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Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Skills and Employment


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 1999

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy provides support to Aboriginal organizations to design and deliver:

  • Labour market development programs to assist Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal persons with disabilities, to prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment;
  • Special programs to assist Aboriginal Youth make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school; and child care programs.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: To support Aboriginal organizations to develop and implement labour market, youth and child care programs that are designed to address the local and regional needs of Aboriginal peoples. This programming was designed to:

  • Assist Aboriginal individuals to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment, thereby resulting in savings to income support programs;
  • Assist Aboriginal youth (normally from 15 to 30 years of age) in preparing for, obtaining and maintaining employment and in making a successful transition into the labour market, thereby resulting in increased employment; and
  • Increase the supply of quality child care services in First Nations and Inuit communities, thereby raising the availability of distinct and diverse services in these communities to a level comparable to that of the general population.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, the AHRDS results were:

  • 60,000 clients completed programs or services to help transition to work; 8,000 returns to school and 16,000 employed; the figures below are a subset of these numbers
    • For Youth - 30,000 completed interventions and 6,000 employed;
    • First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI) is a separately funded initiative which supports First Nations and Inuit (FNI) communities through 58 regional Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreement (AHRDA) holders and subsidizes approximately 8,500 child care spaces in approximately 462 FNI child care sites. While FNICCI is limited to on-reserve and northern FNI people, all AHRDA holders can support child care as an eligible program expense for their clients but only through their available AHRDS funding envelope.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 266.0 257.2 248.4 257.0 257.0 (8.6)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 266.0 257.2 248.4 257.0 257.0 (8.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is related to internal transfers including additional investments in youth aboriginal projects and legal remedies.

Audit completed or planned: An audit was performed in 2009 for the AHRDS. The scope of this audit dealt with monitoring of activity, expenditures, and the results.

Evaluation completed or planned: The latest summative evaluation report about this program from 2007-2008 can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2010/sp_ah_939_03_10e/page00.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (voted payments)

Start date: October 3, 2003

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) initiative is a nationally managed skills development program for Aboriginal people. The ASEP program supports multi-year training and employment strategies that are developed and managed by formalized partnerships to train individuals for targeted jobs.

Formalized partnerships including the private sector and Aboriginal organizations (and others such as the provincial governments and training institutions) are responsible for jointly developing and managing comprehensive, multi-year skills development (training-to-employment) plans leading directly to targeted jobs. The plan must have a commitment from the employers to provide at least 50 long-term jobs for Aboriginal people. The partnership must also make a significant financial contribution to the training plan (at least 50%) and must develop a governance model that will manage and oversee the activities of the project.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) program was launched as an $85M initiative in 2003-2009 that was expanded in 2007 with an additional $105M, and extended to 2012. Canada’s Economic Action Plan under Budget 2009 announced an additional $100M investment over three years beginning in 2009-2010.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The overall objective of the ASEP initiative is to promote maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments through a collaborative partnership approach. It is measured by :

  • Targeted number of individuals served as a result of the projects;
  • Targeted number of individuals employed as a result of the projects; and
  • Number of partnerships created.

Results Achieved:

  • 2,731 Aboriginal clients were served through ASEP projects
  • 1,027 individuals were employed.
  • 14 new partnerships and projects started over this period bringing the total number of projects underway to 26
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 16.1 23.9 43.8 39.6 31.5 12.3
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 16.1 23.9 43.8 39.6 31.5 12.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to re-profiling of funds into future years as there were deferrals of projects to the next fiscal year caused by delays in project proposal start dates.

Audit completed or planned: An Internal Audit of ASEP was also finalized in August 2009.

Evaluation completed or planned: The ASEP formative evaluation covered the 2003-2007 period. The full report can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2009/asep/page00.shtml
The ASEP summative evaluation report and management response for projects ending in 2009 is expected to be finalized in 2010-11.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund (ASTSIF) is an initiative under Canada's Economic Action Plan that is supporting short-term, focused initiatives designed to help Aboriginal people get the specific skills they require to benefit from economic opportunities, including those generated by other Economic Action Plan initiatives.

The Fund is designed to strengthen partnerships between Aboriginal employment service organizations and employers through training-to-employment programs related to concrete job opportunities and support greater investments in training for individuals facing barriers to employment such as low literacy and essential skills.

The ASTSIF focus on three main objectives:

  • entering into a number of training-to-employment projects leading to concrete, guaranteed job opportunities by establishing partnerships with small and medium-sized employers;
  • supporting projects to assist Aboriginal people with barriers to employment, including literacy and essential skills challenges; and
  • supporting pilot projects to test innovative approaches to Aboriginal labour market programming as well as projects that are national in scope.

There are both regional and national components to the ASTSIF. The regional component supports training-to-employment projects, skills development projects and service improvement projects on a regional basis, while the national component supports initiatives that are national in scope, partnership-based and that will result in the development of tools, services or promising practices to enhance the range of client and business services that will be provided under the new Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The ASTSIF is a two-year initiative that supports the development and strengthening of opportunities-based partnerships and the delivery of targeted training, leading to concrete employment outcomes for Aboriginal people. It is expected that approximately 8,200 Aboriginal clients will be served through ASTSIF funding, of which 2,800 are expected to secure employment.

Outcome Indicators:

  • Number of clients served
  • Number of clients with increased employability and employment skills
  • Number of clients employed
  • Key sectors providing training to employment

For ASTSIF regional projects, indicators include but are not limited to information on the following areas:

  • Number of clients registered
  • Level of retention
  • Enhanced employability
  • Percentage of clients employed

Monitoring and Reporting:

  • Quarterly reports as part of the EAP
  • Quarterly financial and activity reports in accordance with the Contribution Agreements

Results Achieved:

  • 1,342 clients were served
  • 746 people participated in skills or employment training
  • 289 became employed

The Construction & Trades; Health; Railway; Mining; and Communications sectors all provided training to employment opportunities for Aboriginal people.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants
Total Contributions 25.0 21.0 21.0 4.0
Total Other types of transfer payments
Total Program Activity(ies) 25.0 21.0 21.0 4.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is explained by differences in planned spending and total authorities for contributions under this program. Total authorities for contributions were not known during the planning period.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A summative evaluation is planned for 2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Apprenticeship Completion Grant (voted payments)

Start date: January 1, 2009

End date: December 31, 20121

Description: Announced in Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG) builds on the existing Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG) by providing a one-time $2,000 taxable cash grant to apprentices who successfully complete their apprenticeship program and obtain journeyperson certification in one of the designated Red Seal trades on or after January 1, 2009.

Through the combined effects of both Grants, registered apprentices that progress through and complete their apprenticeship program and receive their journeyperson certification in a designated Red Seal trade may be eligible for up to $4,000. These programs provide incentives for Canadians to pursue apprenticeship training and launch careers in the skilled trades.

The ACG is linked to the designated Red Seal trades as this designation is widely recognized as a credential by industry, enabling greater labour mobility across Canada, and also represents a standard of excellence for the skilled trades.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The ACG builds on the objectives of the AIG and specifically supports apprenticeship progression and mobility by increasing the number of apprentices who complete their apprenticeship programs and obtain journeyperson certification in a designated Red Seal trade. It is expected that approximately 20,000 individuals will benefit from the ACG each year.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2009-2010, HRSDC issued 18,861 ACGs to apprentices who completed their apprenticeship program and received their journeyperson certification in a designated Red Seal trade.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants     40.0 38.3 37.7 2.3
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies)     40.0 38.3 37.7 2.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly explained by differences in planned spending and total authorities for contributions under this program. Total authorities for contributions were not known during the planning period. The remainder of the variance is due to the fact that slightly fewer grants (18,861 vs. 20,000) were issued than initially estimated.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A combined summative evaluation of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant and Apprenticeship Completion Grant programs is planned for 2011-2012.

1 Note grants may continue to be awarded until June 30, 2013



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (voted payments)

Start date: January 1, 2007

End date: December 31, 20121

Description: The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG) aims to promote access to apprenticeships and improve labour mobility by providing a $1,000 taxable cash grant to registered apprentices upon completion of the first or second year (or equivalent) of an apprenticeship program in one of the designated Red Seal trades, on or after January 1, 2007, up to a maximum of $2,000 per apprentice. This grant is designed to reward advancement in an apprenticeship program in one of the designated Red Seal trades, building momentum for apprentices to complete their programs, receive their journeyperson certification and ultimately receive their Red Seal endorsement.

