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Section 3: Supplementary Information

2006-07 Canadian Heritage, Accountability Structure


Title

Financial Resources Actual Spending ($ millions)

Number of Full-Time Equivalents

Assistant Deputy Minister of Cultural Affairs

389.6

335

Assistant Deputy Minister of Citizenship and Heritage

584.2

480

Assistant Deputy of International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport

283.7

283

Assistant Deputy Minister of Public Affairs and Communications

80.7

683

Assistant Deputy Minister of Planning and Corporate Affairs (responsible for the Corporate Management with the Deputy Minister; the Associate Deputy Minister; the Executive Director, Portfolio Affairs; the Director General, Human Resources and Workplace Management; the Corporate Secretary; the General Counsel and the Ombudsman)

65.2

595


2006-07 Department of Canadian Heritage Regional Offices

Financial and Human Resources


Region

Operating and Management Resources ($ millions)

Number of Full-Time Equivalents

Atlantic Region
Regional office with 3 district offices

4.847

65

Quebec Region
Regional office with 1 district office

5.781

80

Ontario Region
Regional office with 4 district offices

6.017

76

Prairies and Northern Region
Regional office with 3 district offices

5.722

67

Western Region
Regional office with 5 district offices

6.484

86

TOTAL

28.831

374


Financial Tables

NOTE

The following tables are not applicable to the Department:

  • Table 7 – Revolving Fund
  • Table 10 – Progress Against the Department’s Regulatory Plan
  • Table 11 – Details on Project Spending
  • Table 12 – Status Report on Major Crown Projects
  • Table 18 – Procurement and Contracting
  • Table 21 – Travel Policies
  • Table 22 – Storage Tanks

Table 1: Comparison of Planned To Actual Spending (including FTEs)


($ millions) 2006-07
  Actual
2004-2005
Actual
2005-2006
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Business Lines:
Cultural Development and  Heritage 440.1 …. …. …. …. ….
Canadian Identity 696.6 …. …. …. …. ….
Corporate Management 131.4 …. …. …. …. ….
Program Activities:  
Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence …. 330.5 297.9 307.7 348.2 353.3
Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation …. 169.3 281.9 281.6 265.8 246.2
Preservation of Canada's Heritage …. 52.3 36.7 41.6 40.5 45.6
Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life …. 156.8 200.5 199.9 184.8 163.1
Promotion of Inter-Cultural Understanding …. 122.5 118.9 148.8 143.8 146.2
Community Development and Capacity Building …. 272.4 240.8 250.7 244.5 244.1
Participation in Community and Civic Life …. 175.3 207.9 241.7 231.4 204.9
Total  1,268.1 1,279.1 1,384.6 1,472.0 1,459.0 1,403.4
Less: Non-Respendable Revenues 71.5 80.1 62.0 62.0 79.8 79.8
Plus: Cost of services received without charge* 27.5 28.3 29.5 29.5 29.8 29.8
Total Departmental Spending 1,224.1 1,227.3 1,352.1 1,439.5 1,409.0 1,353.4
Full Time Equivalents 2,203 2,206 2,452 2,511 2,376 2,376

* Services received without charge include accommodations provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada, the employer's share of employees' insurance premiums, and expenditures paid by Treasury Board Secretariat (excluding revolving funds), Workers' Compensation coverage provided by Social Development Canada, and services received from the Department of Justice Canada (see Table 4).


Table 2: Resources by Program Activity


2006-2007
($ millions) Budgetary Plus: Non-Budgetary Total
Program Activities Operating Capital Grants Contributions and Other Tranfer Payments Total: Gross Budgetary Expenditures Less: Respendable Revenue Total: Net Budgetary Expenditures Loans, Investments and Advances
Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence  
Main Estimates 26.1 …. 27.0 244.8 297.9 …. 297.9 …. 297.7
Planned Spending 27.9 …. 27.0 352.8 307.7 …. 307.7 …. 307.7
Total Authorities 25.8 …. 25.3 297.1 348.2 …. 348.2 …. 348.2
Actual Spending 32.5 …. 25.3 295.5 353.3 …. 353.3 …. 353.3
Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation  
Main Estimates 58.1 …. 23.1 204.0 285.2 3.3 281.9 …. 281.9
Planned Spending 57.8 …. 23.1 204.0 284.9 3.3 281.6 …. 281.6
Total Authorities 58.3 …. 20.6 190.2 269.1 3.3 265.8 …. 265.8
Actual Spending 62.8 …. 20.6 166.3 249.7 3.5 246.2 …. 246.2
Preservation of Canada's Heritage  
Main Estimates 21.0 …. …. 16.8 37.8 1.1 36.7 …. 36.7
Planned Spending 21.0 …. …. 21.7 42.7 1.1 41.6 …. 41.6
Total Authorities 20.9 …. …. 20.5 41.4 0.9 40.5 …. 40.5
Actual Spending 25.4 …. …. 20.5 45.9 0.3 45.6 …. 45.6
Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life  
Main Estimates 77.7 …. 59.1 64.7 201.5 1.0 200.5 0.01 200.5
Planned Spending 77.1 …. 59.1 64.7 200.9 1.0 199.9 0.01 199.9
Total Authorities 67.8 …. 48.8 69.2 185.8 1.0 184.8 0.01 184.8
Actual Spending 48.9 …. 48.7 66.4 164.0 0.9 163.1 0.00 163.1
Promotion of Inter-cultural Understanding  
Main Estimates 13.1 …. 5.6 100.2 118.9 …. 118.9 …. 118.9
Planned Spending 13.0 …. 35.6 100.2 148.8 …. 148.8 …. 148.8
Total Authorities 13.5 …. 15.2 115.1 143.8 …. 143.8 …. 143.8
Actual Spending 15.9 …. 15.2 115.1 146.2 …. 146.2 …. 146.2
Community Development and Capacity Building  
Main Estimates 19.0 …. 42.1 179.7 240.8 …. 240.8 …. 240.8
Planned Spending 18.9 …. 52.1 179.7 250.7 …. 250.7 …. 250.7
Total Authorities 17.9 …. 5.2 221.4 244.5 …. 244.5 …. 244.5
Actual Spending 17.1 …. 5.2 221.8 244.1 …. 244.1 …. 244.1
Participation in Community and Civic Life  
Main Estimates 69.6 …. 26.2 112.1 207.9 …. 207.9 …. 207.9
Planned Spending 73.0 …. 36.9 131.8 241.7 …. 241.7 …. 241.7
Total Authorities 79.8 …. 30.5 121.1 231.4 …. 231.4 …. 231.4
Actual Spending 55.2 …. 30.4 119.3 204.9 …. 204.9 …. 204.9
Total Department  
Main Estimates 284.6 …. 183.1 922.3 1,390.0 5.4 1,384.6 0.01 1,384.6
Planned Spending 288.7 …. 233.8 954.9 1,477.4 5.4 1,472.0 0.01 1,472.0
Total Authorities 284.0 …. 145.6 1,034.6 1,464.2 5.2 1,459.0 0.01 1,459.1
Actual Spending 257.8 …. 145.4 1,004.9 1,408.1 4.7 1,403.4 0.00 1,403.4

Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items


($ millions) 2006-07
Voted and Statutory Items Main
Estimates
Planned 
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
1 Operating Expenditures 249.6 253.1 252.6 227.0
5 Grants and Contributions 1,104.6 1,188.0 1,179.1 1,149.1
(S) Salaries of the Lieutenant-Governors 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1
(S) Payments under the Lieutenant-Governors Superannuation Act 0.6 0.6 0.9 0.9
(S) Supplementary Retirement Benefits - Former Lieutenant-Governors 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
(S) Contributions to Employee Benefit Plans 28.5 29.0 25.0 25.0
(S) Minister of Canadian Heritage - Salary and Motor Car Allowance 0.07 0.07 0.08 0.08
Total 1,384.6 1,472.0 1,459.0 1,403.4
L15 Loans to Institutions and Public Authorities under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.00
Total Department 1,384.6 1,472.0 1,459.0 1,403.4

The total variance of $55.6M between the 2006-07 authorities and the actuals is overstated by $40.9M which has been reprofiled to future years.

Table 4: Services received without Costs


($ millions) 2006-07 Actual Spending
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 15.9
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board Secretariat (excluding revolving funds) 11.8
Worker's compensation coverage provided by Social Development Canada 0.05
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 2.0
Total 2006-07 Services received without charges 29.8

 

Table 5: Loans, Investments and Advances (non budgetary)


($ millions) 2006-07
Program Activity Actual
2004-05
Actual
2005-2006
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life
Loans to Institutions and Public Authorities under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act -- -- 0.01 0.01 0.01 --
Total - Department -- -- 0.01 0.01 0.01 --

Table 6: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues


($ millions) 2006-07
Actual
2004-05
Actual
2005-06
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
Respendable Revenues  
Business Lines:  
Cultural Development and Heritage 4.3 -- -- -- -- --
Program Activities:  
Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation -- 3.4 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.5
Preservation of Canada's Heritage -- 0.5 1.1 1.1 0.9 0.3
Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life -- 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9
Total - Respendable Revenues 4.3 4.9 5.4 5.4 5.2 4.7
Non-Respendable Revenues  
Federal-Provincial Lottery Agreement 60.5 62.1 62.0 62.0 62.8 62.8
Other Revenue 11.0 18.0 -- -- 17.0 17.0
Total - Non-Respendable Revenues 71.5 80.1 62.0 62.0 79.8 79.8
Total Revenues 75.8 85.0 67.4 67.4 85.0 84.5

Table 8: Resource Requirements by Sector


($ millions) 2006-2007
Program Activities
Organization Creation of
Canadian Content and Performance
Excellence
Sustainability of Cultural
Expression and Participation
Preservation
of Canada's
Heritage
Access and Participation
in Canada's
Cultural Life
Promotion
of Inter-Cultural
Understanding
Community
Development and Capacity Building
Participation in Community and Civic Life TOTAL
Cultural Affairs
Planned Spending 174.1 80.8 3.4 163.2 0.0 0.0 0.2 421.7
Actual Spending 194.9 74.8 1.2 117.9 0.1 0.1 0.6 389.6
Citizenship and Heritage
Planned Spending 0.0 5.3 30.0 15.3 144.1 243.8 158.4 596.9
Actual Spending 0.2 14.5 33.2 12.1 138.5 234.5 151.2 584.2
International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport
Planned Spending 127.7 176.5 0.1 1.7 0.2 0.1 18.0 324.3
Actual Spending 148.5 131.8 0.2 0.6 1.1 0.2 1.3 283.7
Public Affairs and Communications
Planned Spending 0.2 6.5 3.6 9.8 2.4 3.5 61.4 87.4
Actual Spending 3.8 11.8 6.2 14.5 3.5 4.9 36.0 80.7
Corporate Services
Planned Spending 5.7 12.5 4.5 9.9 2.1 3.3 3.7 41.7
Actual Spending 5.9 13.3 4.8 18.0 3.0 4.4 15.8 65.2
TOTAL
Planned Spending 307.7 281.6 41.6 199.9 148.8 250.7 241.7 1,472.0
Actual Spending 353.3 246.2 45.6 163.1 146.2 244.1 204.9 1,403.4

Table 9-A-1: Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP)


A. User Fee

Fee Type

Fee Setting Authority

Date Last Modified

2006-07

Planning Years

Forecast Revenue ($000)

Actual Revenue ($000)

Full Cost ($000)

Performance Standard

Performance Results

Fiscal Year

Forecast Revenue ($000)

Estimated Full Cost ($000)

Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act.

Other products and services

Access to Information Act

1992

See note 1

7

490

See note 4

Response provided within 30 days following the request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The Access to Information Act provides fuller details.

See note 2

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

See note 3

See note 3

See note 3

490

See note 5

See note 5

B. Date Last Modified: (Nil)

C. Other Information: (Nil)


* Note: According to prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004:

  • Performance standard, if provided, may not have received parliamentary review;
  • Performance standard, if provided, may not respect all establishment requirements under the User Fees Act ( UFA) (e.g., international comparison, independent complaint address); and
  • Performance results, if provided, are not legally subject to User Fees Act section 5.1 regarding fee reductions for failed performance.

