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Section II: Performance Report on RCMP Program Activities, by Strategic Outcomes and Strategic Priorities

Performance Results for Departmental Strategic Outcomes and Strategic Priorities

Safe Homes and Safe Communities remains our overall goal. In order to provide safe homes and safe communities, we work across boundaries, both internally and externally, with our domestic and international partners. To ensure that we achieve our goal, we focus on both the Strategic Outcomes set out in our Program Activity Architecture (Quality Federal Policing; Quality Contract Policing; and Quality Policing Support) and on our five Strategic Priorities (Organized Crime; Terrorism; Youth; Economic Integrity; and Aboriginal Communities).

The following section provides a summary of our performance against the commitments set forth in our 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities. The beginning of the section focuses on the progress made towards achieving our Strategic Outcomes, with the remainder focusing on the performance results achieved against the plans and priorities of our five Strategic Priorities.

Summary of our Strategic Goal, Priorities and Outcomes

Program Activity Architecture

Quality Federal Policing


Summary of Departmental Strategic Outcomes as per Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome: 

Quality Federal Policing

Outcome Statement: 

Ensuring the safety and security of Canadians and their institutions, both domestically and globally, as well as internationally protected persons and other foreign dignitaries, through intelligence-based prevention, detection, investigations and enforcement of laws against terrorism, organized crime and other criminal activity

Key Performance Goals  
  • Achieve 84% agreement amongst Canadians that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfills its strategic priority of reducing the threat of terrorism
2006: 84%
2007: 84%
  • Achieve 84% agreement amongst Canadians that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfills its strategic priority of reducing the threat and impact of organized crime
2006: 89%
2007: 89%
  • Achieve 85% agreement amongst Canadians that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfills its strategic priority of contributing to the confidence in economic integrity

2006: 86%
2007: 84%



Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations
$592.9 $626.0
2 – Protective Policing Services $105.1 $108.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations
4,568 3,412
2 – Protective Policing Services 768 593

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Key Results as listed in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities

1. Reduced impact of organized crime

2. Reduced threat of terrorism

3. Safe and secure society

Progress towards meeting the key expected results for Quality Federal Policing:

1. Reduced Impact of Organized Crime

For Organized Crime specific performance information, please refer to the Organized Crime strategic priority presented later in this Section.


2. Reduced Threat of Terrorism

For Terrorism specific performance information, please refer to the Terrorism strategic priority presented later in this Section.


3. Safe and Secure Society

Progress Towards Achieving Key Results:

Protective Policing ensures a safe and secure society for Canadians by ensuring the safety of high-profile sites and people. National security interests, Canadian government executives, the foreign diplomatic community serving within Canada, and the general public are all safeguarded by RCMP Protective Policing. Protective Policing has greatly enhanced their contributions to the intelligence process used to determine potential threats to the people and sites under RCMP protection; for example:

  • The expansion of General Duty Protective members activities in support of gathering information during routine patrols
  • Criminal intelligence gathering and real-time sharing of information within the aviation industry by Aircraft Protective Officers (APO)
  • Improved counter-surveillance practices in the Prime Minister’s Protection Detail (PMPD)

Partnerships with municipal and provincial police partners, DND, Foreign Affairs, and many other government departments, as well as international policing and security agencies, have been fostered through joint operations, sharing of best practices, shared training and active consultation.

All people, sites and flights under the protection of the RCMP were free from terrorist or criminal violence in 2006-2007. Protective Policing provided services to:

  • The Canadian Prime Minister for countless engagements within the National Capital Region as well as 98 domestic and 13 international trips
  • The Canadian Governor General for 68 domestic and international trips
  • 344 Internationally Protected Persons (IPPs) who visited Canada
  • Designated flights by Canadian air carriers
  • 126 foreign missions within the NCR, serving a community of 5,000 foreign diplomats
  • Security and consultative services for 24 events within Canada and abroad, including: several Ministerial conferences in Canada; international conferences; two Royal visits; the World Urban Forum in Vancouver; the 2006 Commonwealth games in Melbourne Australia; and the 2006 Olympic and Paralympic games in Turin, Italy
  • 14 IPPs visiting Canada requiring enhanced high-level security
  • 15 persons designated by the Minister as requiring protection

The Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program (CACPP) hosted the 2006 International Air Marshal Conference, an assembly of 22 nations in a key bridge-building experience. This annual conference fosters the exchange of best practices, ranging from tactics to general aviation security and is a key event relative to the sharing of information amongst air carrier protection programs worldwide.

The collaborative environment among the nations assembled at the conference allowed the CACPP to create the International In-Flight Security Officer Committee (IIFSOC) – a voluntary assembly of partners committed to the support of International In-Flight Security Officers (IFSOs). At an IIFSOC meeting held in London, UK, a CACPP representative was elected as Chair of this Committee for a period of one year. Through this important role, Protective Policing plans to continue its support of international collaboration and standards for civil aviation protection programs.

Drugs & Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS) ensures a safe and secure society for Canadians by enhancing the public’s knowledge on drugs and organized crime and their related issues.

DOCAS is coordinated by specialized trained members at the national, provincial and territorial levels. These members work in partnership with government and non-government agencies, other police agencies, private organizations and other community groups to provide key initiatives in schools, communities and workplaces. They are committed to the following:

  • Promoting the benefits of a lifestyle free of substance abuse
  • Providing leadership, training, programs and coordination on substance abuse issues
  • Educating law enforcement and the Canadian public on the effects and impacts of organized crime on their personal, family and professional lives
  • Reducing the demand for illicit drugs

DOCAS promotes partnerships with community groups, health and addictions organizations, public and private sector agencies, and other police services to address specific drugs and organized crime awareness needs of Canadians.

DOCAS provides a service which includes two components: drug awareness and organized crime awareness. Under the drug awareness umbrella, the service has implemented demand reduction initiatives by working with and mobilizing community partners on substance abuse related issues. Under the organized crime awareness umbrella, DOCAS creates, identifies and shares initiatives utilized by the RCMP and other agencies to combat organized crime.

DOCAS is striving to educate law enforcement and the general public on specific aspects of organized crime.

The goal of DOCAS is to assist in enlightening the Canadian police community and the public on the impacts of drugs and organized crime and ways to reduce that impact. By reducing the demand of illicit drugs and victimization of organized crime, DOCAS assists Canadians in reducing the many impacts of drugs and organized crime on communities across the country.

Planned Improvements:

Protective Policing operating procedures, security measures and business practices are under constant review to ensure that our clients are provided with appropriate and effective protection services.

Planned improvements include:

  • Increased integration within Operations
  • Enhancement of a Major Events planning template
  • Establishment of a broader operational planning framework
  • A program review to improve efficiency and establish a solid accountability framework

Quality Contract Policing


Summary of Departmental Strategic Outcomes as per Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome: 

Quality Contract Policing

Outcome Statement: 

Healthier and safer Canadian communities through effective crime prevention, education, law enforcement and investigation

Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Achieve 80% agreement amongst Canadians that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfills its strategic priority of contributing to safe and healthier Aboriginal communities
2006: 80%
2007: 80%
  • Achieve 84% agreement amongst Canadians that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfills its strategic priority of preventing and reducing youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders
2006: 84%
2007: 83%


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing
$2,083.4 $2,140.7
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing
13,610 12,941

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress towards meeting the key expected results for Quality Contract Policing:

1. Highest quality police services/programs

2. Prevention and reduction of youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders

3. Safer and healthier Aboriginal communities


1. Highest Quality Police Services/Programs

The Canadian public expects to be treated in a professional and bias-free manner and for their concerns to be taken into consideration when developing solutions. Fulfilling these demands is the essence of community policing, that is, to provide consultation and different perspectives to effectively mobilize the community to achieve mutual goals. While demanding that the police be proactive in developing solutions, the public also expects a responsive service to have the right resources, at the right place and at the right time. Canadians rightfully expect a timely response to calls for service and for justice to be served through our actions.

In 2006-2007, Contract Policing delivered “uniformed” policing services to eight provinces, three territories, 200 municipalities, and over 544 Aboriginal communities. Fulfilling our mandate to prevent crime, investigate, and enforce the law, as well as to protect life and property, Contract Policing resources responded to approximately three million calls for service.

In addition, the RCMP contributes to the mandates of other government departments by:

  • Reinforcing Arctic sovereignty
  • Promoting healthier communities through ongoing partnerships with Health Canada (HC) and various provincial/territorial agencies
  • Providing education and awareness on constitutional rights in conjunction with other departments such as the Office of the Federal Interlocutor on Mtis Harvesting Rights
  • Mobilizing resources to respond to provincial/territorial emergencies such as the redeployment of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba RCMP resources to ensure public safety was not compromised during the Saskatchewan Public Service Strike in December 2006

Canadian demographics and crime trends continue to change. Increased migration from rural to urban areas has impacted small communities and their ability to attract or maintain key services. At the same time, policing in urban communities is increasingly complex, as changing values, traditions and language impact policing duties. The value of the RCMP’s contract policing model is our ability to provide effective services to this broad spectrum, responding to the unique circumstances of diverse communities, large and small. Crime trends such as an increase in violent youth crime, technological crimes and drug and alcohol dependency highlight the need for interagency response.

Provincial/Territorial policing continued to form productive partnerships in 2006 by creating or expanding new service delivery models formulated in consultation with our contract partners, integrated tactical units and working groups such as Drug Recognition Experts, National Incident Command and Public Order Working Groups, Historical Case Units and various specialized teams. We also refined our ability to share information across jurisdictions with compatibility mechanisms through our Operational Records Management Systems. Contract Policing anticipates, influences and responds to evolving needs, broadening outreach, prevention and response activities that span our business lines and jurisdiction.

In 2006-2007, work continued on integration, primarily with the continued roll-out and improvements to Police Reporting and Occurrence System (PROS), mobile PROS and its counterpart Police Records Information Management Environment of British Columbia (PRIME BC), linking databases so that information can be retrieved from a number of systems. Our goal is to ensure maximum use of compatible systems by the Canadian police and law enforcement community to make sure that information is accessible and available to those that need it in a timely manner.

Consultation and engagement were at the forefront of community policing where plans to address the number one Youth and/or Aboriginal issue were implemented for a second year across the country. These community plans were instrumental in raising the level of local involvement and in identifying key risk and protective factors where communities may need to focus to address root causes. (See analyses under the Youth and Aboriginal Communities strategic priorities for specifics)

The analysis of over 400 Aboriginal plans, 700 youth plans, 14 divisional business plans and joint priorities of contract partners, as well as the public policy agenda at the national level, provided the focus for Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing Services (CCAPS) in 2006-2007.

In British Columbia, the RCMP began an ambitious Crime Reduction Program focused on using a tactical path to achieve objectives, including a focus on apprehension and management of prolific and priority offenders, on mitigating hotspots using evidence and, on attacking the causes of crime. British Columbia is prepared to mandate community collaboration with key agencies based on a crime reduction model and is looking for federal leadership to ensure the horizontal partnerships are in place to surround their enforcement strategy. In 2006, the province invested funding into targeted enforcement at five RCMP pilot sites: Surrey, Coquitlam, Fraser Lake, Penticton and Port McNeil.

The significant and immediate outcomes of the Crime Reduction Strategy in British Columbia provide the clearest example of success. With a strategic focus on prolific offenders, whereby a small number of offenders typically account for a large proportion of crime [e.g., in Comox Valley 4.5% of offenders committed 23% of known property crime (summer 2006) and the top 9 of 443 offenders committed 16% of crimes], the results of this approach are impressive.

What has been accomplished so far?

  • Notable local gains in pilot sites especially regarding property crimes; drops of 10% – 40% for certain targeted crimes
  • Broad police and client awareness and support
  • Frontline restructuring and analytical capacity
  • From 2003 to 2006:
    • Commercial Break & Enters reduced by 12%
    • Property crime reduced by 14%
    • Motor vehicle theft reduced by 38%

This British Columbia project has led to a national focus on a Public Safety and Crime Reduction Strategy, which is premised on a few guiding principles:

  • Focus – on specific crime, location or offender
  • Simplicity – of design and execution
  • Coordination – of partners and process
  • Intervention – a continuum of action including prevention, enforcement and rehabilitation

This strategic approach is about early crime prevention, early intervention where people are at risk, rapid enforcement action and the provision of support, rehabilitation and resettlement to victims and offenders. With strong leadership, engagement with other federal/provincial/territorial/municipal governments and Aboriginal communities across Canada, crime reduction efforts can have a significant impact on reducing crime within a constrained timeframe. The RCMP has partnered with Public Safety Canada (PS), Health Canada (HC), Department of Justice (DOJ) and is working to expand the sustainability of this initiative.

Public policy involvement at the national level was focused on building partnerships with key federal departments and national organizations to ensure a coordinated approach to important issues such as family violence, road safety, Aboriginal issues, emergency response protocols and interoperability. This perspective extended to provincial/territorial levels as well, as evidenced by our partnership with Newfoundland Provincial Health to provide joint education and awareness on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and its impact on individuals and communities.

In Alberta, multi-jurisdictional teams were formed to address high risk communities with an emphasis on supporting Drug-Endangered Children. On November 1, 2006, Alberta became the first Canadian province to pass legislation giving police the authority to charge parents with exposing their children to drugs. Under the Drug Endangered Children Act, police can seize and hold for two days children found living in homes where drugs are produced or sold. The RCMP in Alberta, alongside Alberta municipal police services (Edmonton and Calgary) received training on how to investigate drug-endangered children. They were taught how to recognize environmental signs that a child is drug-endangered, and interviewing techniques to ensure drug-endangered children don’t experience unnecessary stress or cause them to fear their parents or guardians. This training increases police officers’ awareness of the new tool available to ensure the well-being of drug-endangered children.

The Pipeline/Convoy/Jetway Annual Report for 2006 reveals that:

  • 1,129 persons from 40 different law enforcement agencies received RCMP-led training during the year
  • More than $163M worth of drugs and contraband and more than $9M in cash were seized as a result of this interdiction program

In 2006, in order to allow the general public to become familiar with the work carried out by the RCMP, the Ride-Along program was reviewed and updated.

The new program, known as the Police Observer Program, will:

  • Increase community access to the RCMP
  • Allow community leaders to learn about the pressures faced by RCMP members and detachments
  • Serve as a potential recruitment tool

The expertise within provincial/territorial policing was felt internationally as divisional, detachment and CCAPS resources traveled internationally to provide advice, guidance and support in areas ranging from Crime Stoppers, to crisis negotiation, to community policing, to support to foreign missions and specialized teams including deployment of three members to Afghanistan to provide RCMP expertise in rebuilding the country and its infrastructure.

Planned Improvements:

  • Contract Policing’s vision of a dynamic, flexible organization, reflective of the communities we serve, accountable and operationalized to meet the needs of provinces, territories, municipalities and Aboriginal communities remains unchanged for 2007
  • Contract Policing will continue to adapt to our changing environment. We will engage the communities we serve, and by doing so early, we will gain support for mutual objectives. We acknowledge the fiscal realities, the emergence of alternate service delivery, competitive public and private policing and are incorporating these factors into our service delivery models
  • Our continued focus for 2007-2008 will be to strengthen the collective efforts at the national, divisional and local levels to respond effectively to issues enhancing the stability and security of communities and individuals

2. Prevention & Reduction of Youth Involvement in Crime as Victims and Offenders

For Youth specific performance information, please refer to the Youth strategic priority presented later in this Section.


3. Safer and Healthier Aboriginal Communities

For Aboriginal Communities specific performance information, please refer to the Aboriginal strategic priority presented later in this Section.

Quality Policing Support


Summary of Departmental Strategic Outcomes as per Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome: 

Quality Policing Support

Outcome Statement: 

Support to Canadian policing investigations and enforcement organizations through critical intelligence, equipment, tools, systems, technology and education to optimize the delivery of proactive, intelligence

Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Achieve 75% partner satisfaction with RCMP contributions and collaboration
2006: 82%
2007: 90%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction with the timeliness and quality of RCMP responses
2006: 69%
2007: 63%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction that the RCMP provides appropriate protocols to ensure an integrated and rapid response in evolving situations
2006: 68%
2007: 69%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction of the effectiveness of RCMP technology and investigative techniques
2006: 79%
2007: 78%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction of the accuracy and comprehensive ness of RCMP information and intelligence
2006:
accuracy: 71%
comprehensive: 65%
2007:
accuracy: 72%
comprehensive: 74%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction that the RCMP provides valuable support and services to the IM/IT client community
2006: 57%
2007: 71%
  • Achieve 75% stakeholder satisfaction that the RCMP is a valued leader in the development of IM/IT solutions for interoperability
2006: 53%
2007: 66%


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations
$70.3 $81.8
5 – Technical Policing Operations
$174.2 $190.8
6 – Policing Support Services
$68.5 $84.0
7 – National Police Services
$149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations
547 509
5 – Technical Policing Operations
1,164 1,073
6 – Policing Support Services
326 438
7 – National Police Services
1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress towards meeting the key expected results for Quality Policing Support:

1. Leading-edge policing and security technology

2. Comprehensive, real-time intelligence and threat assessments

3. Increased efficiency and effectiveness of policing

4. Timely and high quality scientific tools, techniques and information management technology

5. High quality learning and training opportunities and support

The RCMP’s National Police Services (NPS) is the largest and often sole provider of essential specialized investigational support services to over 500 law enforcement and criminal justice agencies across Canada. This includes the forensic analysis of criminal evidence, criminal records information, identification services, technological support, enhanced learning opportunities, and collection and analysis of criminal information and intelligence.