The AIG provides an incentive for more Canadians to pursue apprenticeships and, taken together with the Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG) for apprentices, the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit for employers that hire registered apprentices in the Red Seal trades, and the Tradesperson’s Tool Deduction, is intended to meet the future need for skilled trades people that is crucial to the sustained growth of the economy. The Grant is linked to the designated Red Seal trades because this designation is widely recognized as a credential by industry, enabling greater labour mobility across Canada, and also represents a standard of excellence for the skilled trades.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The AIG is one of three measures announced in Budget 2006 to encourage more apprenticeship training and support more Canadians in pursuing careers in the skilled trades. Specifically, the Grant has been designed to meet the following objectives:

  • To increase access to apprenticeships in the Red Seal Program trades by helping apprentices to cover expenses such as the purchase of tools and other materials required for learning on-the-job and travel expenses associated with classroom training;
  • To encourage the apprentice's progression through the technical and on-the-job training requirements in the early years of their apprenticeship program, thus building the momentum towards certification; and
  • To promote inter-provincial mobility by increasing the number of apprentices remaining in the Red Seal trades and getting their Red Seal certification.

Results Achieved:

  • HRSDC issued 58,903 AIGs to registered apprentices who completed either the first or second level of their apprenticeship program.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 30.9 53.4 62.4 62.4 58.5 3.9
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 30.9 53.4 62.4 62.4 58.5 3.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The lapsed funds for the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant ($3.9M) are mainly due to the decrease in the take-up growth rate compared to those from previous years. In addition, initial forecasts were based on the data from the 2003 Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) and assumed 100% take-up by eligible apprentices. Recognizing that take-up would not reach 100% in 2009-10, AIG program funds were reduced by $43.6M, as described in the 2008 Economic and Fiscal Statement.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A formative evaluation of the AIG was completed in early 2010. It focused on program design and delivery was performed from October 2007 to May 2008. The evaluation is currently awaiting publication, when available it will be found on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml
A combined summative evaluation of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant and Apprenticeship Completion Grant programs is planned for 2011-2012.

1 Note grants may continue to be awarded until June 30, 2013.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2005

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The objective of the Enabling Fund (EF) is to enhance the development and vitality of the official language minority communities by strengthening capacity in the areas of community economic and human resource development and by promoting partnerships at all levels. The Enabling Fund provides funding to Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC) designated organizations: the Réseaux de développement économique et d’employabilité (RDÉE Canada); 12 provincial/territorial francophone and Acadian organizations; and the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation (formerly Community Table) for the English-speaking minority communities in Quebec. These organizations are funded through contribution agreements, so that these organizations can plan, develop and manage community projects and access additional funding for these projects.

Through contribution agreements, the EF provides funding to OLMC-designated organizations to undertake a variety of activities, including:

  • The preparation of community economic and human resources development plans for the OLMCs;
  • The creation, implementation and consolidation of collaborative community projects;
  • The establishment of partnerships to meet the objectives set out in the OLMCs’ development plans; and
  • The provision of support to the OLMCs in finding and accessing programs and funding (federal, provincial/territorial and other) to meet objectives.

The EF also supports two national committees, the National Committee for Economic Development and Employability for Francophone Communities and the National Human Resources Development Committee for the English Linguistic Minority. Through these committees, as co-chair, HRSDC regularly engages with OLMCs, informs them of departmental programs and services, and facilitates collaboration with other federal departments.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues;
  • Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and Official Language Minority Communities
  • The views of Official Language Minority Communities about economic and human resources issues are considered in the Government of Canada's policy/program development;
  • Contribution recipients continue to develop and implement effective community plans and projects with concrete results; and
  • Contribute to sustainable collaboration across federal institutions and with Official Language Minority Community stakeholders.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, 14 OLMC organizations received funding through the Enabling Fund for a total amount of $12M.

Recipient organizations demonstrated tangible outcomes in support of five strategic sectors related to community economic and human resources development:

  • Employability: job training, access to job placements, provision of employment services to Francophones, and OLMC-related labour-market research and data collection;
  • Youth employability: entrepreneurship awareness-building activities, youth labour-market integration initiatives in OLMCs, and youth retention strategies in OLMCs;
  • Community capacity building: the provision of training for community organizations on governance, management of social economy enterprises, and support for preparing funding requests and business plans;
  • Community engagement: community development plans and support for planning of high profile projects, such as festivals and the setting-up community radio stations; and,
  • Tourism: development of partnerships between community organizations and provincial and municipal governments to promote their communities as destinations of choice.

In 2009-2010, recipient organizations leveraged additional project funding from a variety of public, private and not-for-profit partners. These partners include Industry Canada and its regional economic development agencies, Canadian Heritage, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, a number of provincial governments (e.g., the Quebec Secrétariat des affaires intergouvernementales canadiennes, the Alberta Francophone Secretariat), Chambers of Commerce, and municipal governments.

Operating funds assigned to the Enabling Fund support the operations of two National Committees involving a number of federal departments and community representatives dedicated to OLMC economic development and employability. In 2009-2010, the Anglophone National Committee met twice and the Francophone National Committee met once. Federal representatives to these committees also meet separately as part of Government Tables to encourage horizontality and interdepartmental collaboration. In 2009-2010, one meeting was held with representatives of 13 federal departments and organizations and 10 teleconferences took place between representatives of the following departments and agencies: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Heritage, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Industry Canada, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Region, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Western Economic Diversification Canada, FedNor, CanDev, CanNor, and Public Works and Government Services Canada.

Program officials also launched an interdepartmental research committee to coordinate research on OLMC economic development and employability at the federal level.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 11.8 12.1 12.0 12.0 12.0 0
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 11.8 12.1 12.0 12.0 12.0 0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities was completed in 2009. The evaluation is currently awaiting publication, when available it will be found on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program (voted payments)

Start date: January 02, 2003

End date: May 27, 2015

Description: The Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) works to ensure that internationally-trained individuals can fully participate in the labour market and Canadian society. The FCRP is one of the key Government of Canada initiatives that support the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications for timely assessment and recognition of foreign qualifications across Canada.1

The program provides strategic financial support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, including regulatory bodies, Sector Councils and post-secondary educational institutions, to develop systems and processes for assessing and recognizing foreign qualifications in targeted occupations and sectors.

The FCRP also provides horizontal leadership in building partnerships and fostering foreign qualification recognition capacity through the development of innovative projects, tools, processes, and exchanges information about successful foreign credential recognition practices.

The goal of the program is to improve labour market outcomes for internationally trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports work that contributes to developing fair, transparent, consistent, and timely foreign qualification assessment and recognition and building institutional capacity.

The FCRP will work with partners and stakeholders to achieve the following short, medium and long-term outcomes:

Short-term:

  • Understanding, consensus, collaboration and commitment among stakeholders and partners on issues and potential solutions related to Foreign Qualification Recognition (FQR);
  • Promotion, information sharing and transfer of best practices in developing Pan-Canadian FQR processes; and
  • Partnership among key stakeholders and provinces and territories to advance the FQR agenda.

Medium-term:

  • Availability of tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials among organizations.

Long-term:

  • Standardization of Pan-Canadian FQR processes and tools in targeted occupations and other sectors; and,
  • Use of tools and processes by organizations to assess and recognize the credentials of internationally-trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Results Achieved:

  • The implementation plan for the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications was developed and Target Occupations were selected;
  • The FCRP is co-leading the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Foreign Qualification Recognition Working Group (FQRWG) and overseeing the implementation of the Framework;
  • The FCRP continues to negotiate and enter into new agreements with provinces and key stakeholders to help implement the FQR framework; and
  • In 2009-10, there were 67 agreements in progress of which 43 agreements were being supported with money sourced from Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 14.3 13.9 28.5 25.7 14.7 13.8
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 14.3 13.9 28.5 25.7 14.7 13.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance of $13.8M is mainly due to the deferral of projected activities from 2009-2010 to 2010-2011 following the development and subsequent announcement of the Pan-Canadian Framework on November 30, 2009 as well as differences in planned spending and total authorities for contributions under this program. Total authorities for contributions were not known during the planning period

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: The summative evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program was completed in 2010. The evaluation is currently awaiting publication, when available it will be found on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

1 Foreign credential recognition (FCR), also called foreign qualification recognition (FQR) encompasses the assessment and recognition of knowledge, skills, work experience and education obtained outside of Canada.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements (voted payments)

Start date: Throughout 2008-09 (varies by Province and Territory)

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: In Advantage Canada, the Government of Canada set out the goal to create "the best educated, most skilled and most flexible workforce in the world." In Budget 2007, the Government of Canada created a new Labour Market Architecture, which included six-year bilateral Labour Market Agreements with the provinces and territories. These agreements were supported by $500M per year of new federal investments to address key labour market challenges at local and regional levels. Labour Market Agreements have been since signed with all 13 provinces and territories.

