Section I     Who We Are and What We Do

1.1 Ministers' Message



The Honourable David Emerson Minister for International Trade

The Honourable David Emerson
Minister for International Trade
The Honourable Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

The Honourable Maxime Bernier
Minister of Foreign Affairs

Canadians care deeply about international issues, and tend to look at the big picture-not only how we are influenced by global trends and developments, but also how we can use our experience and perspective to make the world a better place for ourselves and others. Canadians know this country has a great deal to contribute and that, in order to do so, we must speak constructively with one voice on global issues that affect our priorities and interests.

The role of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade is to provide that voice. As the Government of Canada's centre of expertise on international affairs, this department leads, coordinates and ensures the cohesion of federal policies and programs that advance Canada's global agenda.

The year ahead is particularly significant for the department, as it will mark its 100th anniversary on June 1, 2009. There will be a number of events celebrating the department's history as well as activities looking forward to its future.

Our overall plans and priorities for the year ahead are presented in this 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. In the following pages, readers will see the principal issues on which we will focus, the results we expect to achieve and the strategies we will use to achieve them. We will take particular care in allocating all our resources to deliver the best results for Canadians and the international community.

Our focus will be on four key priorities:

We will continue to work on the ongoing priorities that make up the department's core business. First, recognizing that Canada operates from its strategic base in North America, we will work to make Canada safer, more secure and prosperous. Second, given the significance of international trade and investment, we will continue efforts to secure and expand Canada's international market access, while improving our targeted services for Canadian business.

Third, we will work for greater freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship. Fourth, taking full advantage of Canada's unique range of membership in key international organizations, we will continue to make accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians. Fifth, we will strengthen consular, passport and commercial services to Canadians. Finally, as part of the government's focus on accountability and value for taxpayers' money, we will strengthen stewardship of the department's resources (human, financial, physical and technological) at home and abroad.

In conclusion, we want to emphasize that, in all our efforts to provide timely, meaningful services and benefits to Canadians, we rely heavily on the vigour, enthusiasm and skills of the department's workforce.

This report opens a window on the department and its plans and priorities for 2008-2009. We also encourage readers to visit the department's website (www.international.gc.ca) for a wide range of up-to-date information on all our activities.

1.2 Management Representation Statement



Marie-Lucie Morin Deputy Minister for International Trade

Marie-Lucie Morin
Deputy Minister for International Trade
Leonard J. Edwards Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Leonard J. Edwards
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

We submit for tabling in Parliament the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide to the Preparation of Part III of the 2008-2009 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:



___________________________________
Marie-Lucie Morin
Deputy Minister for International Trade
________________________________
Leonard J. Edwards
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

1.3 Our Raison d'être

1.3.1 Our Mandate

The department is responsible for Canada's foreign policy and all matters relating to Canada's external affairs, including international trade and commerce and international development (aside from activities assigned to other elements of the federal government). The department's specific areas of responsibility include international peace and security, global trade and commerce, diplomatic and consular relations, administration of the Foreign Service and Canada's missions abroad, and development of international law and its application to Canada.

1.3.2 What We Do

As the federal government's centre of expertise on foreign affairs and international trade, this department:

1.3.3 Our Ongoing Transformation

June 1, 2009, will mark the 100th anniversary of the department. Over the past century, it has undergone significant transformation from its beginnings in a tiny office above a barbershop in downtown Ottawa. Between June 2008 and June 2009, a number of signature events will be held to mark this important anniversary, examining its history and achievements as well as looking to its future.

Transformation continues to be a major theme of the department today. In 2008, the department is launching a process to create a state-of-the-art foreign and trade ministry.

The focus is on transformative-not piecemeal-change. This process will enable the department to address key factors that affect its operations. Domestic factors include the Government of Canada's commitment to international leadership, the need to renew the department's business practices and aging workforce, and the increased global engagement of Canadians. International factors include the gradual shift in power to Asia and ongoing threats related to terrorism, climate change, and marginalized and failed states.

The department's transformation agenda comprises six key elements, as follows:

1.4 Our Accountability Structure and Organization Chart

1.4.1 Our Accountability Structure

Senior Management: The Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Minister for International Trade are responsible for their respective components of the department. In addition, the Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs has taken on the responsibility of G8 Sherpa. The Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Minister are responsible for supporting the ministers as well as for the department's strategic outcomes and related program activities.

The Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), who develop policies and initiatives to achieve the department's strategic outcomes and to address priorities, are accountable at the program activity level. Two ADMs and one other ADM-level position have enhanced responsibilities for coordinating work on the government's international priorities: the ADM, Afghanistan Task Force; the ADM, Americas Strategy; and the Senior Adviser, International Trade. Directors General and Directors are accountable for sub- and sub-sub-activities.

Cabinet Committees: The department is directly influenced by the following Cabinet committees: Foreign Affairs and Security, Afghanistan, Economic Growth and Long-Term Prosperity, Treasury Board, Priorities and Planning, and Environment and Energy Security.

Interdepartmental and Internal Committees: The department chairs two key interdepartmental committees: the Deputy Ministers' Committee on Global Affairs, Security and Human Rights; and the Deputy Ministers' Subcommittee on Representation Abroad.