NPS represents numerous centres of expertise that provide highly sophisticated and comprehensive investigational support. By its very nature, NPS encourages national cohesiveness across jurisdictions by providing an integrated group of police information, technical and training services to the law enforcement communities throughout Canada and around the world.

Effective criminal investigations continually demand new and more complex investigative techniques. This requires NPS to remain current and relevant to ensure that services are the best and most efficient.

1. Leading-Edge Policing and Security Technology

NPS pursues leading-edge initiatives on behalf of the Canadian and international law enforcement community. A representative description of achievements in the areas of emerging and increasing demands for services, leadership in national and international law enforcement practices, and security will illustrate the breadth of NPS contributions.

A significant accomplishment in 2006 was achieved through computer forensic analysis of technological devices which provided corroborating evidence to a major international terrorist investigation. This information resulted in the arrest of a terrorist cell that was plotting terrorism in Canada.

The increasingly violent nature of child sexual exploitation images, the targeting of younger victims, and the intense abuse they suffer, demand not only that perpetrators be brought to justice, but that victims be identified and removed from further exploitation. The National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) Victim Identification Unit develops methods to identify and locate victims of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation. As of March 2007, approximately 216 Canadian and numerous international child victims of Internet-facilitated sexual exploitation were identified by Canadian law enforcement agencies, often in collaboration with the NCECC.

The NCECC is developing the Canadian Image Database of Exploited Children (CIDBEC) that will allow police to search a repository of child sexual abuse images to identify victims and suspects. The NCECC has also partnered with G8 countries and Interpol in the development of the International Child Sexual Exploitation Database, which will facilitate and promote international cooperation with functionality similar to CIDBEC.

The use of the Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) was further expanded in 2006-2007 and was used in over 6,000 Canadian investigations. This interoperable, relational database was collaboratively developed by Microsoft, the Toronto Police Service and the NCECC, and includes information that enables investigators to create links between on-line sexual exploitation investigations. As its national host, the NCECC led the national roll-out of CETS. The 37 participating police agencies can now search and share intelligence regarding on-line child abuse regardless of jurisdiction and in a timely and secure manner.

NCECC investigators were trained in the areas of Covert Operations, Major Case Management, Victim Identification, as well as multi-jurisdictional, international files. As a result, the Centre has increased its capability to apprehend suspects, prevent criminal acts and rescue young victims.

The Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System (ViCLAS) is an RCMP-developed system, which creates associations between criminal patterns in sexual crimes, assaults, homicides, missing persons, non-parental abductions, child luring, and child sexual exploitation, which may help to identify suspects. The release of the ViCLAS Version 4 E-Booklet in 2006-2007 allows the direct entry of data into the system increasing efficiency, data quality and timeliness of data entry. In 2007-2008, an interface is being developed between ViCLAS and the Police Reporting Occurrence System (PROS) to enable the extraction of data directly into ViCLAS (one-time data entry), reducing duplication of time and effort and ensuring data quality.

Mandated through the Sex Offender Information Registration Act, the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) is a national database developed and maintained by the RCMP; it currently contains information on 15,000 convicted sex offenders available to all accredited Canadian law enforcement agencies. The NSOR assists police investigating crimes of a sexual nature, and is particularly effective to identify and prosecute sexual predators when used in conjunction with ViCLAS and Geographic/Criminal Profiling. The RCMP has been working with PS, DOJ, and the Federal/Provincial/Territorial High Risk Offender Working Group to amend existing legislation to increase NSOR’s effectiveness.

Bill S-3 (An Act to Amend the National Defence Act, the Criminal Code, the Sex Offender Information Registration Act and the Criminal Records Act) was passed in March 2007 and is expected to come into force in January 2008. The Act will authorize the inclusion of persons convicted of designated offences under the National Defence Act, and the addition of new administrative fields to the database. It will also facilitate disclosure to the Crown and allow for data comparison for compliance purposes. The RCMP is working with the Department of National Defence (DND) to integrate these changes into the NSOR program.
The RCMP has developed a toolkit to facilitate the forensic digital analysis of cellular phones. New designs for Radio Frequency (RF) Tents will permit the safe acquisition of data from seized cellular telephones and communications devices.

Work is ongoing with international police partners to address security and access issues, and specifically, proposed changes to police access to data in the WHOIS databases (an Internet search command that provides technical contact information and other details about a domain nameholder) of registries around the world and in Canada. The proposed changes will have a profound negative impact on law enforcement investigations on the Internet. Efforts have been directed at increasing stakeholder awareness and working with Industry Canada to address the issue at the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers. RCMP representatives have been invited to join a working group examining this issue.

The RCMP is working with the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Electronic Crimes Committee to develop a Botnet (instances where numerous computers are compromised) strategy as a priority operational project for 2007-2008. Internationally, the G8 High Tech Crime Sub-group identified Botnets as a project item and will be conducting a Botnets tabletop exercise to raise awareness of the international Botnets threat and risk environment and developing a “best practice” document for law enforcement.

During 2006-2007, the RCMP increased its participation in emergency preparedness initiatives in support of the larger federal government mandate. RCMP Air Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to jointly address emerging issues such as transportation of personnel, equipment, antivirals and vaccines in cases of pandemic preparedness and management. To ensure effective support of the activities identified in the MOU, all Air Services personnel, who may be involved in activities related to this agreement, have received awareness training in compliance with Occupational Health and Safety regulations.

The RCMP also continued to participate in the development of proposed legislation to compel telecommunications service providers to build interception capability into their networks. This legislation is designed to ensure that law enforcement and national security agencies can effect lawful intercepts in a timely and cost effective manner. The legislative package is expected to be re-tabled in 2007-2008.

Specialized equipment, acquired by the RCMP for the “on-site identification of biological substances”, was deployed to regional personnel. The RCMP, in conjunction with PHAC, provided training for the operation of the equipment to use on suspicious powder calls in the field and has now embarked on a quarterly “Proficiency Program” with PHAC.

The Pre-Employment Polygraph (PEP) process was implemented in November 2005 to screen all RCMP officer applicants. In 2006-2007, 2,642 applicants were tested and the results help ensure that the RCMP accepts the best possible candidates. Fourteen additional positions were created in the Truth Verification Unit to handle the increased polygraph usage, almost doubling the number of employees in the Unit.

2. Comprehensive, Real-Time Intelligence and Threat Assessments

Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) shares intelligence with Canadian law enforcement agencies to support their response to the threat of organized and serious crime. During 2006-2007, CISC delivered 21 intelligence assessments to municipal, provincial and federal law enforcement leaders and government officials to enable them to make informed decisions when developing policies and strategies to address this type of criminal activity.

CISC established a national Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS) Governance Committee, representing Canada’s law enforcement community, to provide direction on ensuring ACIIS remains current, and to develop the future national criminal intelligence system. Three sub-committees are focused on the development of user requirements, researching relevant technological solutions and enhancing ACIIS policy.

CISC also completed Phase I and approved the development of Phase II of the Canadian Criminal Intelligence Model, a business process for integrating all elements of the criminal intelligence process within law enforcement in Canada.

CISC won three international awards in 2006:

  • Two Professional Service Awards from the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts in 2006:
    • The Director General, CISC – for executive leadership in support of intelligence analysis
    • The CISC Annual Public Report on Organized Crime – for excellence in national-level publications
  • The Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement from the International Association of Chiefs of Police

NPS also provides intelligence and threat assessments through the Behavioural Science program in which criminal profilers prepare comprehensive assessments of threats against persons, organizations or property ( e.g., threats against/concerning: terrorism, stalkers, and school and workplace violence).

This analysis provides key insights into managing the risks associated to any given situation. In 2006-2007, NPS criminal profilers conducted or contributed to 33 threat assessments and provided lectures and training to other police/professional groups on the assessments of risk and threats. The Threat and Management Understudy Program, currently under development, will formalize training needs for police threat assessment specialists.

3. Increased Efficiency and Effectiveness of Policing

NPS continuously monitors, evaluates and enhances its services in response to client and stakeholder needs. Forensic DNA analysis is one of the most demanded services due to its validity as an investigative tool in identifying suspects and eliminating the innocent as suspects, and helping police to focus their investigations.

The introduction of a re-engineered DNA analytical process was completed in 2006-2007 and significantly improved capacity to analyze DNA cases. A new case management system was utilized, which includes a National Case Manager and the concept of prioritizing routine cases by placing precedence on the most serious, violent crimes against the person for processing priority. (Previously, routine cases were processed on a first come – first served basis). All urgent DNA crime scene cases were completed within the 15-day goal established by the RCMP for these cases. Non-suspect Break and Enter DNA cases continued to be processed with a high percentage of hits (54%), either to the Convicted Offenders Index (21%) or the Crime Scene Index (33%) of the National DNA Data Bank (NDDB). The NDDB provided a greater proportion of investigative leads to Break and Enter cases and to other crimes associated with the offender than in previous years.


  • The Central Repository of Criminal Records holds 4 million records, supported by an additional 36 million documents
  • Approximately 500,000 criminal fingerprint submissions are received annually, of which 112,000 are new records

In 2006-2007, the fingerprint/criminal record backlogs were reduced by 43,000 files – a 26% reduction. The backlog efforts continue in preparation for the automated, streamlined process to be delivered through the Real Time Identification (RTID) project.

RTID re-engineers systems and processes used for fingerprint identification, civil clearances and criminal records maintenance and allows the paperless electronic transmission and storage of fingerprints. Turnaround times will be reduced from weeks and months to hours and days. March 25, 2007, saw the release of a new Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and the development of an infrastructure to permit electronic fingerprint submissions. This introduced the first operational efficiencies to users of the NPS Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) fingerprint identification and criminal records services.

The Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network (CIBIN) capacity was increased in response to increasing demands for ballistic identification. This has been fuelled partly by public firearms-related violence and by the clear benefit of a national database that can associate ballistic information from crimes across Canada. Canada and the US use the same technology to compare fired bullets and cartridge cases collected.

During 2006-2007, the RCMP signed an MOU with the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to allow the electronic exchange of information between CIBIN and the US National Integrated Ballistic Information Network (NIBIN). This exchange will assist police investigators to detect and investigate cross-border crimes involving firearms.

CIBIN currently has six Integrated Ballistic Identification System (IBIS) units with two instruments operated in partnership with the Quebec and Ontario forensic laboratories. Three of the IBIS units were obtained through the Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms (ICCUF) initiative.

The RCMP Firearms Support Services also provides a firearms tracing service to all law enforcement agencies in Canada. This service is facilitated in North America by the use of the e-trace system of the ATF and globally through Interpol.


  • Urgent DNA cases were processed within the 15 day target, with an average response time of 11 days (See the following Table for detailed FLS statistics)
  • The fingerprint and criminal record backlog was reduced by a further 26% (43,000 cases) from the previous year
  • Urgent latent prints were processed immediately, while routine latent prints were completed in less than a week, an improvement from last year’s two weeks
  • As of March 31, 2007, CIBIN accumulated a total of 517 “hits” since its inception, all connecting firearms to crimes or linking crime scenes. There are now over 18,600 individual bullets and cartridges entered into the system

Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7 – Management of Forensic Laboratory Services (May 2007)

The following information is provided in response to recommendation 7.87 contained in the Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7 – Management of Forensic Laboratory Services (May 2007). This audit recommended the RCMP ensure that Parliamentarians receive information on the performance of all activities related to the Forensic Laboratory Services (FLS). Performance information provided in this Report is for 2003/2004 to 2006/2007, inclusive, and offers comparable data over time. The statistical details provided in the following table represent information on turnaround times for the various disciplines within the FLS. Details are provided relative to the average number of days required to complete service requests as well as the percentage of requests that meet both the 30-day turnaround target for non-urgent cases as well as the percentage which meet the agreed upon diary date 1 . Of note, all urgent Biology (DNA) cases were processed within the 15 day target, with an average response time of 11 days.

It should be noted that the FLS operate as a national service from six sites located at Halifax, Winnipeg, Regina, Edmonton, Vancouver and Ottawa.

Note: 1 A file completion date longer than 30 days which meets the requirements of the investigator.

Forensic Laboratory Services

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

4. Timely and High Quality Scientific Tools, Techniques and Information Management Technology

Many of the previously described NPS initiatives and services – such as the National DNA Data Bank (NDDB), the Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network (CIBIN), the Canadian Image Database of Exploited Children (CIDBEC), the Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) – and the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR), also constitute timely and high quality scientific tools, techniques and information management technology.

The RCMP and the Department of Justice have increased awareness among the judiciary and Crown Prosecutors of the opportunity to increase the collection of convicted offender samples for the NDDB. As of March 31, 2007, the total number of profiles contained in the Convicted Offender Index had reached 110,930. The number of the Crime Scene Index profiles has also continued to increase, with submissions in the Crime Scene Index at 34,245. These increases are significant, as the probability of obtaining a hit from the Crime Scene Index to the Convicted Offender Index improves considerably as the number of samples in the Convicted Offender Index increases.


  • In 2000/2001, 25 crime scene-to-crime scene and crime scene-to-convicted offender hits were made in the first nine months of operations of the NDDB. In 2006/2007, 8,002 hits were made, representing an enormous gain in the ability of law enforcement to solve crimes.

During 2006-2007, the NDDB Training Unit trained 676 individuals from six provinces in sample collection and legislative requirements, representing 150 RCMP detachments, 43 municipal police services, two military police services, and five other groups from the legal community.

Also in 2006-2007, the RCMP represented Canada on the G8 Lyon-Roma DNA Search Request Network Technical Working Group that, together with Interpol, is developing a secure electronic network to facilitate the rapid exchange of DNA data and forensic intelligence. The search request network developed during 2006-2007 will enhance sharing among national DNA databases in G8 countries. The network will enable law enforcement to establish links between crimes on different continents, a critical factor in combating global criminality and terrorism.

The Bureau for Counterfeits and Documents Examinations (BCDE) examines suspicious travel documents in order to classify them as authentic, altered or counterfeit. Program achievements for 2006-2007 include:

  • Providing material on the examination of documents and determination of method of production or alteration to Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) Alerts
  • Networking with other Canadian and international agencies concerned with the production or enhancement of travel documents
  • Cultivating international contacts and increasing the exchange of expertise on document security through attendance at conferences and participation on working groups
  • Training government officers/investigators/trainers to detect fraudulent travel and identification documents

NPS demonstrated considerable progress in 2006-2007 in information management technology initiatives. Program achievements include:

  • The Police Reporting Occurrence System (PROS) records management solution was implemented in 2006, replacing legacy systems. PROS continues to be enhanced and shared with partner agencies
  • The National Integrated Interagency Information (N-III) project is advancing the interoperability objectives of the Government of Canada by enabling broader information sharing and integrated investigations among Canada’s law enforcement and justice communities. The Integrated Query Tool (IQT) is the first N-III project technical solution to be completed. IQT provides search and access functionality to source systems including PROS (with over 13,000 users including 28 external police partner agencies), the Police Information Retrieval System (PIRS), and the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
  • The second N-III technical solution is the Police Information Portal (PIP), which allows police partners to query each other’s occurrence data. Twenty-seven police agencies are now “live” on PIP, including PRIME BC (Police Records Information Management Environment of British Columbia) agencies
  • Facilitated by a standards-based approach for all new radio modernization projects, improvements were made to enhance interoperability to many of Canada’s radio systems
  • In Saskatchewan, the roll-out of a radio communications system that will be interoperable with other police services and border teams is nearing completion. The radio communications system is being phased in over a three-year period, with Phase I already completed. All communications on the new system are now encrypted to provide a secure user environment. Significant progress has been made in the replacement of radio infrastructure – 30% of the coverage area is now able to utilize the new system – and 800 of the 1,500 mobile and portable radios are now part of this new system. Phase II is well underway and is expected to be fully operational by early 2008. The third phase will follow in 2009
  • The RCMP is partnering with Alberta to develop a system that will be interoperable with provincial public safety agencies. The RCMP is going to vendor qualification shortly
  • In 2006-2007, a new radio system for Newfoundland was initiated; it will be interoperable with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary
  • Radio evergreening has been initiated throughout all RCMP divisions to replace radio system components, including end-of-life radios, repeaters and test equipment. The radio projects over the next 15 to 20 years will modernize all radio systems. These projects will bring RCMP divisions up to the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO P25) standard and improve interoperability with other public safety agencies within each division. The new technology allows the RCMP to take advantage of more powerful gateways (interfaces), thereby improving interoperability with other federal and US partners
  • CPIC provides tactical information on crimes and criminals to the law enforcement community. Following the successful deployment of CPIC Phase III on November 26, 2006, CPIC Web Version 2.5 was replaced by Version 3.0. The renewed CPIC system – with a modern messaging protocol, application and infrastructure – replaced an aging legacy system and will better the exchange of information amongst agencies using CPIC

5. High Quality Learning & Training Opportunities and Support

As Canada’s national police college, the Canadian Police College (CPC) supports integrated policing by developing police leadership and management competencies, and providing advanced and specialized training to 3,200 police officers and senior police officials from across Canada and around the world. In 2006-2007, course space was created for 100 more international students at the CPC. The College also provides a forum where police form informal networks to advance policing and common investigative practices and processes used across Canada.