The Labour Market Agreements are intended to increase labour force participation of under-represented groups, providing a means by what Canadians can obtain the right skills to compete in the labour market, and encourage employers to provide more training to their workers. These Agreements are providing labour market training to unemployed Canadians who are not eligible for Employment Insurance and therefore unable to access programs under Part II of the Employment Insurance Act. In addition to these clients, the Agreements are also available to workers with low skills, including those who lack literacy and essential skills.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: Reporting under the Agreements includes following indicators:

Eligible client indicators:

  • Total number of eligible clients served/in training by employment status (e.g. employed, unemployed, self-employed);
  • Education level of eligible clients prior to intervention (interventions include employment counselling and services, skills training and job readiness assistance); and
  • Number of eligible clients served through an intervention by designated client group (e.g. Aboriginal peoples, immigrants, older workers, persons with disabilities, women, and youth).

Service Delivery Indicators:

  • Number of eligible clients participating in interventions by intervention type; and
  • Proportion of eligible clients "satisfied" with service received upon completion of the intervention.

Eligible Client Outcome and Impact Indicators:

  • Proportion of eligible clients who have completed their intervention, by intervention type;
  • Proportion of eligible clients who, 3 months and 12 months after leaving the intervention are (a) employed OR (b) in further intervention;
  • Number of eligible clients who have earned credentials or certification through participation in the intervention;
  • Average hourly earnings of eligible clients following the intervention; and
  • Proportion of eligible clients who, 3 months and 12 months after leaving the intervention, indicate their training helped prepare them for future employment.

Results Achieved:

Reports on the results achieved through labour market agreements are available by province or territory on the website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/partnerships/lma/index.shtml.

Each province or territory is required to report to its citizens on the results achieved in the previous year by Oct. 1. The reports on results achieved during 2009-2010 will be published on the website as soon as they are available.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments   459.9 501.3 527.7 508.5 (7.2)
Total Program Activity(ies)   459.9 501.3 527.7 508.5 (7.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to in-year adjustments made by provinces and territories to reflect revisions to their strategic plans. LMAs provide flexibility to provinces and territories to reprofile and/or carry forward funds between fiscal years as their plans evolve, to maximize the effective use of the funding.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned:

  • LMA evaluation to be performed over the course of fiscal years 2010-2011 to 2012-2013.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2004

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: Under the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities, the Government of Canada contributes 50% of the costs incurred by provinces for eligible programs and services up to the maximum amount identified in each agreement.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The goal of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is to improve the employment situation of Canadians with disabilities, by enhancing their employability, increasing the employment opportunities available to them, and building on their existing knowledge base.

Reporting under the Agreements includes selected societal indicators (employment income, educational attainment and employment rate of working age people with disabilities) and the following program indicators:

  • number of participants in programs and services;
  • number of participants completing a program or service (in cases where there is a specific start and end point to the intervention); and
  • number of participants who were assisted in obtaining and maintaining employment where the program or service supported the activity.

Results Achieved: Based on aggregate information provided by the provinces in their 2008-2009 Annual Reports, approximately 300,000 persons with disabilities are served annually across Canada. This may include individuals who participate in multi-year or multiple interventions. As per the Multilateral Framework, the 2009-2010 Annual Reports are expected to be made available December 3, 2010.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments 218.3 218.3 217.1 218.3 218.3 (1.2)
Total Program Activity(ies) 218.3 218.3 217.1 218.3 218.3 (1.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): An internal transfer was done to cover shortfall in funding for transfer agreements.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A demonstration evaluation of the Canada-Manitoba Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities examined the experiences of clients during the program period (2004-2007), as well as one year pre-program (2003), in order to gain as much knowledge as possible about the outcomes of program participation. The full evaluation report can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2010/sp_949_05_10e/page00.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Literacy and Essential Skills (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2006

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills (OLES) delivers the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP), a non-statutory Grants and Contributions program funded through the Consolidated Revenue Fund. The key objective of the ALLESP is to promote lifelong learning by facilitating the creation of opportunities for Canadians to acquire the learning, literacy and essential skills they need to participate in a knowledge-based economy and society.

These objectives are accomplished by providing funding to eligible organizations to conduct the following four activities:

  • knowledge generation, including transfer of knowledge and its application;
  • promoting innovation by providing targeted investments to encourage innovative approaches;
  • building the capacity of the adult learning and literacy sector and organizations involved in essential skills; and
  • increasing awareness of adult learning, literacy and essential skills.

ALLESP targets adults already employed or preparing to enter the workforce, families and communities with a particular emphasis on Aboriginal Canadians, immigrants, lower-skilled workers, and official language minority communities. ALLESP plays an indirect role in improving Canadians’ skills, leveraging the activities of others through building on existing relationships and developing new partnerships with federal government departments, provinces, territories, business associations, labour and other stakeholders. ALLESP also serves as the delivery mechanism for the Family Literacy Initiative under the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality (2008-2013).

The work of the Office of Literacy and Essential Skills has a particular focus on the workplace since research has shown that the majority of Canadians with low literacy and essential skills are already in the labour market. The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills also recognizes that workplaces, communities and families are interconnected and that strengthening literacy and essential skills in one area of an individual’s life will have an effect in all areas. The OLES also supports tool development as well as major projects that:

  • increase knowledge and enhance the capacity of key players to address LES level needs of adults seeking to enter, and succeed, in the labour market, and
  • increase the integration of LES within skill training and employment programs by raising awareness and increasing knowledge of existing tools and resources.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The expected long-term outcome of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essentials Skills Program (ALLESP) is:

  • Increased participation by Canadians in adult learning, literacy and essential skills

The expected intermediate outcomes are:

  • Programming, services and policies that respond to evolving needs of Canadians.
  • Enhanced opportunities for adult learning, literacy and essential skills.

The expected immediate outcomes are:

  • Improved dissemination, transfer and application of knowledge and information.
  • Increased capacity of funding recipients, other stakeholders and end-users.
  • Increased awareness of the benefits of, and opportunities for, adult learning, literacy and essential skills.

Results Achieved:

ALLESP Results Achieved

  • ALLESP provided support to 23 core-funded organizations including national literacy organizations and provincial/territorial coalitions. The completed annual performance reports demonstrate that they are sharing knowledge and expertise with partners as well as with OLES, and that they are filling capacity and awareness gaps across the country.

OLES Results Achieved
Tool Development and Integration

  • 18 new literacy and essential skills tools published in 2009-2010; 554,000 copies of these publications ordered;
  • 26 apprenticeship tools published in 2009-2010; 57,000 of these ordered;
  • Groups ordering tools are diverse including other government departments, municipalities, provinces, colleges, employment centres and special interest groups. Over 50 groups who ordered tools this fiscal year provided feedback on how they are integrating them into their activities; and
  • 48 organizations overall identified having embedded OLES literacy and essential skills tools into their activities.

Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills and Labour Market Partnerships

  • A number of projects were funded to leverage private sector training efforts in support of workplace literacy and essential skills, including engagement of over 100 small-medium enterprises in piloting new approaches, customized model development for the construction sector, integration of literacy into workplace health and safety programs in collaboration with the Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME), and testing of a new model to assist Aboriginal people in remote communities to transition to manufacturing jobs.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 12.7 7.0 20.7 11.7 5.0 15.7
Total Contributions 10.6 8.1 5.6 14.6 14.6 (9.0)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 23.3 15.1 26.3 26.3 19.6 6.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program did not spend $6.7 million due to delays in several multi-year projects and the posting of two Calls for Proposals.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program was completed in February 2010. The evaluation is currently awaiting publication, when available it will be found on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 1997

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Opportunities Fund provides funding through contribution agreements with individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit organizations to help unemployed persons with disabilities who have little or no labour market attachment prepare for, find, and maintain employment or self-employment.

