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Minister's Message

Tony Clement, Minister of Industry

The past year has been a challenging one for the Canadian economy, as it has been for the economies of all industrialized countries. The global economic crisis put the fiscal and economic frameworks of all countries to the test. But Canada entered the recession with solid fundamentals balanced budgets, decreasing debt and taxes, a strong financial sector and robust economic policies. Consequently, Canada is in a comparatively good position to effectively respond to this time of economic challenge.

The Industry Portfolio played a significant role in developing Canada's resiliency and ability to weather the current crisis. Composed of 11 departments, agencies, Crown corporations and quasi-judicial bodies, the Portfolio includes major instruments in the Government of Canada's tool kit for building a competitive economy.

In 2008-2009, such measures included continued funding of the Canadian Space Agency to continue development of the RADARSAT Constellation and delivery of a Canadian-designed two-armed robot called "Dextre," which began operations aboard the International Space Station, highlighting the Agency's ongoing contribution and active participation in space exploration.

In January 2009, the government introduced Canada's Economic Action Plan, which contained stimulative measures to respond to the global recession. Industry Portfolio members played, and will continue to play, a central role in developing and implementing a significant number of these critical initiatives. These measures range from programs to upgrade research infrastructure at Canada's universities and colleges, to helping small businesses bring innovative products to market, to supporting major tourism events, to enhancing community and recreational facilities and other municipal infrastructure in Ontario. For more information, visit the Canada's Economic Action Plan website.

As a country, we are emerging from the recession by creating a climate that encourages innovation, productivity and competitiveness helping Canadian industry move to the forefront of the global knowledge economy. The Industry Portfolio members, and other federal departments and agencies are working in partnership so that Canada continues to enjoy a high standard of living and a prosperous future.

It is my pleasure to present the Canadian Space Agency's Departmental Performance Report for 2008-2009.

Tony Clement
Minister of Industry


President's Message

This was a year of progress and success for the Canadian Space Agency. Canada recruited two new astronauts to join our highly successful astronaut corps. Thousands of Canadians sent us their applications and young Canadians across our country were inspired to pursue their studies and follow their dreams. During this time, we also prepared for two Canadian astronauts to take part in space missions, including a long-duration mission in the International Space Station - a first for our nation.

Canadian robotics played a critical role in every assembly mission to the International Space Station, further establishing our nation's legacy in space robotics. Indeed, Canada's space sector is renowned for its ability to drive innovation, creating world-leading new technology, and offering services on the ground that benefit Canadians in their daily lives. Yet Canada remains at a crossroads, where major projects like International Space Station robotics and the RADARSAT-2 Earth observation satellite, have been delivered and are now operational, and opportunities to collaborate with international partners in new space missions continue to grow.

In 2008-2009, the Canadian Space Agency carried out a series of consultations with its stakeholders and partners to define the future direction of Canada's space programs. As a result, a Long Term Space Plan will be presented to Government for consideration in the coming months. Meanwhile, the Agency remained committed to strong management, undertaking a Strategic Review to evaluate its programs and ensure they meet the needs and priorities of Canadians; they are aligned with the Government's Science and Technology Strategy; and they are effective and efficient.

It is my pleasure to submit, for tabling in Parliament, the Canadian Space Agency's Departmental Performance Report for 2008-2009. Together with our partners, we will continue to explore how we will help Government meet the needs of Canadians by using space to strengthen our infrastructure for the 21st century.

Steve MacLean
President


Section 1: Overview

1.1 Raison d'tre and Responsibilities

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is "to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians".

The CSA is achieving this mandate in cooperation with other government departments/agencies, industries, and universities, as well as international partners. In addition to delivering its own programs, the CSA is responsible for coordinating all federal civil space-related policies and programs pertaining to science and technology (S&T) research, industrial development, and international cooperation.

To learn more about the mandate of the Canadian Space Agency, go to:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca//eng/about/mission.asp

The Canadian Space Strategy (CSS) approved by the Government of Canada in February 2005 guides the Canadian Space Agency in the management of its programs. The Strategy is instrumental in focusing decision-making at the CSA and aligning all space related program activities through its strategic outcome and long-term priorities.

