Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - Canadian Heritage


Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.

Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Introduction

This section presents results achieved in 2006-07 in relation to the Department’s strategic outcomes and key commitments. All commitments made in the Canadian Heritage 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities are reported in the summary table at the end of this section.  The initiatives presented in the following pages were selected using the following criteria:  i) size - a program or service that consumes a large portion of finances or attention; ii) profile - the population may be interested in a particular program or service; iii) internal importance and materiality of results; iv) recency - a new program or service has been introduced; or v) termination - a program or service has been discontinued.

To demonstrate in more concrete terms how the Department serves Canadians, this section contains examples of Canadian Heritage activities at the community level across the country, and describes the results achieved.

Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome 1 – Canadians Express and Share their Diverse Cultural Experiences with Each Other and the World

Program Activity Architecture

 

Strategic Outcome 2 - Canadians Live in an Inclusive Society Built on Inter-cultural Understanding and Citizen Participation

Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome 1

Strategic Outcome 1:  Canadians Express and Share Their Diverse Cultural Experiences with Each Other and the World

Canadian Heritage helps to ensure that Canadians can express their creativity, showcase their talents and share their stories and experiences through the arts, heritage institutions, cultural industries and sport activities.  To achieve this outcome, the Department carries out policies and programs that support the environment needed to strengthen and share - both at home and abroad - Canada’s values and its diverse voices.

The Department’s efforts toward achieving this strategic outcome are delivered through the first four program activities of the Canadian Heritage Program Activity Architecture.  The table below provides the total planned financial and human resources for the Department’s first strategic outcome, which is the sum of resources allocated to four program activities.


Financial and Human Resources for Strategic Outcome 1 - 2006-07

Program Activities

Actual Spending
($ millions)

Actual
Full-Time
Equivalents

1. Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence

353.3

337

2. Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation

246.2

577

3. Preservation of Canada’s Heritage

45.6

233

4. Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life

163.1

444

Total

808.2

1 591


Program Activity 1

Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence

Did you know that the 2007 Canada
Winter Games Cultural Festival in
Whitehorse showcased 560 Pan-
Northern and Canadian artists in the
performing and visual arts?
Attendance at the seven-day festival
reached 22,777, more than two-thirds
the population of the Yukon.

Expression of culture starts with the creation of works and performance.  Although excellence is what professional artists and high performance athletes strive for, its achievement requires a sufficiently supportive structure both domestically and internationally, at all levels of cultural and sport development.  Canadian Heritage focuses on enabling creators to produce and athletes to perform by supporting the structure and cultural industries needed for high quality works and performances.

The Department expects two results by pursuing this first program activity: Canadian content reflective of Canada’s diverse society is created and produced for domestic and international markets; and Canadians excel domestically and internationally in culture and sport.

CRTC Report on the Impact of Technologies on Canadian Broadcasting

Technology is rapidly changing the broadcasting landscape leading to the emergence of multi-disciplinary media companies containing, among others, converged telecommunication, broadcasting, film production and print business lines. To fulfill its responsibilities for policy making, the Government needs to better understand the future of the broadcasting and media industry and audiences in an era of rapid technological change.  As an important first step towards modernizing Canadian broadcasting policy, the Government directed the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to report on the impacts of technological change on Canadian broadcasting as a whole. 

Planned Results (as outlined in the Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The CRTC’s final report will provide a factual synthesis of research and comments from the public and broadcasting stakeholders, and it will serve as an environmental scan to inform broadcasting policy decisions, including policy as it relates to the CBC/Radio-Canada, regarding the future of the broadcasting system.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  In response to the Government's request through section 15 of the Broadcasting Act, the CRTC released a report, The Future Environment Facing the Canadian Broadcasting System, on December 14, 2006.  The report will inform Canadian Heritage's broadcasting policy decisions, including the role of the public broadcaster, to ensure the ongoing health, contributions and relevance of the Canadian broadcasting system.

The report provided a rich, factual synthesis of research and comments from the public and industry stakeholders.  Issues including the evolution of audio-visual technologies, their usage by Canadians, and the impact of new platforms and technologies on the Canadian broadcasting system were addressed. The report suggests that more information is required to follow the impact of new media, and that fundamental reform is needed in the next three to seven years.

Canadian Television Fund New Governance Structure

The objective of the Canadian Television Fund (CTF) is to assist in the creation and broadcast of high-quality, culturally significant Canadian television programs in both official languages during peak viewing hours.  The CTF’s annual revenues come from three sources: cable and satellite distributors, the federal government and recoupments on investments in television projects by Telefilm Canada.
In response to recommendations, in several reports including that of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage on the Canadian broadcasting system and the Auditor General, the Department has worked with stakeholders to modify the governance framework of the CTF.

Planned Results (as outlined in the Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The results of the modified governance structure of the Canadian Television Fund, which will make one board responsible for its activities, will enhance accountability, simplify administration, and improve reporting.  It will also result in cost savings that will be invested in program production.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The new governance structure for the CTF with one board (CTF Corporation) and one administrator (Telefilm Canada) was implemented on April 1, 2006.  This generated administrative savings of more than $2.8 million. 

In 2006-07, the CTF invested an amount of $250 million in Canadian productions, which generated 2,165 new hours of Canadian television programming. Since its inception in 1996, the CTF has invested more than $2.3 billion, which has generated the production of 23,141 hours of Canadian programs.

High Performance Sport Programming and Technically Sound Sport Development

The Department of Canada Heritage provides strategic support to enhance high performance programming, such as targeted funding to athletes and coaches, national sport organizations and the national network of Canadian Sport Centres, to support Performance Enhancement Teams.

The Department is committed to high performance sport in Canada – results that are essential in defining Canada as a leading sport nation. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key goal of these efforts to support high performance and sport development is to have systematic achievements of podium performances by Canadian athletes at future Olympic and Paralympic Games and World Championships. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  During the 2006 World Championships in summer Olympic sports, Canadians won 10 medals out of 152 events in which we participated.  As a result, Canada ranked 16th in total medals won among the countries that participated in these events.  Canadian athletes won 57 medals out of 501 events in which we participated at the 2006 World Championships for athletes with a Disability.  Canadian athletes won 27 medals out of 86 events in which we participated at the 2007 World Championships in the various winter Olympic sports and as a result, Canada ranked second in the medal standings in 2007. 


Canada's Olympic Ranking Index

The Annual Olympic Ranking Index is based on medal points, from summer and winter Olympic events at World Championships and Olympic Games, over a four-year cycle. The data demonstrates that Canada is continuing to improve its international Olympic ranking in winter sports, while summer sports are maintaining a lower ranking among the top twenty nations.


Sport Canada has been working closely with National Sport Organizations to complete Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) models and with the Coaching Association of Canada to advance the implementation of the revised National Coaching Certification Program.  In addition, Podium Canada was created to replace the interim Canadian Sport Review Panel, establishing a permanent mechanism to provide technical sport expertise and funding recommendations to the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee and Sport Canada, as the three national funding parties.

The UNESCO Convention on Antidoping came into full force in February 2007. Sport Canada undertook a review of the Convention to determine our compliance to each element and to identify priority areas for future pursuit.  In addition, Sport Canada participated in preliminary meetings coordinated by the 2010 Federal Secretariat to sensitize the federal organizations about anti-doping requirements for the Games as an opportunity to educate them about UNESCO Convention commitments and to begin identifying possible partnerships and cooperation.