Examples of activities supported under this program include:

  • encouraging employers to provide people with disabilities with work opportunities and experience;
  • working in partnership with organizations for people with disabilities to address barriers to client’s labour market participation;
  • helping people with disabilities increase their employment skill level; and
  • helping people with disabilities to start their own businesses.

For more information about this program, please visit http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/disability_issues/funding_programs/opportunities_fund/index.shtml

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • People with disabilities have enhanced their employability by completing an Opportunities Fund intervention;
  • People with disabilities obtained employment or self-employment or returned to school for skills upgrading, following Opportunities Fund programming; and
  • People with disabilities have increased earned income levels and reduced their dependence on passive income support.

Results Achieved:

  • 5,574 clients were served;
  • 3,583 clients completed an Opportunities Fund intervention;
  • 1,701 clients were employed;
  • 293 clients returned to school.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 25.4 27.2 26.7 26.7 25.9 0.8
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 25.4 27.2 26.7 26.7 25.9 0.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance between the planned and actual spending, at slightly less than 3% of budget, is minimal. A number of factors can contribute to the variance, including projects beginning later than anticipated, turnover among participants from this vulnerable client group, or costs for specific projects coming in lower than anticipated.

Audit completed or planned: No audits

Evaluation completed or planned: No evaluations of the Opportunities Fund program were completed during 2009-10.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Sector Council Program (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2002

End date: May 30, 2012

Description: Sector Councils are national partnerships of employers and workers that address human resources and workplace skills development on a sectoral basis. The Sector Council Program supports sector council activities that include:

  • Labour market forecasting and analysis;
  • National occupational standards;
  • Curriculum tailored to industry needs;
  • Skills development tools, including e-learning;
  • Literacy and essential skills initiatives;
  • Integration of foreign trained workers; and
  • Targeted recruitment and retention initiatives.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • Develop new and innovative solutions to human resources and skills issues by :
    • increasing understanding of skills, occupational needs and labour market issues;
    • increasing availability and use of products and services to help industry address their human resource issues;
    • facilitating labour market transitions (including both entry and career progression); and
    • Increasing industry investments in skills development to promote a quality workforce.
  • Address current and emerging skills and human resource issues by:
    • increasing sectoral capacity by sharing best practices and innovative ideas between councils and across sectors and industries;
    • encouraging learning systems to be more responsive to the labour market by developing curricula that reflects the skills and competencies required by employers in Canada's labour market and
    • promoting the workplace as a learning environment by encouraging employers to increase investments in workplace learning for their employees.

Results Achieved:

  • Produced 259 labour market intelligence and analysis reports. The Alliance of Sector Councils also conducted a quarterly trend analysis survey that provided on-the-ground information on human resource trends in the labour market in 16 sectors of the economy.
  • As of 2009, 596 National Occupational Standards were in use by Sector Councils for non-regulated occupations.
  • Provided direction to councils to better link to the activities of provinces and territories to leverage existing investments and avoid the duplication of efforts.
  • Contributed to the creation and founding member of the International Network of Sector Skills Organization, which is working to strengthen relationships at the international level, promote the sharing of sectoral best practices, and advance work on the development of transnational occupational standards.
  • Established industry-education partnerships with the Toronto District School Board and 16 sector councils, yielding 11 industry partnership networks, 42 new or adapted course curricula and involving close to 2,000 students in school programs in structured industry placements.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 26.9 26.7 27.0 25.9 25.8 1.2
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 26.9 26.7 27.0 25.9 25.8 1.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance of $1.2M is mostly due to deferral of projects into next fiscal year and delays in approved project start-up.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: The final report of the summative evaluation covering 2002-2005 is currently awaiting final approval. When the report is approved, it will be published on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

A summative evaluation covering the period from 2005-2010 is planned for 2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Strategic Training and Transition Fund (voted payments)

Start date: Throughout 2009-10 (varies by Province and Territory)

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Strategic Training and Transition Fund (STTF) provides time-limited incremental funding for provinces and territories havings signed a Labour Market Agreement, to support the needs of workers affected by the economic downturn, whether or not they qualify for Employment Insurance.

The Fund supports provincial and territorial initiatives that help meet the training needs of workers in affected communities and sectors so that they can stay in their jobs or move to new jobs, while offering provinces and territories the flexibility to design programming that best meets their needs. The fund helps to ensure that Canadians, whether or not they qualify for Employment Insurance benefits, are eligible to participate in the training or other employment initiatives that they need during difficult times.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

Performance will be measured using the same indicators as Labour Market Agreements. Following the conclusion of the initiative in 2011, it is projected that approximately 50,000 Canadians will have benefited from the Strategic Training and Transition Fund initiative.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, there were more than 70,000 Canadians who received labour market services and programming funded by the STTF.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments     250.0 250.0 250.0 0
Total Program Activity(ies)     250.0 250.0 250.0 0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: Programs funded by the STTF will be evaluated through the LMA evaluations, currently scheduled to be performed over the course of fiscal years 2010-2011 to 2012-2013.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (voted payments)

Start date: September 21, 2006

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW) is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures, and/or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment.

Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects.

To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64.

Projects must include employment assistance activities, such as résumé writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, work experience, or assistance to start a small business. As well, they must offer income support to participants in the form of allowances, wages or wage subsidies, and involve at least 25 hours per week of activity for participants.

Where possible and appropriate, activities will support community economic development strategies and activities. As an example, skills development activities may prepare participants for emerging employment opportunities. The initiative focuses on communities with a population of fewer than 250,000 people.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The objective is to help unemployed older workers reintegrate into employment. Where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, desired outcomes would be to increase their employability, and assist them to remain active and productive in the labour market while their communities undergo adjustment.

Results Achieved: In 2009-10, 100 new projects were approved and 32 existing projects were extended, reaching over 7,300 unemployed older workers.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 5.0 23.1 56.6 56.6 18.0 38.6
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 5.0 23.1 56.6 56.6 18.0 38.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance between 2009-10 planned and actual spending was mainly a result of the time lag that ensued as provinces and territories, particularly newly participating jurisdictions, sought the authorities and funding necessary for participating in the TIOW, given that it is a cost-shared initiative. In addition, the time needed for project planning and implementation, including identifying and confirming community-based service providers sometimes resulted in delays in the launch of projects. The $38.6M will be re-profiled and will remain available for provinces and territories to assist unemployed older workers in 2010-2011.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of TIOW was begun in 2009-10 and is currently underway.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Workplace Skills Initiative (voted payments)

Start date: May 1, 2005

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Workplace Skills Initiative (WSI) funds projects that test and evaluate promising, partnership-based, outcomes-focused approaches to skills development, human resource practices and tools for employers and employed Canadians. Central to these projects is the development of human capital in and for the workplace, and while projects will vary in scope and scale (e.g., firm vs. sector), small- and medium-sized enterprises will be a key audience. Projects funded by the WSI will generate cumulative knowledge around skills development and best human resources models, tools and practices.

On April 24, 2009, HRSDC suspended funding for new projects under the WSI.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The Workplace Skills Initiative is expected to contribute towards:

  • increased awareness among workplace partners across Canada of the Innovation Initiative and the importance of workplace skills;
  • increased collaboration among workplace partners toward the development of models, tools and instruments for workplace skills;
  • increased knowledge, innovation, experimentation and dissemination of models, tools and instruments for workplace skills among workplace partners.

Results Achieved: Managed 24 contribution agreements with successful outcomes:

  • Increased the awareness of small business owners regarding the direct benefits that improving HR practices, and skills development, can have on their business’s bottom line;
  • Exposed employers to the concept of Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition and the impact and benefits of successfully integrating new Canadians in the workplace;
  • Improved managers’ abilities at recognizing talent and facilitating that recognition and valuation among their employees (representing an improvement in their own management skills), who will be more fully engaged, and receive development and training for management positions later;
  • Developed evaluation tools and effective training practices that organizations can use to drive positive business outcomes; and
  • Reached 29 contribution recipients and more than 200 partners (associations, employers, unions, universities) and over 77,000 participants (employers, employees) with over $18.2M in funding leveraged from non-federal sources.
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 9.7 14.2 12.6 13.7 13.7 (1.1)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 9.7 14.2 12.6 13.7 13.7 (1.1)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to the difference between planned spending and total authorities. Total authorities for the program were higher than initially expected, and there is no variance between authorities and actual spending. Note that the department ceased delivery of the Workplace Skills Initiative in April 2009; these payments are made under the terms of previously existing contribution agreement.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A summative evaluation is planned for 2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Employment Strategy (voted payments)

Start date: March 18, 1999

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Youth Employment Strategy (YES) supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 11 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

Transfer payments made under the Youth Employment Strategy are predominantly in the form of contributions from participating departments for wage subsidies for participant youth; or for the development and delivery of youth support services. Such support services include client assessment, case management services and the provision of employability tools that help participants acquire needed skills. Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by encouraging organizations to create meaningful, skill-enhancing, opportunities for youth.

