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Section III: Supplementary Information

Our Structure for Service / Program Delivery

Our Management Structure

The RCMP is organized under the authority of the RCMP Act. In accordance with the Act, it is headed by the Commissioner, who, under the general direction of the Minister of Public Safety (Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), has the control and management of the Force and all matters connected therewith. 

Key components of our management structure include: 

  • Deputy Commissioners Pacific, North West and Atlantic Regions:  To oversee operations in these regions
  • Deputy Commissioner Federal Services and Central Region: To meet our federal policing mandate [includes Federal and International Operations (FIO) and Protective Policing Services] as well as A, C and O Division operations
  • Deputy Commissioner Operations and Integration: To drive horizontal integration in all areas including strategy, performance improvement and operations [includes National Security Criminal Investigations (NCSI), Criminal Intelligence (CI), Operational Readiness and Response Coordination Centre (ORRCC), Strategic Policy and Planning Directorate (SPPD), Integrated Operations Support (IOS) and Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing Services (CCAPS)]
  • Deputy Commissioner National Police Services: To focus on the provision of frontline operational services and information management to the RCMP and broader law enforcement and criminal justice communities [includes Technical Operations, the Canadian Police College (CPC), Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC), Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC), Forensic Laboratory Services (FLS), Information & Identification Services (I&IS), the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC), the Chief Information Officer (CIO) Sector, and the Canada Firearms Centre (CAFC). Specific details on the CAFC are included in a special chapter at the end of this report. FLS and I&IS were amalgamated in 2006 to form Forensic Science & Identification Services.]
  • Deputy Commissioner Corporate Management and Comptrollership: To continue to meet standards of accountability, stewardship, results and value-based management, increased transparency and responsiveness, risk management, renewed control systems and sustainable development
  • Deputy Commissioner Human Resources: To develop HR management strategies that maximize human performance and drive organizational success, ensure that HR policies and processes enable operational readiness, and build and sustain a workforce that is committed to excellence in service delivery.

In addition to the Deputy Commissioners, the Ethics and Integrity Advisor, the Director of Legal Services and the Chief Audit Executive (Observer Status) complete the Senior Executive Team.

Management Structure

Where We Are Located

To deliver on our responsibilities, we have over 25,000 employees including Regular and Civilian Members and Public Service employees. We are also fortunate to have over 75,000 volunteers to assist us in our efforts to deliver quality services to the communities we serve across Canada. 

The RCMP is unique in the world since we are a national, federal, provincial and municipal policing body, and as a result, the men and women of the RCMP can be found all across Canada.  

Operating from more than 750 detachments, we provide: daily policing services in over 200 municipalities; provincial or territorial policing services everywhere but Ontario and Quebec; and services to over 600 Aboriginal communities, four international airports, plus numerous smaller ones. 

We are organized into four regions, 14 divisions, National Headquarters in Ottawa and the RCMP’s training facility – or “Depot” – in Regina. Each division is managed by a Commanding Officer and is alphabetically designated. Divisions roughly approximate provincial boundaries with their headquarters located in respective provincial or territorial capitals (except “A”, Ottawa; “C”, Montreal; “E”, Vancouver; and “O”, London).

RCMP Service Locations

Financial Tables

Table 1: Comparison of Planned to Actual Spending (including FTEs)


Program Activity
($ millions)  
2004-2005
Actual
2005-2006
Actual
2006-2007
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual
Federal and International Operations 548.2 579.7 592.9 703.0 653.9 626.0
Protective Policing Services 120.0 125.7 105.1 116.4 150.7 108.9
Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 1,871.0 1,991.8 2,083.4 2,174.0 2,240.4 2,140.7
Criminal Intelligence Operations 68.7 71.6 70.3 76.5 85.2 81.8
Technical Policing Operations 171.0 168.8 174.2 189.3 198.3 190.8
Policing Support Services 60.7 67.3 68.5 71.1 80.0 84.0
National Police Services 143.5 161.9 149.7 164.8 210.4 170.9

Registration, Licensing and
Supporting Infrastructure

92.8 68.5 78.3 68.9 77.7 74.2

Policy, Regulatory, Communications
and Portfolio Integration

    5.3 4.7 4.8 2.4

Pensions under the RCMP
Contribution Act

22.6 23.6 23.0 23.0 20.4 20.4

To compensate members of the
RCMP for injuries received in the
performance of duty

31.8 39.1 48.8 48.8 58.8 55.1

Payments in nature of Workers’
Compensation, to survivors of
members of the Force

1.5 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.5 2.0

Pensions to families of members
of the RCMP who have lost their
lives while on duty

0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

Total

3,131.9 3,299.5 3,401.3 3,642.0 3,782.2 3,557.3

Less: Non-Respendable Revenue

85.7 107.2 92.1 92.1 93.5 99.3

Plus: Cost of services received
without charge

193.9 201.9 198.4 198.4 202.7 221.5

Net Cost of Department

3,240.1 3,394.2 3,507.6 3,748.3 3,891.4 3,679.4
Full Time Equivalents 23,236.0 23,578.8 25,665.0 26,481.3 25,809.6 24,786.4

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.  
17.2 million”Refunds of amounts to revenues in previous years” shown in the 2006-2007 Public Accounts are not included.

Total Gross Expenditures ($ millions)

Table 2: Use of Resources by Business Lines


Program Activity
($ millions) 
Budgetary ($ millions)
FTEs
Operating
Capital
Grants and Contributions
Total Gross Expenditures
Less:
Respendable
Revenues
Total 
Net
Expenditures
Federal and International
Operations
Main Estimates 4,624.0 557.0 35.9 0.0 592.9 0.6 592.3
(Planned) 5,257.2
664.4 38.5 0.0 703.0 0.6 702.3
(Authorities) 4,638.0
612.0 41.8 0.0 653.9 8.9 644.9
(Actual) 4,224.9 585.7 40.4 0.0 626.0 7.7 618.3
Protective Policing Services Main Estimates 918.0 99.8 5.3 0.0 105.1 0.1 105.0
(Planned) 920.5 111.1 5.3 0.0 116.4 0.1 116.3
(Authorities) 932.1 144.2 6.5 0.0 150.7 2.0 148.7
(Actual) 595.6 102.0 6.9 0.0 108.9 5.4 103.5
Community, Contract and
Aboriginal Policing
Main Estimates 15,945.0
1,899.2 184.2 0.0 2,083.4 1,235.2 848.2
(Planned) 5,983.7 1,989.8 184.2 0.0 2,174.0 1,235.2 938.8
(Authorities) 15,946.2 2,038.3 202.1 0.0 2,240.4 1,313.7 926.7
(Actual) 15,741.6 1,989.6 151.0 0.0 2,140.7 1,252.1 888.6
Criminal Intelligence Operations Main Estimates

587.0

66.8 3.5 0.0 70.3 0.1 70.2
(Planned) 624.2 73.0 3.5 0.0 76.5 0.1 76.4
(Authorities) 596.0 80.8 4.3 0.0 85.2 1.0 84.2
(Actual) 596.6 79.1 2.6 0.0 81.8 0.9 80.9
Technical Policing Operations Main Estimates

1,333.0

155.3 18.9 0.0 174.2 0.2 173.9
(Planned) 1,432.4 170.3 18.9 0.0 189.3 0.2 189.0
(Authorities) 1,333.1 176.3 22.0 0.0 198.3 3.5 194.9
(Actual) 1,389.6 180.1 10.7 0.0 190.8 2.1 188.7
Policing Support Services Main Estimates

402.0

65.9 2.6 0.0 68.5 0.1 68.4
(Planned) 403.2 68.4 2.6 0.0 71.1 0.1 71.0
(Authorities) 402.0 76.8 3.2 0.0 80.0 1.0 79.0
(Actual) 528.1 79.2 4.8 0.0 84.0 0.9 83.2
National Police Services Main Estimates 1,454.0 138.8 10.5 0.4 149.7 3.7 146.0
(Planned) 1,458.1 153.9 10.5 0.4 164.8 3.7 161.2
(Authorities) 1,560.1 197.4 12.6 0.4 210.4 6.0 204.4
(Actual) 1,353.0 161.6 8.9 0.4 170.9 7.8 163.1
Registration, Licensing and Supporting Infrastructure Main Estimates 375.0 65.3 0.0 13.0 78.3 0.0 78.3
(Planned) 375.0 55.9 0.0 13.0 68.9 0.0 68.9
(Authorities) 375.0 64.7 0.0 13.0 77.7 0.0 77.7
(Actual) 339.0 63.1 0.0 11.1 74.2 0.0 74.2
Policy, Regulatory, Communications and Portfolio Integration Main Estimates

27.0

4.3 0.0 1.0 5.3 0.0 5.3
(Planned) 27.0 3.7 0.0 1.0 4.7 0.0 4.7
(Authorities) 27.0 3.8 0.0 1.0 4.8 0.0 4.8
(Actual) 18.0 2.2 0.0 0.2 2.4 0.0 2.4
Pensions under the RCMP Contribution Act Main Estimates