Note 1: This figure cannot be provided, as revenue is based on actual information requests received under the Access to Information Act.

Note 2: Taking into account external factors, 90% of requests were completed within the prescribed timeframe.

Note 3: This figure cannot be provided, as revenue is based on actual information requests received under the Access to Information Act.

Note 4: This figure consists of salary and O&M costs in relation to the administration of the Access to Information Act.

Note 5: Budget information not provided in advance. Cannot provide figures for 2008‑09 and 2009‑10.

Table 9-A-2: Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO)


A. User Fee

Fee Type

Fee-setting Authority

Date Last Modified

2006-2007

Planning Years

Forecast Revenue ($000)

Actual Revenue ($000)

Full Cost ($000)

Performance Standard

Performance Results

Fiscal Year

Forecast Revenue ($000)

Estimated Full Cost ($000)

Processing fees

Regulatory Fee

Department of Canadian Heritage Act

March 2004

3,150

3,525

3,179

Issuing certificates 8-10 weeks from the date the application is received and deemed complete.

CAVCO was able to issue the certification within this period 90% of the time.

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

3,500

3,500

3,500

3,300

3,500

3,500

B. Date Last Modified: March 2004

C. Other Information:(Nil)


Tables 9-B-1, 2, 3 and 4: External Fees and Service Standards

More information on tables 9-B-1, 2, 3 and 4 is available on line.

Table 9-B-1: Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP)

Table 9-B-2: Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO)

Table 9-B-3: Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI)

Table 9-B-4: Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN)

Table 13: Details on Transfer Payments Programs


Name of Transfer Payment Programs (above $5 million) Amount of Grants ($ millions) Amount of Contributions ($ millions)  Total($ millions)

Aboriginal Peoples’ Program (including Young Canada Works)

0.6

65.2

65.8

Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education

0.0

0.0

0.0

Arts Presentation Canada Program

0.0

22.1

22.1

Athlete Assistance Program

25.3

0.0

25.3

Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP)

0.0

36.9

36.9

Canada Magazine Fund

0.0

15.6

15.6

Canada Music Fund

0.0

23.2

23.2

Canada New Media Fund

0.0

14.0

14.0

Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program

15.4

8.3

23.7

Canadian Television Fund

0.0

120.0

120.0

Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program

2.1

11.6

13.7

Community Partnerships Program

0.0

7.9

7.9

Contribution in support of the Canadian Culture Online Program

0.6

14.5

15.1

Cultural Spaces Canada

0.3

19.8

20.1

Development of Official-Language Communities Program

5.2

216.3

221.5

Enhancement of Official Languages Program (including Young Canada Works)

0.2

118.5

118.7

Exchanges Canada Initiative

0.1

22.4

22.5

Grants/Contributions to TV5 Program

4.1

3.0

7.1

Hosting Program

0.0

126.5

126.5

Katimavik Program

0.0

17.5

17.5

Multiculturalism Program

0.6

8.6

9.2

Museum Assistance Program (including Young Canada Works)

1.6

8.2

9.8

Music Entrepreneur Program1

0.0

0.0

0.0

National Arts Training Contribution Program

0.0

17.0

17.0

 

0.0

0.0

0.0

New Musical Works Program2

 

Partnerships Fund3

 

Publication Assistance Program

45.4

0

45.4

Sport Support Program

0.0

94.0

94.0

Total

101.5

991.1

1,092.6


1 Music Entrepreneur Program is included under Canada Music Fund.

2 New Music Works Program is included under Canada Music Fund.

3 Partnerships Fund is included under Canadian Culture Online.

All these transfer payment programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

More information on transfer payment programs is available on line.

Table 14: Conditional Grants (Foundations)

More information on Conditional Grants (Fondations) for the Department of Canadian Heritage, 2006-07 is available on line.

Table 15: Financial Statements


Canadian Heritage

Financial Statements

March 31, 2007


Canadian Heritage
Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2007 and all information contained in these statements rests with the management of Canadian Heritage. These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of Canadian Heritage’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in Canadian Heritage’s Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds. Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout Canadian Heritage.

The Canadian Heritage audit and evaluation committee is responsible for discussing and addressing issues arising from audits or evaluations regarding Canadian Heritage programs, services, policies or activities in order to improve the quality of the Department’s program delivery, management practices, performance measurement and reporting.

The financial statements of Canadian Heritage have not been audited. La signature a t ajout aprs la traduction.

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Canadian Heritage
Statement of Financial Position
(unaudited)
as at March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

Accounts receivable and advances (Note 4)

5,768

 

1,836

Investment in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

33,000

 

33,000

Total financial assets

38,768

 

34,836

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses

1,498

 

438

Inventory

2,004

 

1,660

Tangible capital assets (Note 5)

16,962

 

15,895

Total non-financial assets

20,464

 

17,993

 

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

59,232

 

52,829

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY OF CANADA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 6)

579,978

 

560,370

Vacation pay

8,723

 

7,960

Deferred revenue (Note 7)

332

 

277

Pension accounts-Lieutenant Governors

235

 

245

Employee benefits (Note 8)

30,484

 

28,169

Other liabilities

9

 

11

Total liabilities

619,761

 

597,032

 

 

 

 

Equity of Canada

(560,529)

 

(544,203)

 

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY OF CANADA

59,232

 

52,829

 

 

 

 


Contingent liabilities (Note 9)
Contractual obligations (Note 10)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

 


CANADIAN HERITAGE
Statement of Operations

(unaudited)
for the year ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

(Note 13)

Expenses (Note 11)

 

 

 

Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence

354,756

 

331,129

Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation

252,256

 

172,275

Community Development and Capacity Building

245,869

 

277,945

Participation in Community and Civic Life

210,004

 

195,450

Access and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life

170,811

 

163,526

Promotion on Inter-Cultural Understanding

147,574

 

124,618

Preservation of Canada’s Heritage

45,826

 

50,260

Total expenses

1,427,096

 

1,315,203

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

 

 

Revenue from the 1979 Federal-provincial Lottery-

 

 

 

agreement

62,653

 

61,996

Sale of goods and services

4,993

 

