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SECTION 1: Overview

1.1 Minister's Message


Jim Prentice, Minister of Industry

I am pleased to present the Canadian Space Agency's Departmental Performance Report for 2006-2007.

My goal as Minister of Industry, and one of the top priorities of Canada's New Government, is to ensure we maintain a strong economic environment - one that allows Canadians to prosper in the global economy. We are seeing great changes in the international marketplace. New trade agreements, rapidly advancing technologies and the emergence of developing countries are all contributing to today's business environment. Canada needs to keep pace.


Part of my mandate is to help make Canadians more productive and competitive. We want our industries to continue to thrive and all Canadians to continue to enjoy one of the highest standards of living in the world.

For this to happen, the government is committed to maintaining a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace - one that encourages investment, sets the stage for greater productivity, and facilitates innovation. We are relying on market forces to a greater extent, regulating only when it is absolutely necessary. Our policies have helped turn research into new products and business processes. In addition, we are making efforts to increase awareness of sustainability practices among Canadian industry, emphasizing the social, environmental and economic benefits they bring.

The Department and the Industry Portfolio have made progress on a wide range of issues this past year, most notably in the areas of telecommunications, science and practical research, manufacturing, small business, consumer protection, patents and copyrights, tourism and economic development.

The Industry Portfolio is composed of Industry Canada and 10 other agencies, Crown corporations and quasi-judicial bodies. These organizations collectively advance Canada's industrial, scientific and economic development, and help ensure that we remain competitive in the global marketplace.

We have accomplished much this year. Using Advantage Canada - the government's long-term economic plan - as our roadmap, we have made great strides toward many of our most important goals. We will continue to focus on these goals to support the conditions for a strong economy - an environment that Canadians expect and deserve.

Jim Prentice
Minister of Industry


1.2 Management Representation Statement


I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2006-2007 Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for the Canadian Space Agency.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide for the Preparation of Part III of the 2006-2007 Estimates - Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

  • It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) guidance;
  • It is based on the department's approved Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Activity Architecture that were approved by the Treasury Board;
  • It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
  • It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities entrusted to it; and,
  • It reports finances based on approved numbers from the Estimates and the Public Accounts of Canada.

 


Name: ____________________________
  L. J. Boisvert, President and Chief Executive Officer

Departmental Performance Report prepared by:


Name: ____________________________
  Carole Lacombe, Senior Vice-President



1.3 CSA Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Crosswalk


PROGRAM ACTIVITY ARCHITECTURE (PAA)CROSSWALK
2005-2006 2006-2007
Program Activities Resources
($ in millions)
Program Activities Resources
($ in millions)
Space Based Earth Observation (EO) 131.1 Space Based Earth Observation (EO) 124.0
Space Science and Exploration (SE) 145.0 Space Science and Exploration (SE) 133.2
Satellite Communications (SC) 30.5 Satellite Communications (SC) 32.3
Space Awareness and Learning (AL) 5.3 Space Awareness and Learning (AL) 5.9
N/A Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE, and SC (GSA) 44.3
Corporate Services, Strategic Development and Infrastructure 29.8 Corporate Services and Infrastructure 34.5
   
TOTAL 341.6 TOTAL 374.1

In 2006-2007 a Program Activity called Generic Space Activities in support of Earth Observation, Space Science and Exploration, and Satellite Communications was added in order to better reflect the generic technology research and space qualification operations that support scientific and engineering programs. The budget allocated to this Program Activity in the 2006-2007 Main Estimates amounted to $44.3 million, which was drawn from the Earth Observation, Space Science and Exploration, and Satellite Communications Program Activities.

The Main Estimates for the Canadian Space Agency totalled $374.1 million, a net increase of $32.5 million over 2005-2006. The major changes were due to an increase of $21.0 million to meet the cash flow requirements for the new RADARSAT-Constellation project; a net reprofiling of $13.4 million affecting the budgets and expenditure profiles of major projects such as RADARSAT-2, Chinook and CASSIOPE because of the progress made on the development work; and, an additional decrease of $2.0 million to allow for a contribution to the government-wide reallocation exercise.


1.4 Summary Information


Raison d'tre

The mandate of the Agency is to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians.

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is achieving this mandate by implementing the Canadian Space Strategy (CSS) in cooperation with other government departments/agencies, industries, and universities, as well as international partners. In addition to delivering its own programs, the CSA is responsible for coordinating all federal civil space-related policies and programs pertaining to science and technology research, industrial development, and international cooperation.

