MINISTER'S MESSAGE

It is a pleasure to present to Parliament, National Defence’s Report on Plans and Priorities for fiscal year 2009-2010.

Minister of National DefenceOver the coming year, the Government’s priority for Defence will be to ensure continued success in operations as part of whole-of-government efforts, especially in Afghanistan, while moving forward on our plan to strengthen and modernize the Canadian Forces (CF). Given the current economic climate, we will ensure that we manage our defence priorities in a fiscally sound manner and that those priorities contribute to the Government’s broader efforts to strengthen the economy.

The Defence mission is to defend Canada and Canadian interests and values while contributing to international peace and security. We have entrusted this mandate to the men and women of the CF and the civilian members of the Defence Team and we need to ensure that they have the resources and support they need to deliver.

To that end, the Government has put forward the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS), a plan to rebuild the CF through balanced investment across the four pillars upon which military capabilities are built – personnel, equipment, readiness and infrastructure. The CFDS will ensure that Canada has a modern military well-trained and well-equipped to take on the challenges of the 21st century. It will also set the stage for a renewed relationship with the Canadian defence industry which will benefit Canadian companies and create jobs for Canadians across the country during these difficult economic times.

Over the coming fiscal year, as we move further ahead on the implementation of the CFDS, Defence will continue to conduct missions as part of a whole-of-government approach to keep Canadians safe and secure. First and foremost, the CF will deliver excellence at home, including exercising sovereignty in Canada’s Arctic and supporting other government departments during international events in Canada such as the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and June 2010 G-8 Summit, which will be held in Hunstville, Ontario. We will also demonstrate that we remain a strong and reliable partner in the defence of North America, and will work with the new American administration to reinvigorate Canada’s comprehensive defence relationship with the United States. In addition, Defence will continue to foster our engagement with the Americas by strengthening our partnerships with hemispheric nations and institutions.

National Defence will also continue to play a strong leadership role abroad by making significant contributions to global security, including in Afghanistan. Canadians and their government recognize the magnitude of the sacrifice made by members of the CF serving their country under such dangerous circumstances. This difficult and important mission continues to help the Afghan people rebuild their nation and will lead to a safer Canada.

As we work to fulfill our priorities, Defence will continue to ensure management excellence through our own internal fiscal discipline and through the effective delivery of our programs by strengthening accountability and performance management and demonstrating to Canadians the results achieved.

Our men and women in uniform will also stand ready to provide humanitarian assistance when disaster strikes. The Canadian Forces have a long tradition of helping those in need. Our navy’s contribution to the safe delivery of food from the United Nations World Food Programme in Somalia in 2008 is one such example. Our new C-17 Globemaster transport aircraft are also greatly enhancing our ability to quickly and efficiently deliver equipment and personnel where they are most needed in case of emergency.

The professionalism, commitment and dedication of the CF are recognized by our allies the world over and by Canadians coast to coast. As Minister of National Defence, I am proud to lead this national institution and represent the men and women in uniform and the civilian members of the Defence Team who daily demonstrate their commitment to meet our defence mission.

 

 

The Honourable Peter G. MacKay, P.C., M.P.

Minister of National Defence

 

SECTION I: INTRODUCTION

Raison d’ĂȘtre

Sovereignty, Security, and Serving Canada

The Defence[1] Mission

Our mission is to defend Canada and Canadian interests and values while contributing to international peace and security.

The Government has established a level of ambition for the Canadian Forces (CF) that will enable them to meet the country’s defence needs, enhance the safety and security of Canadians and support the Government’s foreign policy and national security objectives. To fulfill these commitments, the CF must be able to deliver excellence at home, be a strong and reliable partner in the defence of North America, and project leadership abroad by making meaningful contributions to international security. 

The CF will have the capacity to:

To carry out these roles successfully, the CF will maintain a range of modern military capabilities that are fully integrated, flexible, multi-role and combat-capable.

The Defence Portfolio 

The Defence mission is carried out by the Department of National Defence (DND), the CF and supported by a group of related organizations and agencies. Further details on selected Defence Portfolio organizations, including the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), National Search and Rescue Secretariat and Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), among others is available at Appendix A.