For more information, please visit: http://www.youth.gc.ca.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: Creation of employment and service initiatives for youth through partnerships with business, labour, industry, not-for-profit and voluntary organizations, Aboriginal and rural remote communities, and other levels of government.

The common key results commitments for all initiatives receiving funding under the Youth Employment Strategy are:

  • Youth clients will be served through work experiences or tailored interventions; and
  • A portion of youth participants will return to school to further their education/skills development and/or become employed or self-employed.

Results Achieved:

  • Canada Summer Jobs
    • Clients Served: 37,543
  • Skills Link
    • Clients Served: 15,085
    • Employed or Self-Employed: 4,829
    • Returned to School: 1,979
  • Career Focus
    • Clients Served: 498
    • Employed or Self-Employed: 195
    • Returned to School: 28
Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants     0.1 0 0 0.1
Total Contributions 235.9 221.2 236.7 227.8 227.7 9.0
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 235.9 221.2 236.8 227.8 227.7 9.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to a transfer of contributions funds from YES to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS) and the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD).

Audit completed or planned: An assurance audit of the Youth Employment Strategy is planned for 2011-2012

Evaluation completed or planned: The summative evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy was completed in August 2009. The complete evaluation is available at:

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2009/sp_ah_911_08_09e/page00.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: YMCA and YWCA Grant(s) for Youth Internships (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: The YMCA and YWCA Grant(s) for Youth Internships is a one-time grant of $15 million to place unemployed youth (aged 15 to 30 years) in internships with not-for-profit and community services organizations with a focus on environmental projects.

While the funding period is until March 31, 2010, activities will proceed until March 31, 2011.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The YMCA and YWCA Grant(s) for Youth Internships will help young Canadians develop their skills and gain work experience.

As a result of this program, approximately 1,000 internships are expected over the duration of the initiative.

Results Achieved: A total of $15M was distributed through the YMCA & YWCA Grant(s) for Youth Internships. The breakdown in funding was $10M to the YMCA and $5M to the YWCA.

As of March 31, 2010, 422 internships were underway; 394 of these had an environmental focus.

Program Activity: Skills and Employment
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants     15.0 15.0 15.0 0
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies)     15.0 15.0 15.0 0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Audit completed or planned: The YMCA and YWCA Grant(s) for Youth Internships will form part of the organizations’ comprehensive annual audits in 2010-2011.

Evaluation completed or planned:


Learning


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Liabilities (statutory payments)

Start date: September, 1964

End date: Ongoing

Description: From September 1964 to August 1, 1995, the Canada Student Loan Program operated a Guaranteed Loan regime with Canadian financial institutions, where financial assistance was provided to students through financial institutions in the form of 100% government guaranteed loans.

There are still borrowers that have loans (in study or in repayment) under the Guaranteed regime. Although the last new Guaranteed loans were issued July 31st, 1995, there is approximately $5 million outstanding in Guaranteed loans that are in class A (in-study) status as of March 31st, 2010.

This transfer payment is used to cover claims submitted by financial institutions related to the remaining Guaranteed Loan Portfolio.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • Canada meets its financial obligations as set out under the Canada Student Loans Act and agreements with financial institutions.

Results Achieved:

  • Obligations under Canada Student Loans Act were met.
Program Activity: Learning
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions (19.1) (14.5) 4.6 (9.5) (9.5) 14.1
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) (19.1) (14.5) 4.6 (9.5) (9.5) 14.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to a difference between planned spending and total authorities. For this program, planned spending reflects the forecasted expenditures for claims made by financial institutions, while the total authorities reflect the net cost of the program. The Government of Canada also recovers money as students repay these loans; authorities are expressed as negative values because recoveries are expected to exceeded claims, resulting in net revenue for Government of Canada rather than an expense.

Audit completed or planned: An assurance audit of the Canada Student Loans Program is planned for 2011-2012.

Evaluation completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Interest Payments and Liabilities (statutory payments)

Start date: August 1, 1995

End date: Ongoing

Description: This transfer payment represents interest subsidies, repayment assistance benefits, the amount of forgiven loans, risk premiums and put-backs, and the administrative costs related to students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime which existed from August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000. At that time, the Canada Student Loans Program operated on a shared risk model with Canadian financial institutions.

There are still borrowers that have loans (in-study or in-repayment) under the Risk-Shared regime. Although the last new loans were issued July 31st, 2000, there is approximately $63 million outstanding in Risk-Shared loans that are in class A (in-study) status as of March 31st, 2010.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • As a result of this transfer payment, students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continue to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment; and
  • Canada meets its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act in agreements with financial institutions.

Results Achieved:

  • Approximately 7,700 students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continued to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment; and
  • Canada met its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act in agreements with financial institutions.
Program Activity: Learning
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 36.3 22.9 31.9 11.6 11.6 20.3
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 36.3 22.9 31.9 11.6 11.6 20.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Due to unexpectedly low interest rates, the cost of administering the Debt Management Measures to Risk-Shared loans was significantly less than planned. This difference accounted for approximately 69% of the overall variance. Note that the actual spending reflects the net cost of the program; while planned spending represents the forecasted expenditures of claim payments only without taking revenue from recoveries of outstanding claims into account.

Audit completed or planned: An assurance audit of the Canada Student Loans Program is planned for 2011-2012

Evaluation completed or planned: A multi-year summative evaluation of the Canada Student Loans Program is scheduled to begin in 2010-2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement (statutory payments)

Start date: August 1, 2000

End date: Ongoing

Description: This transfer payment provides alternative payments to provinces and territories who choose not to participate in the Canada Student Loans Program, so that they receive assistance in delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

The transfer payment also provides interest relief and debt reduction in repayment benefits to borrowers, and the value of loans forgiven according to prescribed criteria.

Starting August 1, 2009, individual debt measures including interest relief and debt reduction in repayment have been replaced by the comprehensive Repayment Assistance Plan, which is a new repayment option for students facing difficulty in meeting their student loan payments.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • Post-secondary education students in the province of Qubec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program; and
  • Students with financial difficulty in participating jurisdictions are able to receive repayment benefits.

Results Achieved:

  • As a result of these alternative payments, post-secondary education students in the province of Qubec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continued to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program; and
  • 126,196 students with financial hardship in participating jurisdictions received repayment benefits in 2009. 103,747 of these students were not required to make a payment in 2009-2010, while 22,449 with asked to make an affordable payment proportional to their level of income.
Program Activity: Learning
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 207.6 209.4 219.9 154.8 154.8 65.1
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 207.6 209.4 219.9 154.8 154.8 65.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Due to unexpectedly low interest rates, the cost of administering the Debt Management Measures to Direct Loans was significantly less than planned.

Audit completed or planned: An assurance audit of the Canada Student Loans Program is planned for 2011-2012.

Evaluation completed or planned: A multi-year summative evaluation of the Canada Student Loans Program is scheduled to begin in 2010-2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Study Grant / Canada Access Grant / Canada Student Grant Program (statutory payments)

Start date:

  • August 1, 1995 (for most Canada Study Grants);
  • August 1, 2005 (for both Canada Access Grants)
  • August 1, 2009 (for Canada Student Grant Program)

End date:

  • July 31st, 2009 for Canada Access Grants and Canada Study Grants
  • Ongoing for Canada Student Grants Program

Description: Between 1995 and 2009, the Government of Canada offered Canada Study Grants to encourage participation in post-secondary education by providing additional non-repayable assistance and reducing debt. The Canada Study Grants were designed to address the education-related costs of students with dependants, women in certain doctoral programs, and high-need part-time students. The Grants also sought to accommodate students with permanent disabilities by covering the exceptional education-related costs associated with their disability, such as an interpreter.