0.0

0.0 0.0 23.0 23.0 0.0 23.0
(Planned) 0.0 0.0 0.0 23.0 23.0 0.0 23.0
(Authorities) 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.4 20.4 0.0 20.4
(Actual) 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.4 20.4 0.0 20.4
To compensate members of the RCMP for injuries received in the performance of duty Main Estimates

0.0

0.0 0.0 48.8 48.8 0.0 48.8
(Planned) 0.0 0.0 0.0 48.8 48.8 0.0 48.8
(Authorities) 0.0 0.0 0.0 58.8 58.8 0.0 58.8
(Actual) 0.0 0.0 0.0 55.1 55.1 0.0 55.1
Payments in nature of Workers’ Compensation, to survivors of members of the Force Main Estimates

0.0

0.0 0.0 1.5 1.5 0.0 1.5
(Planned) 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.5 1.5 0.0 1.5
(Authorities) 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.5 1.5 0.0 1.5
(Actual) 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 0.0 2.0
Pensions to families of members of the RCMP who have lost their lives while on duty Main Estimates

0.0

0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
(Planned) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
(Authorities) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
(Actual) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
Total Main Estimates 25,665.0 3,052.4 261.1 87.9 3,401.3 1,240.0 2,161.3
(Planned) 26,481.3 3,290.6 263.7 87.8 3,642.1 1,240.0 2,402.1
(Authorities) 25,809.6 3,394.4 292.6 95.2 3,782.2 1,336.0 2,446.2
(Actual) 24,786.4 3,242.6 225.4 89.3 3,557.3 1,276.8 2,280.5

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.     
17.2 million “Refunds of amounts to revenues in previous years” shown in the 2006-2007 Public Accounts are not included.


Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items


Financial Requirements by Authority ($ millions)

Vote

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Law Enforcement Program
2006-2007
Main Estimates
Planned Spending
Total Authorities
Actual
60 Operating expenditures 1,259.0 1,313.0  1,656.3 1,570.4
61 Registration, Licensing and
Supporting Infrastructure
50.8 50.8 51.6 50.6
62 Policy, Regulatory, Communications
and Portfolio Integration
14.6 14.6 14.0 11.7
65 Capital expenditures 197.9  217.0 292.6

225.4

70 Grants and Contributions 43.7  43.7 74.9 68.8
(S) Pensions and other employee benefits Members of the Force 288.6 288.6  270.5  270.5
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 51.1 51.1  58.5 58.5
(S) Pensions under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act 23.0 23.0 20.4  20.4
Total Department  1,928.7 2,001.8  2,438.8 2,276.3

Note: Total authorities are main estimates plus supplementary estimates plus other authorities.    
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.      
In addition, $7.4 million was available from proceeds of disposal of surplus Crown Assets, of which $3.9 million was spent. The balance will be available as spending authority in 2007/2008.
Numbers listed above do not include refunds of amounts credited to revenues in previous years.



Authorities 2006-2007


Table 4: Services Received Without Charge


($ millions) 2006-2007
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) 60.6
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by TBS 158.1
Worker's compensation coverage provided by Social Development Canada  0.4
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 2.4
Total 2006-2007 Services Received without charge  221.5
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.  

Table 5: Loans, Investments and Advances (Non-budgetary)

NIL reply. No activity for the fiscal period in review.

Table 6: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue


Revenues by Business Line ($ millions)
Respendable Revenues* 2006-2007
Program Activity Actual
2004-2005
Actual
2005-2006
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
 Total
Authorities
Actual
Federal and International Operations 6.1 6.8 0.6 0.6 8.9 7.7
Protective Policing Services 1.4 1.5 0.1 0.1 2.0 5.4
Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 1,065.2 1,167.1 1,235.2 1,235.2 1,313.7 1,252.1
Criminal Intelligence Operations 0.7 0.8 0.1 0.1 1.0 0.9
Technical Policing Operations 2.4 1.9 0.2 0.2 3.5 2.1
Policing Support Services 0.7 0.8 0.1 0.1 1.0 0.9
National Policing Services 10.5 6.8 3.7 3.7 6.0 7.8
Total Respendable Revenues 1,087.0 1,185.7 1,240.0 1,240.0 1,336.0 1,276.8
  
Non-Respendable Revenues

2006-2007

Program Activity Actual
2004-2005
Actual
2005-2006
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
 Total
Authorities
Actual
Privileges, Licences and permits 20.1 29.1 12.4 12.4 12.4 17.5
Refund of Prior Years' Expenditures 3.5 3.9 6.1 6.1 6.1 5.4
Return On Investments 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Miscellaneous 54.4 68.3 65.7 65.7 65.7 70.9
Proceeds for Sales 1.6 1.4 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.9
Proceeds from Asset Disposal 6.1 4.5 5.8 5.8 7.2 4.6
Total Non-Respendable Revenues 85.7 107.2 92.1 92.1 93.5 99.3
Total Revenues  1,172.7  1,292.9 1,332.1 1,332.1 1,429.5 1,376.1

Note: *Respendable revenues are primarily generated by the provision of policing services under contract to provinces, territories and municipalities. Other revenues related to payment for courses and accommodation at the Canadian Police College and for technology.


Respendable Revenues ($ millions)

Non-Respendable Revenues

Table 7: Revolving Fundse (Statements of Operations, Statement of Cash Flows and Projected Use of Authority)

NIL reply. No activity for the fiscal period in review.

Table 8: Resource Requirements by Branch/Sector Level


($ millions) Federal and International Operations Protective Policing Services Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing Criminal Intelligence Operations Technical Policing Operations Policing Support Services National Policing Services Registration, Licensing and Support Infrastructure Policy, Regulatory, Communications and Portfolio Integration Total Respendable Revenue
Atlantic Region
Planned Spending
48.2
2.2
94.5
4.5
9.9
0.7
2.4
0.0
0.0
162.5
Actual Spending
55.1
3.6
112.3
4.0
13.9
0.9
2.9
0.0
0.0
192.6
Central Region
Planned Spending
251.7
17.4
35.8
22.7
37.6
1.1
5.0
0.0
0.0
371.4
Actual Spending
272.2
30.9
43.2
33.0
45.8
1.4
5.8
0.0
0.0
432.4
North West Region
Planned Spending
66.0
3.8
184.1
11.0
18.8
1.2
3.2
0.0
0.0
288.1
Actual Spending
72.9
5.1
244.3
9.5
23.0
1.7
4.8
0.0
0.0
361.2
Pacific Region
Planned Spending
77.2
6.2
161.1
12.2
22.5
0.9
3.1
0.0
0.0
283.2
Actual Spending
91.0
17.2
263.9
12.1
27.0
1.4
4.3
0.0
0.0
416.9
National Headquarters
Planned Spending
144.9
66.0
246.9
19.8
85.1
57.0
132.5
68.3
5.3
825.9
Actual Spending
127.2
46.7
224.8
22.3
78.9
77.8
145.3
90.4
3.4
816.9
Total
Planned Spending
588.0
95.6
722.5
70.2
173.9
61.0
146.3
68.3
5.3
1,931.1
Actual Spending
618.3
103.5
888.6
80.9
188.7
83.2
163.1
90.4
3.4
2,220.1

Note: 77.6 million Unallocated Grants and Contributions are not included in the numbers stated above
Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Table 9–A: 2006-2007 User Fee Reporting Template – User Fees Act

Royal Canadian Mounted Police


A. User Fee Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Access to Information Act
Date Last Modified 1992
Forecast Revenue ($ millions)
0.0
Actual Revenue ($ millions)
0.0
Full Cost ($ millions)
3.25
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Framework developed by TBS. 
See: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/gos-sog/atip-aiprp/in-ai/in-ai2006/2006-06_e.asp

2006-2007 Performance Results

Access to Information Act
Within 30 days = 29.7%
Past Legislated time allowed:
1-30 days = 15.1%
31-60 days = 7.8%
61-90 days = 5.4%
91 days and over = 4.5%
> 120 days = 37.6%

Privacy Act
Within 30 days = 34.0%
Past Legislated time allowed:
1-30 days = 23.2%
31-60 days = 9.7%
61-90 days = 4.6%
91-120 days =3.7 %
> 120 days = 24.7%

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.0
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.0
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.0
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 3.53
Fiscal Year 2008-09 3.70
Fiscal Year 2009-10 3.70

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Fee Type Other Products and Services
Fee Setting Authority Access to Information Act
Date Last Modified 1992
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
0.0
Actual Revenue ($ millions)
0.0
Full Cost ($ millions)
0.2
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Framework developed by TBS. 
See: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/gos-sog/atip-aiprp/in-ai/in-ai2006/2006-06_e.asp

2006-2007 Performance Results

Access to Information Act
Within 60 days = 83.0%

Privacy Act
Within 60 days = 97.0%

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.0
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.0
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.0
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 0.2
Fiscal Year 2008-09 0.2
Fiscal Year 2009-10 0.2

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Business Licences
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified April 10, 2005
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
0.6
Actual Revenue ($ millions)
0.5
Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Section C – Other information – See note (2)