During 2006-2007, the CPC launched several new initiatives to increase the availability and relevance of its courses. A new campus in Chilliwack, British Columbia, known as CPC West, increases opportunities for advanced police training and reduces the costs for police services located in Western Canada. The first course at CPC West was delivered in January 2007; advanced and executive police training are currently underway. The CPC also continued discussions with various post-secondary institutions (e.g., Royal Military College, Athabasca University) regarding university-level accreditation for courses offered by the CPC.

The Professional Development Centre for Aboriginal Policing (PDCAP) was opened in the fall of 2006 to address training and development needs of police officers serving all Aboriginal communities. PDCAP delivered its first off-site course in Tsuu T’ina, Alberta in November 2006.

Executive and leadership development programs benefited from significant enhancements during 2006-2007. The Executive Development in Policing (EDP) course was designed in French, and the French version of the Senior Police Administration Course (SPAC) was updated and delivered. SPAC provides police officers at the middle management level with the leadership and management skills required to manage a unit or detachment.

The CPC infrastructure was upgraded: classrooms and student bedrooms were renovated; new robots were acquired for the CPC Explosives Training Section; and new course registration/e-business software that enables more effective management of course registration, billings, accommodation and classroom allocation was implemented.

The CPC’s post-course satisfaction survey results remained at 4 (“very satisfied”) on a 5-point quality scale. On average, over 6,000 surveys are sent each year to course participants and their supervisors.

Specialized training continues to be developed for program specific purposes. For example, in 2006-2007, the Technical Operations program, in conjunction with the National Security Criminal Operations Branch, approved and implemented a specialized course on the use of open source data mining in support of investigations.

Overall Planned Improvements

Resolving criminal investigations and prosecuting or exonerating individuals is contingent on the availability and excellence of operational support services provided by National Police Services (NPS). NPS is responding to increased demands for services and the growing expectations of both the law enforcement and public sectors. In 2007-2008, efforts will concentrate on:

  • Continuous improvements in response times for forensic analysis and identification to provide optimal evidentiary support to investigations
  • Replacement and maintenance of secure systems to protect their integrity and functional capacities
  • Establishment of increased functionality and interoperability of systems and infrastructures to facilitate sharing of criminal information and intelligence across jurisdictions

These initiatives will ensure critical support services remain relevant, affordable and responsive to current and anticipated needs.

NPS already plays a key role in the response to violent crime through programs such as ViCLAS and the National Sex Offender Registry. Similarly, the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) is leading a coordinated law enforcement effort to deal with Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation, child luring and sex tourism issues. In 2007/08, efforts will be concentrated on the implementation of CIDBEC and full adoption of CETS in all Canadian jurisdictions as well as exploring international information sharing via CETS.

NPS will also focus on fulfilling its mandate relative to government security policy and the protection of secure information systems. NPS continues to have a significant role in the development of information systems required to collect, collate and analyze data concerning criminals and criminal activity including the development of standards for identification, sharing of criminal intelligence, proper screening of information, and the provision of a single window access point.

In 2007-2008, NPS will continue several large-scale initiatives that, by their nature, require several years to complete. Promotion of interoperability, development of a closer relationship with frontline operations, and horizontality and integration of services are key drivers for future years. This vision will be operationalized through implementation of the NPS Balanced Scorecard, which defines the objectives and measures by which program performance can be evaluated.

1. Leading-Edge Policing and Security Technology

NPS will continue to demonstrate leadership in the development and delivery of operational support services. A vital role in the response to violent crime is already provided through ViCLAS and the National Sex Offender Registry. In 2007-2008, NCECC will put into operation the Canadian Image Database of Exploited Children and will encourage more police agencies to adopt CETS in support of reducing this type of crime.

2. Comprehensive, Real- Time Intelligence and Threat Assessments

Criminal Intelligence Services Canada (CISC) will assist Canada’s law enforcement community to further operationalize criminal intelligence through the provision of integrated Provincial and National Threat Assessments. These assessments support the new Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime. In 2007, this strategy will see its first operationalization effort when, under the banner of the Council on Public Safety (CoPS), the integrated Provincial and National Enforcement Coordinating Committees will develop enforcement priorities based on the intelligence contained in the assessments.

3. Increased Efficiency and Effectiveness of Policing

NPS programs continue to adapt to shifting government and client priorities. The volume of additional work resulting from new legislation such as Bill C-18 (An Act to amend certain Acts in relation to DNA Identification) will significantly impact Forensic Science & Identification Services (FS&IS). NPS has developed strategies to address both current service demand challenges and those anticipated by legislative changes. To address demands generated by legislation, new processes, additional personnel and new case prioritization for DNA analysis will, when fully implemented, support more timely responses to current demands. Efforts to reduce the existing backlogs in criminal record, and civil and criminal fingerprint services, will be maintained to ensure the backlog is eliminated by the time all RTID improvements are rolled out.

4. Timely and High Quality Scientific Tools, Techniques and Information Management Technology

In 2007-2008, the RCMP will concentrate on reducing response times for routine DNA analysis. The implementation of a priority rating system to process the highest priority cases will replace the traditional first-in, first-out prioritization system for routine cases.

The Case Receipt Unit (CRU) operations will be transferred to the Canadian Police Services Information Centre (CPSIC) to provide seamless investigational support to police, while improving the efficiency of exhibit receipt and providing information on case progress.

2007-2008 will see ongoing developments of information systems to collect, collate and analyze data concerning criminals and criminal activity. Work includes not only technology solutions, but also identification standards, intelligence sharing, proper information screening and a single window access point. Implementation of Phase I RTID on March 25, 2007, provided the first dramatic improvement in identifying criminal fingerprints and processing of civil fingerprint submissions.

The integrated, intelligence-led efforts of Canadian police services and public safety agencies are supported through the National Integrated Interagency Information (N-III) project. The Police Information Portal (PIP) solution is already used by 27 police services, representing over 30% of sworn police officers. The use of PIP will increase dramatically as the RCMP’s PROS and other Niche Records Management System users are connected to PIP during 2007-2008. Public Safety Canada and the RCMP are pursuing the Integrated Query Tool (IQT) solution to enable greater opportunities to exchange appropriate information in support of the public safety mandates of federal agencies.

The updating or replacement of security systems and networks is paramount to maintaining effectiveness and will be enabled by internal realignments, prioritization of issues and alternate funding strategies.

5. High Quality Learning & Training Opportunities and Support

The CPC will continue its efforts to become Canada’s state-of-the-art national police college. More renovations will be done to the CPC’s technological and physical training infrastructure, which will enhance distance learning, meet expanded/new program demands, address increased international and Aboriginal student participation, and improve the student’s quality of life while staying at the CPC.

In order to maintain the credibility of the CPC as a world-class educational institution, many courses will be reviewed. This review will include updating the CPC’s 41 course training standards, with input from policing partners and stakeholders, as well as developing a new curriculum to meet ever-growing demands. Course training standards will also be developed for several international courses such as strategic intelligence, major case management and explosives.

The CPC will continue to face challenges and opportunities posed by trends in the external environment in a proactive manner. More specifically, the CPC will continue to assume a much larger role as a provider of training to international partners. The CPC will enhance its international training capacity by adding five FTEs acquired through the International Peacekeeping Memorandum to Cabinet. This will allow the delivery of courses tailored to meet the needs of offshore clients and is expected to attract more qualified international students. Applied research will also be provided in high priority areas such as Aboriginal policing, integrated Canadian and international police investigations, economic crime and organized crime. The CPC has contracted Carleton University to undertake a research project on the role of police in national security.

Strategic Priority: Organized Crime

Reduce the threat and impact of organized crime


What Makes This A Priority

  • Government public safety and security priorities continue: strong national/international institutions and economy; Canada’s cities and communities
  • Available data suggests current annual global revenues from illicit criminal activities include: $100B to $300B from drug trafficking; $9B from automobile theft in the US and Europe; $7B from alien smuggling; widely disparate figures (i.e., $1B-$20B) for theft of intellectual property through pirated videos, software and other commodities
  • Global trade in pirated goods – estimated at $450B USD (5-7% of total value of global trade)
  • Organized crime is increasingly transnational in nature; technological innovations facilitating intellectual property crime – ID theft – $2B losses in US alone; 900% increase in volume of counterfeit notes passed over last decade
  • Drug trafficking continues to be the principal source of revenue for most organized crime groups; recognition that some of the profit derived from drug sales may eventually find its way to terrorist and other insurgent groups who are also involved directly/indirectly in drug trade
  • Direct and indirect links between production, distribution and use of controlled substances and other criminal activities
  • Detrimental consequences of drug abuse include physical, emotional, economic and social harms both to individual Canadians and to Canadian society
  • Ripple effects of organized crime – drug abuse costs Organizations for Economic Co-operation & Development (OECD) countries more than $120B per year in enforcement, prosecutions, prisons, prevention, treatment, health care and financial losses
  • Primary points of entry for the smuggling of illicit drugs are marine ports; for alcohol and firearms it is through land ports of entry; and for tobacco, it is between ports of entry
  • More than 174M people ‘on the move’ – more than double the number of 35 years ago; illegal movements increasingly significant – annual illegal entry estimated at 500,000 to US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand; 800,000 to 4M trafficked across international borders
  • Organized crime is heavily involved in small arms trade, and there is an increasing risk that they will become involved in facilitating the movement/smuggling of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons
  • There are 600M small arms and like weapons in circulation worldwide
  • According to Statistics Canada, in 2005, the national homicide rate increased for the second consecutive year, following a 30-year decline. Most of this increase is linked to gang-related homicides, two-thirds of which involved a firearm, usually a handgun

    (Sources: RCMP Environmental Scan 2004; CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada, 2004; RCMP policy centres; October 2004 Speech from the Throne)


Overview

Organized crime poses a serious long-term threat to Canada’s institutions, society and economy as well as to our quality of life. The RCMP Organized Crime Strategic Priority focuses on “reducing the threat and impact of organized crime”. In countering the growth of these groups, and dismantling or disrupting their structures and sub-groups, a critical component is the improved coordination, sharing and use of criminal intelligence. This intelligence is used in support of integrated policing, law enforcement plans and strategies as well as initiatives designed to communicate the impact and scope of organized crime.

Utilizing the intelligence base established by the RCMP operations provides leadership in developing and implementing intelligence-led tactical operational plans, in partnership with other police and law enforcement agencies, which contributes to the strategic outcome of reducing the threat and impact of organized crime. In addition, the RCMP has embarked on an aggressive program of proactively seeking out actionable intelligence in direct support of enforcement actions. The RCMP is deploying “Probe Teams” alongside existing enforcement resources. This initiative gives practical structure to the term “intelligence-led policing” and has demonstrated success against organized crime in trials thus far.

Plans and Priorities (2006-2007)

The following plans and priorities were listed in the 2006-2007 RPP in relation to the RCMP’s efforts towards reducing the threat and impact of organized crime in Canada:

1. Reduce the supply of, and demand for, illicit drugs in Canada

2. Create an environment of reduced drug supply where demand reduction efforts have a greater likelihood of success

3. Conduct effective investigations – enhance our capability and capacity to effectively conduct organized crime investigations

4. Impact crime through awareness and education

5. Be intelligence-led – effective, intelligence-based priority setting and decision making

6. Expand the collection and sharing of information and intelligence; facilitate greater contribution; develop new sources of information; and collect data on new and emerging subject areas and exchange ballistics information on firearms between Canada and the United States

7. Build new and strengthen existing partnerships, both within Canada and internationally

8. Contribute to public policy at earliest stage of development

9. Support Canadian law enforcement agencies and the courts in the fight against organized crime by providing the most timely criminal history information while respecting privacy and legal considerations

10. Contribute to the fight against organized crime by offering advanced courses, specialized seminars and other learning opportunities to RCMP, Canadian and international police and partner agencies

11. Conduct applied and theoretical research, contribute to environmental analysis, provide policy analysis development and advice; and conduct program design, policy and program monitoring and evaluation

12. Strengthen Canada’s criminal intelligence community by supporting Criminal Intelligence Service Canada’s Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS), the database for sharing criminal intelligence on organized and other serious crime affecting Canada

13. Support Canada’s law enforcement community by participating in Criminal Intelligence Service Canada’s Integrated National Collection Plan and contributing to the production of the National Threat Assessment on Organized and Other Serious Crime affecting Canada

Reduce the threat and impact of organized crime

Organized Crime Strategy Map


Strategic Priority: Organized Crime – Overview of Performance Towards Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: 

  • Reduce the threat and impact of organized crime
Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders and partners who agree the RCMP effectively communicates what it is doing and why it is doing it
Partners:
2005 to 2006: 13%
2006 to 2007: 24%
Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 4%
2006 to 2007: 4%
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders who agree the RCMP provides accurate and complete information about its programs and services

Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: –3%
2006 to 2007: 1%

  • Achieve 85% agreement amongst stakeholders and partners that the RCMP is a valuable partner in reducing the threat and impact of organized crime

Partners:
2006: 89%
2007: 92%
Stakeholders:
2006: 90%
2007: 93%

  • Triple the number of external partners participating at the Strategic Priority Working Group

3 external partners:
– Public Prosecution Services
– Dept. Public Safety
– Corrections Canada

  • Achieve 85% agreement amongst stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides valuable input into the development of public policy on organized crime
Stakeholders:
2006: 78%
2007: 74%


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations

$592.9

$626.0
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

$2,083.4

$2,140.7
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations

$70.3

$81.8
5 – Technical Policing Operations $174.2 $190.8
7 – National Police Services $149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations 4,568 3,412
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 13,610 12,941
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations 547 509
5 – Technical Policing Operations 1,164 1,073
7 – National Police Services 1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress Towards Achieving Key Priorities (2006-2007)


a) Key Priorities:

1. Reduce the supply of, and demand for, illicit drugs in Canada

2. Create an environment of reduced drug supply where demand reduction efforts have a greater likelihood of success

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The Drugs and Organized Crime (D&OC) Branch identified and assisted in the development of best practices to be shared with the law enforcement community across Canada. D&OC collaborated with various key partners to identify the roles and responsibilities for each partner in achieving our common goal, with respect to the ever-emerging dangers associated with clandestine synthetic laboratories. The collaborative effort also led to the collection of best practices, such as the Drug Endangered Children program from Alberta, and the training of support services to assist drug investigators in clandestine drug lab investigations. Also developed with D&OC was a National Repository of Clandestine Drug Laboratories. Agreements have been reached with other law enforcement personnel to have Divisional coordinators liaise with these agencies until such time as the clandestine laboratory reporting processes become National
  • More than 120 police officers from Canada and abroad attended the Drug Investigative Techniques Course (DITC) offered by the CPC. The DITC is aimed at developing the knowledge, skills and investigative techniques essential to the successful investigation and prosecution of drug related offences and organizations/groups involved in the drug trade

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Training of Marijuana Grow Operation Teams to respond in an ancillary role of Clandestine Drug Laboratory responders. This initiative’s goal is to ensure that a major component of the Marijuana Grow operation teams, located throughout our Divisions, have the capacity to investigate, or participate in investigations, concerning synthetic drug operations. These newly trained members will then complement and form a synergistic partnership with the Clandestine Laboratory and Response (CLEAR) teams, creating a focused effort in the prevention of chemical diversion and synthetic drug production
  • Enhance the prominence of the Jetway Criminal Interdiction Program. The goal of this initiative is the interdiction of drugs carried by couriers on public transportation. Targeting organized crime, the program operates in domestic areas wherever modes of transportation, such as air, rail or bus travel and courier services, are used to the benefit of crime

a) Key Priority:

3. Conduct effective investigations – enhance our capability and capacity to effectively conduct organized crime investigations