In August 2005, the Government of Canada introduced two Canada Access Grants, which provided up-front non-repayable assistance intended to improve access to post-secondary education and reduce financial barriers by reducing students’ assessed need for student loans. It was available for first-time, first-year students from low-income families, and full- and part-time students with permanent disabilities.

A student was eligible to receive a combination of Access and Study Grants, depending on their assessed need.

Starting August 1, 2009 Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants have been replaced by the new consolidated Canada Student Grant Program. The new Canada Student Grant Program provides students from low- and middle-income families with a grant equal to $250 and $100 per month, respectively. Students with permanent disabilities are eligible for a grant of $2,000 per year and up to $8,000 per year for those with special education needs. Student with children are eligible for a grant of $200 per month for each child under the age of 12. Students who received the Canada Millennium Scholarship general bursaries in 2008–2009 will receive transitional grants until they complete or withdraw from their current program of study.

The new Canada Student Grant offers the following major advantages to students and their families:

  • Stable and transparent funding, to allow better planning and decision-making;
  • Availability in all years of a college or undergraduate university program;
  • Availability on an equal basis across Canada, regardless of where students live; and
  • The amount of the grant is based on income levels.

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results:

  • Provide non-repayable assistance in an integrated, consistent, and predictable manner across the country;
  • Enable disadvantaged students to better understand and benefit from Student Financial Assistance;
  • Better encourage post-secondary education completion, and thereby support the full participation of individuals from disadvantaged groups in the labour market; and
  • Promote access, completion, and equity (by providing enhanced levels of assistance and by targeting more assistance towards lower- and middle-income groups).

Results Achieved:

  • Provided 284,476 Canada Student Grants at total value of $497.1M;
  • Held 16 information sessions across the country, reaching 68,541 students;
  • Youth Student Officers (YSO) held 1,802 Student Financial Assistance (SFA) workshops for 45,229 students; and
  • CSLP publications were sent to 223 centres across Canada, excluding Quebec, which does not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program.
Program Activity: Learning
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 161.5 143.2 511.5 533.7 533.7 (22.2)
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 161.5 143.2 511.5 533.7 533.7 (22.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Forecasted expenditures for grants in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2009-2010 were precise as they are very close to the actual expenditures that occurred in 2009-2010. There’s a variance of only 4.3%. This is not significant.

Audit completed or planned: An assurance audit of the Canada Student Loans Program is planned for 2011-2012

Evaluation completed or planned: A multi-year summative evaluation of the Canada Student Loans Program which will include the Canada Student Grants Program is scheduled to begin in 2010-2011.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Education Savings Program – Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond (statutory and voted payments)

Start date:

  • January 1, 1998 (Canada Education Savings Grant)
  • January 1, 2005 (Canada Learning Bond)

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Education Savings Program encourages the financing of children's post-secondary education through savings, from early childhood, in Registered Education Savings Plans. The program provides clients with the Canada Education Savings Grant, which includes a regular matching grant available to all Canadian children, and enhanced grant portions for low- and middle-income families; and the Canada Learning Bond, which is a grant intended for low-income families.

The Canada Education Savings Program delivers the Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond through a public/private partnership with banks, mutal fund companies, and scholarship foundations.

The Canada Education Savings Program also administers the Education Savings Community Outreach initiative which helps organizations develop outreach projects that encourage lower-income Canadians to save for their children's post-secondary education, use education savings, and increase their financial literacy.

The Canada Education Savings Program also administers the Education Savings Community Outreach initiative, a non-statutory program aimed at increasing awareness of the importance of saving for post-secondary education. Its target audience is low income families.

Further information regarding the Canada Education Savings Grant can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/cesg.shtml

Further information regarding the Canada Learning Bond can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/clb.shtml

Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Expected Results: The expected results and performance indicators of the Canada Education Savings Program are:

  • Canadians with children under 18 years have Registered Education Savings Plan savings.
  • Families use Registered Education Saving Plan savings to finance their children's post-secondary education.

Results Achieved: By December 2009, 40.6% of Canadian children had received the Canada Education Savings Grant and had RESP savings for their future education, up from 39.7% in 2008.

In addition, 156,000 children benefited from the Canada Learning Bond in 2009. Since 2005, the Canada Learning Bond has encouraged low-income families to open RESP accounts and 94% of those also contributed their own savings to the plans. In 2009, 19.3% of eligible children had received the CLB, up from 16.3% in 2008.

RESP assets reached $25.9 billion by the end of December 2009 (up from $22.6 billion in 2008), representing a 14.6% increase over the previous year.

Students attending post-secondary institutions are using these savings to finance their education. In 2009, 251,159 students withdrew $1.8 billion from their RESPs to finance their participation in post-secondary education.

Program Activity: Learning
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants CESG (Statutory) 579.7 580.7 626.0 615.7 615.7 10.3
Total Grants CLB (Statutory) 35.8 47.8 43.0 56.7 56.7 (13.7)
Total Contributions* 1.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 0.0
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 616.7 631.7 672.1 675.5 675.5 (3.4)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Canada Education Savings Grant payment was $10.3 million less than planned in the 2009-10 fiscal year due to the fact that families saved in RESPs at a lower rate because of the economic downturn while take-up of the Canada Learning Bond was higher than expected.

Audit completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of the Additional Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond was completed in February 2010. The evaluation is currently awaiting publication, when available it will be found on the following website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

An assurance audit is planned for 2010-2011

Evaluation completed or planned: A summative evaluation is planned for 2011-2012

* Referring to the Education Savings Incentive (Voted Contribution).


Labour


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Wage Earner Protection Program (statutory payments)

Start date: July, 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP) is a national program designed to restore wages and vacation pay owing to workers whose employers become bankrupt or are subject to receivership under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, up to an amount equal to four weeks’ maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act. Budget 2009 expanded the Program to include termination and severance pay to provide additional financial support to workers. This has enabled a greater number of applicants to qualify for program support and has resulted in higher average monetary claims.

The Wage Earner Protection Program Act, which underlies the Program, was part of Bill C 55, which set out a comprehensive reform of Canada’s insolvency laws in 2005, including the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act. The Act was subject to technical amendments contained in Bill C 12, which received Royal Assent on December 13, 2007. The Act and its Regulations came into force on July 7, 2008. The recent amendments to the program to add coverage for termination and severance pay were included in Bill C 10, An Act to implement certain provisions of the Budget tabled in Parliament on January 27, 2009, and related fiscal measures.

Strategic Outcome: Safe, fair, and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations

Expected Results: The expected result is to better protect workers whose employers have been declared bankrupt or subject to receivership.

Results Achieved: Before the Program came into force, it was estimated that between 10,000 and 20,000 Canadian workers had unpaid wage claims every year resulting from employer insolvencies. Over the course of the 2009-2010 fiscal year, 16,264 workers who lost their job due to employer insolvency received a WEPP payment, with an average payment per recipient of $2,210.

Program Activity: Labour
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants   3.7 56.2 35.0 35.0 21.2
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) - 3.7 56.2 35.0 35.0 21.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The WEPP recently completed its first full fiscal year of operation. Initial demand projections for the WEPP were based on a study of a similar program that once existed in Ontario - the Ontario Employee Wage Protection Program. An analysis of that program, along with corporate bankruptcy data, was used to predict that approximately $28.7 million would likely be required to reimburse wage and vacation claims under WEPP. In WEPP’s first full fiscal year of operation, $13.4 million in wage and vacation reimbursements were issued.

To support Canada’s Economic Action Plan, an additional $25.0 million was provided to finance the addition of severance and termination pay reimbursements. During the course of the 2009-2010 fiscal year, $21.6 million of this allocation was issued to WEPP claimants.

In some instances, trustees and receivers will be able to request compensation for fees and expenses they incur when performing their WEPP duties. The Labour Program is currently working closely with Service Canada to implement the regulations that govern trustee and receiver compensation arrangements. An amount of $2.5 million has been set aside, but not yet spent for that purpose.

Audit completed or planned: An audit of program eligibility under Canada's Economic Action Plan was recently undertaken, and included WEPP within the audit scope.

Evaluation completed or planned: A summative evaluation of the program will begin in fall 2010.