Executive Council is the department's senior decision-making body. It provides direction and oversight to support achievement of the department's strategic outcomes. Supporting Executive Council are four boards: Policy and Programs; External Services; Core Services; and Missions.

Resource Management Committee is responsible for financial management and resource allocation. Transformation Management Committee ensures oversight of the department's transformation agenda. Both committees advise Executive Council. Other internal committees deal with specific issues, such as human resources, audit and evaluation.

Responsibility for Program Activities: Positions responsible for each program activity are identified in Section II. Individuals in these positions report through departmental committees, the department's annual accountability documents tabled in Parliament (the Report on Plans and Priorities and the Departmental Performance Report), performance management agreements, and the yearly TBS Management Accountability Framework (MAF) process.

1.4.2 Our Organization Chart1



Departmental Organization

1As of April 1, 2008.

1.4.3 Our International Footprint: Canada's Representation Abroad2

Global Engagement: The Government of Canada has a formal presence in most of the world's independent states, providing services at 313 locations worldwide. Canada's network of missions abroad integrates and coordinates the federal government's international activities. All federal employees at missions abroad act as members of a whole-of-government team, regardless of their home department or agency.

Foreign Missions in Canada: The department serves the foreign diplomatic community accredited to Canada (175 foreign diplomatic missions-126 in Ottawa and 49 in New York City or Washington, D.C.; 477 foreign consular posts; and nearly 22 international organizations and other offices). At present, there are 8,311 foreign representatives and accredited members of their families in Canada.

Regional Offices in Canada: The department's regional offices provide international commercial services to Canadian small and medium-sized businesses. This includes export strategies, foreign market intelligence, and facts on trade fairs, missions and events. In addition, Passport Canada has four regional operations and 33 passport-issuing offices across Canada.

1.5 Our Program Activity Architecture (PAA)3

1.5.1 Our 2008-2009 PAA

This year's PAA is more integrated and shows how all the department's activities are conducted in pursuit of its three strategic outcomes. Furthermore, since the new PAA condenses the number of strategic outcomes from 4 to 3 and the number of program activities from 14 to 7, it makes the entire operations of the department much simpler to understand.

1.5.2 Our Overall Strategic Direction

The department's strategic direction is identified in the Program Activity Architecture (PAA) of its Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS). While this is the main tool for setting long-term strategic direction, the department's annual business planning cycle establishes shorter-term priorities.

At the outset, it is important that readers understand what is meant by two key phrases in common use:

DFAIT's new 2008-2009 PAA was approved by TB in June 2007. It is the first to reflect the 2006 reintegration of foreign affairs and international trade. The PAA lists the department's three principal strategic outcomes-the long-term, enduring benefits for Canadians that it strives to achieve-as follows:

The three outcomes are distinct but complementary. The first is about the practice of Canadian advocacy and diplomacy that reflects the country's interests and values. The second reflects the international commercial, consular and passport services provided by the department to Canadians. The third refers to the department's management of Canada's missions abroad and delivery of infrastructure for the entire federal government. Together, the three outcomes reflect the department's leadership role in formulating, coordinating and carrying out the government's foreign and trade policies and programs.

2Readers should be aware that, throughout this document, there will be some variation in the reported number of Canada's missions abroad. This is due to two factors. First, there are several different types of missions, offering different levels of services. Second, the number of missions cited depends on the context in which missions are mentioned. For instance, in speaking about consular services, this report refers to the total number of missions offering such services while, in discussing diplomacy and advocacy, this report refers only to the number of diplomatic missions.

3Table 1 in Section III compares program activities for 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. See table 2 for a financial comparison. Table 3 in Section III presents DFAIT's alignment to Government of Canada outcomes. See Table 4 for DFAIT's sustainable development strategy.

1.5.3 Our Program Activities

The department's seven program activities are as follows:

International Policy Advice and Integration: The department provides strategic direction, intelligence and advice on foreign policy and economic issues; researches and analyzes foreign and trade policy issues, drawing on input from across the department as well as from federal partners; develops related policies and programs to address those issues; and ensures coherence, integration and coordination of foreign and trade policies and programs across government. This work is done by officers from the political/economic and trade commissioner streams of the Foreign Service and by non-rotational officers at headquarters.4

Diplomacy and Advocacy: In delivering international programs and diplomacy, the department's officials engage Canadian stakeholders and partners as well as foreign governments and international players. This program activity includes raising awareness and understanding of Canada's policies, interests and values as they pertain to the government's international agenda. It also includes delivering international programs on Canada's behalf to address specific international issues. This work is done by officers from the political/economic and trade commissioner streams of the Foreign Service and by non-rotational officers at headquarters.

International Commerce: The department works to expand the participation of Canadian business in world markets and increase its interaction with global business partners. It also promotes Canada as a competitive location and partner for investment, innovation and value-added production. This work is done primarily by trade commissioners and by non-rotational officers at headquarters.

Consular Affairs: The department prepares Canadians for international travel by providing information and advice on safe travel to foreign counties. It also helps Canadians abroad to handle trouble or emergencies. This work is done by officers from the management/consular stream of the Foreign Service and by non-rotational officers at headquarters.

Passport Canada: Passport Canada-a special operating agency-focuses on the management and delivery of passport services. It is responsible for the issuance, revocation, refusal, recovery and use of Canadian passports. This work is done by non-rotational staff.

Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters: The department manages and delivers common services to all federal departments and partners that have representation at Canada's missions abroad. This work is done primarily by management/consular officers and non-rotational officers at headquarters.

Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad: The department ensures that common services are in place at missions and coordinates them on site to support the international operations of the entire Government of Canada as well as that of other partners that have representation at the missions. This work is done primarily by management/consular officers and locally engaged employees at missions abroad.

Below the level of program activities are supporting sub- and sub-sub-activities.

The following two diagrams display DFAIT's 2008-2009 PAA and demonstrate how it links to the department's governance and accountability structure.



DFAIT Program Activity Architecture Model 2008-2009



DFAIT Governance And Accountability Structure

4The department employs three streams of the Foreign Service: political/economic officers, management/consular officers, and trade commissioners. Political/economic (PERPA) officers promote Canada's interests bilaterally and multilaterally on issues, including international human rights, environmental concerns, disarmament, crisis management and peacebuilding. Management/consular officers manage the department's finances, human resources and property abroad as well as the consular program, which provides a wide range of assistance to Canadians abroad. Trade commissioners build networks essential to Canada's international commerce and economic prosperity, help shape Canadian trade policy, and promote foreign investment inside and outside of Canada.

1.6 Our Operating Environment

1.6.1 Internal and External Factors and Associated Challenges

Given the unprecedented pace of change in the international environment, the department must carefully monitor and analyze trends and developments that affect its operations. Below is a summary of the most significant external factors at play now.

First, given the importance of Canada-United States relations (political, diplomatic, security-related and economic) to Canada, it is imperative that this country continue to make every effort to maintain dialogue and interaction that is as open, mature and constructive as possible. This is the foundation of Canadian foreign and trade policy and is critical to our strategic position in North America.

Second, globalization is intensifying, which is drawing attention to rising powers such as China and India and heightening emphasis on the importance of knowledge production and global value chains in fuelling intense global competition for trade and investment. Furthermore, because the Doha Round of World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations remains stalled, many countries and regional blocs are turning their attention to bilateral trade agreements to open up more commercial opportunities. At the same time, concern is being expressed worldwide about the health of the global economy, the state of world financial markets and the threat of recession.

Third, the NATO mission in Afghanistan continues to evolve in terms of the ongoing engagement of individual countries. Furthermore, developments in neighbouring Pakistan, including the assassination of Benazir Bhutto, are raising international concerns about the region in general. Meanwhile, failed and fragile states continue to pose threats worldwide.

Fourth, the department continues to focus on its passport, consular and commercial services for Canadians, in light of increasing demand. More and more, Canadians are travelling and conducting business abroad, including in global hot spots. There is also increasing demand for use of the Government of Canada's international platform by other federal departments and agencies as well as provincial governments operating abroad.

Fifth, other key issues that remain high on the international agenda include security, climate change and the future of the Arctic. These issues continue to generate public and media attention.

Internal factors also affect the day-to-day ability of the department to carry out its mandate and address its priorities. The most fundamental relates to the driving force behind the department-its workforce. The department must work harder to attract and retain the best people through targeted and innovative recruitment strategies, to create a dynamic workplace in which employees can use their skills and talents to Canada's best advantage, and to strengthen staff diversity. The department must also ensure the most strategic use of its resources by bringing added focus to the most important missions abroad and reallocating resources to the highest priorities. Moreover, there is an ongoing need to streamline operations and further improve consular, passport and commercial services by making smarter use of technology and by responding more effectively to growing demand and client feedback.

As was the case in dealing with the 2006 evacuation of Canadians from Lebanon and with Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the department faces increased requirements to coordinate Canadian disaster relief efforts, in response to large-scale crises that impact Canadians and Canadian interests abroad.

1.6.2 Risks and Opportunities

Risk Management: The department continues to improve its assessment, management and communication of risks. Its updated Corporate Risk Profile (see table below), which links to the PAA, cites 15 operational, strategic and external risks. Over the planning period, the department will establish a corporate risk committee to integrate risk mitigation throughout its operations. Passport Canada has its own Corporate Risk Profile, established in November 2007.

Several of the risks identified in the table below pertain to some program activities more than others. See Section II for more details.

Opportunities: Canada is uniquely positioned to pursue various opportunities:



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE CORPORATE RISK PROFILE 2008-2009
Risk Event Definition
Operational Risks Risks resulting from inadequate or failed internal organizational processes, people and systems Risks related to capacity and capability
1 Process and Control Compliance There is a risk that established controls will be circumvented.
2 Business Recovery There is a risk that DFAIT's key assets and operations (including people, equipment and systems) will not recover from an undesirable external event in a timely and adequate fashion.
3 Human Capital There is a risk that the department will not be able to attract, develop and retain sufficient human resources with the necessary competencies and knowledge to carry out its mandate.
4 Information for Decision Making and Reporting There is a risk that DFAIT's key assets and operations (including people, equipment and systems) will not recover from an undesirable external event in a timely and adequate fashion.
5 Internal Dependencies There is a risk that internal stakeholders will not respond in an adequate and timely manner to requests needed to meet objectives.
6 Litigation, Treaty or Trade Disputes There is a risk that DFAIT will not have the ability to respond to significant or high-profile litigation or trade/treaty disputes, resulting in an unfavourable outcome or loss.
Strategic Risks Risks resulting from inadequate or failed business decisions, organizational goals and strategies
7 Alignment with Partners There is a risk that the objectives and activities of partners and DFAIT will not be aligned.
8 Transformation There is a risk that DFAIT's culture and practices will not adapt sufficiently to meet emerging strategies of the organization.
9 External Communication There is a risk that DFAIT messages will not be communicated effectively or in a timely manner.
10 Resource Alignment There is a risk that DFAIT does not have the mechanisms to align resources with its priorities and activities
External Risks Risks resulting from events in the external environment that are not within the department's control but may influence its decisions
11 Unanticipated External Policy Shifts There is a risk that an unanticipated policy or international regulatory framework change will be made by another nation or multilateral organization.
12 International Instability There is a risk of crisis or instability in other nations or regions.
13 Economic Conditions There is a risk that a major disruption will occur within the global or domestic economy.
14 Hostile Actions There is a risk of significant hostile actions from other parties to Canadian interests. Examples include breaches of privacy, sabotage, espionage, terrorism, weapons proliferation and other forms of crime and corruption.
15 Catastrophic Disasters There is a risk that a catastrophic disaster will occur.

1.6.3 Government-Wide (Horizontal) Initiatives Involving the Department

This department has the lead in management of the Global Peace and Security Fund, which provides dedicated resources for activities related to countries at risk. The fund is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) Secretariat, using a whole-of-government approach.

1.6.4 Lessons Learned from Our Assessment of Past Performance

High-level lessons learned from the 2006-2007 Departmental Performance Report include:

Primary lessons learned from the MAF assessment (Round IV) include:

The department has taken this experience into consideration in setting its course for the planning period ahead. Its plans and priorities reflect these lessons learned. The details are set out in Section II.

1.6.5 Strategic Review as Announced in Budget 2007

In 2007-2008, the department conducted an in-depth review of the funding, relevance and performance of all its programs and spending to ensure results and value for money from programs that are a priority for Canadians. The results of this strategic review were submitted to Treasury Board last fall, for subsequent review by Cabinet. The results of this review will be reflected in future reporting to Parliament.

1.7 Our Priorities and Plans

The department's key and ongoing priorities link to the three strategic outcomes set out in the department's PAA. Before presenting the department's priorities for 2008-2009, it is important to underscore the distinction between key and ongoing priorities:

The department will focus on key and ongoing priorities in 2008-2009. Nonetheless, since unforeseen developments at home and abroad can require adjustments to the best-laid plans, the department is prepared to respond and make changes rapidly, as required.



Key Priorities
1. Afghanistan
2. North America and the Hemisphere
3. Growing/emerging markets, with a focus on China and India
4. Launching of DFAIT's transformation process, including meeting the challenge of strengthening Canada's global mission network
Ongoing Priorities
1. A safer, more secure and prosperous Canada within a strengthened North American partnership
2. Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business
3. Greater international support for freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship
4. Accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians
5. Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities
6. Strengthened stewardship of the department's resources (human, financial, physical and technological) and of Canada's international representation generally, reflecting alignment with Government of Canada priorities



Key Priorities



1. Afghanistan

The department will continue to contribute to a whole-of-government approach to Canada's participation in the NATO-led, UN-sanctioned mission to protect Canadian interests and to help Afghans rebuild their country as a stable, democratic and self-sufficient society. The department will enhance engagement with key international partners, such as the United States, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and European Union (EU) member states, to deliver on Canada's priorities in Afghanistan and border regions; and establish a Canadian civilian representative in Kandahar to ensure a coherent, coordinated and strategic approach to Canada's efforts across southern Afghanistan. The department will also increase services to Canadian companies, with additional trade resources at the Canadian Embassy in Kabul.



2. North America and the Hemisphere

The department will continue to strengthen its bilateral and trilateral relationships with the United States and Mexico across the full range of issues affecting the three countries. The department will lead Canada's whole-of-government re-engagement in the Americas to enhance prosperity, improve security and promote the values of freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law. The department will work with partners inside and outside government to enhance coherence and coordination of Canadian initiatives; implement an action plan to this end; enhance Canada's presence in multilateral regional forums; advance engagement with the United States and Mexico to foster linkages among partners in North America, Latin America and the Caribbean; support successful conclusion of free trade and other economic agreements; implement the Government of Canada's Global Commerce Strategy in the region; address hemispheric security issues; engage like-minded regional partners on issues of governance and accountability; and work to further corporate social responsibility in the region.



3. Growing/emerging markets, with a focus on China and India

The growing commercial importance of China, India and other emerging markets as competitors of, and markets of opportunity for, Canadian business means that the department must strengthen and realign its services, commercial network and market access priorities in response to the changing needs of Canada's modern, globally engaged businesses.

The Global Commerce Strategy details the government's commitment to reinforce Canada's competitive position in North America, negotiate new agreements to open markets, and expand Canada's commercial network abroad.