4,926

Miscellaneous revenues

333

 

156

Total revenues

67,979

 

67,078

 

 

 

 

Net Cost of Operations

1,359,117

 

1,248,125

 

 

 

 


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


CANADIAN HERITAGE
Statement of Equity of Canada
(unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31
( in thousands of dollars) 2007   2006

Equity of Canada, beginning of year

(544,203)

 

(487,097)

Net cost of operations

(1,359,117)

 

(1,248,125)

Current year appropriations used (Note 3)

1,403,442

 

1,279,103

Revenue not available for spending (Note 3)

(62,806)

 

(62,143)

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue

 

 

 

Fund (Note 3)

(27,615)

 

(54,141)

Services received without charge from other federal

 

 

 

government departments (Note 12)

29,770

 

28,200

 

 

 

 

Equity of Canada, end of year

(560,529)

 

(544,203)

 

 

 

 


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Canadian Heritage
Statement of Cash Flow

(unaudited) 
For the Year Ended March 31
( in thousands of dollars) 2007   2006
Operating activities

Net cost of operations

1,359,117

 

1,248,125

Non-cash items

 

 

 

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(2,153)

 

(2,384)

Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets

(63)

 

(1)

Services received without charge (Note 12)

(29,770)

 

(28,200)

Adjustment to tangible capital assets

171

 

 

Variations in Statement of Financial Position

 

 

 

Increase (Decrease) accounts receivable and advances

3,932

 

(6,745)

Increase (Decrease) in prepaid expenses

1,060

 

(14,083)

Increase (Decrease) in inventory

344

 

(475)

Increase in liabilities

(22,729)

 

(39,374)

Cash used by operating activities

1,309,909

 

1,156,863

 

 

 

 

Capital investment activities

 

 

 

Acquisition of tangible capital assets

3,122

 

5,969

Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets

(10)

 

(13)

Cash used by capital investment activities

3,112

 

5,956

 

 

 

 

Financing activities

 

 

 

Net cash provided by Government of Canada (Note 3)

(1,313,021)

 

(1,162,819)


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

1. Authority and Objective

The Department of Canadian Heritage was established in 1995 under the Department of Canadian Heritage Act.

The Department of Canadian Heritage seeks to contribute to a cohesive and creative Canada in which all Canadians have opportunities to participate in Canada’s cultural and civic life. The two strategic outcomes of the Department are:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world; and
  • Canadians live in an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

These strategic outcomes help give shape to policies, programs and services offered to Canadians related to broadcasting, cultural industries, arts, heritage, official languages, Aboriginal cultures and languages, Canadian identity, citizens’ participation, youth, multiculturalism and sport. Expenses of these programs are reported in the Statement of Operations through the following seven program activities:

  • Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
  • Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
  • Community Development and Capacity Building
  • Participation in Community and Civic Life
  • Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life
  • Promotion of Inter-Cultural Understanding
  • Preservation of Canada's Heritage

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a) Parliamentary appropriations

The Department of Canadian Heritage is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to the Department do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Statement of Operations and the Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high‑level reconciliation between the two bases of reporting.

b) Net Cash Provided by Government of Canada

The Department of Canadian Heritage operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Department is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the Department are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.

c) Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non-respendable revenue recorded by the Department of Canadian Heritage. It results from timing differences between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.

d) Accounts receivable

Accounts receivable are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

e) Investment in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The Department’s investment in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is recorded at cost. The net results of this Crown Corporation are not accounted for in the departmental financial statements, as the Department is not deemed to control this Crown Corporation.

f) Inventory

Inventory consists of material and supplies held for future program delivery and not intended for re-sale. They are valued at cost. If they no longer have service potential, they are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

g) Tangible capital assets

All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. The Department of Canadian Heritage does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian Reserves and museum collections.

Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:


Asset class

Amortization period

Machinery and equipment

5 and 10 years

Informatics hardware

5 years

Informatics software

3 and 5 years

Motor Vehicles

7, 10 and 15 years

Leasehold improvements

Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement

Assets under construction

Once in service, in accordance with asset type


h) Employee future benefits

  • Pension benefits : Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan administered by the Government of Canada. The Department of Canadian Heritage contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require the Department to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
  • Severance benefits : Employees are entitled to severance benefits, as provided for under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

i) Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities, which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

j) Revenues

  • Revenues are recognized in the year in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.
  • Funds received from third parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenues and are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.

k) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on the accrual basis:

  • Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met. In the case of grants which do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements;
  • Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement;
  • Vacation pays are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

l) Foreign currency transactions

Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated into Canadian dollars using the rate of exchange in effect on March 31. Gains and losses resulting from the foreign currency transactions are presented under miscellaneous revenues and other expenses in the Statement of Operations and note 11 respectively.

m) Measurement uncertainty

The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

n) Financial Instruments

The carrying amounts of the Department’s accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their fair value due to their short term maturity.

3. Parliamentary Appropriations

The Department of Canadian Heritage receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Net cost of operations

1,359,117

 

1,248,125

 

 

 

 

Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but

 

 

 

not affecting appropriations

 

 

 

Add (less):

 

 

 

Revenue not available for spending

62,806

 

62,143

Refund of prior year expenses

12,867

 

13,874

Prepaid expenses

1,060

 

(14,083)

Inventory

344

 

(475)

Outstanding respendable revenue

249

 

10

Adjustments to tangible capital assets

171

 

-

Disposal of non-capital assets

9

 

10

Advances

5

 

(87)

Services received without charge

(29,770)

 

(28,200)

Employee severance benefits

(2,315)

 

(3,577)

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(2,153)

 

(2,384)

Department of Justice legal fees

(1,187)

 

(922)

Vacation pay

(763)

 

(1,290)

Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets

(63)

 

(1)

Bad debt

(62)

 

(9)

 

1,400,315

 

1,273,134

 

 

 

 

Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations

 

 

 

but affecting appropriations

 

 

 

Add:

 

 

 

Acquisitions of tangible capital assets

3,122

 

5,969

Adjustment to tangible capital assets

5

 

-

 

3,127

 

5,969

 

 

 

 

Current year appropriations used

1,403,442

 