Income Security


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Old Age Security (statutory payments)

Start date: 1952

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Old Age Security (OAS) pension is a monthly benefit available, if applied for, to most Canadians 65 years of age or over who meet residence requirements. An applicant's employment history is not a factor in determining eligibility, nor does the applicant need to be retired. Old Age Security payments to pensioners are taxable income at the federal and provincial levels.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results: Eligible seniors receive a benefit.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, approximately 4.7 million seniors per month received the basic pension. As required by the Old Age Security Act, benefits are reviewed quarterly to reflect increases in the cost of living as measured by the Consumer Price Index for Canada. There were no increases in 2009-2010.

Program Activity: Income Security
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 24,029.8 25,334.5 26,549.0 26,391.3 26,391.3 157.7
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 24,029.8 25,334.5 26,549.0 26,391.3 26,391.3 157.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance in OAS pension payments expenditures of $157.7 million is mainly due to the fact that the OAS benefit rate has stayed at the same level during the fiscal year 2009-2010.

Audit completed or planned: An Audit of OAS Management Framework (includes OAS, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowances is currently underway. The planning phase began January 2010.

When finalized, the audit report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/audit/index.shtml

Evaluation completed or planned: A summative evaluation of the OAS program, which includes the OAS pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowances, is currently underway. When finalized, the evaluation report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Guaranteed Income Supplement (statutory payments)

Start date: 1967

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) is a monthly benefit paid to residents of Canada who receive a basic, full or partial Old Age Security (OAS) pension and who have little or no income.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results: Eligible low income seniors receive a guaranteed income supplement.

Results Achieved: For fiscal year 2009-2010, over 1.6 million seniors received GIS benefits. As required by the Old Age Security Act, benefits are reviewed quarterly to reflect increases in the cost of living as measured by the Consumer Price Index for Canada. There were no increases in 2009-2010.

Program Activity: Income Security
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 7,406.7 7,511.5 8,091.0 7,736.6 7,736.6 354.4
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 7,406.7 7,511.5 8,091.0 7,736.6 7,736.6 354.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance in Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) expenditures of approximately of $354.4 million is mainly due to a lower number of beneficiaries than the planned estimates of 2009-2010 and to the GIS benefit rates that have stayed at the same level during the fiscal year 2009-2010.

Audit completed or planned: An Audit of the OAS Management Framework (includes OAS, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowances) is currently underway. When finalized, the audit report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/audit/index.shtml

Evaluation completed or planned: A Summative Evaluation of OAS program, which includes the basic OAS pension, the GIS and the Allowances, is currently underway. When finalized, the evaluation report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Allowance Payments (statutory payments)

Start date:

  • 1975 – Allowance
  • 1985 – Allowance for the Survivor

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Allowance may be paid to the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement recipient, or to a survivor.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results: Eligible low income seniors (spouses or common-law partners of Old Age Security pensioners or survivors between the ages of 60 and 64) receive an Allowance.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, over 93,000 persons received an Allowance or an Allowance for the Survivor benefit. As required by the Old Age Security Act, benefits are reviewed quarterly to reflect increases in the cost of living as measured by the Consumer Price Index for Canada. There were no increases in 2009-2010.

Program Activity: Income Security
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 518.2 531.2 557.0 534.9 534.9 22.1
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 518.2 531.2 557.0 534.9 534.9 22.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance in Allowance Payments ($22.1 million) is due to a lower number of beneficiaries than the planned estimates of 2009-2010. In addition, Allowance benefit rates have stayed at the same level during the fiscal year 2009-2010.

Audit completed or planned: An Audit of the OAS Management Framework (includes OAS, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowances) is currently underway. When finalized, the audit report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/audit/index.shtml

Evaluation completed or planned: A Summative Evaluation of the OAS program, which includes the basic OAS pension, the GIS and the Allowances, is planned for 2010-2011. When finalized, the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Disability Savings Program (statutory payments)

Start date: December 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP) is designed to support Registered Disability Savings Plans, which are long term savings vehicles to help parents and others save for the long-term financial security of a person with a severe disability. The Government of Canada will pay matching Grants of 300, 200, or 100 % depending on the beneficiary’s family income and the amount contributed. The Government will also pay income-tested Bonds to the Registered Disability Savings Plan of low-income Canadians with disabilities, regardless of the amount contributed.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results:

The expected long-term result of the program is:

  • to contribute to the financial security of people with severe and prolonged disabilities.

The expected intermediate results for the program are:

  • authorized people or organizations contribute to beneficiary’s Registered Disability Savings Plan; and,
  • beneficiaries receive the Grants and Bonds through the Registered Disability Savings Plans.

The expected immediate results for the program are:

  • eligible individuals (and their families/guardians) are aware of the program and its requirements;
  • financial institutions offer the Registered Disability Savings Program in a manner that meets the needs of the target population; and,
  • eligible individuals (and their families/guardians) open Registered Disability Savings Plans.

Results Achieved: From December 2008 (when Canada Disability Savings Program became available to Canadians) to the end of March 2010, 27,958 plans were registered. During 2009-2010, the Government of Canada contributed $83.9 million in matching grants and $42.9 million in bonds, exceeding original projections.

Outreach activities were conducted to raise awareness of the program, which included contracting organizations to deliver information sessions, two national prints and radio advertising campaigns, and providing information at six practitioner conferences.

Program Activity: Income Security
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants   0.1 5.2 126.8 126.8 (121.6)
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies)   0.1 5.2 126.8 126.8 (121.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Take-up targets were based on the experience of programs including the Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond. Targets for cumulative grant and bond payments were based on Canada Revenue Agency data on Disability Tax Credit eligible Canadians in the target age range (0-49). When the targets were developed, not all provinces and territories had announced their intentions with respect to Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) asset and income exemptions. The assumption at the time was that this could delay full take-up of the Program. At present, all provinces and territories have announced a full or partial exemption of RDSP income and assets. The number of major financial organizations offering the RDSP has also likely contributed to uptake (e.g. access to issuers, promotion). In addition, the CDSP team implemented a diverse and comprehensive outreach strategy to increase awareness and promote uptake.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of the Canada Disability Savings Program will be completed by 2012-2013.
A Summative Evaluation of the Canada Disability Savings Program will be completed by 2014-2015.


Social Development


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Accessibility Fund (voted payments)

Start date: May, 2008

End date: March 31, 2010 (as reported in 2009-10 RPP)

* Please note that Budget 2010 provided an additional three years of funding to the Enabling Accessibility Fund, bringing the end date to March 31, 2013

Description: The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) will contribute to the capital costs of construction for the participatory abilities centres and renovations to buildings, modifications to vehicles, information and communications related to improving accessibility for people with disabilities.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results: The expected result over the next 1-3 years is to improve accessibility for people with varying abilities.

Associated outputs over the same period include:

  • Grant and Contribution Agreements; and
  • Project Reports.

Results Achieved: The Enabling Accessibility Fund’s second Call for Proposals for small projects was successfully completed with up to $50,000 available for projects to renovate buildings, modify vehicles, and/or make information and communication more accessible. In total, 1,196 proposals were reviewed, with 169 small projects announced. The total number of projects approved is lower than projected, because, on average, the approved projects had higher eligible project costs than was anticipated. All funding allocated for the second CFP was allocated to these 169 projects. The anticipated number of 280 was projected based on lower anticipated eligible project costs.

Program Activity: Social Development
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants   5.3 7.0 5.7 5.7 1.3
Total Contributions     10.7 20.6 7.5 3.2
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies)   5.3 17.7 26.3 13.2 4.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The lapse for the Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) was due to delays in the implementation of projects. The lapsed contribution funds have been reprofiled from 2009-10 to 2010-11 and will allow the EAF to fund exemplary major projects that will serve as model approaches of accessibility for people with varying abilities in communities.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: The evaluation strategy for the EAF is divided into three phases covering 2007-2010. Phase I will only include the first round of project results and will be completed in 2010-2011, with the preliminary results available in the spring of 2012.

Phase II will evaluate the effectiveness of the contribution funding of Abilities Centres, and of all funded small and mid-sized projects completed and for which results information will be available as of December 2011. Phase II will be conducted in 2010-2011.