The department will continue to implement government-wide, multi-year market plans for China, India and 11 other priority markets. The plans will identify priority sectors and opportunities based on Canadian business capabilities and interests, and integrate all components of international commerce, including investment, innovation and trade policy negotiations. The department will continue to redeploy resources to address growing demand for more complex services in growing/emerging markets, assigning 46 additional staff to commercial offices in those markets. The department will use its network of missions to pursue comprehensive whole-of-government engagement in China and India, in support of its market plans pertaining to those two countries.

The department will support Canada's Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative through a range of marketing initiatives that promote its use as the transportation network of choice, connecting global supply chains between North America and Asia.



4. Launching the DFAIT's transformation process, including meeting the challenge of strengthening Canada's global mission network

The department will make changes to its current structure and distribution of resources, establish an International Platform Branch to coordinate all aspects of mission administrative support, strengthen the international platform by reallocating more staff from headquarters to missions, remodel the services provided by political/economic officers of the Foreign Service, redesign business processes related to the international platform and create a Chief Financial Officer position.

In addition, the department will improve and standardize its internal communications; evaluate and renew whole-of-government country strategies; increase understanding among staff of Canada's global commerce priorities and their role in advancing them; take a more coherent approach to the investment, innovation and international financing support that it provides to Canadian business; develop more efficient means of hiring and retaining staff; redesign financial processes and systems; renegotiate the interdepartmental memorandum of understanding on common services abroad and implement related performance measurement; and realign Canada's international commercial network to the needs of Canadian business.

The department will also continue to implement its New Way Forward initiative, launched in February 2008, to better align departmental resources (specifically political/economic officers of the Foreign Service) with international policy objectives and program delivery.



Ongoing Priorities



1. A safer, more secure and prosperous Canada within a strengthened North American partnership

The department will strengthen North American cooperation on defence and security through bilateral consultations; increase reporting on countries of strategic importance to Canada; work to enhance international cooperation on Canadian national security objectives in areas such as aviation security and national security-related immigration cases; work with multilateral partners on a more coordinated and effective international space policy; work to reduce threats posed by weapons and materials of mass destruction; and pursue crime and counterterrorism cooperation and information sharing with key partners.

In coordination with federal partners, the department will provide legal advice on Canada-United States security and criminal cooperation in land and air pre-clearance and integrated cross-border maritime law enforcement operations. The department will provide legal advice on the following: the scope of sanctions decided by the United Nations (UN) Security Council against foreign states and non-state actors and implementation of those sanctions into Canadian law; and implementation of domestic sanctions pursuant to the Special Economic Measures Act, including the drafting of new and/or amended regulations, as required.

The department will ensure that Canadian economic interests are supported and promoted through cooperation with the United States and Mexico on North American competitiveness issues, including the regulatory framework; intellectual property protection; energy, science and technology; and the safety of imported products. Working with partners and stakeholders, the department will seek to prevent or remove regulatory and legislative barriers in North America that are contrary to Canadian interests and integrate the resources of federal and other partners, such as the provinces and Export Development Canada, that are related to providing commercial services and advice to Canadian business into mission and regional office networks. As part of the Global Commerce Strategy, the department will implement market plans for the United States and Mexico and, in partnership with stakeholders across Canada, continue to develop a Government of Canada strategy for the Canada-United States border to facilitate movement of legitimate goods, services and people, while improving security.



2. Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business

The department will continue its phased implementation of the Global Commerce Strategy by implementing market plans for priority countries and regions in support of commercial engagement by Canadian business. It will integrate the full range of international business activities, from exporting and importing through two-way investment to licensing, science and technology partnering, and negotiation of market access issues. In addition to enhancing the North American commercial relationship, it will spearhead an agenda of robust bilateral and regional trade policy negotiations to secure competitive terms of access for Canadian business in key markets by making strategic use of policy tools, including free trade and other agreements as well as regulatory cooperation initiatives; boost Canadian participation in global investment and innovation networks through targeted support and promotion of Canadian advantages; and expand Canada's global commerce network in China, India and the Americas to meet ever-increasing demands and opportunities.



3. Greater international support for freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship

The department will work to strengthen international regimes and enhance the capacity of key partner developing states to combat terrorism and international crime; work to significantly improve the international record of signature and ratification of key counterterrorism and international protocols and conventions on fighting crime; and deliver the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program with key partners. It will cooperate effectively with G8 and other multilateral partners on initiatives that respond to peace and security issues and crises, and work to strengthen the government's operational capacity to coordinate whole-of-government responses to international crises. The department will advance Canada's interests in working toward a post-2012 climate change regime; work to ensure practical results of work done by the UN Human Rights Council; further Canada's humanitarian agenda; and support and enhance global energy security by engaging groups such as the International Energy Forum, the International Energy Agency and the G8 to promote a balanced discussion between energy-producing and -consuming countries. The department's Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force will work to improve the Government of Canada's capacity to respond to natural disasters and other crises, while continuing to manage the Global Peace and Security Fund. The department will use Canada's network of missions abroad to support democratic development, governance, security and peacebuilding, human rights and environmental stewardship in priority countries and regions.

The department will continue to implement a policy on tabling international treaties (in the House of Commons), which the government seeks to ratify. It will provide legal advice on the dispute between Canada and Denmark over the sovereignty of Hans Island. It will help coordinate the Government of Canada's position on the Commission of Inquiry into the Investigation of the Bombing of Air India Flight 182 and the Internal Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin.



4. Accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians

The department will prepare for a successful Francophonie Summit in 2008 in Quebec City, which is expected to help modernize the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie; campaign for Canada to be accorded a seat on the UN Security Council for 2011-2012; and work through key bilateral partnerships and effective participation in the Arctic Council and other relevant international forums to advance the international dimensions of Canada's Arctic agenda. The department will also advance Canada's new approach to democracy support; lay the groundwork for a high-impact Canadian G8 presidency in 2010; implement existing G8 commitments through the Global Partnership Program, which carries out various threat-reduction activities; support UN reform efforts; continue Canada's engagement with the Organization of American States; host the Caribbean Development Bank meeting in 2008; and facilitate coherent Canadian policies and priorities across the multilateral system. Canada will work with other countries on the reform of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. The department will ensure that Canadian foreign policy priorities and interests are reflected in the outcome of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) five-year review of the Paris Declaration on aid; and ensure continued sound management of OECD and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) issues.

The department will further strengthen the North American trade policy regime through NAFTA and build strong bilateral economic relationships with key partners in the Americas and other emerging markets. It will pursue conclusion of the Doha Round of the WTO; undertake advocacy initiatives at the WTO dispute settlement bodies and before the NAFTA Chapter 11 tribunals on disputes to which Canada is a party; advance Canada's commercial interests through the OECD, APEC and the G8; and maintain an efficient system of export controls.



5. Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities

The department will strengthen consular services by improving travel information available through its website as well as by enhancing its publications and outreach activities, while increasing consultation with stakeholders. It will also strengthen its emergency response capacity, establish emergency response hubs abroad, and expand access to consular services by increasing the number of consular staff at headquarters and missions and the number of honorary consuls in key travel destinations.

Passport Canada will simplify the passport application process by using security and intelligence software, (including development of facial recognition technology); pilot an e-passport program for diplomatic and special passports; develop a new service model; expand the network and scope of services provided by receiving agents; and improve processing and data entry, using two-dimensional barcode technology.

The department will complete the integration of domestic regional offices into its worldwide commerce network and open four new regional offices in regions with high demand for trade commissioner services; make significant improvements to its vital electronic platforms, such as the Virtual Trade Commissioner and TRIO, the department's business contact management system; and add capacity to its worldwide commerce network to better enable effective intervention on issues of corporate social responsibility and better support Canadian business participation in global value chains. It will develop and implement a Global Innovation Strategy; strengthen international science and technology collaboration to improve access for Canadian-based firms to new research partners, technologies, risk financing and supply chains; pilot a sector-based approach for connecting Canadian business to global value chains; and make further improvements to the import and export permit software to enhance client service.



6. Strengthened stewardship of the department's resources (human, financial, physical and technological) and of Canada's international representation generally, reflecting alignment with Government of Canada priorities

The department will enhance the government's international platform so that departmental resources can best support whole-of-government outcomes at missions abroad; change policies and program delivery related to corporate services and human resources to better support missions; further expand the Business Continuity Program so that critical services can be maintained in the event of business disruption; and make further security upgrades. It will continually assess its allocation of human resources in order to strike a better balance between Canada's mission network, the department's most valuable asset, and departmental headquarters.

1.8 Summary of Our Resources for 2008-2011

1.8.1 Total Financial and Human Resources

Total Financial Resources


Financial Resources ($ millions)
Year
2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011
Total Planned Spending 2,371.6 2,287.0 2,175.0

Total Human Resources


Human Resources (FTEs)
Year
2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011
FTEs 12,975 12,396 12,301

Note: FTEs refer to full-time equivalents-the human resources required to sustain an average level of employment over 12 months, based on a 37.5-hour workweek

The department remains committed to building a bilingual, culturally diverse, gender-balanced and innovative workforce that more fully reflects Canadian society as a whole. The department is also working to address the gap in resources for a number of its key occupational groups.

It should be noted that the department's human resources planning-critical to an organization as large and diverse as this-is closely linked to its business planning. The department collects highly specific information related to human resources through its annual business planning process. This information is used to guide recruitment in response to clearly identified needs. Once approved by senior managers, business plans are used to guide preparation of mandate letters and performance management agreements for Heads of Missions and senior executives. Thereafter, managers throughout the department develop performance agreements for all staff, in accordance with the Performance Management Program.