To learn more about the Canadian Space Strategy, go to:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca//eng/resources/publications/default.asp

The release in 2007 of the Government's Science and Technology Strategy Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage provides the CSA with a solid framework with which to prioritise CSA programs and initiatives to "make Canada a world leader in science and technology and a key source of entrepreneurial innovation and creativity".

To learn more about the Canada's Science and Technology Strategy, go to: www.ic.gc.ca/epic/site/ic1.nsf/en/h_00231e.html

CSA Governance Structure

Reporting to the Minister of Industry, the Canadian Space Agency's Chief Executive Officer is the President, assisted by the Executive Committee, which is composed of the Senior Vice-President, four Directors General (Space Science, Space Technologies, Space Programs, and Operations) as well as the Chief Financial Officer, the Chief Human Resources Officer, and the Director of Communications and Public Affairs. This governance structure became effective on January 2, 2008.


1.2 Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome

In 2007-2008, further to step number one of the full implementation of the Management of Resources and Result Structures (MRRS), the three CSA's Strategic Outcomes were merged into a single Strategic Outcome, to which all program activities contribute: "Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information".

Program Activities1

Space Based Earth Observation (EO): To develop and operationalize the use of Space Based Earth Observation for the benefit of Canadians, especially in the fields of environment, resource and land use management, as well as security and foreign policy. In doing so, the CSA maintains and expands Canada's leadership in EO technologies to obtain the timely, relevant and essential information we need to make judicious decisions about our collective future.

Space Science and Exploration (SE): To better understand the Solar System and the Universe; expand our knowledge on the constituent elements and origins of life; and strengthen a human presence in space. In doing so, the CSA sustains and increases Canada's contribution to humankind's scientific knowledge, to the exploration of our solar system and the Universe and to the development of related technologies.

Satellite Communications (SC): To provide all Canadians with the means to participate and fully benefit from the global information age. In doing so, the CSA upholds Canada's status as a world leader in Satellite Communications and extends the most advanced products and services to all Canadians.

Generic Technological Activities (GTA): To provide leadership, coordination or support to Earth Observation, Space Science and Exploration, and Satellite Communications through activities that are generic in their nature since they contribute to all three program activities.

Awareness and Learning (AL): To further public understanding and engagement with regards to space related issues, ultimately improving the scientific literacy of Canadians by carrying out a national awareness and learning initiative in support of the CSA programs.

Internal Services: To implement the government's commitment to modern public service management in accordance with the Management Accountability Framework's (MAF) expectations.

1 Description of Program Activities are taken from the Main Estimates available on line:
www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp


1.3 Performance Summary


2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ in millions)

Planned Spending

Total Authorities

Actual Spending

368.2

382.0

306.0

2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned

Actual

Difference

724.0

620.5

103.5


* Any significant variance reported against Planned Spending set out in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities is explained in
Section 3.3.1 - Spending by Program Activity.

This year marks the first reporting on two of the three performance indicators for CSA's strategic outcome approved in 2007. For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome.


Canadian Space Agency Strategic Outcome

Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Performance Indicators

2008-2009 Performance

1. Canada's rank in terms of support for peaceful space-related R&D; the measurement will provide the list of CSA missions, looking 10 years into the future and identifying the following for each mission:
  • the CSA's role
    (leader or partner); and,
  • the CSA's contribution (%) to the total mission budget.

In 2008, Canada was positioned 9th among OECD nations in government budget outlays or appropriations in R&D for civil space programs. The order of investment is as follows: USA, Japan, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Korea, UK, Canada, Belgium, Netherlands, and Norway. This list does not include non-OECD members who are major space-faring nations such as Russia, India, China and Brazil.

2. State of the scientific, industrial and public sector communities involved in the space sector:
  • number of universities, companies and organizations involved;
  • number of people employed in space-related jobs; and,
  • number of corresponding FTEs in academia, industry and government.

In 2008, the Annual Space Sector Survey reported a space workforce of 6,742 people (6,205 in the private sector and 537 in the public sector) distributed among 215 organizations (130 companies, 35 universities, 28 federal departments and agencies and 22 other organizations such as not-for-profit associations and research centers).