To learn more about the mandate of the CSA, go to: http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/about/mission.asp.



2006-2007 - Financial Resources ($ in millions)

Planned

Total Authorities

Actual Spending

374.1

384.7

314.4

2006-2007 - Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned

Actual

Difference

690

609

81



CSA Strategic Outcomes

For a second consecutive year, the CSA is contributing under its Program Activity Architecture to the three following Strategic Outcomes, in line with the Government of Canada Outcomes and focusing more specifically on scientific and technological priorities.

Environment and Sustainable Development: A Space Program that helps Canada understand and protect the environment, and develop its resources in a sustainable manner.

Knowledge, Innovation and Economy: A Space Program that generates knowledge and pushes innovation, while leading (where appropriate) to increased productivity and economic growth through commercialization.

Sovereignty and Security: A Space Program that supports recognition of Canada's sovereignty and the security of its communities.


CSA Contributions to Gobernment of Canada Outcomes


Government of Canada Outcomes

Economy

Social

International

  1. A clean and healthy environment
  2. An innovative and knowledge-based economy
  3. Strong economic growth
  1. Safe and secure communities
  2. A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
  3. Healthy Canadians with access to quality health care
  1. A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership
  2. A prosperous Canada through global commerce
  3. A safe and secure world through international cooperation

image

CSA Contributions to Government of Canada Economic Outcomes

The CSA's three Strategic Outcomes contribute to the development of Canada's economy as measured against the following outcomes outlined in Canada's Performance Report:

  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy; and,
  • A clean and healthy environment.

The space industry contributes to Canada's economic well-being and helps achieve a higher standard of living and quality of life for all Canadians.

Through its Research and Development (R&D) investments and the resulting transfers of applications to the private and public sectors, the CSA's programs and activities attract highly skilled labour that contributes to Canada's knowledge-based economy; help enhance the Canadian space industry's competitiveness by encouraging dynamic trade relationships with other nations; and increase Canada's ability to compete in the global marketplace.

Earth observation missions drive some of the changes that are improving our quality of life by helping our government deliver on priorities such as protection of the environment, sustainable development, management of natural resources, understanding climate change and providing support for disaster management.

Satellite communications missions are a key element in linking all Canadians, including remote and northern communities, in a communication network.

CSA Contributions to Government of Canada Social Outcomes

The CSA's three Strategic Outcomes contribute to Canada's social foundations as measured against the following outcomes outlined in Canada's Performance Report:

  • Safe and secure communities; and,
  • A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage.

Space infrastructure offers privileged access and facilitates the dissemination of timely health, cultural, security and safety related information to all Canadians, no matter where they live in Canada.

Earth observation, communication and navigation satellites drive some of the changes that are improving our quality of life by helping our government deliver on environment, safety and security priorities, allowing timely monitoring and maintenance of a healthy physical environment over Canada, and providing support for disaster management in such situations as floods, forest fires and earthquakes. They also provide essential communication tool to support law and order enforcement activities and enhance search and rescue capabilities.

Fundamental research in physical and life sciences, space exploration, science and technology encourages a nation's best minds to participate in visionary endeavours. It encourages science and technology literacy, particularly among our youth, who are inspired by role models such as Canadian astronauts, scientists and researchers, who encourage them to strive high. Satellite communication is a powerful channel that plays a significant role in sharing Canadian culture and heritage. It is also the engine that drives the knowledge economy, contributing to the development of the new technologies that will maintain Canada's leadership in fields ranging from nanotechnology and robotics to healthcare.

Satellite communication is essential to provide all Canadians, no matter where they live in Canada, with timely access to knowledge and expertise related to health and education through a range of non-commercial services, including e-government, e-learning, tele-justice, tele-education, as well as tele-medicine disciplines such as tele-psychiatry, tele-radiology, tele-surgery, and tele-consultations.

CSA Contributions to Government of Canada International Outcomes

The CSA's three Strategic Outcomes contribute to establishing Canada's international presence as measured against the following outcome outlined in Canada's Performance Report:

  • A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership.

Space is now recognized by industrialized nations as an essential strategic tool to meet social and economic objectives. Canada must therefore possess a space infrastructure, not only to meet its specific national needs, but also to play a tangible and visible role in responding to the issues that interest the international community.