Legislation and Regulations Administered

The National Defence Act establishes DND and the CF as separate entities operating in close cooperation in an integrated National Defence Headquarters and elsewhere under the authority of the Minister of National Defence. The National Defence Act also establishes a Deputy Minister to be responsible for policy, resources, interdepartmental co-ordination and international defence relations, and designates the Chief of the Defence Staff, the senior serving officer of the CF, as the person “…who shall, subject to the regulations and under the direction of the Minister, be charged with control and administration of the Canadian Forces.”  As well as the National Defence Act, the Minister is also responsible for the administration of the statutes, regulations and orders listed at Appendix B.

Planning Context

The need for Canada to have a sustainable and affordable military capable of meeting the country’s defence needs and concurrently support its national and foreign policy objectives must be at the core of Defence planning.

While our immediate security environment remains relatively stable and secure, Canada continues to face a number of significant security concerns. Ethnic and border conflicts, fragile states, resurgent nationalism and global criminal networks will continue to pose significant threats to international stability. Terrorist attacks around the world have clearly demonstrated how instability and state failure can affect our security and that of our allies. In this regard, our mission in Afghanistan is an important contribution to global security.

The proliferation of advanced weapons and the potential emergence of new adversarial states headed by unpredictable regimes are also particularly worrisome. Finally, the ongoing build-up of conventional forces in Asia Pacific countries is another trend that might have a significant impact on international stability in the coming years. 

Domestically, the CF plays an important role in supporting other departments and agencies in responding to numerous challenges, including those resulting from catastrophic events, increased activity in the Arctic, human and drug trafficking, foreign encroachments on Canada’s natural resources, potential outbreaks of infectious diseases, and the need to help provide security for important events in Canada, such as the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the G8 Summit.

Responding effectively to these challenges calls for Canada to closely collaborate with its allies, including the United States, with whom we will work to reinvigorate our already strong relationships. It also calls for Defence to maintain a modern and flexible military that is capable of operating at home and abroad across the full spectrum of operations. To that end, the Canada First Defence Strategy, detailed below, is being implemented.

Canada First Defence Strategy

The Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) provides guidance for the modernization of the CF and further expands its ability to deliver excellence at home, to be a strong and reliable partner in the defence of North America, and to project leadership abroad.

The Government will provide Defence with predictable long-term funding.  This will build on Budget 2006, which increased annual baseline funding by $1.8 billion effective fiscal year 2010-2011. The Government announced in Budget 2008 an increase to the existing annual escalator in defence spending to 2 percent from the current 1.5 percent, beginning in fiscal year 2011-2012. This last element will provide Defence with an additional $12 billion over the next 20 years, bringing its annual budget to nearly $31 billion in fiscal year 2027-2028.

Specifically, Defence will replace the CF’s core equipment fleets, expand the overall military to 70,000 Regular Forces personnel and 30,000 Reserve Forces personnel, strengthen the overall  state of readiness, and improve and modernize defence infrastructure. The infusion of long-term, stable funding will also enable Canadian industry to be better positioned to compete for defence contracts at home and abroad. Indeed, the implementation of the CFDS will provide real benefits for the Canadian economy during this time of global economic uncertainty. The foregoing supports the Government’s commitment to get the best equipment for the CF, at the best price for Canadians, with the best benefits for Canadian companies and workers.

Implementing the Canada First Defence Strategy

As we implement the CFDS and rebuild the CF to respond even more effectively to these challenges, we will need to recognize the considerable economic and demographic changes taking place in Canada and around the world; we need more than ever to invest our resources wisely and prudently. At the same time, Canadian society is changing in a way that will undoubtedly affect Defence’s workforce. As the labour market continues to age, the competition among employers to attract young, skilled workers will remain.

In this context, it is critical that the Department have a clear, sustainable and affordable plan to implement the Government’s multi-year strategy for Defence. The Department has developed an Investment Plan (IP) that will provide a clear picture of Defence’s planned investments for the five-year period from fiscal year 2009-2010 to fiscal year 2013-2014. The IP will enable the successful implementation of the Defence Strategy by maintaining balance across the four pillars upon which military capabilities are built – personnel, equipment, readiness and infrastructure, which will ensure the long-term affordability and coherence of the defence programme. Further details on the IP are available on page 34.

Strategic Challenges

Defence has identified a number of strategic challenges as listed below. These will continue to be carefully managed to counter the full spectrum of security challenges and progress the implementation of the CFDS.

Detailed information on the first four strategic challenges outlined above is located in Section IIA – Program Activity: Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces. Additional information on Departmental Enablers can be found in Section IID – Program Activity: Internal Services.