Benefits of Hosting

In order for Canada to have a coordinated approach to bidding on sport events and to fully benefit from hosting such events, the Department will implement the Strategic Framework for Hosting International Sport Events in Canada and revise the funding framework for the Canada Games.  A strategic approach to bidding and hosting events in Canada will provide opportunities to build capacity in the sport system, enhance the excellence of athletes and promote sport participation. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

A planned and coordinated approach to bidding and hosting sport events will result in enhanced excellence and sport development of Canadian athletes and the Canadian sport system, and will ensure that federally funded international events and the Canada Games reflect federal priorities.  By contributing to the revision of the framework for the Canada Games, the Department will maximize the benefits from this important domestic event.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  Both the organizational design and implementation plan for the coordinated approach to bidding and hosting have been developed.     

The objective to revise the funding framework for the Canada Games was aimed at defining a new hosting rotation and a revised funding framework to stage the Games.  The Department worked with the provinces and territories towards a consensus on both areas. The new hosting rotation (which includes all provinces and territories and covers the period up to 2036), was endorsed by federal/provincial/territorial sport ministers in February 2007.  

A consensus was not reached on a revised funding framework to stage the Games.  While the costs identified to stage the Games were validated, a consensus among federal, provincial and territorial ministers on the proposed cost sharing formula was not achieved. In the absence of consensus, the funding framework contained in the 1997 Clear Lake Resolution remains in effect. 

The Federal Policy for Hosting International Sport Events was revised and approval for the new policy was sought.  Full implementation of the new Policy and its associated International Sport Event Coordination Group is pending the identification of a source of funds.  Once fully operational, the Canadian sport system will benefit from a planned and coordinated approach to bidding and hosting events.

Program Activity 2

Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation

Did you know that the tats gnraux
des arts et de la culture
, attended by
about 500 participants, was held on New
Brunswick’s Acadian Peninsula? This
“cultural roundtable” facilitated
networking and a blending of ideas
among all artistic and cultural
communities in New Brunswick,
Atlantic Canada, Canada at large and the
international Francophonie.

Cultural life rests on the continued existence of an intricate network of institutions, not-for-profit organizations, corporations, volunteers, professionals and audiences.  This network is both resilient – it relies on considerable dedication, experience and talent – and fragile – some crucial elements of the chain are vulnerable to investment patterns, market failures, foreign competition, technological changes, labour strains and international trade rules and agreements.  As an integral part of the network, Canadian Heritage fosters the sustainability of the many organizations, cultural industries, entrepreneurs, and artistic and athletic performance events comprising this rich ecosystem.  It does so by assisting them to increase their ability to attract investment, achieve adequate copyright protection, present to Canadian audience, pursue international opportunities and build organizational partnerships.

The result of this program activity is vibrant cultural and sport sectors in which Canadian cultural expression and participation can thrive and remain relevant at home and abroad.

Telecommunications Policy Review Panel Response

The Government of Canada appointed a Telecommunications Policy Review Panel in April 2005 to examine the telecommunications policy and regulatory framework in Canada.  The panel examined issues regarding regulation, access and adoption of information and communication technologies. 

Taken together, the Panel’s recommendations should create a more market-oriented, deregulated approach to telecommunications. The Government of Canada has signalled its intent to move in this direction by tabling in Parliament a policy directive to the CRTC. Where regulation would still be necessary (where the market cannot correct problems), regulation would be minimal and efficient.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The Department will ensure that proposed changes to policy or legislation are measured and that the impacts of such changes on the broadcasting system are consistent with the government’s policies and objectives. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The Department is working with Industry Canada to ensure an effective and coordinated approach to reforms in the broader communications sector: one that puts the public interest first.  This includes taking into account any implications for the broadcasting sector in an increasingly converged environment. 

The changes brought forward to date are consistent with the Government's broadcasting policies and objectives.  Future initiatives and changes in this respect will continue to be monitored.

Canadian Feature Film Policy

In 2000, Canadian Heritage released a policy to support Canadian feature film entitled From Script to Screen.  Although the majority of objectives and targets set in the policy were met, the success of Canadian feature films has been mixed – French-language films have achieved audience success while English-language films have not achieved the same results. French and English feature film markets face different challenges and realities.  The Department is working to address these issues through consultations and is developing initiatives to recognize these differences.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Develop initiatives to recognize differences and build subsequent changes to existing government support for the coming years. 

Results Achieved

Planned results in 2006-07 were partially achieved.  Possible long-term solutions to challenges faced by the film industry are being examined.  The Government response, Enhancing the Canadian Feature Film Policy (CFFP), to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s film report outlined the Government’s commitments to help the industry reach audiences with quality Canadian films. A plan was developed to recognize differences between the English- and French-language markets and adapt the policy, and adjustments to program guidelines have been made.  Work is continuing to review the government’s support to this industry.

The Department has engaged the industry through Telefilm’s Canada Feature Film Fund (CFFF) working groups for the two language markets.  Following the work of these groups, a series of technical amendments were implemented by Telefilm to better adapt the CFFF to each of the markets.  The groups were asked to provide proposals for separate box office targets for the two markets, thereby updating a key objective of the Canadian Feature Film Policy.  Canadian Heritage is working on improving the measurement of film audiences through various distribution platforms – not just movie theatres.

Audio-visual Institutional Renewal: Telefilm Canada and National Film Board

Today, audio-visual production takes place in an environment of rapid technological advancement, globalization, convergence and socio-demographic diversity.  Recent studies, such as those from the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, have recommended that the mandate of Telefilm Canada, the National Film Board (NFB) and other federal cultural agencies be better aligned toward common objectives, while clearly delineating their roles and responsibilities.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

This initiative will result in legislation that establishes a modern governance and accountability structure, as well as flexibilities to respond to the realities of the Canadian audiovisual industry in the 21st century. 

Results Achieved

Planned results in 2006-07 were modified.  This activity has been postponed until the next reporting period because of workplan and resource considerations.

Centralization of Canadian Content Certification

A number of reports, including the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s 2003 Report on Broadcasting, called for the centralization of Canadian content certification processes.  Four federal audio-visual support partners currently assess the Canadian status of productions for their respective programs and responsibilities — the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO), the Canadian Television Fund (CTF), Telefilm Canada, and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

A centralization initiative is being led by the System Council, an inter-departmental group of senior representatives from the Department of Canadian Heritage, the CRTC, the CTF, Telefilm Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Centralizing the certification of Canadian content will provide Canadian producers with a simplified, comprehensive, single-window access. This will bring coherence to certification in view of meeting the objectives of government policies and will improve data gathering on the industry.  The optimization of costs and the improvement of data collection over time will be part of the measures used to assess the performance of this initiative.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were modified.  The System Council members undertook a detailed analysis on how to centralize the certification of Canadian content. The analysis revealed that centralizing all certification in one organization would add a step for producers, instead of simplifying the process. Therefore, System Council members are considering other ways to meet the objectives of centralization, including streamlining and enhanced accountability.  These will include harmonizing practices and sharing information more freely.

Canadian Heritage also began work to put the application processes of the CAVCO online. This initiative will allow producers to more easily apply for production tax credits and help CAVCO improve its efficiency, and will be used as a pilot to put other Canadian Heritage/Government of Canada programs on line.

Virtual Museums of Canada’s Further Enhancement

The Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN), in consultation with its 1,200 member museums and the education community, is in the process of developing a new online museum learning space. 

This initiative is focused on enabling museums to expand their educational outreach by interacting online with teachers and students; enabling teachers to develop and share lesson plans and learning scenarios, and museum educators to participate in interpretative (Web conferencing) sessions; and enabling students and lifelong learners to access learning resources, share information with one another, and interact with museum educators.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

With the new online museum learning space, Canadians will have effective access to digital learning resources that reflect Canada’s heritage.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  Activities were based on research results including a scan of available information on teachers' use of and need for online cultural material, research on learning objects and museum learning content, an environmental scan of features of existing virtual learning environments and usability testing of initial wire frames.