With its space exploration, science and technology endeavours, the majority of which involve international partners, the CSA plays an influential role in building bridges between an increasing number of space-faring countries. In striving to become one of the most advanced, connected, and innovative nations in the world, Canada offers and shares tremendous opportunities for the development and safety of the global community through the peaceful use of space.

Canada is an official member of the International Charter on Space and Major Disasters, through which all members agree to use their Earth observation satellites when required to respond to disasters.

Canada's participation in the International Space Station (ISS) provides access to the unique space laboratory for Canadian researchers and ensures that Canada remains a partner of choice for future international partnerships that will explore the solar system and other planets.

Canada's participation, as a cooperating state, in European Space Agency (ESA) programs allows our industry and our scientific community to participate in forward-looking studies in Earth observation, space science and exploration as well as new telecommunications applications.

Strategic Context of the Canadian Space Agency

International Environment

In the global context, space is recognized by industrialized nations as an essential and strategic tool to meet their social, economic, and foreign policy objectives. Accordingly, many governments around the world, both traditional and newly emerging space-faring nations, are increasing their investments in space activities, seeking increased consolidation and advancement of their space capabilities.

International cooperation is critical to the implementation of the Canadian Space Strategy. Canada must therefore possess a space infrastructure not only to meet its specific national needs, but also to play a tangible and visible role in responding to the issues that interest the international community. Canada can leverage its resources and maximize its return on investment by working in partnership with other space-faring nations. Such partnerships allow for sharing of technical expertise, knowledge and infrastructure, and provide access to areas in which Canada has chosen not to invest its limited resources. In addition, increasing concerns over issues such as space debris, climate change and security, which transcend national borders, encourage nations with common goals to increase cooperation. Canada cooperates with a number of international partners and has ties to various space agencies. Although the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) remain Canada's longstanding international partners, we are developing relationships with national space organizations in India, Sweden, Norway, Germany, Russia, Argentina, Italy, Japan and China.

To learn more about Canada's international partners, go to: http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/resources/links_agencies.asp

Canada is regarded as a reliable partner possessing unique technical and scientific capabilities and as a nation that can meaningfully contribute to the initiatives of foreign space agencies. In particular, emerging space-faring countries in Asia and South America may offer great potential for future cooperation. Consequently, Canada maintains its efforts to establish a foothold in these emerging markets. It is of paramount importance that the CSA continue to work with its stakeholders to ensure that our research community and industry remain active and competitive vis--vis world standards and markets.

The perception of Canada's space industry as being internationally competitive is confirmed by the results of the 2005 Annual Survey of the Canadian Space Sector. With total annual industry revenues of $2.5 billion, of which exports represent 50% ($1.245 billion), Canada has a higher percentage of exports than any other major space-faring nation. The destination of Canada space exports is mainly distributed as follows: 47% generally destined for the U.S., 32% for Europe and 8% for Asia1.

National Environment

The Canadian Space Agency recognizes that the best means of turning scientific and technological advancements into innovative products and services is through partnerships with Canadian universities and industry. The CSA firmly believes that industry is the best vehicle for providing a broad range of services for diverse groups of users - from individuals to public and private organizations. With its highly skilled workforce, the space industry in Canada not only generates wealth in our economy, but also provides Canadians with competitive products and services that would otherwise have to be obtained from foreign sources.

In 2005, Canada's space industry generated $2.5 billion in revenues.2 Satellite Communications continued to generate the lion's share of the Canadian space sector's revenues with a total of $1.83 billion. A breakdown of the revenues by sectors of activity is as follows: Satellite Communications: 77.6% ($1.83 billion); Earth Observation: 8% ($192 million); Navigation: 4.8% ($120 million); Robotics: 6.1% ($153 million); Space Science: 3.4% ($84 million); and all space-related activities in areas other than those mentioned above: $11 million.3 While small in number of firms, the Canadian space sector is knowledge-intensive and at the forefront of research and innovation. Building on the strengths of 6,710 highly skilled workers,4 Canadian firms have acquired world-leading capabilities in niche areas such as Earth observation, space robotics, satellite communications and navigation.

Given that the national market is relatively small, it is critical that the Canadian industry be able to leverage foreign investments and generate export sales. Capitalizing on export revenue depends on the industry's ability to commercialize highly competitive products and services and establish local partnerships. The Government of Canada plays a key role in helping to establish such partnerships, facilitating trade relations and export opportunities and securing a strategic role for Canadian industry and academia in important international space initiatives. The CSA works very closely with the Canadian space industry and scientists in 25 Canadian universities and 12 research centres.