The Defence Program Activity Architecture

Within the umbrella of the Management Resource and Results Structure (MRRS) Policy, the Program Activity Architecture (PAA) is the required planning, management and reporting mechanism for Defence. In response to past Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessments, Defence is developing a revised framework, for implementation in fiscal year 2009-2010, that will consist of four strategic outcomes that reflect its business processes of acquiring resources to meet Government’s expectations of Defence, ensuring readiness of Defence capabilities, the conduct of operations and the contribution to Canada and the international community. 

This new structure will better reflect Defence’s business outcomes and will provide greater transparency as to how Defence plans and manages. It will also provide a better format for reporting financial and non-financial performance information.

Currently, Defence’s three strategic outcomes are:

Reporting in this RPP for fiscal year 2009-2010 will beat the Program Activity level of the current PAA while the Department transitions to the new PAA. For further information on Defence’s PAA, please refer to the PAA Chart on the following page.  Appendix Cprovides further information on performance measure expectations related to the Report on Plans and Priorities and the PAA.

Department of National Defence - Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

Defence Priorities

The Defence Priorities enunciate where Defence will address corporate risks, gaps in capability or capacity and where broader Government direction dictates that greater action be taken. These priorities will translate long- and medium-term goals and objectives into short-term direction for action. The Defence Priorities do not preclude the allocation of resources to undertakings necessary for the successful execution of the defence programme.

Defence Priorities, established by the Deputy Minister and the Chief of the Defence Staff, are linked to specific activities in the PAA, and are listed  below to demonstrate how they will support the advancement of the priorities through specific initiatives.

Relationship Between Defence Priorities and Program Activities

The following crosswalk table shows the relationship between Defence’s priorities and program activities. This link ensures that high-level performance measurement and resource information for Defence priorities and related initiatives are reported through the PAA program activities.


 

Defence Priorities 2009-2010

Program Activities

Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces

Conduct Operations

Contribute
to Canada and the International Community

Type of Priority

Legend: O=ongoing   N=New  ■=Primary     □=Secondary

1. Achieve Operational and Mission Success in Afghanistan

[Related Program Activities: Conduct Operations, Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces, Contribute to Canada and the International Community]

  • Expedite delivery of mission essential equipment;

N

  • Support whole-of-government efforts in Afghanistan; and

 

N

  • Expedite initiatives for the care of the injured and family support.

 

N

2. Support the 2010 Winter Olympics

[Related Program Activities: Conduct Operations, Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces, Contribute to Canada and the International Community]

  • Determine requirements and responsibilities to ensure effective contributions from Defence in support of other federal government departments and agencies; and

O

  • Develop plans, allocate resources and conduct exercises with key stakeholders to enable effective Defence contributions in support of Public Safety Canada and the RCMP.

N

3. Align Defence Activities with Key Government Priorities

[Related Program Activities: Contribute to Canada and the International Community]

  • Implement the Canada First Defence Strategy through the  Investment Plan, manage personnel, equipment, readiness and infrastructure resources in a manner that is consistent with Cabinet’s decisions and the funding line.  Develop key milestones against which to measure progress on the four CFDS pillars;

N

  • Ensure that management capacities and capabilities are in place to manage growth;

N

  • Develop and implement strategies to support the Government’s Advantage Canada plan, through partnerships with other government departments, the defence industry, and research and development organizations; and

 

 

N

  • Implement Defence-related initiatives in support of the Government’s other policy priorities, including the Northern Strategy and Going Green.

 

 

N

4. Build the Defence Team

[Related Program Activities: Conduct Operations, Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces]

  • Implement retention strategies to reduce CF attrition;

 

 

N

  • Implement plans to address shortages in critical military occupations; and

 

 

N

  • Demonstrate leadership in Public Service Renewal, including improving human resources and business planning, streamlining staffing processes, and implementing plans to address shortfalls in key skills areas.

Internal Services

N

5. Build Excellence in Defence Management

[Related Program Activities: Internal Services]

  • Further align governance, resource allocation and reporting processes, including leadership accountabilities;

Internal Services

N

  • Continue to implement MRRS;

Internal Services

O

  • Consolidate the departmental approach to IM/IT;

Internal Services

O

  • Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework and develop materiel, infrastructure, and information control frameworks in support of audited departmental financial statements; and

Internal Services

O

  • Undertake measures to address the “Web of Rules” within DND/CF.