2006-2007 Performance Results

Section C – Other information – See note (3)

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.1
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.6
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.6
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10


A. User Fee Individual Licences
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified December 1, 1998
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
1.9

Actual Revenue
($ millions)
4.9

Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

45 days

2006-2007 Performance Results

76% of properly completed individual licence applications were completed within 45 days

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  1.9
Fiscal Year 2008-09  21.7
Fiscal Year 2009-10  21.7
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Registration Certificates
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified Registration fees repealed as of May 20, 2004
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
0.0

Actual Revenue
($ millions)
0.0

Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

30 days

2006-2007 Performance Results

63% of properly completed registration applications were completed within 30 days

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.0
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.0
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.0
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Authorizations
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified December 1, 1998
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
0.3

Actual Revenue
($ millions)
0.3

Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Section C – Other information – See note (2)

2006-2007 Performance Results

Section C – Other information – See note (3)

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.3
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.3
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.3
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Non-resident Permits
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified April 10, 2005
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
1.9

Actual Revenue
($ millions)
2.0

Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Section C – Other information – See note (2)

2006-2007 Performance Results

Section C – Other information – See note (3)

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  1.9
Fiscal Year 2008-09  1.9
Fiscal Year 2009-10  1.9
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10

Canada Firearms Centre


A. User Fee Services for replacement of documents
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee Setting Authority Firearms Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified April 10, 2005
Forecast Revenue
($ millions)
0.1

Actual Revenue
($ millions)
0.1

Full Cost ($ millions)
Section C
Other information
See note (1)
2006-2007 Performance Standard

Section C – Other information – See note (2)

2006-2007 Performance Results

Section C – Other information – See note (3)

Planning Years Forecast Revenue
($ millions)


Fiscal Year 2007-08  0.1
Fiscal Year 2008-09  0.1
Fiscal Year 2009-10  0.1
Planning Years Estimated Full Cost 
($ millions)
Fiscal Year 2007-08 Section C
Other information –
See note (1)
Fiscal Year 2008-09
Fiscal Year 2009-10

Canada Firearms Centre


2006-2007
Planning Years
($ millions)
Forecast
Revenue
Actual
Revenue
Full
Cost
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Business Licences
0.6
0.5
0.1
0.6
0.6
Individual Licences
1.9
4.9
1.9
21.7
21.7
Registration Certificates
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Authorizations
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Non-resident Permits
1.9
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.9
Services for replacement of documents
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Total
4.8
7.8
4.3
24.6
24.6

B. Date Last Modified:

Forecast Revenues:

  • On May 17, 2006, the Government announced individuals no longer have to pay the fee for the renewal of their possession-only licence (POL) or their possession and acquisition licence (PAL). The fee waiver also applies to:
    • individuals who are modifying their licence to upgrade from a POL to a PAL
    • individuals who are adding new privileges to their licence
    • individuals whose licence expired 1 and are obtaining a new licence; and
    • minors who renew their minors’ possession licence.
  • Fees for registration of firearms were repealed May 20, 2004.
  • Forecast and actual revenue for fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act is approximately $2,000 per year as per the Annual Report to Parliament (2004-2005) – Access to Information Act and Privacy Act. For more information, please refer to the CAFC website.

Note: 1 If the expired licence was a possession-only licence, the licence is no longer valid. To continue to possess firearms, an individual must meet safety training requirements and apply for a possession and acquisition licence).

Table 10: Progress Against the Department’s Regulatory Plan

Nil reply. No activity for the fiscal period in review.

Table 12: Status Report on Major Crown Projects

Real Time Identification (RTID) 

1. Overview

Real Time Identification (RTID) is a re-engineering of systems and processes used for fingerprint identification, civil clearances and criminal records maintenance. It will transform the current paper-based workflow to an electronic workflow, enabling the “real time” identification of fingerprints submitted electronically.

Fingerprints are submitted by police agencies to support the creation of a criminal record, or to search the criminal record repository during a criminal investigation or civil security screening. RTID will streamline these services, facilitate information sharing internationally, and permit an improved tracking of criminals by condensing identification turnaround times from weeks and months to hours and days.

Funding for the RTID Project was announced on April 20, 2004, under the National Security Policy. Between 2001 and 2004 significant work had already been undertaken by a small project team within the RCMP to define RTID requirements and prepare statements of work in anticipation of this announcement.

Following the announcement, a Project Charter was developed and a formal Project Office established under the sponsorship of Information and Identification Services of National Police Services (NPS). The Chief Information Officer (CIO) was appointed Project Leader, responsible for achieving the technology improvements associated with the project. The Project Director reports to the CIO.

The project will be delivered in two major Phases. Phase 1 will modernize the civil clearance process, replace the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and implement a new transaction manager, the NPS National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Server, permitting agencies to submit their fingerprint information electronically. Phase 1 is being delivered in different releases in 2007.

Phase 2 will modernize the processes related to the management and update of the criminal records. Phase 2 is a large re-engineering effort and the replacement of antiquated legacy systems in support of the re-engineering effort. Phase 2 will be delivered in Spring 2009.

2. Lead and Participating Departments

The RCMP is the lead department on RTID. Various levels of governance will ensure the Project is successful and meets the needs of all stakeholders.

The Senior Project Advisory Committee is a senior level committee of RCMP, Public Safety Canada (PS) and Central Agency officials that advises the Project Leader on all aspects of the project as it relates to government-wide policies, strategic direction and procurement, including the review of the scope through the definition stage, and the procurement strategy for the project.

An RTID Project Steering Committee provides ongoing direction to the project, and includes representatives of key Federal Government departments and Central Agencies. Oversight of RTID is also linked to existing PS committees, such as the PS Portfolio Interoperability Committee, thus ensuring the project’s horizontal interests and planned contribution to overall public safety are fully realized.

RTID is a major interoperability initiative of interest to all agencies within the PS portfolio. Its progress and success in contributing to long-term interoperability will be monitored by the Heads of Agency Steering Committee through the Portfolio Interoperability Committee.

RTID will be used across Canada and in all jurisdiction levels. Stakeholder involvement is required to ensure that the system is useful for all and does not hinder or contravene regulations for any. This involvement is ensured through the NPS Advisory Council and Technical Consultative working groups.

3. Prime Contractors / Major Sub-Contractors

The RCMP is using several procurement vehicles for the RTID Project:

1. Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) Vendor: RTID involves the replacement of the existing AFIS with modern AFIS technology. The AFIS vendor, COGENT Systems, selected via a competitive process, is responsible for the delivery, configuration and implementation of a modern AFIS commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) product.

2. Development work that aligns with the RCMP corporate technical architecture is being carried out in-house. The NPS NIST Server, the heart of RTID, is being developed by a team of RCMP resources and contractors. To supplement the skills of internal resources, or to backfill resources seconded to the project, RTID uses internal standing offer vehicles to meet any outstanding demand for project management support, systems architecture and engineering support, systems design, systems development, testing, training and implementation. The major contractors are:

  • Veritaaq
  • NRNS
  • Fujitsu
  • TPG

3. Systems Integration Company: a component of Phase 2 will be contracted out on a fixed price basis to ensure the successful delivery of the multiple components that make up that phase. A Request for Proposal (RFP) has been issued and proposals are due in mid-September 2007. Contract award is anticipated by mid-December 2007.

4. Major Milestones

Accomplishments

  • Funding for RTID was announced on April 20, 2004 under the National Security Policy
  • The current procurement approach was approved by the Senior Project Advisory Committee in November 2004
  • On December 13, 2004, the RCMP received Treasury Board approval of its RTID procurement strategy and Preliminary Project Approval at an indicative estimate of $129.8 million to complete development of RTID over 5 years. The source of funds was identified as follows: $99.8 million from Canada’s National Security Policy and $30 million from RCMP funding
  • A Request for Proposal for the AFIS Vendor was issued in January 2005. A contract was awarded to COGENT Systems on October 13, 2005 and work started November 1, 2005
  • On October 3, 2005, Effective Project Approval for Phase 1 was awarded by TB to the RTID project
  • In November 2006, the RTID Project successfully implemented its first release (R0.5) to bring on two civil contributors
  • In March 2007, the RTID Project successfully implemented a subsequent release (R1.0) providing more functionality to the civil fingerprint process
  • On June 14, 2007, Effective Project Approval for Phase 2 was awarded by Treasury Board to the RTID project
  • RFP’s for Phase 2 were published in June 2007

To be delivered

  • Complete delivery of Phase 1 is planned for December 2007
  • Delivery of Phase 2 is planned for Spring 2009
  • Project closure is on March 31, 2009

5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

Phase 1 work has been split into multiple releases to make the implementation of functionality more successful. The multiple release schedules are now tracking for complete delivery by December 2007. Phase 2 re-engineering started in January 2006, as planned, and completed in the Spring 2007. The RFP has been prepared and published in June 2007, with a contract award expected in December 2007.

6. Industrial Benefits

There is no industrial benefits program for the Real Time Identification Project.

Note: For specific information concerning CAFC Major Crown Projects, please see Section V.