In the initial prototype phases, teachers and students were asked to visit the site on their own for a few minutes, then carry out specific tasks, comment on any issues encountered, and provide information on how they use online resources in their classes.  This helped to uncover any usability issues and to obtain opinions on the prototype.  English and French speaking teachers were recruited to use the virtual learning environment prototype in their classroom and provide feedback on any issues encountered. 

As of March 31, 2007, a total of 23 learning object collections were either created or in process.  Restricted access to the site was provided and museum content was available in both French and English.  Improvements based on the feedback between initial prototype phases have been implemented and additional features for Phase II have been identified based on feedback and previous research.  Comments from trial users have been positive.  During all phases of testing with both teacher and student, users recognized the innovative aspects of the prototype and demonstrated interest in using the future product/service and museum content.

2010 Games: Strategic Opportunities Initiative

The Government of Canada is a key partner in planning the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games to be held in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C.  The 2010 Federal Secretariat, situated within the Department of Canadian Heritage, works closely with the Vancouver Organizing Committee and other Games partners, to ensure that the 2010 Winter Games are a success in the eyes of Canadians, and a credit to Canada abroad.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The goals of the 2010 Federal Secretariat are that: Canadian excellence and values will be promoted nationally and internationally; sport, economic, social and cultural legacies will be established for the benefit of all Canadians, in alignment with federal policy objectives; and that early planning and seamless, cost-effective delivery of mandated federal responsibilities, including essential federal services, will contribute to high quality Games.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The Department provided leadership in delivering the Government of Canada’s hosting commitments, including the necessary preparations for the delivery of essential services, and is continuing to monitor progress and perform due diligence on the venue construction program as part of its operations.  A horizontal and integrated Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) and a Risk-Based Audit Framework (RBAF) have been created. A 2010 Horizontal Communications Strategy was also completed. 

The Government Operations Steering Team (GOST) was created by government partners and the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) to facilitate planning and operations between them.

Active engagement in 2010 Partner bi-annual community update events in all Four Host First Nations communities and on-going support and monitoring was provided to the Four Host First Nations Society.

International Cultural Trade

A key element of Canadian Heritage’s efforts to ensure the sustainability of cultural industries involves the maintenance of realistic and effective domestic cultural policies in trade and investment rules, an active role in the conduct of Canadian trade policy, and the fostering of cultural trade.  The Department supports these efforts by providing international business development and export preparedness services, and assistance to small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) through the delivery of the Trade Routes program.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Key goals include the effective representation of Canadian cultural policy in trade negotiations and the implementation of the technical assistance pilot project aimed at enhancing global cultural trade exchanges for developing countries.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were modified. Through participation in trade negotiations undertaken by the Government of Canada, the Department expressed its trade and culture position and sought to keep the flexibility needed to pursue domestic cultural policy objectives. Although no trade agreement was concluded, Canadian Heritage along with its Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) counterparts advanced Canada's cultural interest in the context of multilateral negotiations and ongoing bilateral negotiations with Korea, Singapore and the Andean Community. The wrap-up of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Doha Development Round negotiations have been postponed until there is a consensus amongst WTO members to reach an agreement on various trade issues.

The Department undertook numerous technical assistance pilot projects in 2004, which were all completed in 2006.  Future cultural-related technical assistance projects are expected to be governed by the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and the Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, which came into effect on March 18, 2007.

In 2006-07, Trade Routes' network of Trade Commissioners, co-located at DFAIT's Regional Offices and missions abroad, served a total of 1,234 clients, initiated 355 prospecting activities in foreign markets and participated in the coordination/funding of 117 regional and international projects. Trade Routes contributions program has become increasingly popular since its launch in November 2001, with project proposals rising from 13 to 157 in 2007 (a growth of 1200%) targeting an increasing diversity of international markets. In 2007, 117 projects were approved, the most ever.  In addition, a number of trade initiatives were carried out in emerging markets such as Brazil and China, which led to conclusive business deals, new partnerships, and relevant insights on market opportunities in these geographic regions.

Develop and Implement an International Strategic Framework

In 2006-07, the Department sought to clearly articulate its international objectives to better respond to wider government priorities.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The Department developed an international framework that sets up key action and result areas which include: increasing exports; using new technology to ensure better visibility for Canadian content; strengthening relations with the United States; increasing focus on G8 and emerging global powers; and more coherence with overall Government international priorities. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved. Canadian Heritage’s International Strategic Framework was finalized and focused on three thematic and geographic priorities: International Cultural Promotion and Trade; Participation and Social Inclusion; and China.

Implementation started in October 2006 with the establishment of senior level Canadian Heritage portfolio working groups corresponding to the priorities. These groups have reinforced information sharing on Canadian Heritage and other government departments’ key international activities in these areas, fostered greater collaboration and synergy, and set the stage for more government-wide harmonization in strategic planning and service delivery in these sectors.

All working groups approved strategic options for action plans (2007-10). Participants initiated a portfolio-wide mapping exercise and databank of all international activities, which will allow for much better coordination, planning and effectiveness.

To address the trade deficit and strengthen Canadian cultural exports, Canadian Heritage has fostered greater collaboration between key federal players to increase policy and program alignment, and maximize the support for the promotion of Canada’s culture abroad and related trade. The International Strategic Framework has resulted in more clearly defined roles for the Canada Council for the Arts, the Trade Routes program, and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade’s Promart program, increasing efficiency and effectiveness.

Communications products and related material have been developed to increase awareness of the Department’s international engagement and priorities. These have contributed to the furthering of Canada’s foreign policy and public diplomacy priorities; specifically in the areas of governance, human rights, trade and innovation.

Copyright Reform

The Canadian Copyright Act seeks to achieve a balance, in the public interest, between recognizing the rights of the creators and owners of copyright works, and the access and dissemination of these works.  Technological advances, the development of new business models, and virtually unlimited access to creative works, have revealed challenges for the Act. 

In 2006-07, the Department in collaboration with Industry Canada, planned to introduce two new pieces of legislation to allow Canada to: implement the provisions of the two most recent World Intellectual Property Organization treaties on copyright and to address issues related to technological advances and the Internet; and amend the provision in the Act relating to the protection of photographs.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The amended legislation will provide adequate copyright protection and fair compensation for rights holders and allow reasonable access to the public in line with international standards.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved. Copyright reform continued to be a priority for Canadian Heritage.  A bill was drafted to address the various challenges such as: international pressures (e.g. World Intellectual Property Organization treaties); technological changes (e.g. new distribution systems for cultural products); marketplace challenges (e.g. the development of new business models); and court decisions such as Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) v. Canadian Association of Internet Providers (CAIP) and Canadian Private Copying Collective v. Canadian Storage Media Alliance et al.  The legislation has not yet been tabled in Parliament.

UNESCO Convention on the Protection and the Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions

Since 1999, Canada has been actively involved in the development and promotion of an international instrument on cultural diversity that reaffirms the right of countries to take measures in support of culture, while recognizing the dual social and economic nature of cultural goods and services.    In 2006-07, Canada demonstrated leadership by advocating in favour of ratification of the Convention.  This key international instrument is a tool to help ensure the diversity of cultural expressions.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The Department is working to convince the largest number of UNESCO Member States to ratify the Convention. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were surpassed.  Canada has continued to use every opportunity to promote the timely and widespread ratification of the Convention, both bilaterally and in a variety of international fora, including the Organization for American States (OAS), La Francophonie internationale and UNESCO.