Internal Services

N


Source:  Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

Planning Summary

Forecast Spending for Fiscal Year 2008-2009 by Program Activity

Forecast Spending for Fiscal Year 2008-2009 by Program Activity

Overview of Financial Resources

The financial resources table below provides a summary of the total planned spending for Defence for the next three fiscal years.


($ Thousands) Forecast
Spending
2008-2009
Planned
Spending
2009-2010
Planned
Spending
2010-2011
Planned
Spending
2011-2012

Total
Forecast/Planned
Spending

19,143,137

20,993,001

20,591,564

19,697,252

Capital Spending
(including
Total Forecast/Planned
Spending)

3,413,911

4,970,665

4,781,910

4,601,370


Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

 


Voted and Statutory Items Displayed in the Main Estimates
($ thousands)
Vote # or Statutory Item (S) Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording Fiscal Year
2008-2009
Main Estimates*
Fiscal Year
2009-2010
Main Estimates*

1

Operating expenditures

13,519,620

13,460,216

5

Capital expenditures

3,356,705

4,272,890

10

Grants and Contributions

192,396

223,498

(S)

Minister of National Defence –
Salary and Motor Car Allowance

76

78

(S)

Payments under the Supplementary Retirements Benefits Acts

6,796

6,079

(S)

Payments under Parts I-IV of the Defence Services Pension Continuation Act (R.S., 1970 c. D-3)

1,493

1,319

(S)

Payments to dependants of certain members of the Royal Canadian Air Force killed while serving as instructors under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (Appropriation Act No. 4, 1968)

82

84

(S)

Contributions to employee benefits plans – Members of the Military

938,132

971,634

(S)

Contributions to employee benefits plans

278,456

303,664

Total

18,293,756

19,239,461


Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

* Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.

Notes: The Main Estimates of 2009-2010 are $945.7 million higher than the Main Estimates of 2008-2009. This increase can be explained by the following:  $531 million for reprofiling previously approved budgetary resources; $322.7 million in funding for the Frigate life Extension Project; $256.4 million in additional funding for the Canada First Defence Strategy; $251.3 million in funding for the Medium Support Vehicle System Project; $246.3 million in funding for the Tactical Airlift Capability Project; $192 million to partially offset the loss of purchasing power due to price increases; $180.4 million in funding for increases to pay and allowances for the Canadian Forces; $100 million to address the shortfall in operating budgets (Sustainability); $80.6 million funding for Medium to Heavy Lift Helicopter Project; offset by a $454.9 million reduction in annual spending required for the Strategic Airlift Capability Project; $338.8 million reduction in funding for Afghanistan; $174.8 million reduction due to reprofiling from Fiscal Year 2007-2008 to Fiscal Year 2008-2009; $121 million reduction in funding for Main Battle Tanks acquisition project; $66.4 million reduction of the Department's share of the Expenditure Review Committee reallocations and cost efficiencies; and a $59 million reduction for other miscellaneous Departmental requirements.


Departmental Planned Spending and Full-Time Equivalents
($ Thousands) Forecast
Spending
2008-2009
Planned
Spending
2009-2010
Planned
Spending
2010-2011
Planned
Spending
2011-2012

Generate and Sustain Relevant, Responsive and Effective Combat-Capable Integrated Forces

13,608,994

14,339,596

14,396,993

14,408,306

Conduct Operations

2,460,906

2,692,101

2,730,174

2,723,092

Contribute to Canadian Government, Society and International Community in Accordance with Canadian Interests and Values

1,341,161

1,200,433

1,001,779

1,004,380

Internal Services

1,284,281

1,423,434

1,433,694

1,423,869

Budgetary Main Estimates (gross)

18,695,342

19,655,564

19,562,640

19,559,647

Less: Respendable revenue

(401,586)

(416,103)

(405,833)

(392,740)

Total Main Estimates

18,293,756

19,239,461

19,156,808

19,166,906

 

 

 

 

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

To 2008-09 through National Defence's Supplementary Estimates

 

 

 

 

Funding advanced for the major capital equipment project ensuring tactical airlift capability

557,343

 

 

 

Funding for Canada's military mission in Afghanistan

331,062

 

 

 

Funding for the land duty allowance

120,000

 

 

 

Increase to pay and allowances for Canadian Forces Members

90,400

 

 

 

Funding for the implementation phase of the Halifax Class frigate modernization and life extension project  

54,609

 

 

 

Funding for Communications Security Establishment investments in technology infrastructure and to sustain essential operational capacities