Canadian Embassy, Beijing
Canadian Embassy, Beijing

1.8.2 Planned Spending for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Planned Spending for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome ($ millions)
  Expected Results 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 Contribute to the Following Priorities
Strategic Outcome 1: Canada's International Agenda The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
International Policy Advice and Integration: Providing strategic direction, intelligence and advice, including integration and coordination of Canada's foreign and international economic policies Canada has the necessary strategic direction in place to allow for the integration and coordination of its foreign and international economic policies for the advancement of its interests internationally. 140.0 125.2 124.8 Key:
1, 2, 3
Ongoing:
1, 2, 3, 4
Diplomacy and Advocacy: Engaging and influencing international players and delivering international programs and diplomacy Canada influences the international community on issues related to its interests and values. 1,068.1 1,043.2 981.3 Key:
1, 2, 3
Ongoing:
1, 2, 3, 4
Strategic Outcome 2: International Services for Canadians Canadians are satisfied with commercial, consular and passport services.
International Commerce: Managing and delivering commerce services and advice to Canadian business Canadian business clients are positioned to successfully exploit business opportunities abroad in trade, investment, science and technology commercialization, global value chains and other modern business models; and the overseas commercial interests and priorities of partner departments and the provinces are supported. 332.1 296.4 247.2 Ongoing: 5
Consular Affairs: Managing and delivering consular services and advice to Canadians Canadians are aware of how to travel safely. Those that need routine or emergency assistance abroad receive satisfactory assistance. 46.4 41.4 41.5 Ongoing: 5
Passport Canada: Managing and delivering passport services through the use of the Passport Canada Revolving Fund The capacity for Canadians to travel without documentation problems; the production of travel documents according to international standards; and innovative, reliable, consistent and accessible passport services. 276.6 246.2 246.2 Ongoing: 5
Strategic Outcome 3: Canada's International Platform The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters: Managing and delivering services and infrastructure at headquarters to enable Canada's representation abroad The department's partners located at missions abroad are satisfied with its provision of services, infrastructure and support from headquarters. 274.9 270.5 271.2 Ongoing: 6
Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad: Managing and delivering services and infrastructure at missions to enable Canada's representation abroad The department's partners at missions abroad are satisfied with its provision of common services, infrastructure and support at those missions. 541.1 541.2 539.9 Ongoing: 6

Note: Planned spending will be adjusted to reflect implementation of the report of the Independent Panel on Canada's Future Role in Afghanistan.

Note: International Commerce includes budgetary and non-budgetary statutory payments to Export Development Canada for the purpose of facilitating and developing trade between Canada and other countries under the terms of the Export Development Act (2008-2009 $4M budgetary, $88.2M non-budgetary; 2009-2010 nil budgetary, $63.3M non-budgetary; 2010-2011 nil budgetary, $19.8M non-budgetary). These payments were reflected under Export Development Canada in previous Main Estimates.

1.9 Our Financial and Human Resources in More Detail

1.9.1 Voted and Statutory Items from Main Estimates



Vote or Statutory Item Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording 2008-2009 Main Estimates
($ millions)
2007-2008 Main Estimates
($ millions)
1 Operating expenditures 1,223.5 1,162.1
5 Capital expenditures 122.7 114.8
10 Grants and contributions 682.1 651.7
(S) Minister of Foreign Affairs-Salary and motor car allowance 0.1 0.1
(S) Minister for International Trade and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics-Salary and motor car allowance 0.1 0.1
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 78.4 77.2
(S) Payment under the Diplomatic Service (Special) Superannuation Act 0.3 0.3
(S) Passport Office Revolving Fund 0.0 (6.1)
(S) Payments to Export Development Canada to discharge obligations incurred pursuant to Section 23 of the Export Development Canada Act (Canada Account) for the purpose of facilitating and developing trade between Canada and other countries. 4.2 2.1
(S) Payments to Export Development Canada to discharge obligations incurred pursuant to Section 23 of the Export Development Canada Act Act (Canada Account) for the purpose of facilitating and developing trade between Canada and other countries. (Non-budgetary) 88.2 679.0
  Total Department 2,199.4 2,681.2

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.