1,279,103


b) Appropriations provided and used:


 

Appropriations provided

(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Vote B120 - Operating expenditures

252,600

 

245,392

Vote B150 - Transfer payments

1,179,044

 

1,018,534

Statutory amounts

27,343

 

28,038

Loans-Cultural Property

10

 

10

 

 

 

 

Less:

 

 

 

Appropriation available for the future years

(19)

 

(23)

Lapsed appropriations

*(55,536)

 

(12,848)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current year appropriations used

1,403,442

 

1,279,103


* Lapsed appropriations of $55,536 include $40,860 which has been transferred to future years.

c) Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by government

1,313,021

 

1,162,819

Revenue not available for spending

62,806

 

62,143

Changes in net position in the consolidated Revenue Fund

 

 

 

Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable and

 

 

 

Advances

(3,932)

 

6,745

Increase in liabilities

22,729

 

39,374

Receipts and expenditures not affecting appropriations

8,818

 

8,022

 

27,615

 

54,141

 

 

 

 

Current year appropriations used

1,403,442

 

1,279,103

 

 

 

 


4. Accounts Receivable and Advances

The following table presents details of accounts receivable and advances:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivables from other federal government departments and agencies

4,419

 

807

Accounts receivable from external parties

1,972

 

1,596

Employee advances

26

 

25

Other advances

120

 

115

 

6,537

 

2,543

 

 

 

 

Less: allowance for doubtful accounts on external receivables

(769)

 

(707)

 

 

 

 

Total

5,768

 

1,836


5. Tangible Capital Assets

(in thousands of dollars)

Cost         Accumulated amortization


Capital asset class

Opening balance

Acqui-sitions

Adjust-ments

Dispo-sals

Closing balance

Opening balance

Amor-tization

Adjust-ments

Dispo-sals

Closing balance

2007 Net book value

2006 Net book value

Machinery & equipment

6,682

971

54

15

7,692

3,771

520

7

1

4,297

3,395

2,911

Informatics

hardware

6,732

811

58

30

7,571

4,779

661

12

1

5,451

2,120

1,953

Informatics

software

3,685

105

 

 

3,790

2,520

542

 

 

3,062

728

1,165

Motor

vehicles

2,093

68

 

72

2,089

1,263

134

 

52

1,345

744

830

Leasehold improvements

2,158

547

92

17

2,780

799

296

14

7

1,102

1,678

1,359

Assets under

construction

7,677

620

 

 

8,297

 

 

 

 

 

8,297

7,677

Total

29,027

3,122

204

134

32,219

13,132

2,153

33

61

15,257

16,962

15,895


Amortization expense for the year ended March 31, 2007 is $2,153 million (2006 is 2,384 million)

6. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Payable to external parties

565,649

 

548,743

Payable to other federal government departments and agencies

10,044

 

7,836

Accrued salaries, wages and employee benefits

4,268

 

3,782

Sales tax payable

17

 

9

 

 

 

 

Total

579,978

 

560,370


7. Deferred Revenue

Deferred revenue represents the balance at year-end of unearned revenues stemming from cost-sharing agreements, which are restricted to fund the expenditures related to the projects. Revenue is recognized each year in the amount of the expenditures incurred. Details of the transactions related to this account are as follows:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Balance, beginning of year

277

 

904

Funds received

504

 

707

Revenue recognized

(449)

 

(1,334)

 

 

 

 

Balance, end of year

332

 

277


8. Employee Benefits

(a) Pension benefits: The Department’s employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years or earning. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the Department contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2007 expense amounts to $24,954 million ($26,253 million in 2006), which represents approximately 2.2 times (2.6 times in 2006) the contributions by employees.

The Departments responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

(b) Severance benefits: The Department provides severances benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year

28,169

 

24,592

Expense for the year

3,982

 

5,687

Benefits paid during the year

(1,667)

 

(2,110)

 

 

 

 

Accrued benefit obligation, end of year

30,484

 

28,169


9. Contingent Liabilities

Claims have been made against the Department in the normal course of operation. Legal proceeding for claims totaling approximately $ 189,000 ($150,000 in 2006) were still pending at March 31, 2007. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

10. Contractual Obligations

The nature of the Department’s activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby the Department will be obligated to make future payments. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:


(in thousands of dollars)

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012 and thereafter

Total

Transfer payments

318,000

322,000

40,000

3,000

1,000

684,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


11. Expenses

The following table presents details of expenses by category:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

(Note 13)

Transfer payments

 

 

 

Non-profit organizations

707,623

 

582,425

Other levels of government within Canada

299,292

 

297,744

Industry

100,291

 

95,091

Individuals

27,084

 

27,141

Other countries and international organizations

6,505

 

6,054

Total transfer payments

1,140,795

 

1,008,455

 

 

 

 

Salaries and employee benefits

192,559

 

189,507

Professional services

33,677

 

53,061

Accommodation

15,939

 

15,200

Utilities, materials and supplies

13,591

 

13,654

Travel and relocation

8,085

 

11,581

Information

8,132

 

10,216

Freight and communications

4,595

 

5,434

Rentals

1,784

 

3,113

Amortization

2,153

 

2,384

Repairs and maintenance

1,897

 

1,626

Loss on disposal of capital assets

63

 

1

Other operating expenses

3,826

 

971

 

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

286,301

 

306,748

 

 

 

 

Total Expenses

1,427,096

 

1,315,203

 

 

 

 


12. Related party transactions

The Department is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies and crown corporations. The Department enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year, the Department received services which were obtained without charge from other federal government departments as presented in part (a).

Services provided without charge:

During the year the Department received without charge from other departments, accommodation, legal fees and the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans. These services without charge have been recognized in the Department’s Statement of Operation as follows:


(in thousands of dollars)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Accommodation

15,939

 

15,200

Employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans

11,845

 

11,400

Legal services

1,986

 

1,600

 

 

 

 

Total

29,770

 

28,200


The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The cost of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Publics Works and Government Services Canada, are not included as an expense in the Department’s Statement of Operations.

13. Comparative information

Comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.