22,418

 

 

 

Funding related to government advertising programs ( horizontal item ) 

10,000

 

 

 

Funding for ex gratia payments to eligible applicants under the Atomic Veterans Recognition Program

9,763

 

 

 

Funding for the establishment and expansion of the Canadian Police Research Centre

5,748

 

 

 

Transfer from Canada Border Services Agency ($941), Royal Canadian Mounted Police ($680), and Transport Canada ($482) - For public security initiatives related to the return of unused funding for Marine Security Operations Centres

2,103

 

 

 

Transfer from Public Health Agency of Canada – For public security initiatives related to the return of unused funding for the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative

865

 

 

 

Transfer from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council - To support the indirect costs of federally-funded research at the Royal Military College

800

 

 

 

Reinvestment of royalties from intellectual property

669

 

 

 

Transfer from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada ($280) and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council ($53) - To support the Canada Research Chairs at the Royal Military College

333

 

 

 

Funding to support the contribution program in support of the Remediation of the Former Mid-Canada Line Radar Sites in Ontario

317

 

 

 

Transfer from Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade - In support of the Minister's responsibilities for Regional Representations for Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

310

 

 

 

Funding related to the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (horizontal item)

286

 

 

 

Funding for the establishment of a Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre to improve security capabilities in the region by identifying and addressing threats to national security (horizontal item)

173

 

 

 

Transfer from Foreign Affairs and International Trade - To support the final phase of the delivery of generic job descriptions and the implementation of the new work descriptions across all departments by the Human Resources Council

106

 

 

 

Transfer from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council - To support research at the Royal Military College through the University Faculty Awards Program

80

 

 

 

Transfer from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada - To support the Industrial Research Chairs at the Royal Military College

78

 

 

 

Transfer from Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For unused funds related to investments in search and rescue coordination initiatives across Canada

66

 

 

 

Funding to provide greater support to Crown agents across Canada

6

 

 

 

Transfer to Indian Affairs and Northern Development – For the Northern Scientific Training Program

(25)

 

 

 

Transfer to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police - For investments in search and rescue coordination initiatives across Canada

(88)

 

 

 

Transfer to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada - For costs incurred in support of the Unexploded Explosive Ordnance and Legacy Sites Program

(138)

 

 

 

Transfer to Department of Fisheries and Oceans - For investments in search and rescue coordination initiatives across Canada

(176)

 

 

 

Transfer to Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada - To support the National Manager's Community

(338)

 

 

 

Transfer to Indian Affairs and Northern Development – To provide for First Nations management costs related to the clean up of Unexploded Explosive Ordnance contaminated sites.

(396)

 

 

 

Transfer to Canadian Food Inspection Agency ($350) and to Canadian Security Intelligence Service ($80) - For public security initiatives related to the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative

(430)

 

 

 

Transfer to Environment ($507) and Fisheries and Oceans ($157) - For investments in search and rescue coordination initiatives across Canada

(664)

 

 

 

Transfer to Foreign Affairs and International Trade – To provide support to departmental staff located at missions abroad

(672)

 

 

 

Spending authorities available within the Vote and available from another Vote due to savings identified as part of the government's reduction of public opinion research expenditures and delays in Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan projects

(776)

 

 

 

Transfer to Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner - In support of the Office of the Communications Security Establishment    Commissioner

(1,365)

 

 

 

Transfer to Public Health Agency of Canada ($1,665) and Environment ($180) - For public security initiatives

(1,845)

 

 

 

Spending authorities available within the Vote and available from another Vote due to the cancellation of the Maritime Information Management Data Exchange

(2,800)

 

 

 

Transfer to Royal Canadian Mounted Police ($1,641), Health ($1,008), Public Health Agency of Canada ($460), Environment ($315), Natural Resources ($196), Canadian Security Intelligence Service ($151) and Fisheries and Oceans ($15) – For public security initiatives related to the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Research Technology Initiative

(3,786)

 

 

 

Transfer to National Research Council of Canada – For the transfer of 36 hectares of land in Ottawa

(6,907)

 

 

 

Spending authorities available within the Vote due to the delays in certain major capital projects

(63,721)

 

 

 

Spending authorities available within the Vote due to reduced requirements related to project delays of the Medium-To-Heavy-Lift Helicopter Project

(138,606)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To 2008-2009 Through Adjustments Other Than National Defence's Supplementary Estimates