In December 2006, the critical mass of 30 ratifications had been reached, allowing the Convention to enter into force. The official entry into force of the Convention took place three months later, on March 18, 2007.  As of March 31, 2007, 56 countries had formally ratified the Convention, while others were expected to follow suit shortly.  As a result of joint advocacy efforts undertaken by Canada, other supporting countries as well as diverse regional and international organisations, this Convention was the fastest ever ratified in UNESCO history, allowing it to move quickly into the implementation phase.

Canadian Heritage, with the collaboration of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, continues to encourage the greatest number of countries to ratify as soon as possible in order for the Convention to become an effective international instrument.

The Department continues to work closely with the provinces and territories and with Canada's arts and cultural community to promote the Convention and to play an active role in its implementation, by holding events such as the fourth Canada-Quebec-Civil Society Roundtable on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions that was held in Ottawa in February 2007.

International Audio-visual Co-production Framework

International co-production agreements provide national status to audio-visual production both in Canada and in partner countries.  This status provides access to public funding and broadcasting systems in both countries, where applicable, and enhances bilateral trade and cultural exchanges in the audio-visual sector.

The International Audio-visual Co-production Framework is under review.  The purpose of the review is to examine and refine the objectives of co-production, ensure that they are properly aligned with other federal audio-visual policies and programs, and with overall government objectives.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Over time, the review will result in clearer objectives for official co-production between Canada and foreign partners, selection criteria for new partners, and an integrated performance measurement framework. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were modified.  Although work towards a revised framework for international audio-visual co-production has progressed significantly, consultation on a draft framework has been postponed to the next fiscal year (2007-08).  The timeline associated with the multi-year implementation strategy will be determined in 2007-08.

Program Activity 3

Preservation of Canada's Heritage

Did you know that the Iroquois – the first
people to farm the St. Lawrence Valley –
were featured from November 7, 2006 to
May 6, 2007, by the Socit du muse
d’histoire et d’archologie de Montral,

Pointe--Callire? Not only did this major
exhibition, supported by Canadian Heritage,
delight 90,000 visitors, but it also
received the 2007 Lonidas-Blanger Award for
Achievement, presented by the Fdration
des socits d’histoire du Qubec
.

Canadians want their stories and history to be safeguarded for future generations.  Canadian Heritage plays a leading role in facilitating the preservation of and access to cultural works and practices, including film, music, Aboriginal languages, Aboriginal  stories and national cultural artefacts and archives.  The ultimate goal of this program activity is that Canada’s diverse heritage is preserved.

Canada’s Museums

Canadians look to our museums and archives to protect and preserve their national heritage for this and future generations.  The four national museums and Library and Archives Canada are key assets for the Government of Canada in fulfilling its policy objectives in this area.  Non-federal museums across the country also play important roles in preserving Canada’s heritage and contributing to the economic and social well-being of communities.

Museums need to respond to changes in Canadian society, the emergence of new technologies and the ongoing challenges of collections care. Museums have also identified gaps in their capacity to measure and report on their cultural, social and economic impact. Canadian Heritage continues to work with the museum sector to address these issues.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The long-term result for this activity is an enhanced accessibility by Canadians to our rich and diverse heritage.

Results Achieved

Did you know that the Near North Mobile
Media Lab
has increased access to new
media technologies for rural and isolated
communities throughout central and
northern Ontario? Canadian Heritage investments
in the project have enabled community partners
to create a mobile trailer-unit that contains a
variety of media equipment (including digital
cameras, projectors, and editing suites)
which have opened up access to digital
creation, particularly for youth and
Aboriginal peoples. To date, a number of
activities have been undertaken, ranging
from providing apprenticeship venues for
emerging artists, to acting as a digital media
classroom for a children’s summer camp. 

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  An economic impact measurement tool was piloted at workshops in conjunction with the Canadian Museums Association in May 2006.  The application was favourably received by the museums representatives who attended the workshops, which were conducted in both official languages.  Following the workshops, further assessment of the tool was performed to determine the most accessible means of distribution. Pilot testing and assessment of the economic impact model led to the conclusion that development of the stand-alone application as a web-based tool would maximize accessibility.

In December 2006, the Government of Canada announced an investment of $41.5 million over five years to address urgent capital and infrastructure challenges facing Canada’s four national museums, in order to protect and showcase our culture and heritage.

In the 2007 Budget, an additional $5 million per year was announced to hire qualified summer interns in small and mid-sized museums.  The heritage component of the Young Canada Works program (YCW) helps renew the workforce in the museum sector while enhancing the capacity of smaller institutions to offer visitor services during the peak summer period. YCW is the only program that also provides support to heritage institutions that are open to the public on a seasonal basis, which are often located in a small or medium size community. In 2006-07, close to 900 summer students and graduate interns found work in heritage organizations through the program.

In 2006-07, the grants and contributions programs in the Department for which museums are eligible, such as the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (CAHSP), Cultural Spaces Canada, Canadian Culture Online, and the Museums Assistance Program, continued to enable institutions to carry out projects such as developing and circulating travelling exhibitions and improving collections care capacity.  For instance, the Museums Assistance Program provided funding for 169 new projects out of the 225 received (75%).  Of these, 72 facilitated Canadians’ access to their heritage through the production and circulation of travelling exhibitions, 22 contributed to the preservation and presentation of Aboriginal heritage, and 75 helped enhance professional standards and competencies in the management of key museological functions such as collections care, exhibitions and public programming.  In addition, 14 of these projects directly supported official language minority communities.  Through the CAHSP, 60 new projects were funded to improve long-term capabilities of heritage organizations in the areas of management practices, financial-sufficiency, audience development and governance.

Cultural Property Export and Import Act Review

The Cultural Property Export and Import Act (CPEIA) was enacted in September 1977, as Canada’s implementing legislation for the 1970 UNESCO Convention on illicit traffic in cultural property.  The Act established Canadian export control over cultural property; the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board; tax incentives and grants to encourage the sale and donation of significant items to Canadian public institutions and the repatriation of such objects from abroad; and import controls that fulfill Canada’s treaty obligations toward other State Parties to the Convention.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The long-term result of this initiative is that this important legislation will be a modernized, more effective tool in the preservation of Canada’s cultural heritage, and that of countries who suffer the loss of their heritage through illicit traffic in cultural property.  The result this year will be the completion of public and stakeholder consultations to identify options for legislative reform.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  A discussion paper to identify actions for legislative reform was partially developed, in preparation for public consultations, to strengthen the Act’s effectiveness and enhance accountability.

In 2006-07, the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board certified 6,095 objects in 839 applications for certification that were made by 149 designated institutions, for a total fair market value of $114,166,980.  In addition, 10 grants were awarded to 9 institutions totalling $1,486,336.59, and 415 cultural property export permits were issued. Of these, 73 were for temporary export and 342 were for permanent export.  Thirty-four files were opened regarding potential illegal imports.

Canadian Conservation Institute: Returning to Full Function

The Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) is an internationally-recognized centre of excellence in preservation that is committed to increasing the heritage community’s capacity to preserve Canada’s material cultural heritage for current and future generations. 

The Institute’s key goal is to ensure the heritage community both in Canada and internationally has access to CCI’s research, publications, expert services and training on the preservation of material cultural heritage.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key planned result of this initiative is to ensure the heritage community both in Canada and internationally has access to CCI’s research, publications, expert services and training on the preservation of material cultural heritage. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  The renovation of CCI’s main facility went well (90% complete for Phase 2), and the certification process for the laboratory ventilation system will be completed in the fall of 2007.  To make CCI services more accessible to clients and to increase the transparency of its decision-making, CCI has introduced an exhaustive framework of services that includes a clear description of eligible clients, new criteria for evaluating the requests for services, a new policy on revenue generation and an updated fee structure.  CCI has also developed an e-Services portal that allows heritage institutions to submit their requests for service on-line.  This will facilitate the access and speed of service for the heritage community.