1 State of the Canadian Space Sector 2005; Export Revenues
2 State of the Canadian Space Sector 2005; Overall Revenues
3 State of the Canadian Space Sector 2005; Revenues by Sector of Activity
4 State of the Canadian Space Sector 2005; Space Sector Workforce, Workforce Groups
http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/industry/state.asp.

Regional distribution of CSA R&D contracts from 1988-1989 to 2006-2007 (in %):

image
Source: CSA Organized Research Information System (ORIS)
Regional distribution of CSA contracts, March 31, 2007.

To learn more about Canadian space-related organizations, go to: http://www3.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/industry/csd.asp.

Government Environment

In keeping with its objective to be an open and transparent organization, the CSA's strategic planning is done in consultation with other Government of Canada organizations and various Canadian stakeholders.

The CSA hold ongoing consultations with Government of Canada organizations to identify where and how space science and technologies could be used to enhance the delivery of their mandates and provide new or more efficient services for Canadians. More specifically, the CSA is constantly seeking ways to contribute significantly to the effective and efficient delivery of government programs and services in the fields of communications, environment and sustainable development, security, intelligence, emergency preparedness, industry development and space sciences.

The wide range of space applications and technologies used by the Government is reflected in the CSA's three Strategic Outcomes, as well as in the number of partnerships between the CSA and other federal organizations. Sorted by Strategic Outcome, the list of partner organizations includes:

  • Environment and Sustainable Development: Natural Resources Canada including the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Environment Canada, Parks Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy: The Communications Research Centre of Industry Canada, which manages satellite communications programs on behalf of the CSA, National Research Council Canada, Industry Canada, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.
  • Sovereignty and Security: Department of National Defence, the Canadian Coast Guard, and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada.

CSA Program Activity Architecture

image

Program Activities

The CSA has been managing its programs according to the Canadian Space Strategy (CSS) for the past two years. The CSS greatly influenced decision-making at the CSA as it streamlined its Strategic Outcomes and set the long-term priorities for all activities under the Program Activity Architecture (PAA).

In 2006-2007 the PAA was amended and as a result, one additional Program Activity was created: Generic Space Activities. This new Program Activity supports the three CSS scientific and technology Program Activities: Space Based Earth Observation, Space Science and Exploration, and Satellite Communications. The Space Awareness and Learning Program Activity remained the same. All five Program Activities are supported by the services provided by the Corporate Services and Infrastructure Program Activity.

Program Sub-Activities

Scientific and engineering program activities are broken down into three large clusters called sub-activities: Enabling Research, Space Mission Development, and Space Mission Operations. Each sub-activity carries out a specific objective, taking part in a project management continuum from initial research phases to the final operational phases:

  • Through Enabling Research, the CSA provides leadership, coordination and support for basic and applied research and experimental development in order to increase the knowledge base, devise new applications through space missions, and allow the transfer of intellectual property and proven technologies to Canadian industry, academia, and government organizations.
  • Through Space Mission Development, the CSA provides coordination and support for the development of space missions through the definition, critical design, manufacturing, integration, testing and delivery phases leading to launch and early operations of space systems.
  • Through Space Mission Operations, the CSA operates manned and unmanned space missions through crew and ground support personnel training, mission analysis and planning, on-orbit ground control operations, system monitoring, maintenance and logistic support, as well as data handling and delivery.

The coordination of sub-activities throughout a project life cycle is meant to optimize the effectiveness and expertise of employees coming from different core functions and to promote an integrated team and a multi-functional approach to projects and services.

The Space Awareness and Learning Program Activity is broken down into two sub-activities, each with a specific objective:

  • Awareness activities, intended to increase public awareness and understanding of how space affects and improves the quality of life.
  • Learning activities, intended to build knowledge and enhance interest in space science and technology.

Together, these activities are part of a proactive strategy of communication, learning, and support for the development of professional expertise.


1.5 Department Performance - Summary


Program Activity - Space Based Earth Observation (EO)
Government of Canada Outcomes
  • A clean and healthy environment;
  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy;
  • Safe and secure communities; and,
  • A safe and secure world through international cooperation.
CSA Strategic Outcomes
  • Environment and Sustainable Development;
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy; and,
  • Sovereignty and Security.