Phase III will be conducted in 2014-2015 and will involve an assessment of the effectiveness of all projects not previously evaluated. Evaluation results from Phases I and II will be rolled up with the results from Phase III.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Homelessness Partnering Strategy (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: Provides grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band and tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Rgies rgionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to help communities better understand and more effectively prevent and reduce homelessness.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results:

By March 31, 2011, the Homelessness Partnering Strategy aims to:

  • Contribute, with partners, to a more sustainable and comprehensive continuum of supports to help homeless Canadians move towards self-sufficiency and to prevent those at risk from becoming homeless through:
    • increased investments in supportive and transitional housing and services, and strategic investments according to community plans;
    • broader and enhanced engagement of partners; and
    • increased knowledge and better informed policy, decision making and coordination of services.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, six new horizontal pilot projects were launched with other federal departments and agencies to address factors that may lead to homelessness such as incarceration, employment, mental health, family violence, and immigration. Furthermore, seven previous horizontal pilot projects with other federal departments and agencies were extended into 2009-2010 in order to strengthen the project evaluations.

For every dollar invested by the HPS in community-based projects, the amount invested in communities by external partners (not-for-profit groups, private sector organizations and other government departments) was $2.27.

74.3% of all HPS investments in regionally-delivered projects were targeted to longer-term transitional and supportive housing and services.

In 2009-20010, a total of 65 housing units were created through the Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI) program, which provides surplus federal properties to community organizations, the not-for-profit sector, and other levels of government for projects to prevent and reduce homelessness.

Collaboration with provincial partners continued through the Canada-Quebec Agreement and the Memorandum of Understanding on Homelessness with Ontario, as well as through bilateral meetings with provincial and territorial governments as part of the federal government's consultations on housing and homelessness investments for 2011-2014.

Program Activity: Social Development
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 0.5 0.9 0.9 0.2 0.9
Total Contributions 86.0 117.7 105.4 126.3 92.3 13.1
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 86.5 118.6 106.3 126.5 92.3 14.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variances are a result of delays in carrying out the approved projects mainly due to time required to develop proposals, solicit funding from other partners, negotiate agreements, and complete project planning. External factors such as construction delays also pose challenges. Funding lapses are reprofiled to future years.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Summative Evaluation of the HPS was finalized in 2009 and covered the period between December 2006 and the fall 2008. The objective of the evaluation was to assess the relevance, design, success and cost-effectiveness of HPS. The report could be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2009/ehps/sp-ah-904-07-09e.pdf

Another Summative Evaluation of the HPS is planned for 2010-2011. The Strategy was renewed in February 2009 for two years (until March 2011) and a Summative Evaluation is required as per the Treasury Board Submission. This evaluation will build on the one finalized in 2009. Work will be conducted on the evaluation framework to align it with the new 2009 Treasury Board Evaluation Policy.

When finalized, the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications resources/evaluation/index.shtml



Name of Transfer Payment Program: New Horizons for Seniors Program (voted payments)

Start date:

  • Original program: October 1, 2004;
  • Expanded Program: September 27, 2007

End date: September 30, 2010 (as reported in 2009-10 RPP)

* Please note: Budget 2010 provided $5 million annually to increase funding for the New Horizons for Seniors Program.

Description: The program supports local projects across Canada that help seniors and contribute to the quality of life in their community through social participation and active living. The New Horizons for Senior Program accomplishes its objectives through three separate funding streams, namely:

  1. Community Participation and Leadership (CPL) component, which provides grant funding to encourage seniors to contribute to their communities by sharing their skills, wisdom and experience and helping to reduce isolation.
  2. Capital Assistance (CA) component, which provides grant funding for the upgrading of community facilities and equipment related to existing programs and activities for seniors.
  3. The Elder Abuse Awareness (EAA) component, which provides contribution funding for national or regional projects that raise awareness of the abuse of older adults.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results:

The expected result(s) over the next 1-3 years include:

  • Community priorities are addressed;
  • Seniors' experience, skills and wisdom are utilized;
  • Canadian society has knowledge and awareness of elder abuse and fraud;
  • Organizational capacity is developed; and
  • Seniors are connected through networks and partnerships.

Associated outputs over the same time period include:

  • Promotions/awareness plan; and
  • Funded projects.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, the Capital Assistance and Community Participation and Leadership components of the New Horizons for Senior Program contributed $24,401,825 in total funding towards a total of 1,468 grants across Canada. Under the Elder Abuse Awareness component of the Program, 16 new contribution agreements were implemented that helped non-profit organizations develop national, provincial/territorial, or regional awareness activities for seniors, their families, and service providers in order to help prevent the abuse of older adults.

Program Activity: Social Development
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 26.1 26.3 24.4 24.4 24.4 0.0
Total Contributions   0.5 1.8 1.6 1.6 0.2
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 26.1 26.8 26.2 26.0 26.0 0.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Formative Evaluation of the CPL component of the New Horizons for Seniors Programs was finalized in 2009. This report can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2009/nhsp/sp-ah-906-06-09e.pdf

Summative Evaluation of CPL component in 2009.
Formative Evaluation of CA and EAA components in 2009.

A Summative Evaluation of the entire New Horizons for Seniors Program is planned for 2014.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Social Development Partnerships Program (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) provides grants and contributions funding to non-profit organizations working to meet the social development needs of persons with disabilities, children and their families, and other vulnerable or excluded populations in Canada.

The SDPP has two funding components: Children and Families, and Disability
(http://www.rhdcc-hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/community_partnerships/sdpp/call/disability_component/page00.shtml.)

The SDPP also provides funding for early childhood development in official language minority communities. Furthermore, the Understanding the Early Years (UEY) Initiative provided three years of funding to community-based, not-for-profit organizations on behalf of their communities to help them learn to generate and use local information to address the needs of young children from birth to age six.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results:

The expected result(s) over the next 1-3 years are:

  • Collaboration, partnerships, alliances and networks are created;
  • Social not-for-profit organizations develop approaches to respond to existing and emerging social issues; and
  • Knowledge of existing and emerging social issues is developed and shared.

Results Achieved: In 2009-2010, 62 projects across Canada were funded under the Children and Families component while another 57 projects were funded under the Disability component. Furthermore, 16 projects were funded ad part of Understanding the Early Years (UEY) component. As a result, almost 20,000 kindergarten children and their parents were part of data collection activities in 15 UEY communities in 2009-10, meeting the yearly target and supporting the ability of communities to generate and use local data related to children’s development. Funded projects generated knowledge on emerging social issues; disseminated information and knowledge and increased public awareness; established and maintained sustainable partnerships; and increased public dialogue and consultations.

An open Call for Proposals (CFP) was held in spring 2009 resulting in the funding of 37 new multi-year contribution agreements – 21 of which were first time recipients. The priorities for the CFP included caregiving over the life course and support for the not-for-profit sector in addressing their issues and challenges during the economic downturn – which substantively expanded the reach and presence of the program beyond its traditional focus on children and families.

Program Activity: Social Development
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b))
Total Grants 7.1 8.7 14.3 11.0 9.1 5.2
Total Contributions 16.7 16.3 6.8 10.1 10.1 (3.3)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 23.8 25.0 21.1 21.1 19.2 1.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Due to delayed start dates for new projects.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: A Summative Evaluation of the Social Development Partnership Program was finalized in 2009.
This report can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/2009/nhsp/sp-ah-906-06-09e.pdf

Another Summative Evaluation of the social Development Partnership Program is planned for 2011-12. A Summative Evaluation for the Voluntary Sector Strategy is planned for 2010-11.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Universal Child Care Benefit (statutory payments)

Start date: July 1, 2006

End date: Ongoing

Description: Effective July 2006, families receive $100 per month (up to $1,200 per year) for each child under six. These taxable benefits are made directly to families so that they can choose the child care that best meets the family’s needs. The Universal Child Care Benefit is provided in addition to existing federal programs such as the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which includes the National Child Benefit Supplement, the new Child Tax Credit and the Child Care Expense Deduction. The Universal Child Care Benefit does not affect the benefits families receive under these programs. Further information can be found at www.universalchildcare.ca.

Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Expected Results: 100% of eligible families with children under six years of age receiving the Universal Child Care Benefit

Results Achieved: 99% of eligible families with children under six years of age are receiving the Universal Child Care Benefit

Program Activity: Social Development
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
a) Planned
Spending
2009-10
Total
Authorities
2009-10
b) Actual
Spending
2009-10
Variance(s) between(s) a) and b)
Total Grants 2,474.3 2,547.8 2,544.0 2,593.6 2,593.6 (49.6)
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 2,474.3 2,547.8 2,544.0 2,593.6 2,593.6 (49.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to a greater increase in the number of recipients than projected.

Audit completed or planned:

Evaluation completed or planned: The formative evaluation of the UCCB is underway and is expected to be completed by December of 2010.