Table 14: Conditional Grants (Foundations)

NIL reply. No activity for the fiscal period in review.


Table 15: Financial Statements (unaudited)
of Royal Canadian Mounted Police
For the year ended
March 31, 2007


Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2007 and all information contained in these statements rests with the management of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the RCMP’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the RCMP’s Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds. Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout the RCMP.

The financial statements of the RCMP have not been audited.


William J.S. Elliott, Commissioner

Alain P. Sguin,
Acting Deputy Commissioner Corporate Management & Comptrollership

Ottawa, Canada
August 9, 2007

Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
EXPENSES (note 4)     
Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 2,245,564 2,098,768
Federal & International Policing 648,497 606,898
Technical Policing Operations 204,446 190,839
National Police Services 183,421 174,450
Protective Policing Services 116,024 134,681
Criminal Intelligence Operations 85,920 75,496
Policing Support Services 85,742 71,354
Firearms Registration, Licensing and Supporting Infrastructure 84,192 101,467
Other activities 80,231 70,800
Total expenses 3,734,037 3,524,753
REVENUES (note 5)    
Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 1,347,642 1,312,206
National Police Services 15,545 11,474
Other activities 34,569 1,679
Total revenues 1,397,756 1,325,359
NET COST OF OPERATIONS 2,336,281 2,199,394
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
ASSETS  
Restated
(note 17)
Financial assets    
Accounts receivables and advances (note 6) 364,510 512,825

Total financial assets

364,510 512,825
Non-financial assets     
Spare parts, materials and supplies 36,917 37,927
Prepaid expenses 831
Tangible capital assets (note 7) 1,103,518 1,037,979

Total non-financial assets

1,140,435 1,076,737
Total 1,504,945 1,589,562
LIABILITIES     
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (note 8) 307,983 270,302
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 185,431 183,388
RCMP Pension Accounts (note 9) 11,703,416 11,322,814
Deferred revenue (note 10) 103,753 75,528
Employee severance benefits (note 11) 439,453 424,744
Other liabilities (note 12) 8,419 6,579

Total liabilities

12,748,455 12,283,355
Equity of Canada (11,243,510) (10,693,793)
Total 1,504,945 1,589,562
Contingent liabilities (note 13)    
Contractual obligations (note 14)    
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Statement of Equity (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)


  2007

2006
Restated
(note 17)

Equity of Canada, beginning of year 10,693,793 10,357,565
Net cost of operations 2,336,281 2,199,394
Current year appropriations used (note 3) (2,297,710) (2,115,936)
Revenue not available for spending 124,488 159,089
Refund of prior year expenditures 7,737 6,365
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund (note 3) 600,376 289,171
Service provided without charge by other government departments (note 15) (221,455) (201,855)
Equity of Canada, end of year 11,243,510 10,693,793
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Statement of Cash Flow (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
OPERATING ACTIVITIES     
Net Cost of Operations 2,336,281 2,199,394
Non-cash items    

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(125,580) (112,199)

Loss on disposal of assets

(11,716) (879)

Loss on write-off 

(4,260) (46,559)

Service provided without charge from other government departments

(221,455) (201,855)
Variations in Statement of Financial Position     

(Decrease) Increase in financial assets

(148,315) 20,198

Decrease in spare parts, material & supplies

(1,010) (7,828)

(Decrease) Increase in prepaid expense

(831) 227

(Increase) in liabilities

(465,100) (366,079)
Cash used by operating activities 1,358,014 1,484,420
CAPITAL INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES    

Acquisitions of tangible capital assets

211,174 181,888

Proceeds from disposal or transfer of tangible capital assets

(4,079) (4,997)
Cash used by capital investment activities 207,095 176,891
FINANCING ACTIVITIES     
Net Cash Provided by Government 1,565,109 1,661,311
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Notes for Financial Statements (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31, 2007

1. Authority and Mandate

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is Canada’s national police service and an agency of the Ministry of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

The RCMP mandate is based on the authority and responsibility assigned under section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act. The mandate of the RCMP is to enforce laws, prevent crime, and maintain peace, order and security. Ten program activities highlight our Program Activity Architecture (PAA). These include:

  • Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing: Contributes to safe homes and safe communities by providing police services to diverse communities in eight provinces (with the exception of Ontario and Quebec) and three territories through cost-shared policing service agreements with federal, provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal governments
  • Federal and International Operations: Provides policing, law enforcement, investigative and protective services to the federal government, its departments and agencies and to Canadians
  • Technical Policing Operations: Provides policy, advice and management to predict, research, develop and ensure the availability of technical tools and expertise to enable frontline members and partners to prevent and investigate crime and enforce the law, protect against terrorism, and operate in a safe and secure environment
  • National Police Services: Contributes to safe homes and safe communities for Canadians through the acquisition, analysis, dissemination and warehousing of law enforcement-specific applications of science and technology to all accredited Canadian law enforcement agencies
  • Protective Policing Services: Directs the planning, implementation, administration and monitoring of the RCMP’s national Protective Security Program, including the protection of dignitaries, the security of major events and Special Initiatives, including Prime Minister-led summits of an international nature
  • Criminal Intelligence Operations: A national program for the management of criminal information and intelligence in the detection and prevention of crime of an organized, serious or national security nature in Canada or internationally as it affects Canada
  • Policing Support Services: Services provided in support of the RCMP’s role as a police organization
  • Firearms Registration, Licensing and Supporting Infrastructure: Develop and oversee an effective firearms registration and licensing system to meet the Government’s principle obligations under the Firearms Act. Enhance public safety by helping reduce death, injury and threat from firearms through responsible ownership, use and storage of firearms, and by providing police and other organizations with expertise and information vital to the prevention and investigation of firearms crime and misuse in Canada and internationally
  • Corporate Infrastructure: Includes the vital administrative services required for an organization to operate effectively. The costs associated with this activity are distributed among the remaining program activities
  • Firearms Policy, Regulatory, Communication and Portfolio Integration: Services provided in support of the RCMP’s role and activities of the Canada Firearms Center

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

(a) The RCMP is primarily financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to the department do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the statement of operations and in the statement of financial position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

(b) The department operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the department is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the department are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.

(c) Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non respendable revenue recorded by the department. It results from timing differences between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.

(d) Revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transactions or events occurred that gave rise to the revenues. Revenues that have been received but not yet earned or not spent in accordance with any external restrictions are recorded as deferred revenues.

(e) Expenses are recorded when the underlying transaction or expense occurred subject to the following:

  • Grants are recognized in the year in which payment is due or in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria.
  • Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, worker’s compensation and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

(f) Employee future benefits:

  • Pension benefits for Public Service employees: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multi-employer administered by the Government of Canada. The department’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require the department to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
  • Pension benefits for RCMP member: The Government of Canada sponsors a variety of employee future benefits such as pension plans and disability benefits, which cover members of the RCMP. The department administers the pension benefits for members of the RCMP. The actuarial liability and related disclosures for these future benefits are presented in the financial statements of the Government of Canada. This differs from the accounting and disclosures of future benefits for RCMP presented in these financial statements whereby pension expense corresponds to the department’s annual contributions toward the cost of current service. In addition to its regular contributions, current legislation also requires the department to make contributions for actuarial deficiencies in the RCMP Pension Plan. These contributions are expensed in the year they are credited to the Plan. This accounting treatment corresponds to the funding provided to departments through Parliamentary appropriations.
  • Severance benefits: Employees and RCMP members are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees and RCMP members is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

(g) Receivables from external parties are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for external receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

(h) Contingent liabilities – Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(i) Environmental liabilities – Environmental liabilities reflect the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of environmentally contaminated sites. Based on management’s best estimates, a liability is accrued and an expense recorded when the contamination occurs or when the department becomes aware of the contamination and is obligated, or is likely to be obligated to incur such costs. If the likelihood of the department’s obligation to incur these costs is not determinable, or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the costs are disclosed as contingent liabilities in the notes to the financial statements.

(j) Inventories – Spare parts, materials and supplies are inventories held for future program delivery and are not intended for re-sale. They are valued at cost. If they no longer have service potential, they are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

(k) Foreign currency transactions – Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated using exchange rates in effect on March 31st. Gains resulting from foreign currency transactions are included under Other revenue in note 5. Losses are included under Other operating expense in note 4.

(l) Tangible capital assets – All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Capital assets do not include intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian Reserves and museum collections.

Amortization of capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the capital asset as follows:


Asset Class  Sub-asset Class Amortization Period
Buildings   20 to 30 years
Works and Infrastructures   20 years
Machinery and Equipment Machinery and Equipment 5 to 15 years
  Informatics – Hardware 4 to 7 years
  Informatics – Software 3 to 7 years
Vehicles Marine Transportation 10 to 15 years
  Air Transportation  10 years
  Land Transportation (non-military) 3 to 5 years
  Land Transportation (military) 10 years
Leasehold Improvements   Term of lease

In the normal course of business, the RCMP constructs buildings and other assets as well as develops software. The associated costs are accumulated in Assets under Construction (AUC) until the asset is in use. No amortization is taken until the asset is put in use.