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Developed Human Source Handler expertise at the supervisor level. In order to increase the effectiveness of our investigations involving Human Source Handling, it was determined (through consultations with our Criminal Operations Officers) that there were many areas of improvement to be made. Specifically, it was determined that the following were identified as some of the key elements for any supervisor training aids:
    • Clear identification and explanation of the supervisor’s role
    • Identification of the types of assistance to be provided by the supervisor
    • Periodic evaluation of the source/handler relationship
    • Review of source debriefing reports authored by source handlers
  • CISC has created National Intelligence Requirements (NIR) to more precisely identify areas of missing knowledge about organized crime group and criminal markets. The NIRs enhance CISC’s National Collection Plan, the integrated national document for collecting criminal intelligence and information on organized crime. NIRs will ultimately assist in more effective detection and targeting of organized crime, as they request all law enforcement agencies to enter on ACIIS – with supporting documentation – all subjects and objects noted in the integrated Provincial Threat Assessments produced by the CISC network

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Conduct specialized courses to address operational gaps. This initiative consists of proactively and through our communications with Divisions, identifying operational gaps on a continuing basis, developing training packages (either courses or workshops) to deal with the issues, and delivering the workshops/courses nationally and divisionally in a timely fashion
  • Familiarize members with the skills and requirements necessary for Major Crime Case Management Team Commander Accreditation. The goal of this initiative is to provide members with an understanding of the type of requirements to become accredited Team Commanders on major crime investigations, and to assist operational personnel with developing skills that are key to securing accreditation

a) Key Priority:

4. Impact crime through awareness and education

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • CISC delivered its 2006 Annual Report on Organized Crime. The report provides an overview of significant issues and trends on organized crime and is aimed at informing and educating the public on the effects organized crime has on Canadian society. The format of the 2006 edition was a major departure from previous years. It examined organized crime through the framework of the criminal marketplace. It highlighted street gangs – an organized crime threat generating significant concern in the public forum
  • Through the Cross Border Crime Forum, the RCMP, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration completed a Canada/US threat assessment on transnational organized crime. From this document a vetted version was made public through websites of all agencies and Public Safety. Public awareness of organized crime is critical in reducing victimization
  • Enhanced the national prominence of the Organized Crime awareness function of the Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS). DOCAS established a website to better promote their program. PowerPoint presentations were also developed and provided in different fora. Much effort was also dedicated to developing a DOCAS portion of the Investigator’s Toolbox, enabling frontline members to have access to increased information and tools in the battle against organized crime. Overall, the DOCAS team has made great strides in providing frontline RCMP members, external law enforcement personnel, as well as the general public, with both information and tools that have helped to battle organized crime
  • Produced a pamphlet entitled “Illegal Tobacco: What You Should Know!” to educate the public about the impact of the illicit tobacco trade and the involvement of organized crime (www.rcmp.ca/customs/tobacco_broch_e.htm)
  • The RCMP continues to work in partnership with the private sector and has created a communication strategy to increase public awareness with respect to the negative impacts in participating in the trade of counterfeit and pirated products. The series of public awareness posters that has been developed includes advising the public of the link between counterfeit products and the funding of organized crime. By educating the consumer, and showing that intellectual property crime is not a victimless crime, the public is able to make informed decisions when offered counterfeit goods
  • The Canadian Police College (CPC) teaches the national standard Major Case Management Team Commander Course to over 100 senior police officers each year

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Implement the Aboriginal Shield Program (substance abuse prevention initiative). DOCAS has recently held seminars with members of the Canadian Aboriginal community to update the curriculum of the Aboriginal Shield Program. This year, the revised program will be piloted in selected communities, and training will be provided to the community facilitators who will deliver the program.
  • Increase collaboration between enforcement and prevention. Organized crime is an overreaching activity that many of our policy centers and directorates actively enforce. Increasing communication, which is the very foundation of education, will contribute to a decrease in organized crime. Developing strategies with our stakeholders and law enforcement community, actively promoting and communicating an increased Organized Crime Awareness to the enforcement side of general policing, will enhance our abilities to effectively inform and bring awareness to the general public to ensure we have safe homes and safe communities.

a) Key Priority:

5. Be intelligence-led – effective, intelligence-based priority setting and decision making

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Criminal Intelligence continued to enhance and expand the focus of the current intelligence base by establishing Probe Teams across the country. These teams are dedicated criminal intelligence units providing direct tactical support to enforcement sections.
  • Criminal Intelligence prepared criminal intelligence assessments in support of RCMP operations to provide actionable and reliable intelligence to combat organized crime activities.
  • CISC delivered 21 intelligence assessments to law enforcement leaders and government officials at the municipal, provincial and federal levels including:
    • The Integrated Provincial Threat Assessments (10)
    • The 2006 National Threat Assessment on Organized and Other Serious Crime
    • The 2006 National Criminal Intelligence Estimate on Organized and Serious Crime in Canada
    • The 2006 Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada
    • The 2006 National Strategic Firearms Assessment
    • The 2006 Situation Overview on Street Gangs
    • Sentinel strategic early warning assessments and watchlists (3)
    • Strategic Intelligence Briefs (3)
  • These products inform, raise awareness, warn of possible future threats relating to organized and other serious crime affecting Canada, and enable the recipients to make informed decisions when developing policies and strategies for dealing with these types of crime. The average level of satisfaction with these assessments is 82%, up from 67% in 2005
  • The role of the Air Protective Officers (APOs) of the Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program (CACPP) evolved to include criminal intelligence gathering and sharing of information within the airport environment. In addition to the obvious focus on National Security, the APOs maintain vigilance on criminal elements attempting to exploit the vulnerabilities of this unique setting
  • The Organized Crime Operational Support Unit (OCOSU) within the RCMP Organized Crime Branch has been working with the Integrated Organized Crime Investigative Units (IOCIU) across Canada for the past year in improving the existing relationship and communication between the various units
  • The OCOSU has also been working closely with our American law enforcement partners to identify and share best practices and protocols in combating organized crime

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Through the establishment of Intelex Units across the country, Criminal Intelligence is working at expanding and consolidating the current knowledge base amongst law enforcement. These units facilitate the management and sharing of criminal information and intelligence within the RCMP as well as with outside partners
  • Criminal Intelligence is developing new analytical tools and revising existing tools to enhance the assessment of Organized Crime activity and its impact on Canada
  • CISC will assist Canada’s law enforcement community to further operationalize criminal intelligence via the integrated Provincial and National Threat Assessments. These assessments support the new Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime. In 2007, the CACP organized crime strategy will see its first full operationalization effort when, under the banner of the Council on Public Safety (CoPS), the integrated Provincial and National Enforcement Coordinating Committees will develop enforcement priorities based on the intelligence in the assessments
  • Conduct Combined Force Special Enforcement Unit (CFSEU) reviews to ensure investigations are aligned to National Tactical Priorities or to highest divisional threat. The purpose of this initiative is to assess and identify operational and administrative best practices as well as to mandate compliance
  • In order to continue to improve upon the effectiveness of criminal intelligence-gathering for Protective Policing, the CACPP threat matrices process is under constant review
  • Streamline and update information management procedures and practices. Improved information management and reporting structures of existing information systems will improve National Headquarters’ ability to perform trend analyses, and to operate in a more proactive manner, which will contribute to effective priority setting and decision making processes

a) Key Priority:

6. Expand the collection and sharing of information and intelligence; facilitate greater contribution; develop new sources of information; and, collect data on new and emerging subject areas and exchange ballistics information on firearms between Canada and the United States

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Criminal Intelligence has continued to strategically deploy resources across the country to assist the Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms (ICCUF) initiative in the collection, development and sharing of firearms related information and intelligence
  • CISC has published the first National Strategic Firearms Assessment. This strategic assessment is to assist the law enforcement community and senior government officials with informed policy making and strategic planning
  • CISC made a major contribution to the publication Combating Illicit Firearms. This Canada/US overview was co-produced with the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the US Customs & Border Protection, and the US Immigration & Customs Enforcement under the auspices of the Consultative Group on Firearms Trafficking of the Canada/US Cross-Border Crime Forum. The Canadian component was written by CISC in collaboration with the Canada Firearms Centre, the National Weapons Enforcement Support Team (NWEST), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), and Provincial Weapons Enforcement Units (PWEU)
  • Controlling the illegal movement of firearms is integral to the fight against organized crime and terrorism in Canada. To reduce gun crime in Canada, the RCMP’s NWEST provided the Canadian law enforcement community with enforcement support regarding the criminal use of firearms. NWEST supports the ability of Canadian law enforcement agencies to address the smuggling and trafficking of illegal weapons, to increase Canadian expertise in criminal information gathering on the illegal movement of firearms, and to enhance the capability of Canadian law enforcement to trace illegal weapons
  • The Canadian National Firearms Tracing Centre provides an extensive firearms tracing service for all Canadian police services. The Centre uses a Web-based connection called E-Trace, which allows tracing requests to be sent directly to the ATF. In 2006-2007, approximately 2,800 traces were conducted using this system
  • The Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network (CIBIN) enhanced Canada’s capacity to link firearms crimes to each other and to weapons through a Memorandum of Understanding with the United States to allow the electronic exchange of ballistic information with the US network. As of March 31, 2007, CIBIN had accumulated a total of 517 “hits” since its inception, all connecting firearms to crimes or linking crime scenes. There are now over 18,600 individual bullets and cartridges entered into the system
  • The Tactical Analysis Unit provides “actionable” intelligence to law enforcement units across Canada to assist them in investigating and prosecuting those involved in the movement of illicit firearms. The Unit also provides information to agencies such as CISC for strategic intelligence purposes and the development of the National Strategic Firearms Threat Assessment (the 2006 National Strategic Firearms Threat Assessment was recently produced by CISC)
  • Developed a streamlined and integrated reporting process for Federal and International Operations (FIO)’s Drug Operations. Upon developing this initiative within the D&OC Branch, the goal was to inventory and streamline the reports requested of Divisions, by HQ. However, it became clear quickly that while the reports were a main issue facing the collection and sharing of data and information, the collection faced deeper problems. A more detailed project plan and approach was developed and, through Divisional consultations, further detail was sought and evaluated

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Forensic Science & Identification Services (FS&IS) will complete the alignment of Firearms Support Services. Established in 2006, the Firearms Support Services Directorate (FSSD) is comprised of the National Weapons Enforcement Support Team (NWEST), the Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network (CIBIN), and the Firearms Reference Table (FRT), all of which provide direct support to police investigations of firearms smuggling and trafficking. NWEST provides training and investigative support and operates the Canadian National Tracing Centre and the Firearms Tactical Analysis Unit. CIBIN links cartridges and bullets from crime scenes through ballistic analysis, while the FRT provides standards for describing and classifying firearms. The alignment of these services will allow the RCMP to provide an integrated response to the current government commitment to address gun violence
  • The RCMP’s Technological Crime Branch is enhancing its support to organized crime intelligence and investigations by leveraging the effective sharing of specialized technical tools and utilities with trusted partners in the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Electronic Crimes Committee, the Five Eyes Cyber Crime Work Group, and the G8 High Tech Crime Sub-Committee.
  • Launch and continue development of Project Lion and National Backstopping data bank enhancements. The Backstopping database initiative involves enhancements to the current Lion platform. The purposes of these enhancements are: to make the database user-friendly by upgrading the search and input capabilities of the software; and to expand the type of information that may be stored

a) Key Priority:

7. Build new and strengthen existing partnerships, both within Canada and internationally

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Through the Cross-Border Crime Forum, the RCMP Criminal Intelligence Program, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration completed a Canada/US threat assessment on transnational organized crime. This threat assessment identified priority Organized Crime groups for joint investigation. For this threat assessment the US agencies utilized the RCMP threat assessment model including SLEIPNIR
  • The RCMP continued to participate in various crime forums around the world as a means of sharing our experience and supporting other foreign governments in fighting the global face of organized crime
  • Hosted the 5th Annual Tobacco Diversion Workshop in partnership with the CBSA, CRA, ATF and Alcohol & Tobacco Tax & Trade Bureau (TTB) to devise bi-national strategies to combat the illicit tobacco trade and the involvement of transnational organized crime
  • The Director of Federal Enforcement Branch is the Co-Chair of the Interpol Intellectual Property Crime Action Group (IIPCAG), a body comprised of law enforcement and private sector representatives which provides Interpol’s General Secretariat with expert advice on matters pertaining to intellectual property crime
  • The RCMP is also actively involved in the Fake Free North America initiative within the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America, working trilaterally towards enhancing detection and deterrence of counterfeiting and piracy, expanding public awareness and outreach efforts regarding trade in pirated and counterfeit goods, and developing measurements to assess progress over time and to estimate the magnitude of the problem
  • Drawing on the personal experience and expertise of Canadian police personnel deployed abroad, the RCMP has been able to support the collection of information/intelligence. This has served to enhance Canadian investigation of criminal organizations
  • Canada has authorized the deployment of 100 police personnel to Haiti, a country that has been identified as a key region in facilitating the supply of drugs from South America to North America. The development of Haitian National Police capacity to respond to these challenges through the deployment of Canadian subject matter experts, serves to advance investigations of interest to Canadian law enforcement
  • As part of the Provincial Reconstruction Team in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Canadian police are directly involved in the training of local police. Canadian civilian police participation in the development and professionalization of the Afghanistan National Police will not only assist in creating a secure and stable environment for the development of all Afghanistan institutions, but it will also diminish the capacity of Afghan-based extremist/terrorist groups and illicit drug traffickers to adversely affect the safety and security of Canadians at home and abroad

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Working with key international partners, Criminal Intelligence will expand the identification and sharing of information on trans-national organized crime groups to enhance public safety
  • Coordinate joint operations with US Departments and educate them on the role of the RCMP in organized crime investigations. The purpose for this initiative is to develop relations with international partners in order to conduct joint international investigations on matters relevant to organized crime
  • Enhance cooperation with domestic and international partners such as PWEU, NWEST, CBSA and ATF to target firearms smuggling

a) Key Priority:

8. Contribute to public policy at earliest stage of development

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • A member of the RCMP was nominated to an international expert group tasked with further elaborating the illicit trade in tobacco products obligations set out in Article 15 of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) into a protocol template. (www.who.int/gb/fctc/PDF/cop2/FCTC_COP2_9-en.pdf)
  • The RCMP is actively participating on an interdepartmental working group comprised of RCMP, DPS, CBSA, DOJ and other departments, that is working together to address legislative reforms and resource issues for the goal of creating an effective national intellectual property crime enforcement program

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Criminal Intelligence will participate in the development/progression of integrated public policies regarding the criminal environment in Canada in support of strategies to reduce crime through the production of focused criminal intelligence assessments
  • Actively participate in intergovernmental negotiations, set to commence in early 2008, on a protocol on illicit trade in tobacco products which will build upon and complement the provisions of Article 15 of the WHO FCTC (www.who.int/gb/fctc/)

a) Key Priority:

9. Support Canadian law enforcement agencies and the courts in the fight against organized crime by providing the most timely criminal history information while respecting privacy and legal considerations

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The RCMP and the Department of Justice have held consultations regarding the lack of a national policy on disclosure. Consequently, the RCMP has drafted a National policy on disclosure, for tabling at the Joint RCMP/FPS Disclosure Working Group
  • The Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) contributed to the Organized Crime initiative through its management of criminal record and fingerprint files and through the exchange of information with Canadian and international law enforcement agencies. Through the Backlog Elimination Project, CCRTIS has reduced the criminal record and fingerprint backlog by a further 43,000 files in 2006-2007

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Efforts to reduce the existing backlogs in criminal record, civil and criminal fingerprint services will be maintained to ensure the backlog is eliminated by the time all Real Time Identification (RTID) improvements are rolled out

a) Key Priority:

10. Contribute to the fight against organized crime by offering advanced courses, specialized seminars and other learning opportunities to RCMP, Canadian and international police and partner agencies

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • CPC delivered several sessions of the Financial Crime course for police investigators. Approximately 30% of those attending were RCMP officers, with the balance from other Canadian police services
  • The CPC used several investigative “communities of practice” to update other courses that target organized crime, including Tactical Intelligence and Strategic Intelligence
  • The CPC teaches investigators from the RCMP and other Canadian police services techniques to interdict and apprehend organizations engaged in identity theft on the Internet

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • The CPC has piloted a new organized crime investigation course, which it will deliver on a regular basis through 2007-2008 and in future years

a) Key Priority:

11. Conduct applied and theoretical research, contribute to environmental analysis, provide policy analysis development and advice, and conduct program design, policy and program monitoring and evaluation

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Comprehensive review and modifications to FIO drug program policy to ensure effective support of operations. The D&OC Branch performed a complete review of drug program policy to ensure that it was up to date and reflects CDSA and other legislation. Drugs and Organized Crime, Marijuana Grow Operations and Clandestine Laboratories were all identified as priorities. The policies for these three priorities were drafted, sent to Divisions for feedback, finalized and published, bringing all Drug policy in line with national policy
  • In order to advance our understanding of the impact we are having against organized crime groups we must measure the effectiveness of our enforcement actions. It is through this observation that the Disruption Attributes Tool (DAT) was developed in 2005. In its most basic form, the DAT is an analytical systematic instrument used to provide an operational definition of organized crime disruptions. The DAT allows the RCMP to track the number and level of disruptions to targeted organized crime groups. This type of performance indicator provides RCMP senior management with a national comprehensive picture of the impact RCMP enforcement actions are having against targeted organized crime groups. In its second year running, the DAT process has captured a more accurate picture than the previous year