Canadian Embassy, Washington
Canadian Embassy, Washington

1.9.2 Planned Spending and Full-Time Equivalents



Planned Spending ($ millions) and Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs) Forecast Spending 2007-2008 Planned Spending 2008-2009 Planned Spending 2009- 2010 Planned Spending 2010- 2011
International Policy Advice and Integration 145.7 135.2 122.3 122.4
Diplomacy and Advocacy 905.8 929.5 909.3 718.5
International Commerce 180.3 235.5 231.5 226.4
Consular Affairs 41.1 41.3 41.3 41.3
Passport Canada 233.1 276.6 246.2 246.2
Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters 271.0 268.4 269.5 270.1
Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad 488.5 532.3 539.2 537.6
Budgetary Main Estimates (gross) 2,265.5 2,418.8 2,359.3 2,162.6
Non-budgetary Main Estimates (gross) 679.0 88.2 63.3 19.8
Less: Respendable Revenue 328.7 307.6 277.2 277.2
Total Main Estimates 2,615.8 2,199.4 2,145.4 1,905.2
Adjustments
Operating budget carry-forward 46.1 35.0    
Carry-forward of capital funds 2.8 2.0    
Funding for the Global Peace and Security Fund 138.4      
Funding for Passport Canada to address the increased demand for passports 55.0      
Reinvestment of revenues from the sale or transfer of real property 30.9      
Transfer from partner departments to provide administrative support to partner departments' staff located at missions abroad 20.5      
Funding for ongoing maintenance requirements and capital rust-out in missions abroad in accordance with industry standards 14.0      
Funding to implement and administer the 2006 Canada-United States Softwood Lumber Agreement 12.9      
Funding to enhance physical security at missions abroad 12.0      
Funding for the implementation of the Global Commerce Strategy to sustain Canada's North American advantage, to extend Canada's reach into new priority markets, and to renew Canada's trade negotiation efforts 9.3      
Payments to Export Development Canada to discharge obligations incurred pursuant to section 23 of the Export Development Act (Canada Account) 4.5      
Collective bargaining agreements 3.2      
Funding for the costs of hosting the 12th Summit of La Francophonie in Quebec City in 2008 (horizontal item) 3.2      
Funding for contributions to support international environmental programs to meet Canada's United Nations Climate Change Conference commitment 3.1      
Funding to identify, schedule and prepare witnesses asscociated with the Internal Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin (horizontal item) 1.0      
Transfer from the Canadian Commercial Corporation for its share in the Ministry's Expenditure Review Committee reductions 1.0      
Funding of Edu-Canada, a new international education campaign to attract foreign students to Canada 1.0      
Transfer from the Canadian International Development Agency for contribution in aid of academic relations related to scholarship programs 0.8      
Funding for Canada's participation as a member of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (horizontal item) 0.7      
Funding to strengthen DFAIT audit capacity 0.7      
Funding to identify, schedule and prepare witnesses associated with the Commission of Inquiry into the investigation of the bombing of Air India Flight 182 (horizontal item) 0.7      
Transfer from Environment Canada for payment of the assessed contribution to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 0.5      
Funding for activities that are essential to the continued implementation of the Public Service Modernization Act (horizontal item) 0.4      
Funding related to government advertising programs (horizontal item) 0.3      
Funding in support of the Federal Accountability Act to evaluate all ongoing grant and contribution programs every five years (horizontal item) 0.3      
Funding for the payment of assessed contributions representing Canada's membership in the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade and in the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants 0.3      
Transfer to Passport Canada from Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada for furthering connectivity to the National Integrated Information System 0.2      
Transfer from Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada for a joint contribution to the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) 0.1      
Funding to implement Cabinet Directives on streamlining regulations by strengthening regulatory coordination capacity 0.1      
Reprofiling for the construction of an Embassy in Baghdad (0.5)      
Transfer to Citizenship and Immigration Canada for cost increase of processing applications for the International Youth Program (1.0)      
Currency gains on expenditures abroad (10.6)      
Termination of the Moscow Chancery project (30.0)      
Funding for the Global Partnership Program   70.1 60.2 93.0
Funding for Canada's presence in Afghanistan   19.7 40.1 9.2
Funding for international assistance activities   18.0 18.0 18.0
Funding for DFAIT accommodation   9.5 7.5 8.1
DFAIT overseas activities   7.0 10.0 10.0
Funding for Canada's Safe Travel Abroad program   4.4 0.0 0.0
Funding for the administration of the 2006 Canada-United States Softwood Lumber Agreement   2.3 2.3 0.9
Funding for international environmental agreements   2.0 1.9 1.8
Funding for Passport Canada's e-passport project   0.9 0.3 0.0
International science and technology   0.8 0.8 0.0
Funding for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act   0.5 0.5 0.0
Funding for the Global Peace and Security Fund   0.0 0.0 128.8
Total Adjustments 321.8 172.1 141.6 269.8
Total Planned Spending 2,937.6 2,371.6 2,287.0 2,175.0
Less: Non-respendable Revenue 214.2 169.3 151.1 181.6
Plus: Cost of Services Received without Charge 84.6 87.0 87.7 87.9
Net Cost of Department 2,808.0 2,289.3 2,223.6 2,081.3
 
Personnel— Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs) 12,917 12,975 12,396 12,301

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

1.10 Our Principal Performance Measurement Model and Tools

1.10.1 Principal Performance Measurement Tools

The department has used approved plans as the basic material for this report. The department's degree of success in carrying out its plans, advancing its priorities and achieving its expected results will be evaluated in its 2008-2009 Departmental Performance Report.

The following is a list of the principal tools used by the department in assessing performance:

How does the department assess its performance, both immediate and longer term? It uses quantitative and qualitative indicators that provide feedback on the effectiveness of the department's program achievements, the efficiency of its program management and its compliance with government-wide requirements. There are indicators particularly relevant to each of the seven program activities, as demonstrated by the following examples. Readers should note that this is not an exhaustive list.

Although the department is making progress on performance measurement, it acknowledges that it has much more work to do in this area. This task is complex because the department's mandate, particularly in foreign affairs, focuses on results-such as strengthened bilateral and multilateral relations, or advocacy of Canadian positions on the world stage-that cannot be measured in numbers and other easily quantifiable terms. (This is somewhat less true of the international commerce elements of the department, since at least some trade and other commerce-related achievements can be assessed, using hard data and statistics.)

To ensure Canadians that it provides value for taxpayers' money as well as effective and beneficial programs and services, this department is continuing to develop a performance framework that corresponds to its new PAA. A draft framework is currently being reviewed, in consultation with stakeholders. The department will provide an update on this process in its 2008-2009 Departmental Performance Report.

5The department will be finalizing its performance measurement framework, following further discussions with TBS.

1.10.2 Departmental Results Chain and Performance Model

An expected results chain-or results-based logic model-illustrates the levels of influence in the public environment in which the department operates:

What the department does at the operational level is meant to generate changes with respect to the target group(s), which should effect changes at the desired state level.

The information in Section II is presented in a manner that follows this logic model. Each of the department's program activities has its own subsection, providing details on how it applies its resources strategically to achieve certain results and thereby contributes to the department's overall priorities and outcomes.



Departmental Results Chain and Performance Model



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