(m) Intellectual property such as licences, patents and copyrights are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.

(n) Measurement uncertainty – The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, environmental liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary Appropriations

The Department receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used 


 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

NET COST OF OPERATIONS

2,336,281 2,199,394
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting appropriations    
Add (Less):     

Services provided without charge from other government departments

(221,455) (201,855)

Revenue not available for spending

124,488 159,089

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(125,580) (112,199)

Refunds of prior year expenditures

7,737 6,365

Increase in liability for severance benefits

(14,709) (26,905)

Transfer cost to assets under construction 

128,072 108,063

Increase in liability for vacation pay and compensatory leave

(2,043) (13,542)

Increase in liability for contaminated sites

(1,203) (1,227)

Net loss and write-off on disposal of tangible capital assets

(15,921) (40,469)

Other

(1,282) (33,575)
Subtotal (121,896) (156,255)
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of  operations but affecting Appropriations    

Add (Less): 

   

Acquisitions of tangible capital assets

78,207 73,895

Accountable advances

173

Inventory purchased

5,776 (1,325)

Prepaid expenses

(831) 227
Subtotal 83,325 72,797
Current year Appropriations Used 2,297,710 2,115,936

(b) Appropriations provided and used


 

Appropriations Provided 

 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Operating expenditures 1,721,843 1,559,547
Capital expenditures 292,555 203,547
Grants & Contributions 74,846 57,646
Statutory amount 374,004 369,733
Less:    
Appropriations available for future years (3,543) (2,758)
Lapsed appropriations – Operating  (161,995) (71,779)
Total 2,297,710 2,115,936

(c) Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used


 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Net cash provided by Government 
1,565,109
1,661,311
Revenue not available for spending
124,488
159,089
Refund of prior year expenditures
7,737
6,365
 
1,697,334
1,826,765
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund 
 
 

Variation in accounts receivable and advances

148,315
(20,198)

Variation in inventory

1,010
7,828

Variation in prepaid expenses

831
(227)

Variation in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

37,681
(16,112)

Variation in pension liabilities

380,602
364,880

Variation in deferred revenue

28,225
(25,272)

Variation in other liabilities

1,840
2,312

Other adjustments

1,872
(24,040)
 
600,376
289,171
Current year appropriations used
2,297,710
2,115,936

4. Expenses

The following table presents details of expenses by category:


 

 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
   

(in thousands of dollars)

Operating expenses:      Salaries & employee benefits 2,471,754 2,357,399
Professional & special services 305,489 271,321
Travel & relocation 152,530 136,487
Amortization 125,580 112,199
Accommodation 108,893 91,986
Utilities, material & supplies 105,260 97,251
Purchased repairs & maintenance 88,732 79,303
Telecommunications 44,457 40,120
Rentals 26,013 28,068
Loss on disposal and write-off 16,157 51,843
Provision for severance benefits 14,708 26,905
Information 3,958 2,963
Other operating expenses
186,605 159,442
Subtotal 3,650,136 3,455,287
Transfer payments:    Compensatory grants to individuals 72,261 58,705
Transfers to other levels of Governments 11,076 10,115
Payments to or on behalf of First Nations Organizations 178 224
Other 386 422
Subtotal 83,901 69,466
TOTAL EXPENSES   3,734,037 3,524,753

5. Revenues

The following table presents details of revenues by category:


 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Policing services 1,381,340 1,318,459
Firearms registration fees 6,245 19,294
Less: Reimbursements of fees due to remission order  (19,000)
Net Firearms registration fees 6,245 294
Other revenues 10,171 6,606
TOTAL REVENUES 1,397,756 1,325,359

6. Accounts Receivables and Advances


 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Other government departments 23,280 220,851
External parties 331,168 281,525
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts on external receivables  (293) (291)
Net receivables from external parties 330,875 281,234
Total receivables 354,155 502,085
Temporary advances 7,815 8,233
Standing Advances 2,540 2,507
Total Advances 10,355 10,740
Total receivables and advances 364,510 512,825

7. Tangible Capital Assets


 

Cost 
(in thousands of dollars)

Accumulated Amortization 
(in thousands of dollars)

   




Opening
Balance
Acquisition Disposal and Write-offs Closing Balance Opening Balance
Restated
(note 17)
Amortization Disposal and Write-offs Closing Balance Net Book 2007

Net Book 2006 
Restated
(note 17)

Land 41,672 1,039 174 42,537 - - - - 42,537 41,672
Buildings 723,953 43,734 3,747 763,950 325,907 29,512 2,577 325,842 411,108 398,046
Works & 
Infrastructure
4,736 8,511 - 13,247 720 610   1,330 11,917 4,016
Machinery &
Equipment
461,770 66,162 3,071 524,861 267,742 44,693 2,925 309,510 215,351 194,028
Vehicles 431,129 65,524 35,381 461,272 208,994 49,650 25,781 232,863 228,409 222,135
Leasehold
Improvements 
9,593 2,661 - 12,254 1,972 1,115   3,087 9,167 7,621
Assets Under 
Construction 
170,461 23,543 8,975 185,029 - - - - 185,029 170,461
Total  1,843,314 211,174 51,338 2,003,150 805,335 125,580 31,283 899,632 1,103,518 1,037,979

Note: Amortization expense for the year ended March 31, 2007 is $125,580 (2006 – $112,199).

8. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities 

The following table presents the accounts payable and other accrued liabilities:


 

2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Payables to other government departments 21,769 21,080
Payables to external parties 243,984 206,168
Accrued salaries and wages 20,444 21,046
Other 21,786 22,008
Total accounts payable & accrued liabilities 307,983 270,302

9. RCMP Pension Accounts

The department maintains accounts to record the transactions pertaining to the RCMP Pension Plan, which comprises the RCMP Superannuation Account, the RCMP pension Fund Account, the Retirement Compensation Arrangement Account and the Dependents Pension Fund Account.These accounts record transactions such as contributions, benefit payments, interest credits, refundable taxes and actuarial debit and credit funding adjustments resulting from triennial reviewed and transfers to the Public Sector Investment Board.

The value of the liabilities reported in these financial statements for the RCMP Pension Plan accounts do not reflect the actuarial value of these liabilities determined by the Chief Actuary of the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions nor the investments that are held by the Public Sector Investment Board.

The following table provides details of the RCMP Pension Plan Pension Accounts:


  2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

RCMP Superannuation Account 11,640,609 11,255,481
RCMP Pension Fund Account 11,140 16,563
Retirement Compensation Arrangement Account 22,258 21,025
Dependents Pension Fund Account 29,409 29,745
  11,703,416 11,322,814

10. Deferred Revenue


  2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Deferred revenue – Contract policing arrangements on capital assets, beginning of year 75,084 100,269
Increase in net book value of contract policing capital assets 28,100
Revenue recognized (25,185)
Deferred revenue – contract policing arrangements on capital assets, end of year 103,184 75,084
Deferred revenue – Donation and bequest accounts, beginning of year 444 531
Contributions received 128 150
Revenue recognized (155) (237)
Deferred revenue – Donation and bequest accounts, end of year 417 444
Deferred revenue – Registration fees, beginning of year    
Application request and registration fees received 152
Revenue recognized    
Deferred revenue – Registration fees, end of year 152
Total deferred revenue  103,753 75,528

Deferred revenue consists of three categories: deferred revenue for contract policing arrangements on tangible capital assets, deferred revenue for donation and bequest accounts and deferred revenue for registration fees.Deferred revenue for contract policing arrangements on tangible capital assets represents the balance of revenue received at the time of acquisition of tangible capital assets owned by RCMP and dedicated for usage to meet contractual obligations over the life of the asset. The deferred revenue is earned on the same basis as the amortization of the corresponding capital asset.Deferred revenue for donation and bequest accounts represents the balance of contributions received for various purposes. They are recognized as revenue when the funds are expended for the specified purposes. Deferred revenue for registration fees represents the application fee received from clients where the application processing has not reached a sufficient stage to warrant recognizing revenue. They are recognized as revenue when the eligibility checks point of application is processed.