Although some of its laboratories were non-functional due to the renovation project, CCI undertook 51 conservation and scientific research projects in 2006-07.  The Institute responded to more than 870 requests for expert services to museum clients in Canada.  Knowledge dissemination activities included 19 workshops provided to more than 326 museum professionals and staff (with a satisfaction rate of 99%) and the sale of over 5 900 publications in Canada and abroad.

Planning for the 2007 Preserving Aboriginal Heritage Symposium is underway and 54 experts have been invited as speakers (39 from Canada, 28 of whom are from First Nations and 15 from outside Canada, Metis and Inuit communities).  An international workshop aimed at reducing risk to collections was held with participants from America, Europe, Australia and Asia.  Seventeen national training workshops were given to 269 participants with a satisfaction rate of 99%.

A Collection Preservation Management Manual for heritage workers and volunteers is approximately 75% complete.  Conservation documents were consulted on CCI’s Web site more than 2 300 000 times.

First Nations, Inuit and Mtis Languages

Today, over 60 languages are spoken by Canada’s First Nations, Inuit, and Mtis people, and among these languages, only three – Cree, Ojibway, and Inuktitut – are considered viable and relatively secure from extinction in the short term.  The remaining languages are considered to be endangered, with most considered to be critically endangered.  In 2006-07, the Department focused on working with its partners in the Aboriginal language community to identify opportunities for language preservation, revitalization and promotion.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Consult Aboriginal organizations on the development of the Government of Canada’s response to the report issued by the Task Force on Aboriginal Languages and Cultures.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved. Canadian Heritage's Aboriginal Peoples' Program consulted with Aboriginal organizations on the development of the Government of Canada’s response to the report issued by the Task Force on Aboriginal Languages and Cultures.  In November 2006, the Government of Canada also announced the renewal of $5 million per year for the Aboriginal Languages Initiative (ALI) until 2013-14. The stabilization of ALI funding enabled community-based language activities to continue while Canadian Heritage initiated work with national Aboriginal organizations to develop strategic language plans that will inform new approaches for support to First Nation, Inuit and Mtis languages.

In 2006-07, $5 million was provided through the ALI to Aboriginal organizations that undertook and distributed funding to community-based language projects in over 200 communities across Canada to preserve, revitalize and promote First Nation, Inuit and Mtis languages.  Some of these projects supported community level activities such as: early childhood acquisition; promotional projects to encourage youth to learn and use the language; the development of new lexicons and dictionaries; the recording of endangered languages; and workshops bringing language practitioners to develop long-term plans for language revitalization. Many First Nation projects focused on critically endangered languages. 

The Government of Canada also provided $4.1 million to support languages in Canada’s North through accords with the governments of Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. 

The preservation, revitalization and promotion is considered to be a long-term process, which will require sustained investments.  The initiative is considered ongoing, and results will be long-term and incremental.

Program Activity 4

Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life

Did you know that with help from
Canadian Heritage, two pioneering
organizations, The Saskatchewan Native
Theatre Company and the Manitoba
Theatre for Young People,
are providing
young Aboriginal people in Winnipeg
and Saskatoon with innovative
training and experience in the theatre arts?
Nearly 200 participants were introduced
to performance as a channel for
personal expression, a forum for community
dialogue, and a pathway for career
development.

In addition to being part of the creative process, participation in Canada’s cultural life can take a considerable variety of forms: reading, attending exhibitions or performances, learning through the Internet, listening to radio, watching films or television, visiting heritage sites, etc.  Canadian Heritage helps to create the conditions for a wide access to and participation in the various modes of cultural exchange.  The Department focuses on exposing individuals and communities to the wide array of cultural experiences, bridging challenges such as distance, community size, language and ethno-cultural diversity.  The primary vehicles for engaging Canadians in cultural participation are arts activities, mass media, and heritage site and events.

The Department’s efforts in this regard will yield an important result: Canadians have access to and participate in a diverse range of Canadian cultural experiences.

Canadian Periodical Policy

Canada’s expansive geography scope and limited population base causes Canadian periodicals to be highly dependent on a strong, subscription-based domestic periodical industry.  While recent evaluations of the Publications Assistance Program (PAP) and the Canada Magazine Fund (CMF) were positive, a review of federal funding initiatives in this area is required. 

In this context, Canadian Heritage is reviewing how effectively its Canadian periodical programs and policy serve Canadians, and will make any necessary adjustments to ensure that they are effective in meeting Canadian Heritage policy goals.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The Department’s review of its Canadian periodical support framework will lead to changes to ensure the programs remain relevant and that the program funding is as effectively targeted as possible.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  As a result of the Government of Canada's directive in December 2006, Canada Post will continue their financial partnership in the PAP and the program's budget will be stabilized at $60.4 million until April 2009.  Industry reaction to the announcement was positive.  The 1,161 magazines and non-daily newspapers supported through the program received stable funding in 2006-07 and will not experience major cuts in 2007-08 or 2008-09.  This decision will also help prevent widespread increases in subscription prices due to higher delivery costs.

Over 200 million copies of Canadian periodicals were delivered through the PAP in 2006-07.  Formal consultations with stakeholders have yet to be undertaken.  The full review is expected to be completed by April 2009.

Canadian Content Online

Since 2001, the Canadian Culture Online (CCO) Strategy has been a primary instrument to help ensure Canadians have access through the Internet, and through other delivery vehicles such as cellphones and MP3 players, to Canadian cultural content in both French and English.

Given the dynamic nature of digital interactive media, Canadian Heritage is undertaking a review of the Canadian Culture Online Strategy.  The review was initiated by an evaluation of the support program for the new media sector – the Canada New Media Fund – in 2005. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The assessment of support mechanisms under the CCO Strategy will be key to providing Canadians with access to diverse and quality Canadian content in the online space that Canadians need and want.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  The Department’s Audit and Evaluation Committee approved the evaluation of the Canada New Media Fund and the management response in December 2006.  The Department met with industry stakeholders in the fall of 2006 to discuss a set of proposed changes to the Canada New Media Fund but the process of finalizing a revised strategy for support to the new media industry has not been completed.

In 2006-07, through the CCO Strategy, a total of $53.4 million in funding support was approved for 221 projects and initiatives that included: content creation projects that reflect our diversity of cultures and heritage; activities that support the Department’s two cultural portals (Culture.ca and the Virtual Museum of Canada) and projects that facilitated the sustainability of the Canadian new media sector.

Projects with broad appeal have received many visits, such as The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (6.8 million visits), the CBC/Radio-Canada Archives sites (3.2 million visits) and the McCord Museum’s Keys to History site (close to 1 million visits).  The majority of projects reported much lower statistics, which can be expected from projects that target specific niches or communities, such as the Deafplanet website (8,000 visits).

The creation of effective thematic research networks and partnerships have brought together 68 Canadian research institutions and new media organizations, which have actively collaborated on the development of numerous innovative tools and applications in support of the creation, management and distribution of digital cultural content.

Canada Travelling Exhibition Indemnification Program

The Canada Travelling Exhibition Indemnification Program was implemented following the adoption of the Canada Travelling Exhibition Indemnification Act, which came into force on December 15, 1999.  Under the auspices of the program, the Government accepts the financial risk of loss or damage associated with major traveling exhibitions in Canada.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key result of this initiative is to increase opportunities for Canadians to access Canadian and international cultural heritage through the exchange of artefacts and exhibitions in Canada.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  Most visitor numbers for indemnified travelling exhibitions circulating in 2006-07 have been received, but not all individual data has been yet submitted by client institutions.  To measure exhibition impact and improve data collection, a post-exhibition survey tool, including the number of visitors, was developed in 2006-07 for implementation in 2007-08.  Future letters of approval to successful applicants will stipulate that completion of the survey is a prerequisite.