 

 

 

 

Operating Budget Carry Forward - TB Vote 25

200,000

 

 

 

Employee Benefit Plan (EBP)

56,258

 

 

 

Funding for Eligible Paylist Expenditures - TB Vote 30

27,482

 

 

 

Civilian Pay Raises - TB Vote 15

22,190

 

 

 

Frozen Allotment

(441,351)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Planned Spending Levels

 

 

 

 

Incremental Funding for the Afghanistan Mission (3.a)

 

822,000

943,000

178,000

Reprofiling - Strategic Capital Investments (3.j)

 

141,706

228,517

(53,834)

 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) 2008-2009 (3.b)

 

23,403

-

-

Contribution Program in Support of the Remediation of the Former Mid Canada Line Radar Sites in Ontario (3.c)

 

8,931

6,595

5,571

Employee Benefits Plan (EBP)

 

6,134

672

477

Canadian Forces Compensation Policies (3.c)

 

934

934

934

Public Opinion Research (3.d)

 

(454)

(454)

(454)

Transfer to Department of Fisheries and Oceans - For investments in search and rescue coordination initiatives across Canada (3.e)

 

(474)

(235)

-

Funds returned for reallocation (3.e)

 

(2,504)

(1,193)

-

 

 

 

 

 

Budget 2005, 2006, 2007 & 2008 Announcements

 

 

-

-

2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympic Games (3.b)

 

205,020

-

-

Partial compensation for the loss of purchasing power due to price increases (3.h) (4)

 

-

-

85,000

Enhancing Public Safety through Science and Technology Cooperation: The public Security Technical Program (PSTP) (3.i)

 

-

3,087

3,087

Strategic Capital Investments

 

 

 

 

Main battle tanks (3.f)

 

165,000

128,000

68,000

Relocation of Joint Task Force 2 (3.f)

 

147,147

141,449

26,737

Medium Support Vehicle System (3.g)

 

140,796

(180,117)

(63,973)

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (3.f)

 

95,900

164,500

280,800

 

 

 

 

 

 Total Adjustments

849,381

1,753,540

1,434,756

530,345

Total Forecast/Planned Spending

19,143,137

20,993,001

20,591,564

19,697,252

Less: Non-Respendable revenue

30,591

20,539

31,639

16,231

Plus: Cost of services received without charge

703,275

728,484

744,593

750,934

Total Departmental Spending

19,815,821

21,700,946

21,304,517

20,431,954

 

 

 

 

 

Full-Time Equivalents

 

97,517

99,697

TBD5


Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Notes:

  1. Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
  2. The "Forecast Spending 2008-2009" column includes items brought forward, but not yet approved in fiscal year 2008-2009 Supplementary Estimates (B) and (C) at the time this document was prepared.
  3. Expected approval of items in the adjustments to Planned Spending Levels:
    1. Spending authorities will be sought through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (B). For fiscal year 2010-2011 and beyond, spending authorities will be adjusted through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    2. Spending authorities will be sought through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A).
    3. Spending authorities will be sought through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A). For fiscal year 2010-2011 and beyond, spending authorities will be provided through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    4. Spending authorities will be reduced through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A). For fiscal year 2010-2011 and beyond, spending authorities will be reduced through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    5. Spending authorities will be reduced through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A). For fiscal year 2010-2011, spending authorities will be reduced through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    6. Spending authorities will be sought to ensure continuous funding for the implementation phase of the project starting in fiscal year 2009-2010.
    7. Spending authorities will be sought through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A). For fiscal year 2010-2011 and beyond, spending authorities will be reduced through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    8. For fiscal year 2011-2012, spending authorities will be provided through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
    9. Renewal of the program will be sought to ensure continuous funding starting in fiscal year 2010-2011.
    10. Spending authorities will be sought through fiscal year 2009-2010 Supplementary Estimates (A). For fiscal year 2010-2011 and beyond, spending authorities will be adjusted through the fiscal year 2010-2011 Annual Reference Level Update.
  4. This figure represents the additional 0.5% in funding DND will receive to compensate for loss in purchasing power due to price increases as announced in Budget 2008.
  5. Current fiscal framework limits Regular Force expansion up to 68,000 by fiscal year fiscal year 2011-2012. Class C allocation for fiscal year 2011-2012 is to be determined. Please see “Human Resources”, page 16.

Human Resources

The table below provides a summary of the total planned human resources for Defence for the next three fiscal years.