Priority

Develop and operationalize the use of Space Based EO for the benefit of Canadians.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
124.0 66.4
Expected result

Delivery, directly or in partnership, of Space Based EO data, products and services in response to operational and scientific user requirements in the field of Environment, Resource and Land Use Management, and Security and Foreign Policy, supported by access capacity development.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: 82% (18/22) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.

In 2006-2007: 83% (15/18) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.



Sub-Activities Achieved vs Planned Targets
2005-2006 2006-2007
Enabling Research 8/11 73% 11/12 92%
Space Mission Development 7/8 87% 2/4 50%
Space Mission Operations 3/3 100% 2/2 100%
TOTAL 18/22 82% 15/18 83%


Examples of 2006-2007 Main Accomplishments

Ongoing operation of RADARSAT-1 provides useful information for both commercial and scientific users. A contingency plan was put in place to prescribe the use of foreign sensors as backup to RADARSAT-1 in order to continue to meet the needs of operational users until RADARSAT-2 data become available.

The assembly, integration and test of the RADARSAT-2 spacecraft were completed on time at the David Florida Laboratory, along with the operation preparation activities at CSA. However, the launch on a Soyuz rocket was rescheduled to November 2007. In the meantime, the Preparatory Program for the use of RADARSAT-2 data, value at $445 million, continued.

Conceptual design and technology development work on the RADARSAT-Constellation program, the follow-on program to RADARSAT-2, continued through 2006-2007.

The NASA's Cloudsat mission, launched in April 2006, leads to a very successful validation campaign in the Great Lakes region during the winter season. Analysis results are expected to have significant impact on numerical weather prediction models.

Three major Canadian science instruments continued orbiting Earth and collecting environmental data: MOPITT, aboard the NASA Terra satellite, OSIRIS, aboard the Swedish Odin satellite and SCISAT, operated by the CSA.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.2 - Space Based Earth Observation Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


Program Activity - Space Science and Exploration (SE)
Government of Canada Outcomes
  • A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership;
  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy; and,
  • A prosperous Canada through global commerce.
CSA Strategic Outcomes
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy; and,
  • Sovereignty and Security.


Priority

Understand the solar system and the Universe, expand our knowledge of the constituent elements and origins of life, and strengthen a human presence in space.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
133.2 130.0
Expected Result

Increased participation in Canadian and international opportunities in order to expand the scientific knowledge base made available to Canadian academia and R&D communities in astronomy, space exploration and solar-terrestrial relation as well as physical and life sciences.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: 83% (19/23) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.

In 2006-2007: 86% (24/28) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.



Sub-Activities Achieved vs Planned Targets
2005-2006 2006-2007
Enabling Research 6/9 67% 12/15 80%
Space Mission Development 6/7 86% 3/4 75%
Space Mission Operations 7/7 100% 9/9 100%
TOTAL 19/23 83% 24/28 86%


Examples of 2006-2007 Main Accomplisments

As part of the Shuttle-based ISS Assembly and Maintenance mission STS-115/12A, Canadian Astronaut, Steve MacLean, successfully performed one space walk (extra-vehicular activities) to install solar panels to increase the capability of the ISS to generate power to support science and operational activities.

As part of the Canadian Space Station Program (CSSP), a ground control capability was implemented for Canadarm2, which will allow for movement of the robotic arm by personnel on the ground without involvement of the on-orbit crew.

Canada's contribution to NASA's Phoenix mission, an on-board meteorological station (MET), underwent final testing at the CSA's David Florida Laboratory in Ottawa and was delivered on time to NASA for the successful launch in August 2007.

The CSA completed the detail design of the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, scheduled for launch in 2009. The Canadian contribution will help scientists to determine the chemical composition of various soil, dust and rock samples.

Canada continued the design and construction of the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), a critical element of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), a major facility-class space observatory to be launched in 2013. Through the CSA's contribution, Canadian astronomers will have guaranteed access to 5% of the observing.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.3 - Space Science and Exploration Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


Program Activity - Satellite Communications (SC)
Government of Canada Outcomes
  • Safe and secure communities;
  • A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage;
  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy;
  • A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership; and,
  • Healthy Canadians with access to quality health care.
CSA Strategic Outcomes
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy; and,
  • Sovereignty and Security.


Priority

Provide all Canadians with the means to participate in and fully benefit from the global information age.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
32.3 29.3
Expected Results

1) Increased access for Canadians to state-of-the-art communications systems and services to meet their social and economic needs.