In 2006-07, a total of 12 new travelling exhibitions were indemnified for presentation at 16 different venues.  Using a cost-saving formula developed by the program and sanctioned by both the program evaluator and the insurance industry, the program achieved $ 1.7 million insurance savings for host institutions.

A report on first five years of the program’s operation was compiled and submitted to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.  An analysis program parameters was provided in the report. The program continues to monitor the impact of current liability ceilings and is assessing the current list of risks excluded from indemnification.

Strategic Outcome 2

Strategic Outcome 2:  Canadians Live in an Inclusive Society Built on Inter-Cultural Understanding and Citizen Participation

The Department’s activities focus on inclusion and participation in Canadian life while reinforcing core values and shared citizenship.  The Department also works to connect Canadians across their differences through inter-cultural exchange, helping to reduce the tensions that could otherwise divide us and to respond to both the challenges and opportunities of an increasingly diverse society.  When Canadians come together in acceptance of their differences, cultural expression becomes richer in quality and quantity, new audiences can be reached, institutions can be more responsive and sustainable, and opportunities for excellence in all cultural spheres are maximized. 

Three program activities of the Department’s Program Activity Architecture work to achieve Strategic Outcome 2 and its related priorities.  The table below provides the total planned financial and human resources for the Department’s second strategic outcome, which is the sum of resources allocated to three program activities.


Financial and Human Resources for Strategic Outcome 2 - 2006-07

Program Activity

Actual Spending
($ millions)

Actual
Full-Time
Equivalents

5. Promotion of Inter-Cultural Understanding

146.2

124

6. Community Development and Capacity-Building

244.1

161

7. Participation in Community and Civic Life

204.9

500

Total

595.2

785


Program Activity 5

Promotion of Inter-cultural Understanding

Do you know how a group of 13 to
17 year-old Montrealers from a variety
of cultural backgrounds got involved in
educating young people about the impact
of street gangs in the Bordeaux-
Cartierville neighbourhood? They did
this simply by creating a magazine,
Authentik,
exploring topics of
interest to young people such as resisting
peer pressure. Funded by Canadian Heritage,
this project was such a success that a
major pharmacy chain sponsored the
magazine and distributed it for free.

Canadian Heritage fosters inter-cultural understanding by generating opportunities for Canadians to share experiences and learn about each other’s cultures.  One of the ways this is done is through the promotion of linguistic duality and of learning Canada’s two official languages.  The Department also supports initiatives that promote cross-cultural understanding within and between communities.  With attention to the unique opportunities generated by sport activities in Canada, the Department promotes diversity as a means of enhancing inter-cultural experiences and understanding.

By promoting inter-cultural understanding, the Department expects to foster a society where Canadians interact across diverse communities and value the diversity and linguistic duality of Canadian society.

Second-language learning agreements

Over the past 35 years, the Government of Canada has provided financial assistance to the provinces and territories to help them offer second-language learning programs.  Learning the second official language gives Canadians, whether French- or English-speaking, an appreciation of the other group’s reality, thereby enhancing Canada’s linguistic duality.  Through its Enhancement of Official Languages program, the Department continues to work with the provinces and territories to support the instruction of English and French as second official languages, while pursuing the objective of doubling the proportion of Canadian youth between 15 and 19 years old who have a working knowledge of both official languages. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The planned result of this initiative is to increase the proportion of Canadians who have a working knowledge of both official languages and a greater understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality in the short term. 

Results Achieved 

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The Department continued to work with provinces and territories in the area of second-language learning seeing that multi-year agreements in education signed in 2005-06 with provinces and territories were implemented during 2006-07.

The most recent data shows that the enrolments remained stable. Over 2.3 million young Canadians (47.5%) studied English or French as their second language in 2003-04, compared to 2.25 million in 2001-02.  There were over 367,000 students enrolled in French-immersion programs in 2003-04, compared to 290,000 in 2001-02.

In 2006-07, 8 projects were supported as part of the second-language instruction component for a total of $635,000. Moreover, 17 projects were supported as part of the linguistic duality promotion component for a total of $2,169,694.

Opportunities were given to 12,000 young Canadians to appreciate linguistic duality through activities stemming from various official-languages programs: language bursary programs Destination Clic et Explore, in-class language monitor programs Accent and Odyssey, Young Canada Works in Both Official Languages and youth forums. 

Multiculturalism Program

Did you know that in 2006-07, the Alberta
International Medical Graduates Association

worked to address the shortage of foreign-trained
medical graduates in Canadian residency
programs in Alberta?  With Canadian Heritage
support, the Association is working with
government partners and professional
associations to remove the barriers which prevent
or delay the recognition of foreign medical
credentials and the Canadian accreditation of
highly skilled professionals trained abroad.

The Multiculturalism Program continues to focus on identifying the barriers faced by ethno-cultural/racial communities by supporting activities that include specific interventions and leadership at the federal level.  Particular emphasis is placed on youth in these communities and on the removal of barriers that limit the economic, social, political and cultural participation of these communities in Canada. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

By broadening the reach to ethno-cultural/racial communities through targeted interventions and effective partnerships, towards achieving fuller participation of these communities in all aspects of Canadian society, the Department will further help to create a cohesive society.  Eliminating barriers to participation will help Canadians of all backgrounds contribute to Canada’s economy, political landscape, and to build a welcoming respectful society. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved. Several initiatives showed interesting results.  Capacity Canada Roundtable, a national network of internationally educated/trained professionals promoting greater access to professions and trades, saw significant results in areas such as engineering and nursing.

Ethno-cultural/racial minority youth at the senior high school level were encouraged to participate in the journalism profession through the Young People's Press Diversifying Canada's Newsrooms project.

The Multiculturalism Internship pilot projects sponsored by the Success Skills Centre in Winnipeg and Costi-IIAS Immigrant Services in Toronto are supporting the skills development of ethno-cultural minority youth who are experiencing barriers to employment.

The reach of the Racism Stop It! National Video Competition and the Mathieu Da Costa Challenge were significantly broadened through the support of partnerships with other agencies and corporations such as the National Film Board of Canada, CBC/Radio-Canada, and Canada Post. 

The Program also reached out to more than 46 000 Canadians, in particular youth, through the delivery of 29 national initiatives involving public education events celebrating Black History Month and Asian Heritage Month.

A collaborative framework with the National Crime Prevention Centre, Public Safety Canada, resulted in funding support for initiatives such as the League for Human Rights of B’nai Brith Canada project and the Third International Symposium on Hate on the Internet.

Program Activity 6

Community Development and Capacity-Building

Did you know that, with Canadian
Heritage support, the Inuit Heritage
Trust completed the research and
consultation for Moving Forward
(Sivumut Kajusininq): From Plan to
Action?
 This is a project designed to
address the training needs of
Nunavut’s heritage sector and provide
the necessary tools to allow Nunavut’s
people the ability to manage their own
heritage resources.

Aboriginal and official languages communities play a uniquely important role in Canada as part of the fabric that has shaped Canadian society since its beginning.  Canadian Heritage supports the development of Aboriginal organizations with programs that build on the cultural strengths of Aboriginal peoples and help Aboriginal communities and networks to thrive.  Canadian Heritage also supports the development of official-language minority communities by enhancing their participation in different sectors of society and by working to ensure their vitality in all parts of the country. 

This program activity seeks to advance the cultural vitality of Canada’s official languages minority and Aboriginal communities.