3. Access and utilization by the Canadian government and industry of space data generated by Canadian space missions.

Not measured in 2008-2009.


1.3.1) Program Activity Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes


Program Activity
($ in millions)
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2008-2009
Main
Estimates
2008-2009
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Total
Authorities
2008-2009
Actual
Spending
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
Space Based Earth
Observation (EO)
66.6 145.2 149.6 118.6 63.0 A Clean and Healthy Environment
Space Science and
Exploration (SE)
140.2 129.8 129.8 172.5 161.4 A Strong and Mutually Beneficial North American Partnership
Satellite
Communications (SC)
26.9 30.0 30.0 32.8 27.1 A Safe and Secure Canada
Generic Technological
Activities (GTA) in support of EO,
SE and SC
52.7 54.3 54.3 50.4 47.5 An Innovative and Knowledge
Based Economy
Space Awareness and
Learning (AL)
5.4 8.9 8.9 7.7 7.1 A Vibrant Canadian Culture and Heritage
Total 291.7 368.2 372.6 382.0 306.0  

Notes:

  • Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
  • Program Activities shown in this table include amounts for Internal Services.

1.3.2) Contribution of Program Activity Priorities to the Strategic Outcome of the Canadian Space Agency

An increasing number of countries are now involved in the peaceful development and use of space and close to a thousand satellites are expected to be launched in the next ten years. Two-thirds of these satellite projects will serve government programs in Earth Observation and Space Science and Exploration while most of the commercial investments are mainly related to Satellite Communications. The Canadian government investments in these three fields are guided by the Canadian Space Strategy in order to meet the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Canada is at a crossroads where major projects have been delivered and are now operational, while opportunities to collaborate with international partners in major space missions are growing. Major projects are now fully operational: RADARSAT-2 Earth observation satellite; Dextre, the two-armed dexterous robot to the International Space Station (ISS); and, the successful flight demonstration of the KA broadband capabilities aboard the Anik F2 communication satellite. These and other remarkable accomplishments, combined with sustained contribution by Canadian astronauts to international space exploration missions, have continued to brand Canada as a science and technology focused and reliable trading partner.

In 2008-2009, the CSA undertook a Strategic Review to evaluate its programs and ensure that they continue to meet the needs and priorities of Canadians; were aligned with the Government's Science and Technology Strategy; and were effective and efficient. The CSA can make adjustments in a number of areas, among which:

  • Strengthening planning, project management and risk mitigation of complex space projects and missions;
  • Renewing Grants, Contributions and Sponsorship Program and strengthen collaborations with other Granting Councils to leverage CSA investments and expand the partnership between government, academia and space industry;
  • Strengthening the use of RADARSAT-2 Earth Observation imaging by Government departments and agencies; and,
  • Extending the existing agreement and outstanding collaboration of the CSA and Canada's science and space industry communities with the European Space Agency.

At the same time the CSA carried a series of consultations with its stakeholders and partners in order to move forward with a renewed impetus to sustain and enhance Canada's space advantage. A Long Term Space Plan will be presented to Government for consideration in 2009, and will propose investments to achieve its strategic and public policy interests with recommendations for Canada's role and participation in future space exploration activities. The critical challenges that Canada faces related to space consist of increasing significantly the use of space data and information by the Government of Canada to serve its strategic and public policy interests; ensuring the sustainability and capacity of its space industry and academia; and strengthening its international partnerships through meaningful, leading-edge contributions.


Program Activity Space Based Earth Observation (EO)
Operational Priority

Develop and operationalize the use of Space Based EO for the benefit of Canadians.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Mostly met



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
15/18 83% 23/23 100% 13/15 87%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 82%)
Arrow Arrow Arrow


Tendency is established by comparison with the starting base value set in 2005-2006. Note the continued effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.

Two indicators were partially met for the following reasons: one indicator achievement was less than anticipated and the other was due to one of the projects being put on hold.

Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

The CSA maintained and expanded Canada's leadership in Earth observation technologies to obtain the timely, relevant and essential data needed to make judicious decisions about our collective future especially in the fields of environment, resource and land use management, as well as security and foreign policy. As a result, over the last 3 years:

  • A total of 19 missions were either considered or undertaken generating 63 partnerships with the industry, universities or other Canadian government organizations;
  • 70 applications emerged from EO technology development programs;
  • RADARSAT-1 began its 14th year of operation in November 2008 and RADARSAT-2 its first;
  • The partnership with the European Space Agency provided an average "Industrial return coefficient" of 1.19 compared to an expected return of at least 0.84; and,
  • A total of $166 million was spent over this period.
Areas for Future Improvement

Through the Government Related Initiative Program strengthen the use of RADARSAT-2 Earth observation imaging by Government departments and agencies.

Following an evaluation, implement changes to enhance CSA capabilities in satellite operations.

Extend existing agreement and outstanding collaboration of the CSA, and Canada's science and space industry communities with the European Space Agency.

For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Program Activity - Space Science and Exploration (SE)
Operational Priority

Understand the solar system and the Universe, expand our knowledge of the constituent elements and origins of life, and strengthen the human presence in space.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Mostly met



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
24/28 86% 29/31 94% 22/23 96%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 83%)
Rise Rise Rise


Tendency

Tendency is established by comparison with the starting base value set in 2005-2006. Note the continued effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.

One indicator was partially met because the achievement was less than anticipated.



Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

The CSA sustained and increased Canada's contribution to humankind's scientific knowledge, to the exploration of our solar system and the Universe and to the development of related technologies. As a result, over the last 3 years:

  • A total of 26 missions were either considered or undertaken generating 391 partnerships with the industry, universities or other Canadian government organizations;
  • Canadian astronauts participated in 2 missions and trained for 2 upcoming missions;
  • More than 1,400 peer-reviewed papers acknowledged the CSA's contribution and 1,892 presentations were delivered;
  • The CSA met year after year 100% of its requirements to the International Space Station program: the largest international scientific and engineering project ever undertaken;
  • The partnership with the European Space Agency provided an average "Industrial return coefficient" of 0.84 compared to an expected return of at least 0.84; and,
  • A total of $400.6 million was spent over this period.


Areas for Future Improvement

With the Budget 2009 additional funding of $110 million allocated over the next three years, contribute to the development of terrestrial prototypes for space robotic vehicles, such as the Mars Lander and Lunar Rover, and further the development of other technologies and space robotics.

Renew Grants, Contributions and Sponsorship Program and strengthen collaborations with other Granting Councils to leverage CSA investments and expand the partnership between government, academia and space industry.


For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Program Activity - Satellite Communications (SC)
Operational Priority

Provide all Canadians with the means to participate in and fully benefit from the global information age.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Somewhat met



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
7/9 78% 7/8 88% 4/6 67%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 69%)
Rise Rise Drop


Tendency

Tendency is established by comparison with the starting base value set in 2005-2006. Note the continued effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.

One indicator was partially met because of a project slip and one indicator was not measured due to organizational transition and lack of resources in one program sub-sub-activity.



Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

The CSA contributed to uphold Canada's status as a world leader in Satellite Communications and extend the most advanced products and services to all Canadians, including those living in northern communities. As a result, over the last 3 years:

  • 5 technology demonstration projects were put forward;
  • 2 joint studies involving the departments of Transport Canada, National Defence, Environment Canada, and Indian and Northern Affairs were brought forward for consideration;
  • The partnership with the European Space Agency provided an average "Industrial return coefficient" of 1.00 compared to an expected return of at least 0.84; and,
  • A total of $76.9 million was spent over this period.


Areas for Future Improvement

Optimise the use of the Government of Canada capacity credit for Anik F2 broadband telecommunications for trials of innovative services to northern communities by government departments.

Support the Government's Arctic priorities particularly the need to provide satellite full-time coverage over Canada up to the North Pole.


For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Program Activity - Generic Technological Activities (GTA)
in support of EO, SE and SC
Operational Priority

Provide leadership, coordination or support to Earth Observation (EO), Space Science and Exploration (SE), and Satellite Communications (SC) through generic technology research and space-qualification activities.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Somewhat met



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
6/7 86% 7/8 88% 4/7 57%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 86%)
Base Rise Drop


Tendency

Tendency is established by comparison with the base value set in 2006-2007. Note the continued effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.