Full-Time Equivalents
(FTEs)
Fiscal Year
2009–20101
Fiscal Year
2010–2011
Fiscal Year
2011–2012

Regular Force2

66,992

67,742

68,000

Class C3

2,100

1,600

TBD4

Total Military FTEs5

69,092

69,342

68,000

Civilian7

28,8256

30,3556

30,4116

Total

97,917

99,697

TBD4

Primary Reserve paid strength (All Classes)8

26,100

26,100

27,000

Primary Reserve total strength (All Classes)9

35,500

35,500

TBD4

Cadet Instructor Cadre

7,500

7,500

7,500

CA Rangers10

4,600

4,800

5,000


Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

Notes:

  1. Planned FTE counts are based on planned establishment numbers.
  2. This number reflects Regular Force Planned Total Strength. Current fiscal framework limits Regular Force expansion up to 68,000 by fiscal year 2011-2012. This strategic limit does not include personnel seconded to other government departments (OGD) and Project Management Personnel Resources (PMPR) paid under Vote 5 projects.
  3. Class C members currently augmenting operationally deployed forces for Task Force Afghanistan (TFA). Class C figures are being reported separately to maintain the visibility of reservists employed in support of deployed/contingency operations, including support to the 2010 Winter Olympics.
  4. Class C allocation for fiscal year 2011-2012 is to be determined.
  5. Canadian Ranger expansion to 5,000 by fiscal year 2011-2012. Military Full-Time Equivalent statistics include Class C.
  6. Long-term sustainment of the civilian workforce has been established at the Salary Wage Envelope (SWE) equivalent of 25,000 FTEs. Some programmes and initiatives, such as the apprenticeship programme and the requirement for a short-term surge in project management personnel and support to deployed operations, will continue to bring civilian numbers over the Canada First Defence Strategy 25,000 FTE SWE equivalent limit. Notwithstanding, it is forecasted that the Department will be challenged to recruit and retain sufficient talented workers as the number of individuals eligible for retirement increases in years to come. The Department is currently developing investment opportunity options to continue to hire above the 25,000 FTE for the next five years as a temporary measure to ensure the workforce is sustained at the maximum possible level in the longer-term.
  7. Civilian FTE statistics include Communication Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), the Office of the Ombudsman (OMB) and National Search and Rescue Secretariat (NSS). For additional details, refer to Section IV: Selected Human and Financial Resources Tables 2, 4 and 6 respectively.
  8. Primary Reserve average monthly Paid Strength reporting, planning and allocations are based on monthly reports provided by Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services)/Director Strategic Finance Costing and Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management)/Director Human Resource Information Management (DHRIM). Canada First Defence Strategy calls for Reserve Force expansion to 27,000 (Average Paid Strength) by fiscal year 2011-2012.
  9. Primary Reserve Total Strength reporting, planning and allocations are based on monthly reports provided by ADM(IM)/DHRIM. Primary Reserve Total strength figure is a forecasted end-year snapshot.
  10. Canadian Ranger expansion to 5,000 by fiscal year 2011-2012.

Planning Summary Table
Strategic Outcome 1: Canadians’ confidence that DND/CF have relevant and credible capacity to meet defence and security commitments.
Performance Indicator Targets

Net Growth: Actual versus planned growth of CF.

Increase in Regular Force by 1,492.

Civilian Workforce Size: Planned civilian FTEs versus actual.

Refer to Human Resources Table, Note 6 on page 16.

Program Activity1 and 3

Forecast Spending 2008-2009

Planned Spending
(net revenue in $ thousands)

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes2

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Generate and Sustain Relevant, Responsive and Effective Combat-Capable Integrated Forces

Departmental Spending ($ thousands)

Safe and secure communities

A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership

13,821,076

14,865,806

14,712,953

14,549,021

 

Capital Spending ($ thousands - included in Departmental spending)

2,933,445

4,395,690

4,174,067

3,997,298



Strategic Outcome 2: Success in assigned missions in contributing to domestic and international peace, security and stability.