2) Better use of space communications, search and rescue, and global navigation satellite systems and applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of other government departments and organizations in delivering services to Canadians.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: 69% (9/13) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or
successfully met.

In 2006-2007: 78% (7/9) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or
successfully met.



Sub-Activities Achieved vs Planned Targets
2005-2006 2006-2007
Enabling Research 3/6 50% 5/5 100%
Space Mission Development 6/7 86% 2/4 50%
Space Mission Operations NA NA NA NA
TOTAL
(NA = Not Applicable)
9/13 69% 7/9 78%


Example of 2006-2007 Main Accomplishments

Canadian companies continued to manufacture the Cascade payload and prepared for assembly, integration and test on the spacecraft. The project completion was delayed due to problems with the development of critical components and the launch date had to be moved from December 2007 to November 2008.

Canada's participation in European Space Agency (ESA) programs allowed our industry to access forward-looking studies on new telecommunications services; to develop new technologies, equipment and applications in multi-media, optical inter-satellite and mobile communications; and to demonstrate satellite-based communications services such as interactive communications services for remote communities and disaster management.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.4 - Satellite Communications Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


Program Activity - Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC (GSA)
Government of Canada Outcomes
  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy;
  • Strong economic growth; and,
  • A prosperous Canada through global commerce.
CSA Strategic Outcomes
  • Environment and Sustainable Development;
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy; and,
  • Sovereignty and Security.


Priority

Provide leadership, coordination or support to Earth Observation (EO), Space Science and Exploration (SE), and Satellite Communications (SC) Program Activities through generic technology research and space-qualification activities.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
44.3 47.2
Expected Result

Innovative space technologies, techniques, and design and test methodologies in response to advanced developments required for future space missions and activities.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: Not Applicable (NA) - This Program Activity did not exist in 2005-2006.

In 2006-2007: 86% (6/7) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.



Sub-Activities Achieved vs Planned Targets
2005-2006 2006-2007
Enabling Research NA NA 5/6 83%
Space Mission Development NA NA 1/1 100%
Space Mission Operations NA NA NA NA
TOTAL NA NA 6/7 86%


Examples of 2006-2007 Main Accomplisments

The CSA continued to enhance Canada's space capabilities by awarding technology R&D projects to industry and research organizations on a competitive basis through its Space Technology Development Program (STDP). This year, 19 technologies were brought to higher readiness levels out of 20 completed projects.

The CSA developed high-risk space technologies and maintained in-house technical capabilities through its Space Technology Research Program (STRP). This year, 8 new patents applications were filed out of 11 projects and 2 patents, filed last year, were granted.

The David Florida Laboratory provided world-class, cost-effective environmental space qualification services for the assembly, integration and testing of spacecraft systems and sub-systems to all of the CSA's programs. In 2006-2007, more than 150 tests were performed in support of CSA programs and projects and Canada's tele-communications industry.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.5 - Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


Program Activity - Space Awareness and Learning (AL)
Government of Canada Outcomes
  • A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage; and,
  • An innovative and knowledge-based economy.
CSA Strategic Outcomes
  • Knowledge, Innovation and Economy.


Priority

Further public understanding and engagement with regards to space-related issues, ultimately leading to improvement in the scientific literacy of Canadians.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
5.9 4.1
Expected Result

Increase public awareness of Canada's activities in space and the space benefits that positively affect the quality of life of Canadians.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: 94% (14/15) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or
successfully met.

In 2006-2007: 87% (14/16) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or
successfully met.



Sub-Activities Achieved vs Planned Targets
2005-2006 2006-2007
Awareness 5/6 83% 8/9 89%
Learning 9/9 100% 6/7 86%
TOTAL 14/15 94% 14/16 87%


Examples of 2006-2007 Main Accomplishments

Awareness:

The promotion of STS-115 mission, with Canadian Astronaut Steve MacLean, generated 367 interviews, produced more than 46 hours of radio coverage and more than 59 hours of TV coverage. Daily print media carried 2,071 articles on the mission.

The 20th Anniversary of Human Space Flight exhibit continued its journey across the country, reaching the Maritimes for five months before moving on to Sherbrooke, Quebec, to finish the year.

Learning:

Space-centred learning initiatives, which encourage youth to pursue studies and careers in the field of science and engineering, reached a significant participation increase of 275% for educators and 13% for students.