11. Employee benefits

(a) Pension benefits (Public Service employees): The department’s public service employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the department contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2006-2007 expense amounts to $44 millions ($45 millions in 2005-2006), which represents approximately 2.2 times (2.6 in 2005-2006) the contributions by employees. The department’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

(b) Pension benefits (RCMP members): The department’s regular and civilian members participate in the RCMP Pension Plan, which is sponsored by the Government of Canada and is administered by the RCMP. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the members and the department contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2006-2007 expense amounts to $213 million ($223 million in 2005-2006), which represents approximately 2.5 times (2.9 in 2005-2006) the contributions by members. The department is responsible for the administration of the Plan including determining eligibility for benefits, calculating and paying benefits, developing legislation and related policies, and providing information to Plan members. The actuarial liability and actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

(c) Severance benefits: The department provides severance benefits to its employees and RCMP members based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:


  2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year 424,744 397,840
Expense for the year 46,952 60,774
Benefits paid during the year (32,243) (33,870)
Accrued benefit obligation, end of year 439,453 424,744

12. Other liabilities


  2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars)

Benefit Trust Fund 2,312 2,229
Contractor Securities 119
Environmental Liabilities 3,752 2,549
Other 2,355 1,682
Total other liabilities  8,419 6,579

Benefit Trust Fund: This account was established by section 23 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, to record moneys received by personnel of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in connection with the performance of duties, over and above their pay and allowances. Receipts of $219,719 ($161,801 in 2006) were received in the year and payments of $136,650 ($96,308 in 2006) were issued. The fund is use for (i) the benefit of members, former members and their dependants; (ii) as a reward, grant or compensation to any person who assists the RCMP in the performance of its duties in any case where the Minister is of the opinion that such person is deserving of recognition for the services rendered; (iii) as a reward to any person appointed or employed under the authority of the RCMP Act for good conduct or meritorious service, and (iv) for such other purposes that would benefit the RCMP as the Minister may direct.

13. Contingent Liabilities

(a) Contaminated sites

Liabilities are accrued to record the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of contaminated sites where the department is obligated or likely to be obligated to incur such costs. The department has identified approximately 17 sites (18 sites in 2006) where such action is possible and for which a liability of $3,752,007 ($2,549,512 in 2006) has been recorded. The department’s ongoing efforts to assess contaminated sites may result in additional environmental liabilities related to newly identified sites, or changes in the assessments or intended use of existing sites. These liabilities will be accrued by the department in the year in which they become known.

(b) Claims and litigation

Claims have been made against the department in the normal course of operations. Legal proceedings for claims totalling approximately $84 millions ($46 millions in 2006) were still pending at March 31, 2007. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

(c) Pension litigation

The Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act which received Royal Assent in September 1999 amended the RCMPSA to enable the federal government to deal with excess amounts in the RCMP Superannuation Account and the RCMP Pension Fund. The legal validity of these provisions has been challenged in the courts. The outcome of these lawsuits is not determinable at this time.

14. Contractual Obligations

The nature of the RCMP’s activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligation whereby the RCMP will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received.Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:


(in thousands of dollars)
2007 2008  2009 2010  2011 and thereafter Total
Services agreement 10,000 10,000 10,000 9,268 39,268
Total 10,000 10,000 10,000 9,268 39,268

15. Related Party Transactions

The RCMP is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The RCMP enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year the RCMP received without charge from other departments, accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, worker’s compensation and legal services. These services without charge have been recognized in the department’s Statement of Operations as follows:


Services received without charge from other government departments
2007 2006
Restated
(note 17)
 

(in thousands of dollars) 

Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 60,579 49,563
Contributions covering employers’ share of employees’ insurance premiums and expenditures by the Treasury Board Secretariat 158,070 149,197
Workers’ compensation cost provided by Human Resources Canada 381 522
Legal services provided by Department of Justice 2,425 2,573
Total 221,455 201,855

The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada, are not included as an expense in the department’s Statement of Operations.

16: Comparative information

Comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.

17. Restatement of prior year’s figure

It should be noted that in May 2006, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness announced the transfer of the Canada Firearms Centre to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Current year’s financial statements and comparative figures represent combined financial statements of Canada Firearms Centre and Royal Canadian Mounted Police.


Table 16: Response to Parliamentary Committees, and Audits and Evaluations for Fiscal Year 2006–2007


Response to Parliamentary Committees

N/A 

Response to the Auditor General including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD)

  • Proper Conduct of Public Business – Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Agencies
    • The OAG looked at whether the RCMP has values and ethics programs that promote good behaviour and has internal disclosure (or “whistle-blowing”) policies that support the reporting of wrongdoing. They also examined the role that internal audit plays in verifying compliance with laws, policies, and regulations. They looked at three areas where they believe a risk of abuse is present – contracting, use of acquisition (credit) cards, and use of overtime and leave
    • The RCMP generally agreed with all the findings and has accepted all the recommendations of the OAG. Implementation of the recommendations is underway
  • Pension and Insurance Administration – Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • In 2003, allegations of fraud and abuse in the management of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s pension and insurance plans triggered an internal audit, which was followed by a criminal investigation by the Ottawa Police Service (OPS)
    • The OAG examined whether the RCMP had responded adequately to the findings of the internal audit and the criminal investigation. They examined certain amounts spent on pension and insurance administration. They also examined additional allegations that were brought to their attention during the course of the audit. Finally, they looked at whether the OPS investigation was independent of, and conducted without undue direction or bias by, the RCMP
    • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police agreed with each of the OAG’s recommendations and is in the process of taking corrective action
  • Relocating Members of the Canadian Forces, RCMP, and Federal Public Service
    • The Integrated Relocation Program was designed to improve the quality of life of transferred members of the Canadian Forces, the RCMP, and the federal public service. It does this by providing flexible relocation benefits and reimbursing reasonable relocation expenses
    • The Auditor General examined how the government awarded the current contracts. They also examined the extent to which the Treasury Board Secretariat and the departments involved had established appropriate measures of the contracts’ performance
    • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police has agreed with the recommendations pertinent to its area of jurisdiction

External Audits (Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC), the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. (OCOL), or Privacy Commissioner (PC).

N/A



Project
Comments
Estimated Start
Estimated Completion
Internal Audits      
Investigation Management Control Framework Completed    
Management and Administration of Compensation Benefits Completed    
Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program (CACPP) Completed    
Audit of National Security Operations Criminal Intelligence Management Control Framework Completed    
Departmental Bank Accounts Completed    
Pension Plan Financial Statements (2004/2005) Completed    
IT Security Framework   Ongoing July 2007
Recruiting   Ongoing March 2008
Prime BC   Ongoing December 2007
TEAM   Ongoing August 2007
Real Time Identification (RTID)   Ongoing March 2008
Formal Follow up on OCC review conducted in 2000   Ongoing November 2007
Financial Reporting Postponed due to RCMP readiness assessment TBD TBD
Evaluations      
Shiprider Proof of Concept Completed    
Integrated Border Enforcement Teams (IBET) Completed    
Pension Plan Outsourcing Completed    
First Nations Organized Crime Completed    
Integrated Market Enforcement Teams Completed    
Measures to Combat Organized Crime Completed    
National Port Enforcement Teams Completed    
Marine Operations Course Completed    
2010 Olympics – RMAF Completed    
War Crimes – RMAF Completed    
Canada’s Drug Strategy Awareness Completed    
Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSET)   Ongoing November 2007
Source Development Unit (SDU)   Ongoing November 2007
Public Safety and Anti-Terrorism Initiatives (PSAT)   Ongoing February 2008
Aboriginal Policing Services   Ongoing November 2007
NORAD NorthComm Cancelled    

Table 17: Sustainable Development Strategies (SDS)

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES


Department  Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Points to address Departmental Input
1. What are the key goals, objectives and/or long-term targets of the SDS?

The RCMP Sustainable Development Strategy, Safe Homes – Sustainable Communities (2007-2009), as developed in 2006-2007 is framed by three strategic priorities.

Sustainable Communities: Driven by the need for communities to be sustainable, the RCMP aims to demonstrate leadership through the capacity of our mandate by focusing on the positive impact of RCMP Policing operations on the long-term health and sustainability of the communities we serve.

Corporate Governance: Recognizing the need to be responsible for organizational actions and decisions, the RCMP aims to increase focus and expectations for accountability and cohesive performance reporting for the sustainable development program and to work towards improved and more integrated sustainable business practices.

Environmental Stewardship: Understanding the need to effectively conserve and replenish our resources and natural systems, the RCMP aims to reinforce the message for meeting and exceeding our environmental regulatory obligations and to provide departmental services in a manner that respects our natural environment.

2. How do your key goals, objectives and/or long-term targets help achieve your department's strategic outcomes? Through RCMP’s mandate to provide safety and security to the communities we serve, we also fulfill an essential role for sustainability that no other agency provides. As we work to uphold our commitment to safe homes and safe communities, the sustainable development program ensures we provide these services in a manner that cares for our environment; our people and culture; and our commitments to responsible decision making.
3. What were your targets for the reporting period? During the course of 2006-2007, the commitments made in our former Sustainable Development Strategy, Communities+2003, were refined and enhanced with renewed commitment being established in our newest strategy, Safe Homes – Sustainable Communities (2007–2009). See the table on the next page for target summary.
4. What is your progress (this includes outcomes achieved in relation to objectives and progress on targets) to date? See table below for progress summary (Safe Homes – Sustainable Communities, 2007-2009).
5. What adjustments have you made, if any? (To better set the context for this information, discuss how lessons learned have influenced your adjustments.) RCMP’s 4th Sustainable Development Strategy (2007-2009) provides increased focus on strategic, intelligence-led program development. Program priorities are risk based and aligned with new Federal Sustainable Development Goals established in FY 2006-2007. A renewed framework for RCMP’s targets and performance measures allows for cohesive reporting and better demonstration of strategy progress, fostering enhanced accountability and an improved alignment with future Departmental Performance Reporting.