Table 16: Response to Parliamentary Committees, Audits and Evaluations


Responses to Parliamentary Committees, 2006-07

Fourth report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, Report on the Canadian Feature Film Industry -- “Scripts, Screens and Audiences: A New Feature Film Policy for the 21 st Century.”

The report was tabled on June 1, 2006, and contained 30 recommendations.

The Committee began its study of the Canadian film industry in February 2005, the purpose being to evaluate the federal government’s Canadian feature film policy. After hearing more than 180 film industry witnesses, the Committee presented an interim report in June 2005 asking stakeholders for written responses to a series of targeted questions. This report contains statistical and economic data on the film industry, market shares and government support for Canadian cinema. It outlines the opinions expressed by the stakeholders on the interim report and compares assistance programs in Canada to those of other countries. Finally, it outlines 30 recommendations for preparing and implementing a new film policy, focusing primarily on the basic components for a new policy, the importance of governance and transparency, and the actions required to apply the new policy.

The Government’s response was signed by Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women and tabled on September 29, 2006.

Ninth report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, Report on Museum Policy in Canada.

The report was tabled on November 27, 2006, and contained one recommendation.

The Committee report refers to two motions adopted by the Committee and tabled in the House of Commons, one requesting the presentation of the new museum policy discussed in 2005, and the other, the reinstatement of the Museums Assistance Program, which was done away with as part of the expenditure review of the Government in September 2006. After hearing evidence from various Canadian museum associations, the Committee recommended that the Government present a new museum policy before the next budget.

The Government’s response was signed by Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women and tabled on March 27, 2007.

Second Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications: Final Report on the Canadian News Media.

The report was tabled on June 21, 2006, and contained 40 recommendations and 10 proposals.

The Committee began the study in March 2003 and presented an interim report in May 2004. While the Committee’s mandate originally covered the media at large, it soon chose to focus on the news media. The main issues in the study are technological innovation coupled with recent changes in ownership in the Canadian media sector. The report requests that the policy on the Canadian news media give greater consideration to the public interest, and makes recommendations on current policies supporting the news media and journalists and on the rights of linguistic minorities. It also considers self-regulation of the news media industry, permanent education for journalists and diversity in newsrooms. A number of recommendations call for amendments to the Broadcasting Act, the Competition Act, and the Security of Information Act. Some call for CRTC action in media company mergers and licensing conditions, and for empowering the CRTC to fine broadcasters. Finally, a few recommendations directly affect the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s governance and mandate.

The Government’s response was signed by Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women and tabled on November 24, 2006.

Sixth Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages, French-language Education in a Minority Setting: “A Continuum from Early Childhood to the Postsecondary Level”.

The report was tabled on June 14, 2005, and contained eight recommendations.

The report focuses essentially on education from early childhood (pre-kindergarten) to postsecondary school (college and university), treating education as a continuum to ensure and promote the development of minority Francophone communities. It looks at the challenges that must be faced to achieve results equivalent to those of the majority in providing education in French as the first language in a minority setting. Among its recommendations, the Committee asks the Government to conduct a national awareness campaign to ensure respect for language rights and a national information campaign on French education rights. The Government, it suggests, should include specific measures in memoranda and agreements, develop a national early childhood and primary, secondary and postsecondary education policy, and coordinate its policies at all levels.

The Government’s response was signed by Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women , Minister of International Cooperation and Minister for La Francophonie and Official Languages and Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada and tabled on November 2, 2006.

 

List of Evaluations, 2006-07

Arts, Culture and Diversity Program (June 28, 2006)

Atlantic Canada Cultural and Economic Partnership (June 28, 2006)

Canada New Media Fund (December 8, 2006)

Community Participation Program (including the Canada Volunteerism Initiative)
(March 16, 2007)

Fathers of Confederation Trust Program (May 19, 2006)

Katimavik Program (May 19, 2006)

List of Internal Audits, 2006-07

Interchange Canada Program (March 16, 2007)

Management of Human Resource Information (September 15, 2006)

Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting and Northern Distribution (June 28, 2006)


 


Audit from the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, 2006-07

2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada - An Overview of the Federal Government's Expenditure Management System Report - Expenditures Management System in Departments

The November 2006 audit examined the Expenditure Management System at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Heritage, and Public Works and Government Services Canada. The audit found that some parts of the system are working well. For example, the departments are able to track and monitor their compliance with conditions imposed by Treasury Board in funding decisions. The audit also found notable weaknesses. In particular, there were significant examples of funding that were not adequately aligned with program requirements, which had a negative effect on program delivery. This problematic lack of alignment was considered to be primarily due to inflexibility in the system. Other such problems were the lack of a systematic approach to central expenditure review exercises, and the increasing proportion of spending items appearing in Supplementary Estimates rather than Main Estimates. The audit found that there is a need for more risk assessment, improved alignment and capacity building for improved response to future expenditure reviews.

2007 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada - Advertising and Public Opinion Research – Follow-up to the 2003 Report

The 2003 audit assessed the extent to which the government had ensured effective control over its spending on advertising and public opinion research activities and whether it measured results and reported them to Parliament. In this February 2007 follow-up audit, advertising campaigns and public opinion research projects were audited to see whether the departments administering these activities were exercising adequate management and control and whether changes made in response to the 2003 recommendations were effective.

The audit found that Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) made satisfactory progress in ensuring that it awards contracts for advertising and public opinion research services in a fair and transparent manner in accordance with the Treasury Board's Contracting Policy. Departments made satisfactory progress in ensuring that planning for advertising activities and managing suppliers is done in accordance with the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada and in ensuring that there was adequate documentation to support invoices submitted for payment for advertising and public opinion research activities. The results of advertising and public opinion research were measured and reported in accordance with the requirements established by the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada. The audit also found that some departments are still not complying with all requirements that apply to public opinion research. For example, some had contacted a research firm before informing PWGSC that they intended to carry out public opinion research activities.

2007 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada - The Conservation of Federal Built Heritage – Follow-up to the 2003 Report

The 2003 Protection of Cultural Heritage audit showed that built heritage was at risk because of a marked decrease in financial resources allocated to heritage conservation in the previous years, and because of shortcomings in built heritage management mechanisms and in the legal protection framework. It also reported that the heritage conservation framework had reached its limits and that a better balance had to be struck between departments' and agencies' conservation responsibilities and the resources made available to them.