Three indicators were partially met; note that they were close to achieving newly set targets.



Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

Through its research and development investments and the resulting transfers of applications to the private and public sectors, the CSA helped enhance the Canadian space industry's competitiveness and increased Canada's ability to compete in the global marketplace in the fields of Earth observation, space science and exploration, and satellite communications. As a result, over the last 3 years:

  • A total of 20 partnerships were created with universities and industry in high-risk technology research and development initiatives, and 19 patents were either filed or obtained;
  • On average per year, the David Florida Laboratory supported 7 CSA missions and more than 100 commercial projects;
  • The partnership with the European Space Agency provided an average "Industrial return coefficient" of 1.2 compared to an expected return of at least 0.94; and,
  • A total of $135.5 million was spent over this period.


Areas for future improvement

Participate in the renewal of the Grants, Contributions and Sponsorship Program and strengthen collaborations with other Granting Councils to leverage CSA investments and expand the partnership between government, academia and space industry.

Following an evaluation, implement changes to enhance capabilities of the David Florida Laboratory.


For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Program Activity - Space Awareness and Learning (AL)
Operational Priority

Further public understanding and engagement with regards to space related issues, ultimately leading to improving the scientific literacy of Canadians.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Met all



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
14/16 87% 15/16 94% 3/3 100%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 94%)
Drop = Rise


Tendency

Tendency is established by comparison with the base value set in 2005-2006. Note the considerable effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.



Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

The CSA fostered science and technology literacy and offered opportunities to enhance the expertise of Canadian scientists, engineers and physicians in space science, space technology and space medicine. As a result, over the last 3 years:

  • More than four million people visited the CSA's website;
  • On average, Canadian astronauts reached 25,000 persons yearly through public events;
  • A total of 5,267 educators and 4.3 million Canadian students were reached through the Space Learning Program;
  • A total of 203 graduate students, fellows and medical residents were supported through the Program in support of Research and Training in Space Science, Space Technology and Space Medicine; and,
  • A total of $14.7 million was spent over this period.


Areas for future improvement

Renew Grants, Contributions and Sponsorship Program to further learning activities in relationship with science centres and museums, youth and science associations, and the education community across Canada as well as enhance expertise of Canadian scientists, engineers and physicians in space science, space technology and space medicine.


For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Program Activity - Internal Services
Operational Priority

To implement the government's commitment to modern public service management in accordance with the Management Accountability Framework.

Type

Ongoing

Status

Somewhat met



Target Achievements
(Program Sub-sub-activities)
Achieved vs Planned Targets
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
N/A N/A 13/14 93% 3/6 50%
Tendency
(Starting base value = 93%)
N/A Base Drop


Tendency

Tendency is established by comparison with the base value set in 2007-2008. Note the considerable effort to rationalize total number of indicators for program sub-sub-activities.

One indicator was partially met although it showed significant progress towards achieving the targets and two indicators were postponed for Strategic Review and Long Term Space Plan concurrent exercises were prioritized.


Main Accomplishments over the last 3 years (2006-2009)

A 3-years summary is unavailable this year because this section appears for the first time in 2008-2009.



Areas for future improvement

Strengthen planning, project management and risk mitigation of complex space missions in accordance with the new Government wide Policy on the Management of Projects.

Ensure that investment and project management meets standards set by the new Government wide Policy on Investment Planning, Assets and Acquired Services, and the Policy on the Management of Projects.


For more detailed 2008-2009 performance information, go to:
Section 2 - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


1.4 Risk Analysis

Strategic Context of the Canadian Space Agency

International Context

Space is recognized by industrialized nations as an essential and strategic tool to meet their social, economic, and foreign policy objectives. Accordingly, many governments around the world of traditional and emerging space-faring nations are increasing their investments in space activities, looking for increased consolidation and advancement of their space capabilities. In terms of public expenditures in the space sector, Canada has been losing ground over the past decade when compared with other space nations.2

International cooperation is critical to the implementation of the Canadian Space Strategy. Working in partnership with other space-faring nations, Canada can leverage its resources and maximize its return on investment, sharing technical expertise, knowledge, and infrastructure, while gaining access to areas where Canada has chosen not to invest due to limited resources. In addition, there are increasing concerns over issues such as space debris and climate change. These transcend national borders and favour increased cooperation between nations with common goals. Canada's space infrastructure must not only meet national strategic needs, but must also play a tangible role in responding to issues of interest to the international community.