Safe Homes – Sustainable Communities (2007-2009)


Goals & Themes/
Target Areas
2006-2007 Progress Achieved
Future Program Initiatives
Sustainable Communities
– Healthier and Safer Communities
Community Partnerships

Increased understanding of RCMP role in Sustainable Communities

  • Community Safety Officer pilot program developed to dedicate a resource within identified Detachments for community-driven priority issues and activities
  • Participated in indicators project for Canadian Communities focused on strategies for social, economic & environmental issues
  • Continue working with Community Policing services to identify partnerships for sustainable development
Aboriginal Communities

Improved Relationships with Aboriginal Communities through RCMP Aboriginal Policing Initiatives and National Strategic Priorities

  • RCMP Aboriginal Youth Training program provides Aboriginal youth with summer employment with the RCMP
  • Community Justice Forums offer innovative options for conflict resolution by bringing together all people affected by a crime
  • Aboriginal Awareness Training for RCMP operational and corporate employees.
  • Continue working with National Aboriginal Policing services to identify partnerships for sustainable development
Youth

Greater capacity for youth focused services by addressing root causes of crime and by getting involved with youth from an early age giving them positive learning experiences with police officers.

  • DEAL.org – encourages youth to make healthy, informed decisions and get involved in their communities
    Establishing effective partnerships for sustainability through RCMP Crime prevention through social development initiative
  • “Adopt-A-Library” program created by Constable in rural detachment recognizing connection between illiteracy and crime
  • Youth Officer Resource Centre established to provide RCMP members with tools & resources to assist them in communications with youth
Continue working with Youth Strategy to identify partnerships for sustainable development
Corporate Governance
– Sustainable Development is a way of doing business for organizations of excellence
Environmental Management Systems

Increased capacity to strategically manage RCMP’s environmental portfolio

  • Development of Environmental Database to manage environmental information related to RCMP’s property portfolio improving capacity to capture baseline data and identify areas for improvement
  • Develop and Implement Environmental Management System Framework including environment Database
    Complete baseline data collection for key environmental program priorities based on risk
Sustainable Business Practices

Progress towards integration into business processes and procedures

  • Environmental Policy Suite incorporated into Property and Asset Management Manuals
  • Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Environmental Considerations Incorporated into RCMP Project Delivery System and TB submission process
    Improving solid waste management practices across RCMP
  • Working with PWGSC to improve waste reduction opportunities and 3Rs management in Headquarter facilities throughout Regions
  • Establish sustainable development review cycle and ensure greater linkage to RCMP business planning processes and key strategic documents
    Conduct post-review of RCMP environmental policy suite to ensure operational effectiveness
Green Procurement

Developing tools to respond to increased integration of green procurement

  • E-learning Green Procurement course being tested in Atlantic & Pacific Region
  • Implement National Green Procurement Guidelines
  • Roll-out green procurement training program
  • Develop roll-out strategy for any new PWGSC standing offers respecting green procurement
  • Development of corporate tracking system for green procurement activities
Capacity Building

Increasing Capacity of employees to support RCMP’s sustainable development strategy

  • Environmental & sustainable development liabilities & responsibilities course for CM&C staff & Detachment Commanders in Central Region
  • Development and delivery of awareness training to RCMP employees and officers from various business lines and locations
  • Participated in sub-committee for Canadian School of Public Service sustainable development training initiative
    Participated in interdepartmental projects for common sustainable development goals including Pacific Federal Council regional sustainability initiatives
  • Identify opportunities nationally for sustainable development training
  • Roll-out e-learning for storage tank managers
  • Continue participation in interdepartmental initiatives to support implementation of horizontal targets
Communications

Progress Towards Communication and awareness programs:

  • Role and Value of Sustainable Development program communicated through training sessions to various levels and roles throughout organization
  • Various publications produced with focus on sustainable communities and role of RCMP
  • Environmental Calendar developed using drawings from RCMP employee’s children to demonstrate community involvement in protecting the environment
  • Publication of 15 Environmental, Health & Safety Awareness Bulletins to educate RCMP building occupants on potential facility issues such as mould, asbestos, potable water, etc.
  • Develop, implement and assess three-year communications strategy for Sustainable Development programs and Initiatives
Environmental Stewardship
– RCMP physical operations support long-term conservation and restoration of our natural resource systems
Green Building Design
& Energy

Sustainable Development principles integrated into various newly constructed facilities:

  • Wind turbine at Cumberland Detachment
  • Iqualuit HQ, designed to Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Gold, will be the first LEED Gold building north of the 60th parallel
  • 4 Solar powered backup systems in Nunavut
  • All new houses in NWR meet R2000 standards
  • “E” Division Headquarters & Cornwall Detachment designs incorporate green building and LEED criteria in technical specifications
  • 7 Detachments upgraded to high-efficiency lighting in Pacific Region
  • Develop specification for Green building design by energy source, for new and existing RCMP facilities
  • Design and implement national process for accurate and timely data capture for energy information
Contaminated Sites

Continued management of RCMP asset liability

  • 2006/2007 included 160 Assessments and 4 Remediation projects for sites under RCMP custodianship

Spill Response Kits and Emergency Spill Response Protocol distributed to 275 Detachments and facilities nationally to enable quick response to minor fuel spills or leaks from fuel storage equipment

  • Develop and implement environmental emergency response protocol for high-risk sites
  • Develop total liability capture tool for internal performance reporting
  • Develop standardized scopes of work for various site assessments
  • Develop risk based replacement and maintenance strategy for reportable & non-reportable tanks
Potable water

Continued focus on ensuring sound management of RCMP potable water systems

  • Operating Procedure for potable water systems developed & implemented in Atlantic Region
  • Completed 2nd phase of baseline Risk assessments of RCMP owned water systems in Pacific Region (final phase in FY2007/2008)
  • All baseline assessments completed in Central Region for owned & leased water systems
  • Develop and implement standard operating procedures for RCMP potable water systems
  • Conduct baseline testing for all RCMP owned potable water systems
Hazardous Materials

Continued focus on managing hazardous materials risks associated with RCMP operations.

  • Investigation of impacts and strategies for various operational items containing hazardous materials, ex: tear gas and breathalyser test kits
  • Developed strategy to manage hazardous materials associated with illegal drug operations
  • Developed Inventory Checklist for hazmats and halocarbon systems in Central Region
  • Establish protocols and standards for abatement of Hazardous buildings materials
  • Compile inventory of RCMP hazardous materials including stores facilities and seized goods
  • Update halocarbon inventory and identify replacement strategies for halocarbon systems
Fleet Management

Continued efforts to increase efficiencies of RCMP operational and administrative fleet

  • 88 hybrid and flex-fuel vehicles purchased nationally
  • Developed Leadership Vehicle Policy increasing number of alternative fuel or hybrid vehicles among Senior Managers
  • Roll-out targeted campaign for anti-idling and E10 fuel usage
  • Implement RCMP “leadership” vehicle policy
Policing Operations

Progress towards understanding linkages between Policing operations and environmental protection:

  • Pilot training implemented for RCMP officer response to urban Bear-Human encounters
  • Environmental Assessment completed for security operations required at Summit of the Americas in Montebello, Quebec
  • Develop capture tool to track regional initiatives for integrating environmental consideration into policing operations

Table 18: Procurement and Contracting


Department/Agency:  
Points to address Departmental Input
Role played by procurement and contracting in delivering programs 
  • Provide strategic procurement approach at the initial Project Planning Stage
  • Plan procurement action and establish high level milestones for the procurement process
  • Evaluate, identify and mitigate procurement risks, industry trends, etc. and provide advice to senior management
  • Assist and guide clients in the formalization of procurement documents
  • Ensure support documents are provided and that required approvals and funds are available
  • Select and use the most efficient procurement method to satisfy the operational requirement while respecting government policies
  • Carry or oversee activities of all procurement processes to conclusion, ensure the integrity of the process, negotiate and issue contracts, manage associated risks
  • Establish and coordinate procurement milestones and timelines
  • Manage procurement file, contracts and resolve issues
  • Conduct needs analysis and Initiate pro active procurement tools for anticipated requirement
  • Ensure that the Procurement and Contracting approach achieves best overall value for the organization
  • Include quality control as part of the procurement process
  • Introduce remedial action for non-compliance to policies etc
Overview of how the department manages its contracting function
  • Institute and manage a record of activity for incoming requirements, TEAM application
  • Develop and use procurement process standards & objectives
  • Clearly identified roles and responsibilities in the process in line with objectives
  • Plan procurement actions with clients
  • Assign a dedicated commodity expert buyer to requirements
  • Buyers ensure procurement processes respect TB Policies and guidelines
  • Ensure authorities are respected and funds available
  • Develop procurement milestone schedule
  • Provide procurement process guidance and update to clients
  • Manage procurement progress activity and update reports
  • Ensure document actions are well documented
  • Developed and maintain templates and process map
  • Identify and use procurement tools available at PWGSC and at the RCMP
  • Perform procurement documents and process quality control review and post review for compliance with government policies and our established process standards and objectives
  • Use remedial action in place to address deficiencies and  non-compliances
  • Manage contract and files using TEAM reports
  • Analyze procurement trends and develop efficient tools
  • Developed a training plan for buyers and provide continue guidance to enhance expertise
  • Share lessons learned
Progress and new initiatives enabling effective and efficient procurement practices
  • Analysis of regional and national needs to identify future requirement and put in place efficient tools, contracts or standing offers. Initiatives are as follows:
    • Established a Contracts Review Committee that reviews procurements that fit a particular risk profile
    • Established a Strategic Procurement Directorate responsible for complex and/or sensitive requirements
    • Established $20M procurement initiative consisting of developing documents and putting in place a Standing Offer for the services of Guards and Matrons
    • Establish $2M procurement initiative for claims management on a national basis
    • Establish $6M procurement initiative for environmental services on a national basis
    • Developing, with regions, a Statement of Requirement for a National Standing Offer Agreement for reproduction equipment specific to the RCMP
    • Review Regional procurement activities and processes for Construction and Real Property to ensure optimum quality of the process
    • Developing generic standard template procurement documents
    • Maintaining government procurement policy update knowledge
    • Overseeing procurement activities in the regions and sharing knowledge and tools