Development of Official-language Minority Communities

For the past 35 years, the Government of Canada has provided financial assistance to the provinces and territories to help them offer minority-language education programs.  Canadian Heritage encourages provincial and territorial governments and other federal agencies to provide communities with programs and services in areas deemed to be a priority for their development.  Through its Development of Official-Language Communities program, the Department continues working with its many partners, with a particular emphasis on pursuing the education objective, which is to increase the overall proportion of eligible students enrolled in minority-language schools in Canada.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The planned result of this initiative is to provide official-language communities with greater access to programs and services in their language through various community and government bodies. 

Results Achieved

Did you know that a pilot project to
develop and implement an integrated
service delivery centre for
Government of Canada programs and
services to actively offer products,
programs and services in French to the
minority official language community
of the Port au Port Peninsula was
funded by seven federal partners
under the leadership of Canadian Heritage
and the province of Newfoundland
and Labrador?

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The multi-year agreements on education reached with the Council of Ministers of Education Canada and the provinces and territories in 2005‑06 over a four-year period were implemented in 2006-07, and nine complementary project agreements were reached, including six involving school-community space initiatives. Since 2005-06, federal-provincial/territorial co-operation agreements involving services were signed with each province and territory, including the signing in 2006-07 of the first agreement on English-language services with Quebec since 1999.

Efforts focussed on two major initiatives to co-ordinate activities undertaken with federal departments and agencies: federal institution awareness was raised through over 45 presentations given by the Department on the Act to amend the Official Languages Act; and federal institutions and the Department were better equipped to report on the results of their community development and duality promotion activities.

In co-operation with Decima Research, the Department conducted a survey on Canadians' perceptions of official languages, polling 2,073 members of minority communities and 1,259 respondents from majority communities. Preliminary analysis showed that Canadians have maintained or increased their support for policies and programs aimed at fostering minority-community development. Of all respondents, 62% believe that the Government of Canada’s official-languages policy strengthens national unity, an increase of 6% over 2002. As well, 91.5% of minority respondents believe that the Government of Canada has a key role in supporting minority-community development, and 73.8% say they are satisfied with the services available in their language, in their region.

The Department supported the development of other performance measurement instruments, including the signing of a contract with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, for the preparation and release of two Canada-wide reports (2007-08 and 2009-10) on the implementation of provincial and territorial action plans for official-language education.

Program Activity 7

Participation in Community and Civic Life

Did you know that ArtReach Toronto is
a three-year pilot initiative that uses the
arts to engage at-risk youth and increase
their connection to their communities?
The initiative is a successful
collaboration between all levels of
government, as well as community and
arts granting organizations to provide
funding to support arts-based projects
that not only encourage creative
expression but also foster meaningful
youth engagement in local communities.

An inclusive society means that all Canadians feel that they have a stake in their communities and their country; they can participate and feel that their contribution matters.  Canadian Heritage programs and activities contribute to this goal by helping to address some of the key impediments to community and civic participation.  This is done through initiatives that educate Canadians about their country and their citizenship, both at home and abroad, while helping to educate the rest of the world about Canada.  It is also achieved through the development of sport participation and volunteerism in communities.  Youth programs generate opportunities and encourage participation. Targeted measures for ethno-cultural and ethno-racial communities assist these groups to more effectively participate into all aspects of Canadian life.  Targeted measures for Aboriginal communities, including Aboriginal youth and women, support the participation of Aboriginal peoples and build upon Aboriginal cultures. 

As a result of the activities that foster participation, the Department will become more engaged in Canada’s communities and civic life.

Canada’s Action Plan Against Racism

In their commitment to combat racism and nurture a more inclusive society, Canadian Heritage and key federal partners are working to implement initiatives announced in A Canada for All: Canada’s Action Plan Against Racism.  These initiatives aim to help Canadian families and communities by addressing gaps in federal programs and by eliminating systemic barriers.  They focus on the settlement of new citizens, and the promotion of institutional change within public institutions to remove systemic barriers. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key result for the Action Plan is that by combating racism, Canadians, regardless of race, ethnicity, cultural or religious background, are better able to participate in and contribute to Canadian society and achieve their full potential.  To measure the Action Plan’s impact, the Department will develop success indicators and consult Canadians to solicit their feedback. Progress will be reported in the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  Performance indicators have been identified for the Action Plan but more work was needed to refine them, which was carried forward into spring 2007. In addition, the development of a framework for baseline data collection began in 2006-07.  Actual data collection will not be completed until fall 2007.

Horizontal governance structures have been developed, including a performance measurement and reporting framework, to coordinate the overall Action Plan across departments.  A consultation strategy was developed and three discussion sessions were held in the fall of 2006 to further increase awareness about the Action Plan and to gain stakeholder perspectives on measuring progress.

Statistics Canada releasedhate crimes data for London and Ottawa on February 6, 2007. The release of this data provided an opportunity to highlight the Action Plan’s national strategy for the collection of hate crimes data, as well as illustrate concrete progress in the implementation of one of its initiatives. Activities of the Inclusive Institutions Initiative are ongoing and matching funds continue to be provided to federal institutions for projects that assist them in promoting policies, programs and services that are sensitive and responsive to Canada’s rapidly growing diversity.

Historical Redress

The historical redress initiative responds to the Government of Canada’s commitment to recognize the historical experiences of ethno-cultural communities impacted by wartime measures and/or immigration restrictions that, while legal at the time, are not consistent with the values held by Canadians today. It also relates to the Government of Canada’s commitment to the Chinese community and all Canadians to provide appropriate acknowledgment and symbolic ex gratia payments related to the Chinese Head Tax.  

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key result for the initiative will be: symbolic ex gratia payments to those who were required to pay the Chinese Head Tax and to the spouses of Head Tax payers who have since passed away; the establishment of a fund for community projects aimed at acknowledging the impact of past wartime measures and immigration restrictions on ethno-cultural communities; and the development of a national historical recognition program to fund federal initiatives.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were partially achieved.  As promised in the 2006 Speech from the Throne, on June 22, 2006, the Government of Canada made an official apology for the implementation of the Chinese Head Tax.  In 2006-07, 42 ex gratia payments totalizing $840,000 were made to Head Tax Payers and 119 ex gratia payments totalizing $2,380,000 were made to conjugal partners of now deceased Head Tax Payers, for a total of 161 payments and $3,220,000. 

A $24 million Community Historical Recognition Program was developed and a $10 million National Historical Recognition Program was developed, but details have not been finalized.  These programs are expected to be launched in 2007.

Opportunities for Sport Participation

The Department of Canadian Heritage recognizes the contribution of sport participation to achieving wider societal goals including public health and community development.  Using the framework provided by the Canadian Sport Policy and the objectives set out in the Physical Activity and Sport Act and the Department of Canadian Heritage Act, the Department is developing initiatives to increase opportunities for sport participation among children, youth and under-represented groups, including Aboriginal peoples and persons with a disability. 

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The key goal of the Department’s activities in the area of sport participation is increased sport participation by Canadians, including Aboriginal peoples and persons with a disability. 

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  The Department began the implementation of the Policy on Sport for Persons with a Disability and Policy on Aboriginal Peoples’ Participation in Sport, and supported 12 federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) bilateral agreements to increase sport participation levels and 11 FPT bilateral agreements to encourage and support greater participation of aboriginal people in sport.  Baseline data is being collected to enable the ongoing monitoring of progress-to-date toward targets in measuring the participation in sport of children and youth, and girls and women.

Canadian Heritage assisted Finance Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency to develop the definition of physical activity programs eligible for the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit identified in the 2006 Budget speech.  As well, the Department worked with the Public Health Agency of Canada to revitalize ParticipAction to promote physical activity and sport participation, and contributed content and financial support to WinterActive and SummerActive promotional campaigns for physical activity and sport.

