3,481 doping tests were conducted by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES). 2,728 of those tests were conducted by CCES as part of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program.  In 2006-07, 21 Canadian athletes were sanctioned for an anti-doping violation.

Sport Canada worked to expand and strengthen program and policy collaboration within the federal government and with provincial/territorial governments and the sport community. In 2006-07, Sport Canada began implementation of the Policy on Sport for Persons with a Disability and Policy on Aboriginal Peoples’ Participation in Sport. Sport Canada also invested in 12 federal/provincial/territorial Bilateral Agreements to increase sport participation levels as expressed in the Canadian Sport Policy and 11 federal/provincial/territorial Bilateral Agreements to encourage and support greater participation of aboriginal people in sport.

Sport Canada worked to increase opportunities for sport participation among all Canadians, including targeted under-represented groups. Sport Canada funded Sport Participation Development Initiatives for 35 NSOs and 5 MSOs. Sport Canada funded Sport Participation Projects for 3 MSOs and 9 other Non-Government Organizations. About 500,000 participants benefited from the opportunities created by these Initiatives and Projects, an increase over 373,000 in 2005-06.  In addition, Sport Canada supported 12 federal/provincial/territorial Bilateral Agreements to increase sport participation levels as expressed in the Canadian Sport Policy and 11 federal/provincial/territorial Bilateral Agreements to encourage and support greater participation of aboriginal people in sport.  While only some provincial/territorial bilateral results have been received to date, future reports on federal/provincial/territorial bilaterals will be regularized through the reporting procedures adopted by all federal/provincial/territorial jurisdictions in November 2006.

Sport Canada worked to improve performances by Canadian athletes at the highest levels of competition. In summer sports, Canadians won 10 medals at the 2006 World Championships, out of the 152 events held. As a result, Canada ranked 16th in total medals won among the countries that participated in these events. In summer Paralympic sports, Canadian athletes won 57 medals at the 2006 World Championships for athletes with a Disability. As a result, Canada was ranked 8th in summer Paralympic sports.  In Winter Sports, Canadian athletes won 27 medals at the 2007 World Championships in the various winter Olympic sports. As a result, Canada ranked 2nd in the winter Olympic sport medal standings in 2007. Canada placed 4th in the only World Championship for Winter Paralympic sport, wheelchair curling.  
                                                                                 

Millions of $   7) Actual Spending 2004-05 8) Actual Spending
2005-06
9) Planned Spending 2006-07 10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual Spending
2006-07
12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL):  Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 0.0          
Total Contributions 83.3          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.8          
Program Activity
(PA):  Creation of Canadian Content and Performance
Excellence
           
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   91.7 83.3 92.8 92.6 (9.3)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   300.8 279.8 322.4 320.8 (41.0)
Program Activity (PA):  Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   1.3 0.8 1.4 1.4 (0.6)
Total Program Activity (PCH)   108.7 227.1 210.8 186.9 40.2
Program Activity (PA):  Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total Grants   0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions   0.0 13.8 0.0 0.0 13.8
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of  $3.9M is mainly explained by the following:

  • $3.2M was reallocated to other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.
  • $0.5M was transferred through Supplementary estimates to  the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) to support sport participation.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Formative Evaluation of Sport Support - Participation Elements  (February 24, 2006)

Audit of the National Sport Organization Support Program
  (February 26, 2003)

Evaluation of the NSO Support Program: National Sport Federation (NSF), Sport Organizations for Athletes with a Disability (SOAD), and Domestic Sport Organization (DSO) Components
 (February 20, 2002)

Evaluation of the National Sport Organizations Support Program: Multi-Sport/-Service Organization Component  (February 20, 2002)


TABLE 13: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs) for the Department of Canadian Heritage

PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNICATIONS SECTOR

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program
2) Start Date: 2003-04 3) End Date: 2007-08
4) Description:

The Program is a theme-based dynamic approach to celebrating and commemorating significant people, places, symbols, anniversaries and events and is delivered in collaboration with other federal departments, agencies, regions, partners and stakeholders. It provides funding to non-profit organizations and Celebrate Canada committees to commemorate important aspects of Canadian history and carry out initiatives under a five-year plan.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

6) Results Achieved:

Canadians were provided access to various opportunities to celebrate and commemorate Canada, its heritage, its citizens and their stories, and to take part in key events. In 2006-07, the CelebrateCanada! Program provided funding to more than 1700 groups and communities for activities to mark the Celebrate Canada Week (National Aboriginal Day, June 21; St-Jean Baptiste Day, June 24; Canadian Multiculturalism Day, June 27; and Canada Day, July 1). Also, for the first time since the creation of the Celebrate Canada! Program, more than 20,000 participants registered in the Canada Day Poster Challenge.

Successful partnerships between federal departments and stakeholders allowed for national commemorations to be organized and delivered such as the unveiling of the Valiants Memorial in the National Capital Region this past fall. The Memorial consists of nine bronze busts and statues representing men and women who have showed remarkable heroism and commitment during the five major periods of conflict in Canadian history. 

Participation in activities under the Celebrate Canada! Program and participation in other celebrations and commemorations of national significance contribute to an increased knowledge and understanding of Canadians about Canada and its key events, and about their shared history, values and interests.

Every year, the Canada Day Noon Show on Parliament Hill brings together tens of thousands of people from every part of the country to celebrate Canada Day in the nation’s capital. In 2006-07, the Show was broadcast live across the country on CBC/Radio-Canada television, NewsWorld and le Rseau de l'information (RDI) as well as on Radio Canada International. Viewers from around the world have been able to tune in to the noon show by accessing the Webcast available on Canadian Heritage’s Web site, as well as on the sites of the National Capital Commission and CBC/Radio-Canada.  The Noon Show was broadcast the week following Canada Day on TV5.  Events like these contribute to increased knowledge and appreciation that Canadians have of their shared history and cultural diversity.

In addition to this, the Program provides promotional materials on national symbols, institutions and events. Examples of these include hand flags, 3x6 flags, pins, posters, or publications such as the Symbols of Canada booklet.  Promotional materials are made available for national, regional and local events.    
The availability and efficient use of promotional material has created opportunities for Canadians to show their pride in Canada, and contribute to an increased sense of shared citizenship and sense of belonging.

Millions of $   7) Actual Spending
2004-05
8) Actual Spending
2005-06
9) Planned Spending
2006-07
10) Total Authorities
2006-07
11) Actual Spending
2006-07
12) Variance(s) between 9 and 11
Business Line (BL):  Canadian Identity            
Total Grants 1.6          
Total Contributions 5.8          
Total Business Line (PCH) 628.6          
Program Activity
(PA):  Participation in Community and Civic Life
           
Total Grants   0.9 5.5 2.1 2.1 3.4
Total Contributions   11.9 12.5 11.6 11.6 0.9
Total Program Activity (PCH)   107.9 168.8 151.7 149.7 19.1
Total TPP (PCH) 997.9 1,015.7 1,188.8 1,180.2 1,150.3 38.5

13) Comments on Variances:

Overall variance of $4.3M is mainly explained by the following:

  • Of the $11M initially planned for the 400th Anniversary of the City of Quebec in 2006-07, only $6.1M was actually accessed through Supplementary Estimates.  The balance of $4.9M was reprofiled to 2007-08.
  • $0.4M was transferred to Operating in Supplementary Estimates to manage a temporary shortfall within the Celebration, Commemoration and Learning program.
  • Transfers of ($0.9M) were received from other departmental programs in order to adjust for emerging priorities.

14) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation
 
Audit of the Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program  (January 25, 2006)

Formative Evaluation of Celebrate Canada!  (October 20, 2004)