The STS-115 mission gave the CSA's Space Learning resources an opportunity to access 20,000 Canadian classrooms, reaching 470,000 primary and secondary students in 10 provinces and 2 territories.

An increase of 57% was achieved in requests for educational space-based materials by not-for-profit and educational institutions.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.6 - Space Awareness and Learning Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


Program Activity - Corporate Services and Infrastructure
Government of Canada Outcomes

Not applicable.

CSA Strategic Outcome

Not applicable.



Priority

To implement the government's commitment to modern public service management in accordance with the Management Accountability Framework's (MAF) expectations.

2006-2007
Planned Spending
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual Spending
($ in millions)
34.5 37.5
Expected Results

1) Corporate Services provide added value for CSA managers in the performance of their duties.

2) Key corporate risks are addressed and mitigated.

Performance History

In 2005-2006: Not Applicable - This Program Activity was not measured in 2005-2006.

In 2006-2007: 67% (8/12) of the sub-sub Program Activity targets were exceeded or successfully met.



Targets Achieved vs Planned
2005-2006 2006-2007
Corporate Risks Management NA NA 8/12 67%
TOTAL NA NA 8/12 67%


Examples of 2006-2007 Main Accomplishments

From the 18 indicators outlined in the 2006-Round IV MAF assessment produced by Secretariat Treasury Board (SCT), 39% have improved, 44% have stayed the same and 17% have declined.

CSA's three strategic outcomes were merged into a single outcome that will first appear in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Staffing Management Accountability Framework (SMAF) was approved by CSA's Executive Committee and circulated among managers.

To learn more, go to: Section 2.7 - Corporate Services and Infrastructure Program Activity Performance Measurement.


Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in Section 1.6 - Spending by Program Activity.


1.6 Spending by Program Activity


Description Planned Spending
($ in millions)
Actual
($ in millions)
Variance
($ in millions)
Space Based Earth Observation 124.0 66.4 57.6
Comments:

The variance of $57.6 million was mainly due to the following factors:

Under-spending of $25.3 million in the RADARSAT-2 Program caused by problems encountered in testing the spacecraft and by the change of launcher from Boeing to Starsem (Kazakhstan); these difficulties have delayed the launch date to Fall 2007.

Reprofiling of $20.4 million to 2007-2008, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 reference levels for the RADARSAT-Constellation Program. The phase A was prolonged in 2007-2008.

Under-spending of $9.8 million in the Chinook Project caused by a series of difficulties; delay for redefining the project originally known as SWIFT as a new Canadian mission, several unusual problems for completing the system requirements, and uncommon impediments for procuring contracts to Canadian industries.

Transfer of $1.2 million to other activities following the decision to abandon the Hydros project.

Space Science and Exploration 133.2 130.0 3.2
Comments:

The variance of $3.2 million resulted mainly from delays in awarding contract to industry for the NEOSSat project and from postponed announcement of opportunities to award contracts to university researchers.

Satellite Communications 32.3 29.3 3.0
Comments:

The variance of $3.0 million was mainly due to an under-spending of $2.3 million in the CASSIOPE Contribution Program caused by delays in the development of the payload for the Cascade satellites (e.g., DSU, C&DH components). This led to move the launch date from December 2007 to November 2008.

Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC 44.3 47.2 (2.9)
Comments:

The additional spending of $2.9 million was mainly due to the increase of $1.7 million in Canada's contributions to ESA General Budget activities, and $0.5 million for critical technology development to meet new specifications for the RADARSAT-Constellation small satellite bus.

Space Awareness and Learning 5.9 4.1 1.9
Comments:

The variance of $1.9 million in Space Awareness and Learning mainly resulted from under-spending in public communications activities caused by delays in the launches of RADARSAT-2 and the STS-118 mission in which Canadian Astronaut Dave Williams is participating.

Corporate Services and Infrastructure 34.5 37.5 (3.0)
Comments:

The variance of $3.0 million was mainly due to increased spending for Information Technologies.


* The table explains the major variances by Program Activity. Not mentioned are less significant gaps that occurred in ongoing programs, and variances that resulted from the adaptation of management practices in the new environment of the Program Activity Architecture (PAA). For 2006-2007, the PAA was amended in order to better monitor financial information by Program Activity and improve the coding in financial systems in order to fully link financial and performance information, and track every financial transaction by Program Activity expected results, starting April 1, 2006.