The Department participated in Health Canada’s interdepartmental work group on the Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy leading to the acceptance of sport participation as one of the important tools to address this health crisis.  The Department also began exploring with the Office of the Governor General how sport participation can help bring diverse Canadian youth together.  The FTP governments have approved a Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) implementation plan to better enable Canadians to participate and excel in lifelong sport.

400th Anniversary of Qubec in 2008

Canada 2004-08 is a five-year plan to commemorate Canada’s national anniversaries.  This plan identified the celebration of the 400th anniversary of the founding of Qubec City in 1608, Canada’s oldest city, as a key commemorative event. 


The Department is coordinating federal involvement in this event through working with federal departments and agencies, provincial governments, municipalities and other partners, including the Socit du 400e anniversaire de Qubec.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

As a result of this key initiative, Canadians will have increased opportunities to learn about and celebrate Canada’s first city and permanent settlement of la Francophonie in North America.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  A multiyear contribution agreement with the Socit du 400e anniversaire de Qubec was signed on August 23, 2006.  In 2006-07, Canadian Heritage contributed $7 050 000 to this initiative. The management and monitoring of the contribution agreement with the Socit du 400e annniversaire de Qubec is underway and bi-weekly meetings with the federal, provincial, municipal commissioners and the Socit du 400e anniversaire de Qubec are being held. 

Committees have been put in place to collaborate and coordinate with other federal departments, including: Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers; Directors General Communications Working Group; Federal Coordination Committee and Federal Communications Coordination Sub-Committee.

Canada’s Participation in International Expositions

Canadian Heritage plans and manages Canada’s participation in International Expositions in close collaboration with other federal departments, provinces and territories, and key partners in the private sector. This includes the upcoming exposition planned for Shanghai in 2010 and the support of the Government of Canada for a proposal for Toronto to prepare a bid for 2015. 

In support of the objectives set out in the Policy Framework on International Expositions (1995), the Department will develop an approach for Canada’s participation in future recognized and registered expositions by the Bureau international des expositions (BIE) – the body that controls the frequency and the quality of international expositions, of which Canada is a member.


Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

This initiative is expected to achieve two results: Canada’s interests abroad are broadened and asserted through its participation at international expositions sanctioned by the BIE; and Canadians participate in projecting Canada’s interests in the world through international expositions.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved. In 2006, Canada declined the invitation to participate in the 2008 International Exposition in Zaragoza, Spain and accepted the invitation from the Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China to participate in Expo 2010 in Shanghai.  The scope and thematic approach of Canada’s pavillion and overall participation was developed in harmony with the general theme of Expo 2010: Better City, Better Life.  The development of a risk management plan for Expo 2010 is underway.  Expo 2010 is expected to be the world’s largest Expo ever, in terms of participation and attendance.

The Toronto proposal for the 2015 International Exposition was analyzed and a pan-federal response was negotiated and coordinated.  The federal government agreement was to commit $600 million for existing federal policy obligations related to hosting an international expo in Canada, such as essential federal services, federal presence and support for developing countries.  Unfortunately, as neither the municipality nor the province of Ontario would assume responsibility for any potential deficit, it was not possible to forward the Toronto proposal to the BIE.

2010 Games: Strategic Opportunities Initiative

The Government of Canada is a key partner in planning the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games to be held in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C.  The 2010 Games Federal Secretariat, situated within Canadian Heritage, works closely with the Vancouver Organizing Committee and other Games partners, to ensure that the 2010 Winter Games are a success in the eyes of Canadians, and a credit to Canada abroad.

Planned Results (as outlined in Canadian Heritage’s 2006-07 Report on Plans and Priorities)

The goals of the 2010 Federal Secretariat are that: Canadian excellence and values will be promoted nationally and internationally; sport, economic, social and cultural legacies will be established for the benefit of all Canadians, in alignment with federal policy objectives; and that early planning and seamless, cost-effective delivery of mandated federal responsibilities, including essential federal services, will contribute to high quality Games.

Results Achieved

Planned results for 2006-07 were achieved.  Canadians of diverse origins have been engaged in the planning of 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and have participated in various 2010 related activities thereby promoting sustainable sport, social, cultural, and economic benefits for all Canadians. The Government of Canada supported the signing by non-government partners of a Collaborative Protocol of Francophone communities to ensure representation of Canada’s Francophonie in the hosting of the 2010 Winter Games.

Negotiations have been entered into with municipalities of Vancouver and Whistler to plan and implement Live Sites, which will be free public gathering spaces.

The 2010 Federal Secretariat actively participated in 2010 Partner bi-annual community update events in all Four Host First Nation communities, as well as provided ongoing support and monitoring for the Four Host First Nations Society.

Discontinued programs

As part of Expenditure Review, the Government of Canada announced on September 25, 2006, that four programs were discontinued: the Canada Volunteerism Initiative, the Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program, the Community Participation Program and the Court Challenges Program.

Summary Table: Results of All Key Initiatives

The Summary Table presents the results of all planned key initiatives as they were indicated in the 2006-07 Canadian Heritage Report on Plans and Priorities. We have indicated results under the following 6 categories: 


Results achieved were above planned results.

Exceeded

All planned results were achieved.

Met

Only some planned results were met.

Partially met

The initiative has been discontinued.

Discontinued

The initiative has been changed and new planned results were set.  

Modified

Planned results were not achieved. 

Not met


Strategic Outcome 1:  Canadians Express and Share their Diverse Cultural Experiences with Each Other and the World

Program Activity 1:  Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence


Key Initiative:
CRTC Report on the Impact of Technologies Change on Canadian Broadcasting

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
Canadian Television Fund New Governance Structure

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
High Performance Sport Programming and Technically Sound Sport Development

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Benefits of Hosting

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met


Program Activity 2:  Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation


Key Initiative:
Telecommunications Policy Review Panel Response

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
Canadian Feature Film Policy

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Audio-visual Institutional Renewal: Telefilm Canada and National Film Board

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Modified

Key Initiative:
Centralization of Canadian Content Certification

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Modified

Key Initiative:
Virtual Museums of Canada’s Further Enhancement

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
2010 Games: Strategic Opportunities Initiative

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
International Cultural Trade

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Modified

Key Initiative:
Develop and Implement an International Strategic Framework

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
Copyright Reform

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
UNESCO Convention on the Protection and the Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Exceeded

Key Initiative:
International Audio-visual Co-production Framework

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Modified


Program Activity 3:  Preservation of Canada’s Heritage


Key Initiative:
Canada’s Museums

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Cultural Property Export and Import Act Review

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Canadian Conservation Institute: Returning to Full Function

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
First Nations, Inuit and Mtis Languages

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met


Program Activity 4:  Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life


Key Initiative:
Canadian Periodical Policy

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Canadian Content Online

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Canada Traveling Exhibitions Indemnification Program

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met


 

Strategic Outcome 2:  Canadians Live in an Inclusive Society Built on Inter-cultural Understanding and Citizen Participation

Program Activity 5:  Promotion of Inter-cultural Understanding


Key Initiative:
Second-language Learning Agreements

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
Multiculturalism Program

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met


Program Activity 6:  Community Development and Capacity Building


Key Initiative:
Development of Official-language Minority Communities

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met


Program Activity 7:  Participation in Community and Civic Life


Key Initiative:
Canada’s Action Plan Against Racism

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Historical Redress

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Partially met

Key Initiative:
Opportunities for Sport Participation

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
400thAnniversary of Qubec in 2008

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
Canada’s Participation in International Expositions

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Key Initiative:
2010 Games: Strategic Opportunities Initiative

Overall Results Achieved in 2006-07:

Met

Discontinued programs in 2006-07

Canada Volunteerism Initiative
Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program
Community Participation Program
Court Challenges Program