Table 19: Client-Centred Service

The RCMP is addressing the challenge of meeting higher public expectations for service, openness and accountability within given resources by making better use of new information and communication technologies to improve decision making, respond to change and focus on citizen-driven service delivery. 

We remain committed to client-centered service delivery and a culture of continuous improvement. On-going and bilateral consultation has been integrated into the performance management regime through the implementation of the Annual Performance Plans. In this regard, we have: 

  • Adopted an annual review of strategic measures taken by all detachments and units across the Force. These are developed in consultation with our clients thus reflecting in actions that address issues from the grass roots level and up. Accountability to our clients is the end result of this process.
  • Established documented baseline measures that extend well beyond the citizen satisfaction-based measures as part of the Common Measurements Tool
  • Incorporated, into our integrated business planning processes, the means to prepare and implement annual service improvement targets and plans based on documented survey results and consultation with our clients

The RCMP’s survey program was established in 2003 in consultation with the Institute for Citizen-Centred Service.

The RCMP measures the satisfaction levels of its clients/partners/stakeholders/employees. A survey program provides baseline data to organization-wide program planning and performance management. 

Baselines have been established to gauge satisfaction levels across the following groups: citizens; clients with whom we have policing contracts (provincial, territorial, municipal and First Nations) and with whom we provide protection services; other policing agencies; other federal partners and stakeholders; and, employees. 

Collectively, the surveys gauge perceptions regarding the RCMP – such as responsiveness to client’s needs, effectiveness, value for money, cultural sensitivity and coordination with partners – and its services. Satisfaction of citizens, clients of police contracts, police partners and other partners is now assessed on a yearly basis. The survey results are made available to the public on the RCMP website. 

In 2006-2007, the next iteration of surveys was conducted. These results have been compared against those of the 2005-2006 Core Surveys to determine where improvements have taken place and where initiatives are required to improve the services offered to Canadians, and our law enforcement partners, by the RCMP. 

The administration of justice is the constitutional responsibility of the provinces who have generally established Police Service Acts that set out and govern policing functions and standards. The RCMP delivers a professional level of service which meets or exceeds the service standards established in jurisdictions where we provide provincial, territorial, municipal and First Nations policing. 

The RCMP also fulfills its obligations under federal legislation and is governed by the RCMP Act and Regulations in ensuring a high standard of service delivery. 

Growing expectations and increased demand for service from both the law enforcement and public sectors have increased the need for continuous improvement within the RCMP, particularly within National Police Service (NPS) programs. NPS comprises a heterogeneous group of services which provide police information, technical expertise, and training delivery. Throughout 2007/2008, NPS will continue to demonstrate leadership in the development and delivery of operational support services that address these changing demands for service.

Programs/Projects/Initiatives of Special Interest 

Information and Intelligence Sharing – As an intelligence-led organization, it is critical that the RCMP be able to share relevant and timely information with its domestic and international partners including: Canadian police agencies; law enforcement and security agencies; international agencies; the Canadian justice community; and the public sector. 

The Real Time Identification (RTID) Project is transforming the manual, paper-based processes of Canada’s fingerprint and criminal record repository to electronic, standards-based processes which will improve efficiency. Modern technology will enable the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) to provide more efficient and faster services. In addition, the ability to electronically exchange information will provide a new level of interoperability to all users of fingerprint and criminal records services. In an effort to ensure a greater client-centred service, CCRTIS has entered into Service Level Agreements with its clients, which will ensure that timelines are respected for electronic fingerprint and criminal record submissions.

The National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) is responsible for the implementation of and training for both the Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) and the Victim Identification Database for police forces across Canada. CETS allows Canadian child exploitation investigators to share information and intelligence in a secure and efficient manner. The Victim Identification Database is currently in its test phase and will provide an identification and image analysis capacity that will significantly reduce the duplication of investigative efforts, and more importantly, assist in the identification of victims of child sexual offences.

Training – The Canadian Police College (CPC) developed and implemented new client satisfaction survey questionnaires that were sent to course participants who graduated from December 2006 onwards. The questionnaires, which are sent to course participants six months after attending a course, attempt to measure direct results gained by attending the course. Surveys are simultaneously sent to the participant’s supervisor to assess the extent to which the training has impacted the participant’s work performance.

The results received to date indicate clients are generally satisfied with the training offered by the CPC and that the knowledge/training acquired had a positive impact on overall work performance. On a scale of 1 to 5, 1 illustrating the least satisfaction and 5 the most satisfaction, participants averaged 4.2, while the level of satisfaction gauged from the supervisors averaged 4.0.

Continuous Service Improvement Program – As part of its Continuous Service Improvement Program (CSIP), the new Information Technology (IT) governance model initiated in 2005 is now fully implemented, prescribing governance requirements for all elements of the IT program, from strategic and business planning to the successful close-out of projects. Effective governance is key to ensuring sound stewardship of the information management/information technology budget and to making investment decisions aimed at delivering strategic solutions to critical business requirements.

A revitalized planning function is now in place for the IT Program. The planning process integrates data and intelligence from a variety of sources across the IT program, internal and external clients, government direction, and the wider environment. The emphasis is on improving forecasting of demands for service, prioritizing the demands, and short and long-term financial planning. The planning function also includes a performance feedback loop, monitoring of program performance using the RCMP’s Balanced Scorecard instrument, and relaying performance-related information back into the planning process to make program adjustments as required.

The IM/IT planning cycle includes procedures to ensure alignment of the program objectives with those of clients and stakeholders. Managers bring external client perspectives into the environmental scanning process which drives planning efforts. As well, business planning follows RCMP-wide directives and reporting requirements for specific corporate-wide strategic objectives.

The participation of clients, stakeholders and central agencies in Chief Information Officer (CIO) Sector planning and project steering committees is the normal practice for major projects under the CIO.

The RCMP will continue to make better use of new information and communication technologies to improve decision making, respond to change and focus on citizen-driven service delivery.

Client Service Enhancement Project – The goal of the Client Service Enhancement Project is to ensure we continue to meet our partner’s needs in a future that promises rapid change and requires increased flexibility on the part of the RCMP. We traveled coast to coast talking with our contracting partners, First Nations/Aboriginal Communities and many other groups. We wanted to find out what makes communities feel safe and secure, so that we could ensure that those needs were taken care of. We also asked them about how they viewed the Force and the direction they’d like to see us take.

As a result of those discussions, a number of projects and initiatives have been developed to address the needs of our clients and partners.

We found that the support for the RCMP and our members was overwhelming. Alternative policing models are seen by clients as an opportunity for the RCMP to enhance service delivery. Recruiting opportunities with First Nations/Aboriginal communities was of key concern. We also learned that many see the Crime Reduction Strategy as a progressive step forward.

We instituted a number of programs dealing with Community Based Websites, the Police Familiarization Program, and a National Video outlining the many positive aspects of the RCMP. We have also undertaken the development of a Community Safety Officer pilot project; an Aboriginal Community Officer Program for Aboriginal communities, as well as a defined structure for addressing community hired alternative policing options. We continue to talk to communities about what is important to them as well as continuing our work on a continuous development program for the Force.

Table 20: Horizontal Initiatives

The RCMP as the lead department or as a partner, is engaged in an array of multi-jurisdictional and interdepartmental horizontal initiatives which serve to leverage RCMP capacity through partnerships, shared objectives, and common goals to maximize results for Canadians.

The RCMP is the lead department on the following major horizontal initiatives:

  • Integrated Border Enforcement Teams (IBET)
  • Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMET)
  • Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSET) – Lead

Note: According to TBS requirements, the INSET program does not qualify as a Horizontal Initiative, however, the RCMP feels this program is a high priority and warrants inclusion in this report.

Supplementary information on horizontal initiatives can be found at:

http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/fcer-cfre/links-liens/rhr_e.asp