The 2007 report found that the Parks Canada Agency (PCA) took satisfactory measures to follow up on the 2003 recommendations concerning the legal protection framework for built heritage and the management infrastructure for national historic sites. PCA has developed policy proposals to strengthen conservation, has completed and approved several management plans for national historic sites, and has carried out several evaluations of historic sites. However, these conservation interventions are not sufficient to guarantee the conservation of built heritage placed under the custody of departments. The report recommends that the government strengthen its conservation regime by e stablishing overall objectives for the conservation of built heritage, setting priorities for conservation and monitoring organizations activities, covering all elements of built heritage of custodian departments, combining the functions of designation and conservation, and reporting to Parliament on the results of conservation activities.

Official Languages

With regard to Part IV of the Official Languages Act, audits were conducted on site and over the telephone to determine whether offices and facilities designated bilingual and those with new obligations are complying with the requirements for communications with and services to the public in both official languages. The on-site audit took place in the Atlantic Region, whereas the telephone audit was conducted across Canada and reflected the objectives and scope of the 2003 audit.


Table 17: Sustainable Development Strategy


1. What are the key goals, objectives, and/or long-term targets of the Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS)?

The Sustainable Development Strategy 2004-06 for the Canadian Heritage had the following goals, objectives and targets :

Goal 1 :To reduce the environmental impact of Canadian Heritage’s internal operations.

Objective 1.1 : To increase employee awareness of Canadian Heritage’s approach to sustainable development.

Objective 1.2 : To reduce the environmental impact of procurement.

Objective 1.3 : To operate in a more eco-efficient manner.

Goal 2: To integrate sustainable development into Canadian Heritage programsand policies delivered directly by the Department or in partnership with others.

Objective 2.1 : To raise awareness of clients regarding how they can integrate sustainable development into the delivery of projects funded by Canadian Heritage.

Objective 2.2 : To integrate sustainable development principles into the design and delivery of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics.

Objective 2.3: To improve the eco-efficiency of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio

Goal 3: To integrate social and cultural dimensions into the federal government’s broader vision of sustainable development in Canada .

Objective 3.1 : To better understand the social and cultural dimensions of sustainable development.

2. How do your key goals, objectives, and/or long-term targets help achieve your department’s strategic outcomes?

Two strategic outcomes are identified in the Program Activity Architecture of the Department of Canadian Heritage:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world; and
  • Canadians live in an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

These outcomes summarize the overall goals of the Department, and they reflect an approach that is all about sustaining and reinforcing the cultural fabric of Canada. Canadian Heritage contributes a key component to federal sustainability objectives because the Department’s policies and programs help to ensure that Canadians are well equipped to build a strong future, with a strong understanding of their past and an ability to connect with each other in the present.

The goals and objectives of the Sustainable Development Strategy help to advance the Department’s strategic outcomes by:

  • Promoting an environment in which the Government of Canada is shown to respond to the concerns of Canadians with respect to sustainable activities and operations; and
  • Promoting a complete approach to sustainable development in Canada that also considers culture, heritage, inclusion, civic participation, and the importance of sharing experiences among Canadians.

In this way, the Department’s outcomes are furthered because cultural development is valued and trust is built in Canada’s civic institutions.

3. What were your targets for the reporting period?

During the reporting period, Canadian Heritage aimed to advance its sustainable development objectives by emphasizing operational improvements, particularly in implementing the new policy on green procurement, reviewing the procedures for performing strategic environmental assessments and developing a new procedure to ensure that the Department meets its obligations under the 1999 Cabinet Directive on the Strategic Environmental Assessment of Policies, Plans and Programs.

The Department also sought to participate in at least two interdepartmental projects to improve understanding of the Department’s role in supporting the social and cultural dimensions of sustainable development.

With the preparations of the new strategy (SDS 2007-09) during this year, the 2006-07 period offered a key opportunity to review the department’s overall approaches and systems for promoting sustainable development practices within the organization.

4. What is your progress to date?

Goal 1: To reduce the environmental impact of Canadian Heritage’s internal operations

Green Procurement

Canadian Heritage has incorporated "green" clauses into departmental Requests for Proposals where pertinent (for example, with regard to proposals for developing Canada’s pavillions at international expositions.) Generic "friendly environment clauses" have also been included in Requests for Proposals and contracts. Wherever possible, double-sided printing has been required within the terms of contracts.

Links to the policy on green procurement have been posted on the Department’s internal Web site (Intranet) for employees, also giving them access to the Sustainable Development Strategy and various green strategy sites.

Green suppliers are identified in the Department’s financial system. Awareness sessions were conducted for 202 program administrators and managers, which included aspects of green procurement.

Canadian Heritage has also participated actively in the Commodity Council on Greening Government Operations as well as in an internal steering committee to oversee various greening strategies. Canadian Heritage also manages a small fleet of vehicles to serve corporate requirements and during this reporting period, the Department purchased one energy efficient vehicle and one hybrid vehicle as replacements within this fleet.

Canadian Heritage and Portfolio Facilities

Canadian Heritage has been providing regular communiqus regarding the participation of Les Terrasses de la Chaudire, the headquarter office complex in the National Capital Region, in all recycling programs. A new program that was included in 2006-07 is the battery recycling program for alkaline, nickel cadmium, and lithium ion batteries.

The Department of Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) has also embarked on a major renovation project, whereby all washrooms in Les Terrasses de la Chaudire (LTC) complex are being upgraded. With these renovations, the complex will see a reduction in water consumption because of the installation of water sensor faucets. As well, PWGSC incorporated an energy program reducing light consumption at the LTC complex. PWGSC has the lead on all building projects, however as tenants in the complex, Canadian Heritage has ensured that information about these projects is disseminated to all staff and regular updates are provided when new initiatives are taken on.

The Department strives to ensure that its facilities projects meet ecological standards, such as the use of water based paints, non-toxic glues when installing carpets and the purchase of recyclable materials when ordering work stations. Canadian Heritage has made recommendations to PWGSC on these requirements as they have the lead in providing affordable and sustainable office accommodation and related services for departments and agencies of the Government of Canada.

The Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI), an agency within the Canadian Heritage portfolio, made operational improvements to advance sustainable operations through the renovation to its main facility on Innes Road ( Ottawa): the roof and windows were replaced; appropriate new materials (e.g. flooring) were installed, and the washrooms were modernized.

Information Technology and Systems

The Knowledge, Information and Technology Services (KITS) branch of the Department has established an internal “green” committee to address what can be done at the employee/branch level (which can also be shared for application in other areas), as well as to study the feasibility and effectiveness of IT initiatives to improve its sustainable operations (e.g. formatting shared printers for duplex printing, the use of “green” icons, reminders and warning windows that will promote green behaviour, etc.).

Goal 2: To integrate sustainable development into Canadian Heritage programs and policies delivered directly by the Department or in partnership with others .

Strategic Environmental Assessments

Canadian Heritage hired an experienced environmental assessment coordinator who undertook the management of the procedures involved in strategic environmental assessments and has also worked closely with Public Works and Government Services Canada in order to further capitalize on their expertise in the field of environmental assessments. The Department developed environmental assessment procedures and has presented an information session for program managers in collaboration with Public Works and Government Services Canada.

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

The 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Federal Secretariat continues to work closely with the 2010 Vancouver Organizing Committee (VANOC) to ensure that the principles of sustainable development are respected in all areas of their work. The environmental assessments for all the Winter Games venues are complete. VANOC also recently released the 2005-06 Sustainability Report. This report is the first of five that will be completed.

Promoting Sustainable Development with Partners

The Canadian Conservation Institute has committed to establishing a committee that will guide efforts to improve the understanding of CCI's role in supporting sustainable development within the museum community and to ensure the efficient operation of scientific and conservation laboratories, as well as its common spaces (library, training facility and office space).

Goal 3: To integrate social and cultural dimensions into the Government of Canada’s broader vision of sustainable development in Canada .

Cultural Sustainability

Canadian Heritage's cross-sector working group on cities and communities has continued to examine the concept of cultural sustainability, or culture as the "fourth pillar" of sustainability, in the context of the Department's investments in arts and sport activities, cultural infrastructure including artistic venues and heritage institutions, and forums for inter-cultural dialogue. The working group produced a commentary on this concept that has fed into interdepartmental discussions on federal roles and interests in communities, and on the need for place-based, collaborative policy approaches in support of community development. This group also helped to develop an international workshop on "the cultural basis of sustainable community planning," sponsored by Canadian Heritage, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Creative City Network of Canada at the third World Urban Forum, held in Vancouver from the 19 th to 23 rd of June, 2006. The theme of this major international gathering, organized by the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) in collaboration with the Government of Canada, was "Our Future: Sustainable Cities."

Canadian Heritage also participated in the development of a colloquium on francophone immigration, which addressed the issues and challenges related to the cultural sustainability of francophone communities, particularly those in a minority situation. The event explored issues such as the integration and participation of francophone immigrants, as well as the intersections of bilingualism and multiculturalism. The colloquium took place in March 2007, and was organized in collaboration with Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

5. What adjustments have you made, if any?

The Department is reviewing the Environmental Assessment Coordinator position to include the coordination of sustainable development functions in order to ensure the Department is better equipped to meet its commitments set out in its next Sustainable Development Strategy, for the 2007-09 period.

In preparation for assuming custodianship of its facilities in 2008-09, the Canadian Conservation Institute is including sustainable development as a component of its Facilities Management Plan and will be requiring the property management service provider to develop and implement a 5‑year energy management program as well as to implement and manage recycling programs.

In addition, the annual report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development was presented to Parliament in September 2006. Canadian Heritage was among the departments audited for the report. The report commended the coordination efforts for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games as an encouraging sign that federal departments are incorporating sustainable development principles in operational planning. The report also encouraged departments to make more specific commitments in their strategies and it identified the need for Canadian Heritage to improve its management systems, including in the planning, implementation and monitoring of commitments. These recommendations were critical during the development of the next Sustainable Development Strategy for the 2007-09 period, which took place over several months in the 2006 calendar year. Canadian Heritage’s new SDS was tabled in Parliament on December 14, 2006, and included as its first priority the strengthening of SD management measures throughout the Department. A number of explicit actions and performance measures were attached to this priority in order to facilitate its implementation.


Table 19: Client-Centered Services

More information on Client–Centered Services is available on line.

Table 20: Horizontal Initiatives

Official Languages Action Plan

The Action Plan is a policy statement of the Government of Canada that strengthens the implementation obligations under the Official Languages Act and includes a number of initiatives aimed at the enhancement and promotion of linguistic duality in Canadian society. Back in 2003, ten (10) federal institutions received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. These institutions work together to ensure that Canadians enjoy the benefit of linguistic duality; can live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French, and have access to government services in the language of their choice. The Action Plan is part of the Government of Canada's Official Languages Program which encompasses all activities with respect to its obligations and commitments under the Official Languages Act and its efforts to advance linguistic duality.

2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games – Delivering on our Commitments

The Department of Canadian Heritage is the lead on the horizontal initiative, 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games – Delivering on our Commitments. With eleven other departments and agencies responsible for the planning, coordination and management of their respective essential federal services in support of the 2010 Winter Games, this initiative will promote Canadian excellence and values nationally and internationally, establish sport, economic, social and cultural legacies that are aligned with federal policy objectives and will contribute to high quality games. Through this coordinated and integrated initiative, Canadians from across the country have participated in various 2010 related activities; federal visibility at home and abroad has been enhanced; and, significant progress on sustainable legacies such as venues has been made.

Horizontal Initiative: V2010


Programs / Themes

Department

Federal Coordination / Enhancing Canada’s International Profile

Canadian Heritage

Promoting Sustainable Benefits

Police and Security

RCMP, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, National Defence, Canadian Security Intelligence Agency, Public Health Agency of Canada

Entry of Goods and Individuals

Canadian Border Service Agency, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Public Health and Safety

Health Canada

Meteorological Services

Environment Canada

Sustainability

Environment Assessments

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada


More information on Horizontal Initiatives is available on line.