Canada is regarded as a reliable partner that possesses unique technical and scientific capabilities, and as a nation that can meaningfully contribute to the initiatives of foreign space agencies. In particular, emerging space-faring countries in Asia and South America may offer great potential for future cooperation. Thus, Canada continues efforts to gain a foothold in these emerging markets. It is of paramount importance that the Canadian Space Agency continues its work with stakeholders to ensure the competitiveness of our research communities and industries with world markets. Canada's space industry is perceived as internationally competitive. This was confirmed by the results of the 2008 Annual Survey of the Canadian Space Sector3. With yearly revenues of $2,793 billion, $1,405 billion comes from exports, representing 50% of the industry's total revenues. The main destinations of Canadian space exports are as follows:

  • The U.S. remains the largest market accounting for 52.1% (or, $733 million) of the $1,405 billion of total exports. Europe remains second overall, accounting for 28.4% (or, $399.5 million).
  • Export revenues from Oceania increased by 7.5% - from $47.6 to $51.2 million.
  • Export revenues from South America increased by 63.8% - from $31.8 to $52.1 million.
  • Export revenues from Africa increased by 71.4% - from $5.4 to $8.9 million.

2 EUROCONSULT - CONFERENCE BOARD OF CANADA: Socio-economic Study and Policy Analysis of Future Canadian Investments in Spaced-based Robotics Opportunities (2006)
3 CSA: State of the Canadian Space Sector 2008

National Context

The Canadian Space Agency recognizes that the best means of turning scientific and technological advancements into innovative products and services is through partnerships with Canadian universities and industry. With its highly skilled workforce, the space industry in Canada not only generates wealth in our economy, but also provides competitive products and services. Given that the national market is relatively small, it is critical that the Canadian space industry be able to leverage foreign investments and generate export sales. Capitalizing on export revenue depends on the industry's ability to commercialize highly competitive products and services, and establish local partnerships. In 2008, Satellite Communications continued to dominate the largest share of Canada's space sector with revenues increasing by $314 million (17.1%) from $1,832 billion to $2,146 billion. A breakdown of the revenues by sectors of activity is as follows:4

  • Satellite Communications: 76.8% ($2,146 billion)
  • Earth Observation: 7.1% ($200 million)
  • Navigation: 9% ($254 million)
  • Robotics: 4% ($110 million)
  • Space Science: 2% ($68 million)
  • All space-related activities in other areas: 0.5% ($16 million)

Regional Distribution of Government Space-Related Funding From 1988-1989 to 2008-2009

Regional Distribution of Government Space-Related Funding

Source: CSA Organized Research Information System (ORIS), March 31, 2009.

While small in the number of firms, the Canadian space sector is knowledge-intensive and is at the forefront of research and innovation. Building on the strengths of 6,742 skilled workers, including 2,189 highly qualified personnel Canadian firms have acquired world-leading capabilities in niche areas such as Earth observation, space robotics, communications and navigation satellites.

To learn more about Canadian space-related organizations, go to:
www5.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/industry/csd.asp

4 CSA: State of the Canadian Space Sector 2008

Government Context

1. The Canadian Science and Technology Strategy

The objective of the Government Science and Technology (S&T) Strategy is to "make Canada a world leader in science and technology and a key source of entrepreneurial innovation and creativity". In order for Canada to achieve this objective, the S&T Strategy identifies the following three underlining conditions for success: a strong private-sector commitment to S&T, a strengthened knowledge base and, be a magnet for talent. In 2008-2009, the CSA undertook a Strategic Review to evaluate its programs and ensure that they were aligned with the Government's S&T Strategy. As indicated in the Budget 2009 announcement, the CSA will make adjustments in order to continue to meet the needs and priorities of Canadians.