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Review and update the RCMP policy on Sensitive Expenditures. In line with our commitment to accountability and effective stewardship of public funds, reviews will be conducted in several Divisions to identify deficiencies and/or best practices in the administration of covert accounts. New policy guidelines will be developed based on the findings
  • Partner with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit (OTRU) to conduct a knowledge synthesis study of anti-contraband tobacco measures
  • The RCMP recently improved the DAT reporting process to capture a more accurate picture of organized crime disruptions. The new process will be implemented for the 2007/2008 fiscal year and will provide an all-encompassing picture of all proactive (strategic) and reactive (opportunistic) disruptions against organized crime groups

a) Key Priority:

12. Strengthen Canada’s criminal intelligence community by supporting Criminal Intelligence Service Canada’s Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS), the database for sharing criminal intelligence on organized and other serious crime affecting Canada

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • A National ACIIS Governance Committee, consisting of representatives from Canada’s law enforcement community, was established to keep ACIIS up-to-date and to develop the future national criminal intelligence system
  • CISC has implemented real-time intelligence sharing by raising awareness on the issue of timeliness and by enhancing the ACIIS application to facilitate shortening the time between occurrences and data entry on ACIIS

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Criminal Intelligence is implementing an RCMP ACIIS policy to ensure and enhance ACIIS use across the four levels of policing (municipal, provincial, national and international) in order to expand and consolidate the current knowledge base amongst law enforcement

a) Key Priority:

13. Support Canada’s law enforcement community by participating in Criminal Intelligence Service Canada’s Integrated National Collection Plan and contributing to the production of the National Threat Assessment on Organized and Other Serious Crime affecting Canada

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The CISC’s Integrated National Collection Plan was enhanced, in 2006-2007, with better input from CISC member agencies and the National Threat Assessment was further enhanced by including more in-depth reporting on key criminal markets in Canada
  • RCMP Criminal Intelligence resources have contributed significantly to the National Collection Plan by providing criminal intelligence on organized crime groups, working with other police agencies in evaluating information and playing a significant role in drafting assessments
  • The Drugs & Organized Crime Branch has taken a lead role in coordinating the use of intelligence gathered by CISC and its provincial bureaus. Through its involvement with the Council of Public Safety, the RCMP is ensuring threats to public safety are minimized by targeting organized crime at its highest level

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • The new CACP Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime will take steps to use CISC’s Integrated Provincial and National Threat Assessments on Organized Crime to establish intelligence-led enforcement priorities in 2007-2008
  • The CISC’s Integrated National Collection Plan will be further enhanced with the implementation of the new National Intelligence Requirements (NIRs) in 2007-2008

Strategic Priority: Terrorism

Reduce the threat of criminal terrorist activity in Canada and abroad


What Makes This A Priority

  • Government priorities continue to include – public safety and security; commitment to build on the success of Smart Border; strengthened continental security; and increasing international profile
  • Threat of terrorism is still prominent – Voice of the People Gallup poll
  • Threat of terrorism includes: actions waged by state and non-state actors; weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear threats, suicide bombings – taking lives, wreaking havoc on economic infrastructures and creating environment of fear in public
  • Global security environment in transition – unpredictable violence with threats from both natural and man-made sources undermining global stability
  • Threats that cross borders and menace integrity of nations and/or health of citizens remain the key security challenges – transnational character to many threats; threats increasingly generated from diffuse sources; difficult to define; increasingly international in composition
  • The second generation of Al-Qaeda – the radicalization of youth worldwide and entire new generation of Muslim fighters adopting the Al-Qaeda doctrine of global jihad; Al-Qaeda is evolving into an idea or cause rather than a structured group
  • Disruption of terrorist groups progressing, but networks still active – experts estimate there are 30-40 terrorist groups worldwide affiliated with Al-Qaeda, with presence in 60 countries; 18,000 ‘graduates’ from training camps still operational
  • Approximately 85% of Canada’s trade is with the US; more than 300,000 people cross the border every day
  • 3,700 large cargo and passenger ships dock in Canadian ports and nearly 3.5M containers pass through ports annually; many Canadian ports receive some form of international shipping – all are potentially vulnerable

(Sources: Canada’s Performance, 2004; October 2004 Speech from the Throne; RCMP policy centres; Voice of the People international poll; RCMP Environmental Scan, 2004)


Overview

The threat of terrorism in contemporary society is continually changing, presenting a “criminal intelligence challenge” to governments around the world. Potential terrorists have not yet necessarily engaged in criminal activity and are therefore difficult to recognize and impede. Terrorist organizations are increasingly sophisticated, with educated members linked through technology allowing them to operate in cells worldwide. In addition, law enforcement has identified “single issue terrorism” (extremist groups dedicated to specific issues versus widespread political change) as a serious threat.

The worldwide operations base of terrorist groups emphasizes the importance of an integrated policing approach where criminal intelligence is shared among countries around the world.

The RCMP is committed to working in partnership with both domestic and foreign agencies to enhance prevention measures against the threat of terrorism in North America and elsewhere.

The RCMP strategic priority of terrorism continues to focus on “reducing the threat of criminal terrorist activity in Canada and abroad”. Using an intelligence-led, integrated approach, we focus our activities on achieving this goal. Our participation in Canada-US and domestic interdepartmental national security committees and working groups aimed at the enhancement of transport security, border integrity, intelligence and information sharing are examples of this approach. Internationally, the seeking of best practices and enhanced information sharing has been pursued through our active participation in the G8 Roma-Lyon Anti-Crime and Terrorism (ACT) Group.

Plans and Priorities (2006-2007)

The following plans and priorities were listed in the 2006-2007 RPP in relation to the RCMP’s efforts towards reducing the threat of terrorist activity by preventing terrorist groups from operating in Canada and abroad:

1. Contribute collectively to national security by protecting Canadians from terrorism, organized crime and other border-related criminality, while allowing for the secure and effective international movement of people and goods

2. Ensure border integrity – work with partners to create “smart borders”; prevent entry of those who pose terrorist threat

3. Implement national program activity in order to successfully detect, prevent/disrupt and investigate terrorist activity

4. Expand the collection and sharing of information and criminal intelligence with internal and external audiences

5. Produce robust criminal intelligence – to provide a real-time, comprehensive map of terrorism in Canada

6. Build new and strengthen existing partnerships, nationally and internationally

7. Contribute to public policy – enhance RCMP participation in public policy at earliest stage of development

Reduce the threat of criminal terrorist activity in Canada and abroad

Terrorism Strategy Map


Strategic Priority: Organized Crime – Overview of Performance Towards Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: 

  • Reduce the threat of criminal terrorist activity in Canada and abroad
Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Successfully disrupt the planned number of significant terrorist targets in 2006-2007
Planned: 6
7 disruptions recorded:
– 5 in Divisions
– 2 at NHQ
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders/partners who agree the RCMP effectively communicates what it is doing and why it is doing it
Partners:
2005 to 2006: 17%
2006 to 2007: 30%
Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 5%
2006 to 2007: 1%
  • Increase by 5 the number of new partner groups or agencies with whom information is shared
Target: 5
Achieved: 6
  • Increase by 10 the number of new or expanded information sources/techniques that advance specific National Security initiatives
Target: 10
Achieved: 24
  • Achieve 100% successful completion of projects/investigations related to key terrorist targets
Achieved: 100% (594) at mid-year – new RMS preclude continuance
  • Increase to 84% the percentage of stakeholders/partners who agree that the RCMP is a valuable partner in reducing the threat and impact of terrorism
Partners:
2006: 83%
2007: 84%
Stakeholders:
2006: 82%
2007: 80%
  • Double the number of external partners participating in Strategic Priority Working Groups
Target: 4
Achieved: 1
  • Increase to 80% the percentage of stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides valuable input into the development of public policy pertaining to terrorism
2006: 81%
2007: 72%
  • Achieve 100% compliance for investigations which are centrally coordinated in accordance with National Security Policy
Achieved: 100%
  • Attain level of 60% for Border Integrity investigations that are initiated by Intelligence Profiles
Unavailable – IM/IT systems could not track data


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations

$592.9

$626.0
2 – Protective Policing Services
$105.1 $108.9
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

$2,083.4

$2,140.7
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations

$70.3

$81.8
5 – Technical Policing Operations $174.2 $190.8
6 – Policing Support Services $68.5 $190.8
7 – National Police Services $149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations 4,568 3,412
2 – Protective Policing Services 768 593
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 13,610 12,941
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations 547 509
5 – Technical Policing Operations 1,164 1,073
6 – Policing Support Services 326 438
7 – National Police Services 1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates *** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress Towards Achieving Key Priorities (2006-2007)


a) Key Priority:

1. Contribute collectively to national security by protecting Canadians from terrorism, organized crime and other border-related criminality, while allowing for the secure and effective international movement of people and goods

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • It is essential that Canada develop a strong security strategy for Critical Infrastructure. In doing so, the RCMP has been working closely with government departments and the private sector, forming direct and indirect partnerships with security stakeholders within several of Canada’s 10 critical infrastructures and, in particular, the energy, transportation and government sectors
  • The RCMP created the Critical Infrastructure Criminal Intelligence Section (CICI) to assess a range of emerging threats – including terrorism – to the critical infrastructure. The section has forged partnerships with law enforcement, government and private-sector stakeholders to conceptualize and develop a sustainable Suspicious Incident Reporting (SIR) framework including the introduction of the National Security Information Network and its toll-free number
  • Protective Policing continued to ensure the safety of high profile sites, such as Parliament Hill, thereby contributing to national security, the continued safe functioning of the Canadian government, and the safety of the general public
  • The Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) remains a priority for the governments of Canada, the United States and Mexico to address security and prosperity of North America. A tripartite meeting of Ministers responsible for the SPP was held in Ottawa on February 23, 2007 to review the progress of the SPP. Key law enforcement initiatives include: development of a counter-terrorism enforcement strategy; additional RCMP Laison Officers in the US and Mexico; Canada/US radio interoperability for border enforcement; and the development of a reciprocal policy and legal framework to govern integrated Canada/US law enforcement operations
  • The level of protection afforded to all of our protectees continued to be intelligence-led; depending on the circumstances and the intelligence reports, security is adjusted accordingly. The RCMP led the integrated approach in having provincial and municipal police forces and/or national partner agencies work together as one team to provide a superior level of protection during visits by our protectees. An example of Protective Policing’s successful collaboration with a national partner agency are several visits with the military troops in Afghanistan by the Prime Minister and other Ministers; security was handled jointly by RCMP and DND to ensure total safety at all times

b) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Develop an all hazards risk assessment capability with internal and external partners
  • Complete and exercise emergency management plans throughout the RCMP

a) Key Priority:

2. Ensure border integrity – work with partners to create “smart borders”; prevent entry of those who pose terrorist threat

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Integrated Border Enforcement Teams (IBETs) continued to facilitate cooperation and provide a link between all programs responsible for protecting Canadian borders, and those overseeing National Security (NS) criminal investigations. IBETs explore and report on the nature and extent of links between terrorist activities and other forms of cross-border criminal activity including organized crime

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Pursue with the US new and innovative law enforcement models that promote seamless investigations and operations at the Canada-US border to maximize our capacity to respond to the evolving tactics and methods employed by organized crime and terrorists
  • Conduct two concurrent bi-national integrated maritime law enforcement pilot projects, operationally known as the “Shiprider”, with the US Coast Guard
  • Develop an enhanced Crime Awareness package designed to promote, through education and enforcement, increased public and business support and enhance the reporting of border-related crime or suspicious activity. Measures will include the percentage of individuals who are prepared to modify or have modified their behaviour after receiving awareness information along with the percentage of companies (public and private) who are prepared to modify or have modified their practices and policies after receiving information
  • Implement an outreach program to improve the integration of RCMP IBETs’ partners and stakeholders, both internally and externally, with a focus on reinvigorated partnerships and preparing for the next generation of IBETs

a) Key Priority:

3. Implement national program activity in order to successfully detect, prevent/disrupt and investigate terrorist activity

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The Government and the RCMP accepted all of the recommendations in Justice O’Connor’s (Part I) Report of the Events Relating to Maher Arar that highlighted the critically sensitive and high-risk nature of NS criminal investigations, and stressed the need for improved accountability and effectiveness in this area. The recommendations also called for a strengthened central coordination and control of NS criminal investigations, the need for clear policy, direction and monitoring related to information sharing practices, more protection of human rights and privacy, improved training, and culturally sensitive and bias-free policing policies
  • On October 1, 2006, the Commissioner announced a significant restructuring of the Criminal Intelligence Directorate (CID) designed to strengthen the RCMP foundation for intelligence-led policing
  • This restructuring also recognized the need for strong, central control of national security criminal investigations. This was instituted by the new NS Governance Framework for Increased Effectiveness. The establishment of National Security Criminal Investigations (NSCI) will ensure that all NS criminal investigative resources and functions are aligned and controlled from within a single organizational structure. Under this new governance framework and policy, NSCI at National Headquarters monitors NS criminal investigations and provides oversight, guidance and direction where appropriate to the divisions
  • Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSETs) continue to be strategically based in locations across the country. These multi-agency teams collect, share and analyze intelligence on investigations that concern threats to NS and criminal extremism/ terrorism. Duties include intelligence and counter-terrorism in concert with other RCMP, domestic and foreign agencies, the diplomatic community, Parliament and the public
  • The RCMP maintains an accredited forensic explosives analysis facility which will withstand the scrutiny of Canadian law enforcement and the courts with regard to anti-contamination facilities and procedures. The Trace Evidence (TE) Explosives facility continued to upgrade and enhance the explosives analysis capabilities and capacities of the RCMP. New instrumentation, which is technically more advanced, replaced older equipment, and new methods and techniques for analysis of explosives were instituted. This enabled the RCMP and the Government of Canada to be in a state of readiness for national security-related emergencies
  • The CACPP was present on flights by Canadian air carriers designated as requiring protection. As a result, no unauthorized person was successful in gaining control of flights for terrorist or criminal purposes. Through its intelligence-led processes and proactive flight selection, the CACPP was present when London Heathrow International Airport experienced the liquid-explosive IED threat. The CACPP successfully responded to an increased demand for APO service to the UK, with no disruption to the CACPP’s designated flight commitments or its regimen of proactive selected flight deployments
  • The Prime Minister’s Protection Detail (PMPD) has successfully integrated improved counter-surveillance practices into their standard operating procedures. Inter alia, these improved practices resulted in the successful identification of a group conducting surveillance on the Prime Minister’s motorcade movements
  • CPC provided training courses to the RCMP and all Canadian police services that directly support investigation and interdiction of terrorist activities:
    • A new Financial Investigators’ course was launched, with input from the financial community, to support inquiries into money laundering and other terrorist financing activities. Over 20 investigators completed the pilot course session
    • Sixty police explosives disposal technicians were trained at the CPC at two post-blast investigative courses. Post-blast techniques enable investigators to gather intelligence which is critical to preventing terrorist bomb attacks
    • Other CPC courses which support anti-terrorism investigations include Tactical and Strategic Intelligence, Polygraph Examiner, and Computer Forensic Examiner

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • The development of a Disruption Attributes Tool (DAT) for NSCI will be completed and begin to be rolled out across the NS Program in 2007-2008. The NS DAT will provide NSCI with the capability to quantitatively measure the level of disruption of terrorist groups or their activities as a result of NSCI actions
  • NCSI’s ability to implement the central coordination and control of NS criminal investigations will require a substantial internal reallocation of resources. Accordingly, a rigorous capacity review will be conducted across the entire National Security Program to determine where the resource gaps are, and what is required to mitigate the increasing file load on INSETs, NSIS and at RCMP Headquarters
  • NSCI will establish a National Office of Investigative Standards and Practices (OISP). It will heighten oversight, increase accountability and work closely with those responsible for the external review of NS criminal investigations across the RCMP. A key function of the OISP will be to institute and manage a program for accreditation of Team Commanders. Team Commanders, or case managers, are the single point of responsibility and accountability for major cases. OISP’s responsibilities would include ensuring field compliance with CPC’s principles of Major Case Management through audits and review of investigations
  • Improve national security training to ensure compliance with investigative standards model (Major Case Management) for the national security program and meet the needs of Justice O’Connor’s Part I report
  • A joint RCMP-CSIS strategic training model has been instituted to enhance the operational relationship of both organizations in the area of counter-terrorism. Components of the course include information sharing, assessing the accuracy and reliability of information, organization mandates and roles. During 2007-2008, the course will undergo some modifications to better serve the needs of a more senior CSIS management audience
  • Support National Security Investigations through effective Incident Director training and support at the National Operations Centre
  • The Trace Evidence Explosives facility will continue to develop opportunities for integration between the explosives program and the CRTI/CBRN program to obtain the maximum advantage of the capabilities of both units. It is developing a business continuity plan with Canadian forensic laboratory partners to allow for the provision of critical forensic explosive examinations in the event of an incident or natural disaster rendering the RCMP laboratory unavailable

a) Key Priority:

4. Expand the collection and sharing of information and criminal intelligence with internal and external audiences

6. Build new, and strengthen existing, partnerships, nationally and internationally

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Domestic plots such as the one disrupted by the arrests of 18 people in Toronto in June 2006, together with the London, England bombings of July 7, 2005, underscore the unsettling phenomenon of domestic radicalization inspired by extremist ideology. The RCMP is engaged in a number of initiatives to better understand the radicalization process by working with domestic and international partners, minority communities and academia to develop new, and improve existing, strategies to identify and prevent the threat posed by radicalization leading to political violence
  • The RCMP National Security Community Outreach Program (NSCOP), established in 2005, is a comprehensive effort to engage all of Canada’s diverse ethnic, cultural and religious communities, in order to protect national security. The Program was created to address issues raised by representatives of diverse communities during the O’Connor Commission of Inquiry and the Anti-Terrorism Act Review. The Program is continuing with many initiatives this year to assist RCMP investigators in their work, for example:
    • The establishment of the National Security National Capital Region Community Advisory Committee (CAC) comprised of representatives from diverse Muslim and/or Arab Canadian communities in Ottawa. The committee works with the RCMP to ensure quality delivery of policing services in the National Security Program
    • Community representatives organizing events for RCMP NS employees to speak to their communities on the RCMP’s NS role, policies and practices and provide career information
    • Community-designed and delivered Cultural Awareness training for investigators and intelligence analysts
    • A NS Youth Outreach Program has been established, along with a youth steering committee
  • The Trace Evidence (TE) Explosives facility provided scientific intelligence to Canada’s criminal justice and security agencies, and formed partnerships nationally and internationally to exchange information, align, and where possible, integrate system capabilities
  • The CPC was engaged with international police services, maintaining partnerships by providing training to senior police officers from a range of European, Asian and Caribbean nations. Approximately 90 international police officers attended CPC, representing ten countries
  • Protective Policing continued to play an important role in developing strong partnerships nationally and internationally through such activities as: providing advice to foreign police and security services on security for major events; consulting and leading international collaboration in the field of air carrier protection; advising partner agencies on the use of the threat-assessment process for intelligence-led deployments; and the sharing of training initiatives and best practices with similar agencies worldwide
  • The Critical Infrastructure Criminal Intelligence Section (CICI) examines a range of emerging criminal threats – including terrorism – to the critical infrastructure. The section has forged partnerships nationally and internationally with law enforcement, government and private-sector stakeholders to conceptualize and develop a sustainable Suspicious Incident Reporting (SIR) framework. CICI continues to represent the RCMP in governmental, critical infrastructure sector, and federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) working groups, to ensure law enforcement needs are considered when developing and implementing new initiatives relative to the protection of the Critical Infrastructure
  • CICI is also developing, with Public Safety and Transport Canada, training for law enforcement and rail and urban transit operators of jurisdiction to be better able to detect and report suspicious behaviours and activities which could be terrorist pre-attack planning and preparation
  • Actively participated in meetings of the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) Operational Experts Group (OEG) which aims to help prevent the proliferation of WMD, their delivery systems, and related materials, through enhanced interdiction efforts

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Conduct with partners an all-hazards risk assessment
  • The Critical Infrastructure Criminal Intelligence Section (CICI) is expanding its capability to produce criminal intelligence products and conducts criminal threat and risk assessments (TRAs) to inform, not only government and law enforcement partners, but also private-sector security stakeholders. Criminal TRAs are an essential component of Critical Infrastructure security stakeholders risk and vulnerability assessment activities
  • The RCMP is working with the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police’s (CACP) Counter-terrorism and National Security Committee (CTNS) to develop a strategic plan for 2007-2009 that will provide strong leadership to the broader law enforcement community to help reduce the threat of terrorist criminal activity in Canada. The CACP represents 60,000 sworn police officers across Canada; success in harnessing their local knowledge and community links to the work of more specialized integrated investigative units like the Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSETs), will leverage existing police resources more effectively in countering terrorism
  • In 2007-2008, CICI will implement a suspicious incident reporting and analytic framework in direct support of the RCMP’s intelligence-led mandate to detect, deter and disrupt threats to the Critical Infrastructure. The framework will streamline the reporting, collection and analysis of information regarding suspicious activities which could pose a threat to national safety and security. It will also promote integration with security intelligence and law enforcement agencies
  • The framework will be tested in the Rail and Urban Transit sector before a more permanent and robust SIR framework is developed and implemented for all 10 Critical Infrastructure sectors
  • Continue to implement and enhance the National Security Community Outreach Program
  • Enhance divisional relationships with the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security
  • The CPC will be offering a post-blast workshop at APEC in early 2008, focusing on anti-terrorist investigations in the public transit area. In addition, the CPC will be strengthening partnerships with Australia through the Visiting International Fellow program, with French-speaking nations via membership in “Francopol”, and with Latin America by the delivery of courses there
  • Work with federal partners to develop a PSI outreach program which will inform and educate industry on the risk and outcomes of dealing with proliferators
  • In close collaboration with other government departments, develop a national protocol to enhance cooperation, coordination and response to proliferation incidents

a) Key Priority:

5. Produce robust criminal intelligence – to provide a real-time, comprehensive map of terrorism in Canada

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The activities of General Duty Protective members were expanded in support of gathering information during their routine patrols; this has proven to be a valuable contribution to the intelligence process determining potential threats to the people and sites under RCMP protection

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Modernize the National Operations Centre to ensure effective support of criminal investigations of terrorist activity in Canada and abroad.
  • The implementation of a suspicious incident reporting and analytic framework in direct support of the RCMP’s intelligence-led mandate to detect, deter and disrupt threats to the Critical Infrastructure will assist law enforcement in operational decision making

a) Key Priority:

7. Contribute to public policy – enhance RCMP participation in public policy at earliest stage of development

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Protective Policing contributed to public policy issues affecting the security of Canada and Canadian interests ( e.g., Parliamentary Precinct Security, 2010 Olympics, and legal issues involving APOs in foreign countries)

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • CICI continues to represent the RCMP in governmental, critical infrastructure sector and federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) working groups, to ensure law enforcement needs are considered when developing and implementing new initiatives under the Government’s National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP)

Strategic Priority: Youth

Prevent and reduce youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders


What Makes This A Priority

  • Government priorities and social policies continue to include children, caregivers and seniors; public safety and security; crime prevention/diversion; learning and innovation
  • Rising family dissolution – one in four children live through parental separation by age 10; 19% live with single parent, primarily mother; children who experience separation/divorce are more likely to separate in adult life
  • Child poverty rate has remained steady at about 15% in past three decades – 1 in 6 – or 1M children growing up poor
  • Poverty among children of recent immigrants (those arriving in Canada within the last ten years) – more than twice national rates
  • Number of people using food banks up 92% in past decade – estimated 42% of users are children; also homeless
  • UNICEF report on child poverty – ranks Canada 17th out of 23 developed countries on child well-being
  • Children of low income families exhibit higher rates of poor health, hyperactivity and delayed vocabulary development – evidence that early childhood development, parental and family leave and child care programs redress economic disadvantages associated with poorer health outcomes
  • Technological advances are continuing to facilitate increased availability of child pornography in Canada and internationally
  • Criminal networks have emerged on-line in order to share child pornography and learn from others
  • Reports of child pornography cases (which represent the possession, manufacture and distribution of images depicting children being sexually abused and exploited by adults) have risen dramatically – a fourfold increase between 1998 and 2003, according to the US Department of Justice
  • In terms of luring offences, a US study (conducted by Janis Wolak et al) has found that 1 in 7 children (ages 10 to 17) have received unwanted sexual solicitations on-line. Four percent of these solicitations were defined as aggressive (i.e., offline contact such as telephone, regular mail, or in person was made following on-line communication)
  • A significant number of pedophile networks have been increasingly emerging on-line, involving individuals worldwide
  • Globally, it has been estimated that annual profits from child sexual abuse images are in the billions of dollars

(Sources: Wolak, Janis, Mitchell, Kimberly and David Finkelhor (2006) “Online Victimization of Youth: Five Years Later. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; RCMP Environmental Scan, 2004; CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada, 2004; CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada 2005, Canada’s Performance 2004; October 2004 Speech from the Throne; RCMP National Youth Strategy)


Overview

Both nationally and internationally, it is recognized that economic disparity may increase the potential for criminality.

In Canada, almost 20% of children live in low-income households. These children are twice as likely to live with violence, and more than three times as likely to live with a depressed parent.

To successfully address youth crime and victimization, police must continue to increase their involvement in non-traditional policing roles. This means taking what we have learned about crime prevention and factors associated with crime and shaping RCMP service delivery to reflect this knowledge. When considering the Youth strategic priority, social development, root causes, community wellness and problem-solving provide the cornerstones of our work.

Planned Improvements to Key Performance Goals

The RCMP Youth Charge and Diversion numbers have been adjusted and now do not include Traffic Offences or Municipal By-laws. The 2006 numbers will continue to be used as the baseline from which valid comparisons can be made to determine program impact in the long-term reduction of Youth involvement in crime both as offenders and victims. The 2007 numbers are not yet available.

The Youth Priority already has two outside agencies, Directors General from the Department of Justice and National Crime Prevention Council, participating on the Strategic Priority Working Group, and has welcomed a third from Industry Canada. Expanding and strengthening our partnerships with outside agencies fosters an environment for developing and executing a horizontal integrated strategy for the Youth Priority.

Some key areas require improvement. We must formulate a communication strategy to improve our rating amongst stakeholders and partners. This strategy will focus on effectively and accurately communicating why and what the RCMP has to offer its clients, stakeholders and partners.

Plans and Priorities

The RCMP Youth strategic priority places much emphasis on activities that address root causes and enhance community capacity. This approach follows the “crime prevention through social development” model, which requires strong linkages to partners in the community, including schools and other social or youth-oriented agencies. Identifying and making early interventions in the lives of youth at risk by targeted educational and preventive programs, and using diversion and restorative justice strategies where appropriate, must be combined with broad-based community crime prevention and school-based liaison and drug awareness programs.

The following plans and priorities were listed in the 2006-2007 RPP in relation to the RCMP’s efforts towards preventing and reducing youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders:

1. Prevent youth crime by addressing the underlying causes and respond to needs of young persons, especially those in situations of risk

2. Optimize responses to youth who offend with an emphasis on early intervention, meaningful consequences, restorative approaches and community involvement

3. Build on community capacity to prevent crime and use restorative processes by seeking input from communities, especially youth and youth-serving organizations, and by providing expertise and leadership in facilitating community problem-solving, prevention and intervention strategies

4. Enhance the protection of children on the Internet and the pursuit of those who use technology to exploit them

5. Contribute valued public policy advice

6. Prevent crime in Canada’s youth by providing appropriate courses and other learning opportunities to police officers

7. Disseminate information, internally and externally, on good policing practices with youth and the benefits of crime prevention through social development

Prevent and reduce youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders

Youth Strategy Map


Strategic Priority: Youth – Overview of Performance Towards Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: 

  • Prevent and reduce youth involvement in crimes as victims and offenders
Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Reduce by 3% the percentage of youth charged nationally
Baseline to be established
  • Increase by 3% the number of chargeable youth dealt with outside the formal court system
Baseline to be established
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders who agree the RCMP effectively communicates what it is doing and why it is doing it
Partners:
2005 to 2006: 32%
2006 to 2007: 23%
Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 4%
2006 to 2007: 8%
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides accurate and complete information about its programs and services
Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 4%
2006 to 2007: 5%
  • Increase to 84% the percentage of stakeholders/partners who agree that the RCMP is a valuable partner in preventing and reducing youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders

Partners:
2006: 68%
2007: 81%
Stakeholders:
2006: 81%
2007: 83%

  • Double the number of external partners participating in Strategic Priority Working Groups
2005-2006 baseline: 2
2006-2007: 3
New baseline: 4
  • Increase to 80% the percentage of stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides valuable input into the development of public policy pertaining to youth issues
Stakeholders:
2006: 76%
2007: 70%


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations

$592.9

$626.0
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

$2,083.4

$2,140.7
5 – Technical Policing Operations $174.2 $190.8
7 – National Police Services $149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations 4,568 3,412
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 13,610 12,941
5 – Technical Policing Operations 1,164 1,073
7 – National Police Services 1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress Towards Achieving Key Priorities (2006-2007)

a) Key Priorities:

1. Prevent youth crime by addressing the underlying causes and respond to needs of young persons, especially those in situations of risk

2. Optimize responses to youth who offend with an emphasis on early intervention, meaningful consequences, restorative approaches and community involvement

3. Build on community capacity to prevent crime and use restorative processes by seeking input from communities, especially youth and youth-serving organizations, and by providing expertise and leadership in facilitating community problem-solving, prevention and intervention strategies

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

The focus for 2006-2007 was on community plans and engagement, as a basis for developing more successful preventive policies and programs:

Highlights of Youth Community Plans 2005/2006 & 2006/2007 Trends Report:

  • The RCMP completed its analysis of the youth community plans. A total of 743 plans were analyzed over a two-year period (368 in 2005/2006; 375 in 2006/2007). These were based on the extensive sustained efforts of RCMP frontline members to consult and partner with their communities to identify youth issues, including underlying causes along with risk and protective factors. It is through these detachment youth community plans that the RCMP, with its many partners, are addressing the root causes of crime so that young people are less likely to become victims or offenders
  • National Consultations:
    • A total of 11 consultation types were available to check off in the youth community plan template
    • The minimum average number of consultations held by detachments = four

Top 5 consultations (most frequently undertaken over two-year period)
  1. Municipal Government/Council meeting (73%)
  2. Meeting with multiple agency partners (69%)
  3. Discussion formal/informal (68%)
  4. Town hall/Community meeting (54%)
  5. Youth focus group (49%)

The percentages in this table are an average of the percentage for both years.


  • National Risk & Protective Factors:
    • A total of 19 risk factors and 16 protective factors were available to check off in the youth community plans template
    • The most frequently identified risk and protective factors over two years are presented in the following tables:

Top 10 Risk Factors
  1. Positive attitudes, values or beliefs
  2. Availability of services
  3. Positive role models
  4. Success at school
  5. Good peer group/friends
  6. Favourable socioeconomic conditions
  7. Attention to mental physical, spiritual and emotional health
  8. Positive self-esteem
  9. Participation in traditional healing and cultural activities
  10. Conflict resolutions skills

The percentages in this table are an average of the percentage for both years.


  • National Issues:
    • Issues were analyzed by primary (No. 1) issues and by secondary issues (all others)
    • Secondary issues were analyzed to provide a more in-depth and accurate understanding
    • The issues most frequently identified over two years are presented in the following tables
  • Primary Issues:
    • Frequency of primary issues: one issue counted per detachment/community in tables and graphs

Top 5 National Primary Issues (grouped by major category)
  1. Substance abuse issues = 55% of all primary issues
  2. Violence issues = 11.5% of all primary issues
  3. Property crime issues = 10.5% of all primary issues
  4. Miscellaneous issues* = 9% of all primary issues
  5. Other issues = 5% of all primary issues

* Miscellaneous issues = mostly lack of services, then boredom and loitering
The percentages in this table are an average of the percentage for both years


  • Secondary Issues:
    • Frequency of secondary issues: one to 17 issues counted per detachment/community
    • Strong reciprocal relation between primary and primary+secondary issues

Top 5 National Primary and Secondary Issues (grouped by major category)
  1. Substance abuse issues = 34% of all issues
  2. Violence issues = 16% of all issues
  3. Property crime issues = 15% of all issues
  4. Miscellaneous issues* = 12% of all issues
  5. Other issues = 10% of all issues

* Miscellaneous issues = mostly lack of services, then boredom and loitering
The percentages in this table are an average of the percentage for both years


  • Initiatives:
    • A total of three initiatives per detachment/community (average) were undertaken to address each primary issue
    • One to two initiatives per detachment/community (average) were undertaken to address each secondary issue

Initiatives for Primary Issues
  1. Substance abuse issues 59% of initiatives undertaken nationally
  2. Property crime issues 11% of initiatives undertaken nationally
  3. Violence issues 10% of initiatives undertaken nationally
  4. Miscellaneous issues 6.5% of initiatives undertaken nationally
  5. Other issues 5% of initiatives undertaken nationally

The percentages in this table are an average of the percentage for both years..