Performance Indicator Targets

Relative number of people deployed on operational missions in the past year

No target yet established

Average response time for Search and Rescue (SAR) requests

30 minutes for working hours and 120 minutes for weekends/evenings

Program Activity1 and 3 Forecast Spending
2008-2009
Planned Spending
(net revenue in $ thousands)
Alignment to
Government of
Canada
 Outcomes2

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Conduct Operations

Departmental Spending ($ thousands)

Safe and secure
communities

A safe and secure
world through
international cooperation

A strong and mutually
beneficial North
American partnership

2,872,874

3,702,818

3,651,741

2,897,446

 

Capital Spending  ($ thousands - included in Departmental spending)

307,660

445,223

467,553

460,431



Strategic Outcome 3: Good governance, Canadian identity and influence in a global community.
Performance Indicator Targets

CF Cadets : number of youth involved with the Cadet Program

No target established; trend analysis being developed

Number of military personnel who have participated in Military Training Assistance Program (MTAP) activities over past twelve months

No target established

Program Activity1 and 3 Forecast Spending 2008-2009 Planned Spending
(net revenue in $ thousands)
Alignment to
Government of
Canada
 Outcomes2

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Contribute to Canadian government, society and international community in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Departmental Spending ($ thousands)

An innovative and knowledge-based economy

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

A safe and secure world through international cooperation

A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership

1,144,727

1,037,130

828,581

849,605

 

Capital Spending  ($ thousands - included in Departmental spending)

46,286

26,190

31,004

33,564


Notes:
  1. For program activity descriptions, please access the Main Estimates online at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20082009/me-bd/pub/ME-334_e.asp.
  2. While Defence actively contributes to all Government of Canada Outcomes, areas where Defence makes a primary contribution are noted. A summary of the linkages between Defence Program Activities and Government of Canada Outcome Areas is available at Appendix J.
  3. Departmental and Capital Planned Spending by PAA by Sub-activity can be found in Section III – Supplementary Information – Table 14.

Internal Services
Internal Services - Total Spending Net of Revenues

Resources

Forecast
Spending
2008-2009
Planned
Spending
2009-2010
Planned
Spending
2010-2011
Planned
Spending
2011-2012

Departmental Spending
($ thousands)

1,304,460

1,387,247

1,398,289

1,401,180

Capital Spending
($ thousands) (included in Departmental Spending)

126,521

103,563

109,287

110,078


Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Note: Internal Services, within the current PAA construct, supports the three Strategic Outcomes as identified in the tables above.


Contribution of Priorities to Strategic Outcomes
Operational Priorities Type1 Links to Strategic Outcomes Description

Operational and Mission Success in Afghanistan –

Operation ATHENA, Canada’s commitment to the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan

PREVIOUSLY COMMITTED TO

Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians’ confidence that the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces have relevant and credible capacity to meet defence and security commitments.

Program Activities: Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces, Conduct Operations.

Why is this a priority?

- support government objectives efforts - will continue to focus on training of the Afghan National Army, the provision of increased security for reconstruction and development efforts in Kandahar

Plans for meeting the priority

-approximately 2,800 personnel employed in an Infantry Battle Group, Provincial Reconstruction Team, Operational Mentor Liaison Teams, National Support Element, Theatre Support Element, and a Headquarters.

Support the 2010 Winter Olympics –

Operation PODIUM

NEW

CF planned major domestic operational focus will be support to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians’ confidence that the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces have relevant and credible capacity to meet defence and security commitments.

Program Activities: Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces, Conduct Operations

Why is this a priority?

-under the leadership of the RCMP, the CF will be a major partner for Games security and will provide numerous unique capabilities.  

Plans for meeting the priority
- CF will be providing military capabilities in a variety of areas including operational and exercise planning and research; infrastructure and logistical air support, air, land and maritime surveillance; support to chemical, biological radiological and-or nuclear incidents; intelligence; explosives disposal and other technical expertise.



Management Priorities Type1 Links to Strategic Outcomes Description

Building Excellence in Defence Management

ONGOING

Further align key management processes throughout the DND/CF. Additional information is available under Internal Services/Building Excellence in Defence Management.

Strategic Outcome:

Good Governance, Canadian Identity and Influence in a Global Community

Program Activity:

Contribute to Canada and the International Community

Why is this a priority?
- In accordance with the Management Accountability Framework continuous improvement of management excellence across the Public Service.

Plans for meeting the priority
- Further align governance, resource allocation and reporting processes including leadership accountabilities.
- Continue to implement the MRRS.
- Consolidate IM/IT.
- Strengthen core Control Framework in support of audited financial statements.
- Address Web of Rules. 


Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group and Strategic Joint Staff Group

Legend: Previously committed to: committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; Ongoing: committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; New: newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP.

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