To learn more about the Canadian Science and Technology Strategy, go to:
www.ic.gc.ca/epic/site/ic1.nsf/en/h_00231e.html

2. The Canadian Space Strategy

Approved by the Government of Canada in February 2005, the Canadian Space Strategy was developed in full consultation with Government of Canada organizations and Canadian stakeholders. It is the framework that guides all CSA programs and provides our stakeholders and partners with insight on Canada's strategic directions. While the Canadian Space Strategy preceded the S&T Strategy it embraces the principles of world-class excellence, and contains a similar set of priorities and innovative national partnerships. The CSA implements the Canadian Space Strategy priorities through the following five building blocks:

  • 1) A strong science capacity;
  • 2) A proficient technology base;
  • 3) Dynamic space industry focused on expanding markets;
  • 4) National and international partnerships; and,
  • 5) Qualified test and operations infrastructures.

To learn more about the Canadian Space Strategy, go to:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca//eng/publications/default.asp#strategy

3. Integrated Corporate Human Resources Management

A Human Resources analysis of the CSA's workforce indicated that the Agency had attained a degree of stability since 2005-2006. In 2008-2009, the CSA had a growth rate of 2.2% and a turnover rate of 7%. The workforce distribution showed that the average age of employees is 43.8 years compared to 44 years (2008) in the federal Public Service. The analysis also revealed that 53.6% of the CSA's workforce has less than 10 years of service in the government making the majority of CSA's workforce ineligible for retirement.

In June 2007, the CSA approved an Integrated Corporate Human Resources Plan to guide its human resources planning, recruitment, retention, development and succession planning initiatives over the next three years. An integrated human resources plan is an essential tool to assist the CSA in its recruitment, development and retention activities, assuring it has the highly qualified and motivated workforce required to meet its current needs, and to be ready to take on challenging space missions in the future. The Integrated Corporate Human Resources Plan identified strategies to address the following challenges:

  • Organizational needs and recruitment;
  • Management capacity;
  • Competency-based management and succession development; and,
  • Workplace well-being.

4- Corporate Risk Management

The CSA reviewed the mitigation action plans developed to address each of the corporate risks identified as the highest priorities in 2008-2009. While progress was noted, the CSA assessment concluded that the targeted risk tolerance levels were not reached and that the priorities and actions plans should be pursued in 2009-2010. The definitions of the priority corporate risks were reviewed in the RPP 2009-2010 as follows:

Integration and Implementation: Capacity of CSA to align its strategies, planning, priorities, funding levels, operations and capacity to deliver, and to obtain clear understanding and buy-in from managers and staff at all levels.

Trust in CSA Governance: Capacity of CSA in gaining and maintaining the confidence of the Minister, Central Agencies and stakeholders in the governance and effective management of its affairs in accordance with the public service values and ethics.

Workforce: Capacity of CSA to hire and maintain a qualified workforce to deliver its mandate within the government legislative frameworks, policies and rules.


1.5 Expenditure Profile

1.5.1) Spending Trend

CSA Spending Trend

The CSA's A-base funding has been maintained at $300 million par annum since 1999. However, authorities and estimates are significantly higher than this amount and fluctuate from year to year for two reasons: the incremental funds ($111 million) allocated in 2005 over five years to the RADARSAT Constellation mission for the development of the next generation radar Earth observation satellites and secondly, the cumulative impact of funds reprofiling caused by delays in project implementation. Conversely, the recurrent annual under-spending results from cumulative reprofilings of capital funds, mainly for the RADARSAT development and space science projects, due to a series of uncertainties and technical challenges, some with international partners, impeding the implementation of space-related initiatives.

1.5.2) Voted and Statutory Items


Voted or
Statutory
Item
(S)
Truncated Vote or
Statutory Wording
($ in millions)
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2008-2009
Main
Estimate
2008-2009
Actual
Spending
25 Operating expenditures 192.0 178.9 193.1 196.6
30 Capital expenditures 56.7 56.8 118.1 56.9
35 Grants and Contributions 56.8 46.7 46.4 43.0
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 8.9 9.2 10.6 9.4
  Total 314.4 291.7 368.2 306.0

Notes: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.