  • By far, the largest percentage of initiatives undertaken over the two years were to address substance abuse issues
  • The most common initiatives undertaken to address substance abuse were:
    • The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program
    • Substance abuse education awareness
    • Recreation/sports activities
  • The most common initiatives undertaken to address property crime were:
    • Vandalism education/awareness
    • Citizens on Patrol
    • Increased enforcement/patrols
  • The most common initiatives undertaken to address violence were:
    • Violence/bullying awareness
    • Substance abuse enforcement initiatives

a) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Build on community capacity to prevent crime and use restorative processes by seeking input from communities, especially youth and youth-serving organizations, and by providing expertise and leadership in facilitating community problem solving, prevention and intervention strategies
  • Increase horizontal communication and seek a more effective mechanism for funding youth initiatives in Canada’s north through continued support and advancement of the Northern Youth Action Strategy

a) Key Priority:

4. Enhance the protection of children on the Internet and the pursuit of those who use technology to exploit them

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) is committed to enabling law enforcement in their investigation of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation. All priority files where a child is at imminent risk were forwarded to police agencies within the same business day
  • The NCECC attained an 80% compliance rate for files and information forwarded to police agencies within seven days of receiving a complaint. Impediments that influence the processing of file and information transfers are the increasing complexity of files and Internet Service Provider (ISP) refusals, both circumstances beyond internal control
  • The Victim Identification Unit within the NCECC was established to develop effective methods of identifying and locating victims of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation. Canadian investigators, often in collaboration with the NCECC, have identified approximately 216 Canadian children and numerous international children who were victims of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation
  • The Canadian Police College (CPC) delivered the Canadian Internet Child Exploitation Course (CICEC) to 57 investigators in 2006-2007, with a cumulative total of 200. The Advanced Internet Child Exploitation Course was developed and piloted in 2006, with 32 officers trained to date These courses, developed with the assistance of the NCECC, provide investigators with the tools to pursue those who attempt to exploit young children via the Internet. The CPC also entered into a partnership with the Ontario Police College to deliver these courses at their college in Aylmer, Ontario. Several other CPC courses have a youth component, including Drug Investigative Techniques, Clandestine Lab Investigation, and Aboriginal Domestic Violence

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Continued development and implementation of the Canadian Image Database of Exploited Children to assist in the identification and rescue of children
  • Capacity to conduct covert operations within NCECC will prevent potential offences and deter offenders
  • Education of frontline service providers will be prioritized to ensure that they understand the gravity of, recognize the indicators of, and take appropriate action in Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation cases. Video training has been developed and translated with roll-out planned for Fall 2007
  • The CPC will continuously adapt the NCECC investigative course CICEC in response to changing technology and conditions on the Internet, and will increase the number of investigators trained in response to feedback from the police community

a) Key Priority:

5. Contribute valued public policy advice

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • While the focus for 2006-2007 was on community plans and engagement, significant progress was also made on public policy input and on key components of the National Youth Officer Program. This includes the Youth Officer Resource Center and Community Engagement training, to ensure police officers are provided with valuable resources, tools and skills to address the underlying causes and respond to needs of young persons, especially those in situations of risk
  • National Youth Services participates on the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO) for Youth Justice to provide input around the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) including the pre-trial detention sub-committee. Engagement at the national level with Health Canada, Department of Justice and other partners has provided the momentum necessary to advance a holistic approach to youth concerns

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • We will seek increased presence at policy tables and heightened coordination within and across governments, and with internal and external partners and stakeholders, with emphasis on directing special attention to those who are in greater need

a) Key Priority:

6. Prevent crime in Canada’s youth by providing appropriate courses and other learning opportunities to police officers

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • We have developed the National Youth Officer Program, which provides training for Police Officers identified to work with youth of all ages in a variety of venues including schools. The Youth Officer training program aims to develop and improve skill sets for members on a variety of educational, safety, intervention and referral topics. This training will help members recognize youth at risk and offer intervention skills to reduce the numbers of youth involved in crime as victims and offenders. Community engagement is a key component within the training, recognizing the community’s valuable contribution to the well-being of youth and its impact in the prevention of youth crime by addressing underlying causes. We have completed a draft Policy for police officers working with schools, as well as the Youth Officer and supervisor competency profiles that help ensure the right member is in the position of guiding Canadian youth
  • We undertook the School Action for Emergencies (SAFE) Plan, an operational support tool for members responding to emergencies in a school environment. The SAFE Plan will contain pertinent site-specific information such as staging areas, observation points, traffic points, floor plans and photographs of all schools in RCMP jurisdictions. A national database has been developed to house SAFE Plan data for all schools policed by the RCMP. The SAFE Plan has received support from the Canadian Association of Principals, the Canadian Teachers Federation, the Canadian Association of School Administrators and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. It is being implemented by partnering Canadian police agencies, and also as an integrated response at school sites within RCMP and neighbouring jurisdictions
  • A Youth Officer Resource Centre has been set up as an internal website providing tools, tips and education for members working with youth. The website contains carefully selected crime prevention/educational presentations targeted at specific age groups. The tools available reflect the community issues identified through the Youth Community Plans. Accessibility is country-wide, promoting the delivery of consistent messages and providing members with access to information regarding successful programs targeting rehabilitation and integration of youth

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Additional training and learning materials are in development to support police officers in the implementation of the criminal justice legislation and forthcoming amendments
  • Continued implementation of the National Youth Officer program will lead to increased visibility and accessibility of police officers within schools
  • We will complete the development of a National Youth Intervention Program, as an effective diversion strategy to intervene at an early stage for youth who may be experiencing difficulties
  • A national network is in development to promote wellness among children and youth through the sharing of education, assessment and intervention tools, as are policies and protocols related to “crime prevention through social development”, which can be used and implemented in communities everywhere in Canada

a) Key Priority:

7. Disseminate information, internally and externally, on good policing practices with youth and the benefits of crime prevention through social development

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The website www.deal.org, a “by youth for youth” initiative, continued to grow as a means of reaching youth with information on issues that are important to them. The website provides a forum for expression, encourages leadership, and incites youth to take a stand and get involved in their schools and communities. It also makes available the tools needed to make healthy life choices and to overcome obstacles in personal, family and community life. Deal.org was recognized in 2006 by the Treasury Board Secretariat for exceeding its Government-on-Line commitments, with the number of hits on the deal.org website surpassing one million monthly
  • Under the Northern Youth Action Strategy, a community-based “crime prevention through social development” (CPSD) pilot project was initiated in Pangnirtung, Nunavut. The project builds on the RCMP’s experience and success in community safety initiatives and in particular with sustainable approaches to CPSD. This initiative is based on community consultation, the identification and prioritization of community issues and concerns, the development and implementation of action plans, and the ongoing evaluation and assessment of both the process and the impact by all partners

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • We will design generic exercises under the School Action for Emergencies (SAFE) Plan that will be distributed across Canada

Strategic Priority: Economic Integrity

Contribute to Canada’s economic integrity through crime reduction


What Makes This A Priority

  • Economic crime is a growing trend, impacting both Canadian and global economies
  • February 2005 Ipsos-Reid survey indicates 80% of Canadian adults consider identity theft a serious problem and 17% say that someone they know has been a victim of identity theft
  • Based on the most recent data, it is estimated that the global illicit cigarette trade was 10.7% of total sales in 2006, representing a loss to government revenue of $US 40 to 50 billion annually
  • 22% of cigarettes smoked in Canada are illegal – up from 16.5% in 2006 or a 30% increase (GfK Research). It is estimated that the illicit trade cost federal and provincial governments $1.6 billion per year in lost revenues
  • Nearly 75% of Canadians agree that the illegal tobacco trade is a serious problem
  • 37% of multinational firms have experienced significant economic fraud
  • Exploiting globalization and new technologies, criminals resort to increasingly elaborate and transnational methods, challenging more conventional forms of law enforcement investigation and prosecution
  • Global impact of counterfeit products has increased from $100M US in 1992 to over $600B US in 2004
  • China is source of 2/3 of pirated goods
  • 80% of counterfeit goods in Canada originate from the Asia-Pacific region
  • The World Health Organization estimates that 10% of the world’s pharmaceuticals are counterfeit
  • In Canada, money laundering is a multi-billion dollar problem
  • Money laundering represents 2-5% of global GDP
  • According to the International Monetary Fund, global estimates of money laundering range from between US$590B and $1.5T
  • Direct cost of Intellectual property crime to Canada is estimated at $10-13B annually
  • Increasing range of potentially harmful counterfeit products being found in Canada, e.g., pharmaceuticals, electrical products
  • Canada leads G10 nations in measured vulnerability to counterfeiting of banknotes
  • Currency counterfeiting is on the rise in Canada
  • Fraud in its many forms has been on the rise since 2001
  • Credit card fraud has been rising steadily since 1990 in Canada – in 2006, losses from credit card fraud amounted to C$292M
  • Debit card fraud is an emerging issue, comprising 42% of reported identity thefts in 2003. In 2006, losses from debit card fraud amounted to C$94M

(Source: RCMP Environmental Scan, 2005;Feature Focus: Economic Crime, CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada 2005, RCMP Policy Centres)


Overview

Economic Integrity refers to consumer and investor confidence in Canada’s financial, currency and equity market systems. A safe and secure economy provides confidence for consumers and investors in conducting business, investing and saving. The RCMP contributes to Canada’s Economic Integrity through crime reduction, with an aim of supporting the economic and social well-being of all Canadians.

Concerns extend beyond financial crime, touching many areas – counterfeit goods and currency; corporate fraud; theft of intellectual property and identity fraud. These problems can impact the overall Canadian economy through loss of confidence, nationally and internationally, in our country’s institutions and markets.

Plans and Priorities (2006-2007)

The following plans and priorities were listed in the 2006-2007 RPP in relation to the RCMP’s efforts towards contributing to economic integrity:

1. Prevent, detect and deter criminal activity that affects the Canadian economy

2. Build awareness around crimes that affect the Canadian economy

3. Educate Canadians on the different forms of economic crime and the measures they can take to protect themselves from becoming victims

Contribute to Canada’s economic integrity through crime reduction

Economic Integrity Strategy Map


Strategic Priority: Economic Integrity – Overview of Performance Towards Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: 

  • Contribute to Canada’s economic integrity through crime reduction
Key Performance Goals Performance
  • By 2008, 85% of the individuals who have received information, are prepared to modify or have modified their behaviour
2006: 73%
2007: 74%
  • By 2008, 85% of the companies (public or private) that have received information, are prepared to modify or have modified their policies

2006: 74%
2007: 62%



Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations

$592.9

$626.0
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

$2,083.4

$2,140.7
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations

$70.3

$81.8
5 – Technical Policing Operations $174.2 $190.8
7 – National Police Services $149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations 4,568 3,412
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 13,610 12,941
4 – Criminal Intelligence Operations 547 509
5 – Technical Policing Operations 1,164 1,073
7 – National Police Services 1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress Towards Achieving Key Priorities (2006-2007)


a) Key Priority:

1. Prevent, detect and deter criminal activity that affects the Canadian economy

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Federal Budget 2006 allocated funding to the National Counterfeit Enforcement Strategy

In 2006-2007, dedicated enforcement teams were created and located in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, and Regional Counterfeit Coordinator positions were created and located in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. These dedicated teams, known as Integrated Counterfeit Enforcement Teams (ICET), are mandated to conduct the investigation of organized crime groups involved in the production or high volume distribution of counterfeit currency

  • The RCMP Counterfeit Analysis Project continued to proactively monitor and analyze counterfeit activity, sharing that intelligence with law enforcement agencies across Canada
  • CPC launched a new financial investigators course (FINANC) to equip investigators to address money laundering, fraud and other “white-collar” criminal activities. There was substantial input from the Canadian financial services community in creating and updating this course
  • In 2006, the RCMP seized approximately 500,000 cartons of cigarettes across Canada – 10% higher than in 1994 when RCMP seizures peaked during the cigarette smuggling heyday. In addition, 2006 seizure levels increased 1700% since 2001
  • In consultation with other partners, RCMP Commercial Crime Branch has developed a National Mass Marketing Fraud Strategy to combat increases in fraudulent telemarketing. The strategy includes the amalgamation of the Canadian Anti-Fraud Call Centre and the Reporting of Economic Crime Online (RECOL) capabilities
  • RCMP Criminal Intelligence has an intelligence analyst dedicated to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Call Centre. This analyst works closely with law enforcement and private sector partners in the dissemination and sharing of intelligence on mass marketing fraud and related criminal activity
  • The RCMP continues to work with other government departments and international law enforcement partners – such as Interpol, the FBI and ICE – to investigate intellectual property with the focus on reducing the risk to the health and safety of Canadians, reducing the funds channelled to organized crime and protecting the Canadian legitimate economy and tax revenues
  • The RCMP conducts priority intellectual property crime investigations targeting the manufacturing, importation and wholesale distribution at the highest levels, as per RCMP/DOJ guidelines
  • Under the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering, 12 new resources were allocated to the RCMP to enhance its ability to detect and deter money laundering and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering offences
  • The first charges in a project status investigation were laid by the Greater Toronto Area Integrated Market Enforcement Team (IMET) on September 26, 2006. The Greater Toronto Area IMET charged three individuals with numerous criminal offences relating to the fraudulent manipulation of the share price of a company quoted and traded on a US market. The share price had been manipulated through significant trading directed by Canadian-based suspects. These charges represent the first “project status” investigation charges in the IMET program. On March 22, 2007, the principal accused pleaded guilty to criminal charges, resulting in a prison sentence of seven years being levied
  • On May 11, 2006, Vancouver IMET charged an individual in respect of an $8.1 million (US) fraud affecting approximately 229 victim investors within the province of British Columbia. On May 16, 2006, the individual pleaded guilty and subsequently was sentenced to six years in prison
  • In December 2006, the IMET Program’s mandate was reformulated and, accordingly, the new mandate of the IMET initiative is phrased as follows:

    To investigate serious Criminal Code capital markets fraud offences that are of regional or national significance and threaten investor confidence or economic stability in Canada

    To work to ensure that those who commit these offences are brought to justice in an effective and timely manner

    To collaborate with other law enforcement agencies and securities regulators to ensure that all complaints and inquiries received by the IMETs pertaining to other market offences (e.g., money laundering in capital markets, securities law violations and other commercial crimes and violations) are addressed by the appropriate body. In particular, infractions to the Criminal Code not within the mandate of IMETs will be referred to the RCMP Commercial Crime Branch

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • The FINANC will be delivered by the CPC to at least 100 investigators in 2007-2008 to meet increasing demand. Non-police organizations have asked to participate and a few seats may be accommodated
  • In the face of the growing threat of illicit tobacco trade, a renewed national strategy will be developed in consultation with relevant stakeholders. Efforts will also be undertaken to develop innovative operational responses to stop the flow of contraband tobacco entering Canada in the Central St Lawrence Valley corridor
  • RCMP Commercial Crime has received funding to create two Corruption investigative teams mandated to investigate domestic and international corruption of public officials. The teams will be located in Calgary and Ottawa
  • The Government of Canada recognizes that the IMET approach to capital market enforcement is sound, however results to date suggest room for improvement. Accordingly, as announced in Budget 2007, the Government appointed a senior expert advisor to the RCMP to help develop and guide the implementation of a plan to improve the effectiveness of the IMETs. This will include initiating concrete steps to enable the IMETs to attract and retain the best qualified police and other expert resources, strengthen coordination of the program on a National basis and enhance collaboration with Provincial authorities
  • Enhance collaboration with other law enforcement agencies and securities regulators to ensure that all complaints and inquiries received by the RCMP pertaining to other market offences (e.g., money laundering in capital markets, securities law violations and other commercial crimes and violations) are addressed by the appropriate body.
  • Since 1995, the RCMP has taken a strong leadership role in the formation of a consortium of investment fraud regulators interested in pooling resources to develop computer software that would automate the process of trading analysis. This system, known as Market Integrity by Computer Analysis (MICA), can be used to determine the nature and scope of a given criminal scheme, and to prepare schedules for inclusion in court briefs. The RCMP Integrated Market Enforcement Branch coordinated a MICA software training session held at Ottawa from October 16-20, 2006. However, MICA courses that have been available to date have been offered from a Provincial Securities Commission (i.e., Regulatory) perspective. Accordingly, IMET will be leading in the development of a course geared towards using MICA in a criminal law enforcement environment
  • Integration is a hallmark of the IMET program. With this in mind, and in the spirit of intelligence-led policing, the RCMP has established one Joint Securities Intelligence Unit (JSIU) in each of the four permanent locales in which there are dedicated IMETs. The JSIUs will be comprised of RCMP personnel, employees from provincial securities regulators and secondments from self-regulatory organizations. The RCMP contribution to each JSIU will be one (1) Regular Member investigator and one (1) Civilian Member Intelligence Analyst for a total of eight FTEs nationwide. Now that each JSIU is operational with RCMP staff, the next step is to formalize the day-to-day activities of each unit. Given the Provincial nature of the Canadian securities regulatory environment, the specific composition will be particular to each unit, but the overall objectives of identifying emerging trends and threats will be common to all
  • Integrated Human Resources across the breadth of all of the organizations involved in IMETs
  • Vigorous pursuit of legislative amendments that will enhance our ability to investigate and prosecute capital markets-related fraud
  • Criminal Intelligence will provide threat assessments specifically in support of the Economic Integrity priority

a) Key Priority:

2. Build awareness around crimes that affect the Canadian economy

3. Educate Canadians on the different forms of economic crime and the measures they can take to protect themselves from becoming victims

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • RCMP Commercial Crime Branch has redesigned and implemented the Commercial Crime Investigator Course to reflect advances in investigative techniques
  • The aforementioned Regional Counterfeit Coordinators have been mandated to liaise with local law enforcement and with the Bank of Canada in the development and delivery of public education and awareness programs
  • The RCMP completed a comprehensive report on identity fraud in Canada. This report consists of data collected and collated from a variety of law enforcement and third party sources
  • To inform and alert the public, the Commercial Crime program electronically distributed “Personal Information and Scams Protection: A Student Practical Guide”, a prevention and awareness publication developed in partnership with the University of Ottawa and other post-secondary institutions. In the past year, this document was accessed through the RCMP website more than 20,000 times. Following this success, a similar guide was developed for all Canadians. The “Personal Information and Scams Protection: A Canadian Practical Guide” was posted on the RCMP’s website in March 2007, Fraud Prevention Month. In its first month this guide was accessed more than 3,700 times
  • Within its Commercial Crime Sections and Proceeds of Crime Sections across Canada, the RCMP continued to deliver Merchants-Community Partnership Against Financial Crime public awareness seminars. These seminars are delivered by summer students who have received training specific to counterfeit currency, payment cards, money laundering and identity fraud. These information sessions are directed at a variety of businesses, corporations and members of the public. In 2006-2007, this program reached over 2,400 businesses

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • National harmonization of intelligence and complaint intake mechanisms. Work has begun in earnest on the revitalization of the Securities Fraud Information Centre, which will provide Canadians with a single complaint intake service for any securities-related complaint
  • Establish a baseline with which to measure changes in the integrity of Canadian Capital Markets and thereby enable practitioners in the Canadian securities regulatory and enforcement communities, whose mission is to protect the confidence of Canadians and investors in the integrity of Canada’s Capital Markets, to objectively measure the integrity of Canada’s Capital Markets. As a Balanced Scorecard initiative, the international promotion of this Market Integrity Index (Mi2) research project will solicit the input and feedback of Canadian stakeholders and the international academic community
  • Enhance information-sharing practices between securities regulators and law enforcement agencies
  • Enhance IMET program promotion and awareness

Strategic Priority: Service to Aboriginal Communities

Contributing to the long-term wellness and safety of Aboriginal communities
through a holistic and culturally competent approach


What Makes This A Priority

  • There are 152 FNPP agreements in total in Canada (as of January 2007); 94 RCMP community tripartite agreements (RCMP, First Nations and Provincial agreements); and 10 RCMP – First Nations Community Policing Services Provincial Framework Agreements
  • The RCMP has 544 community plans from its Detachments, representing its policing service to over 600 Aboriginal communities
  • Ongoing Government focus on Aboriginal affairs: long-term development, specific quality of life indicators and accountability report card
  • A statistical profile of Aboriginal communities continues to rank them closer to poor countries than the rest of the Canadian population on key social indicators (i.e., health, life expectancy, disposable income, education)
  • While the Aboriginal population represents a small proportion of Canadian population as a whole, it constitutes significant proportion in some provinces and territories [i.e., in Nunavut, Inuit represent 85% of territory’s total population; 51% of Northwest Territories; almost 1/4 (23%) of Yukon, and about 14% of Manitoba’s and Saskatchewan’s populations]
  • Aboriginal people disproportionately impacted by criminal justice system – in terms of federal incarceration, Aboriginal people account for 18% of those federally incarcerated yet represent only 3.3% of the Canadian population
  • Aboriginal population is younger and growing more quickly than non-Aboriginal; children under 14 represent 1/3 of Aboriginal population – far higher than 19% of Canadian population; Aboriginal youth – key vulnerable population
  • Aboriginal children currently under age 15 will be entering workforce within next 10 to 15 years – in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, these young people may account for 1/4 of new workplace entrants
  • Aboriginal unemployment rate continues to be higher than in the rest of Canadian population; Aboriginal youth (ages 15-24) – twice as likely to be unemployed; part of increasingly diverse homeless population
  • Aboriginal baby boom – many Aboriginal youth are being recruited by organized crime groups and Aboriginal-based gangs – profound effect on gang activity and incarceration rates; other important social implications
  • Aboriginal youth, due to the range of problems caused by poverty, are targeted for recruitment by organized crime gangs for prostitution, smuggling, drugs and other forms of violence and corruption (AFN Resolution No. 70, Development Of A First Nations Youth Gang Prevention Strategy)
  • Close to half of all Canadians (49 %) believe unregulated “smoke shacks” in Aboriginal communities are the primary source for illegal tobacco

(Sources: RCMP Environmental Scan, 2004; Canada’s Performance, 2004; Canada’s Performance, 2005; CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada 200; CISC Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada 2005; October 2004 Speech from the Throne; RCMP policy centres)


Overview

The RCMP has had a long and productive history of service to Aboriginal communities across this country, and has worked successfully to build good relationships with Aboriginal communities serviced in RCMP jurisdictions. In line with the Government of Canada’s priority to build stronger Aboriginal communities, the RCMP is committed to bring a greater focus to this area of policing by dealing with the various challenges Aboriginals face both on and off reserves.

The Aboriginal Communities strategic priority of the RCMP continues to focus on “safer and healthier Aboriginal communities”. RCMP Operations will continue to develop and implement culturally sensitive strategies, plans and programs to address the particular needs of Aboriginal Peoples in both urban and rural areas, and in the North. An integral part of this approach is the continued use of restorative justice techniques and methods where appropriate. The restorative justice approach allows us to work with communities to help them heal and to confront their problems using traditional Aboriginal justice practices, rather than relying on more formal criminal sanctions or incarceration.

Plans and Priorities (2006-2007)

The following plans and priorities were listed in the 2006-2007 RPP in relation to the RCMP’s efforts towards contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities:

1. Provide a culturally sensitive policing service

2. Develop community capacity to prevent crime through social development

3. Contribute to public policy and ensure sound policy development

4. Build new and strengthen existing partnerships

5. Communicate effectively to internal/external partners and stakeholders

6. Build capacity in terms of expertise and resources, while supporting employees

Contributing to the long-term wellness and safety of Aboriginal communities
through a holistic and culturally competent approach

Aboriginal Strategy Map


Strategic Priority: Aboriginal Communities – Overview of Performance Towards Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: 

  • Contribute to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities
Key Performance Goals Performance
  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders satisfied their organization/community has a good working relationship with the RCMP

Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 20%
2006 to 2007: 2%

  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders satisfied that the RCMP makes a valuable contribution to the sustainability of their community

Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 6%
2006 to 2007: 14%

  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders satisfied the RCMP successfully addresses local policing priorities

Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 2%
2006 to 2007: 9%

  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders/partners who agree that the RCMP effectively communicates what it is doing and why it is doing it

Partners:
2005 to 2006: 11%
2006 to 2007: 10%
Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 3%
2006 to 2007: 1%

  • Increase by 10% the percentage of stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides accurate and complete information about its programs and services

Stakeholders:
2005 to 2006: 3%
2006 to 2007: 1%
Partners:
2006: 77%
2007: 94%

  • Increase to 80% the percentage of stakeholders/partners who agree that the RCMP is a valuable partner in contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities

Stakeholders:
2006: 76%
2007: 72%

  • Double the number of external partners participating in Strategic Priority Working Groups
One new partner engaged
  • Increase to 80% the percentage of stakeholders who agree that the RCMP provides valuable input into the development of public policy pertaining to Aboriginal communities issues
2006: 84%
2007: 63%


Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned Spending (millions)* Actual Spending
(millions)*
1 – Federal and International Operations

$592.9

$626.0
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

$2,083.4

$2,140.7
7 – National Police Services $149.7 $170.9
Supporting Program Actitvities (PAA)* Planned FTEs Actual FTEs
1 – Federal and International Operations 4,568 3,412
3 – Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing 13,610 12,941
7 – National Police Services 1,266 1,127

Note: * Program Activity allocations may represent all related activities undertaken across RCMP Divisions and do not necessarily reflect allocations for a specific RCMP program, service or organizational unit of similar name.
** Planned Spending based on Main Estimates
*** Actual Spending based on Main Estimates + in-year funding

Progress Towards Achieving Key Priorities (2006-2007)


a) Key Priority:

1. Provide a culturally sensitive policing service

2. Develop community capacity to prevent crime through social development

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • In 2006-2007, 544 Aboriginal communities across Canada were involved in implementing community plans to address the number one issue/offence within that community. An integral aspect of the RCMP’s success in building trust with Aboriginal communities is our daily frontline engagement with them. Whether serving as an enhanced policing service under a Community Tripartite Agreement or through our provincial policing role, the RCMP continually strives to enhance and grow the relationship with each community we serve
  • The community planning process provides insight into Aboriginal Policing across Canada, by providing a medium for reporting the successes and challenges that result from the RCMP’s continued efforts to contribute to the health and safety of Aboriginal communities, and by identifying key factors that must be addressed in a holistic manner if improvement and sustainability are to occur. For instance, in 2006, over 60% of communities identified drug and/or alcohol and substance abuse as the primary issue
  • A newly restructured National Aboriginal Policing Services (NAPS) within CCAPS illustrates the priority placed on both Aboriginal Affairs and Aboriginal Operations. While Aboriginal Affairs’ primary objective is to work collaboratively with partners and Aboriginal organizations to strategically position critical Aboriginal research and policy issues, Aboriginal Operations is focused on enhancing service delivery/operations to Aboriginal communities. By engaging Aboriginal communities, the RCMP has become a force of change in many communities across Canada and is sought as a resource to provide a cultural perspective in Aboriginal disputes, issues or protests
  • Developed community programs that enhance capacity – these include the Aboriginal Youth Training Program, Band and Community Constables, and the Cadet Corps Program to provide opportunities for role models for youth, as well as prevention programs geared towards substance abuse and suicide prevention. More specifically, NAPS continued to provide insight to the Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Section on the training materials, syllabus and program delivery of the Aboriginal Shield drug demand reduction program for Aboriginal Youth. NAPS also provided support to innovative initiatives at local levels to address key issues, such as the Hobbema Cadet program and the Cops Camp in Northern Manitoba
  • Drugs & Organized Crime Awareness Service held seminars with members of the Canadian Aboriginal community to update the curriculum of the Aboriginal Shield Program
  • As of January 2007, there were 1,147 self-identified Aboriginal employees in the RCMP – an Aboriginal people employment rate in the Government of Canada which is second only to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
  • The RCMP’s Aboriginal Employee Council was formed with representation from major policy centres and all Divisions; it provided impetus to numerous human resources-related changes to improve the RCMP’s service to Aboriginal communities

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • The Indian Residential School issue has remained a priority area for the RCMP, in terms of prevention, enforcement and reconciliation. The RCMP has been recognized as a leader in terms of its approach toward mobilizing employees, Aboriginal communities and other police on this issue. We have developed specific programs and initiatives to reduce any negative community impacts (e.g., fraud, elder abuse, drug abuse, organized crime) arising from the Common Experience Payment that is anticipated to be mailed to survivors on or after November 2007
  • The revised Aboriginal Shield Program will be piloted in selected communities, and training will be provided to the community facilitators who will deliver the program
  • The RCMP has worked with independent Aboriginal consultants to develop and deliver its Aboriginal Perceptions Training for our employees across Canada for over a decade; it now requires updating and we are currently analyzing the best approach, that is whether to retain and modify our existing perceptions training (to add more depth on women and Mtis) or to utilize an existing training program such as that offered by the Canada School of Public Service

a) Key Priority:

3. Contribute to public policy and ensure sound policy development

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • To promote coordination and consistency in responding to Aboriginal concerns, National Aboriginal Policing Service has been an integral component of interagency and interdepartmental working groups such as the Aboriginal Justice Interdepartmental Working Group, Organized Crime Awareness Working Group, AFN Public Safety Protocol, Indian Residential School Community Impacts Aboriginal Affairs Working Group, Family Violence Initiative, Influenza Pandemic Plan, and the Sisters in Spirit. In its unique position as a Federal, Provincial, Municipal and Aboriginal Policing Service, the RCMP brings to the table both a law enforcement perspective and a close working relationship with a multitude of partners and jurisdictions across Canada

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • Collaboration with Aboriginal communities, and work within the Government of Canada, and with the provinces/territories towards the development of: enhanced relationships with Aboriginal people and communities; an RCMP contraband tobacco strategy; the prevention and disruption of Aboriginal gangs; reduction of community impacts from the Indian Residential School Common Experience Payments; Truth and Reconciliation as part of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement; Mtis Rights; provision of training on Matrimonial Real Property legislation; and reduction of the sexual exploitation of Aboriginal Women and Children

a) Key Priority:

4. Build new and strengthen existing partnerships

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • Relationship building is an essential component of the community planning process. The RCMP continued to work in collaboration with Aboriginal communities, stakeholders and partners to develop initiatives, programs, strategies and processes that contribute to and enhance the health and safety of Aboriginal communities. Partnerships with Aboriginal organizations at the provincial and territorial levels continue to be developed by all Divisions across Canada
  • At the national level, relationships are being fostered with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), Assembly of First Nations (AFN), Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), Mtis National Council (MNC), and the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP)
  • The RCMP has partnered with the Office of Federal Interlocutor (OFI), Parks Canada, Environment Canada, and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to help all enforcement and policing personnel understand their obligations as a result of the Powley decision and expanded Mtis rights
  • The RCMP’s Aboriginal Strategic Priority Working Group succeeded in having a representative from Public Safety participate in the group, and will continue to seek further opportunities to engage external partners

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • NAPS has partnered with the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) and the Sret du Qubec (SQ) to develop a cohesive response to Aboriginal conflict. Ensuring a common understanding and approach to dealing with Aboriginal protests will contribute to public security. The renewal of the Assembly of First Nations Protocol will further strengthen our relationship with Aboriginal communities
  • Increased numbers of division-based public safety protocols and nationally-based public safety protocols with First Nations peoples and organizations such as the Mtis National Council and the Inuit Tapirit Kanatami\
  • Work with federal and provincial agencies responsible for health, education and employment-related issues

a) Key Priority:

5. Communicate effectively to internal/external partners and stakeholders

6. Build capacity in terms of expertise and resources, while supporting employees

b) Progress Made in 2006-2007:

  • The Professional Development Centre for Aboriginal Policing (PDCAP) was established at CPC in 2006-2007, with an RCMP Inspector and three instructors. Public Safety provided some of the funding for PDCAP and is fully engaged in PDCAP activities
  • All PDCAP instructors are seconded from other police partners. PDCAP delivered an Aboriginal Senior Police Administration Course (SPAC) in Alberta in 2006 – training 24 middle managers from Aboriginal police services or other police services with Aboriginal jurisdiction. New courses have been created focusing on Organized Crime in Aboriginal communities and on Domestic Violence
  • As the PDCAP curriculum is tailored for police who serve Aboriginal communities, it focuses on cultural sensitivity and building partnerships with Aboriginal communities and groups, such as the First Nations’ Chiefs of Police Association (FNCPA). These courses also build capacity in terms of expertise amongst Aboriginal community police services

c) Planned Improvements in Future:

  • In 2007, the RCMP developed its “Service Delivery to Aboriginal Communities: An Operational Framework”, which is a business-line wide service delivery model developed by National Aboriginal Policing Services and divisional Aboriginal Policing Service (APS) sections to help all employees provide more effective policing service to Aboriginal communities
  • The key facets of the operational framework involve realizing tangible goals by building and strengthening relationships, demonstrating a culturally competent police service, reducing criminal involvement and victimization, and ensuring accountability. There are measurable and achievable goals in each of the four interdependent quadrants of the operational framework that apply to detachments and to contract, federal and national policing policy centres in the divisions and National Headquarters, including Human Resources and Corporate Services. These measurable goals are incorporated into Performance Plans at all levels and, most notably, facilitate a collaborative relationship between the Detachment commander, personnel, and the Aboriginal communities they serve
  • Future efforts will be focused on integrating the operational framework into the RCMP’s service delivery general principles
  • The CPC is conducting needs assessments to guide the development of additional Aboriginal policing courses. Most PDCAP courses will be delivered offsite at Aboriginal communities, where possible
  • The RCMP has developed organizational and functional competencies specific to the Aboriginal culture. These competencies will be used to manage employee performance as well as to create job descriptions for those serving Aboriginal people

Service Delivery Map