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Section 3: Supplementary Information

3.1  Organizational Information

Environment Canada's Branches

Financial Performance Overview

This section contains a summary of Environment Canada's financial performance for the fiscal year 2006-2007.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

The Department receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis.

The Department spent $868.4 million in 2006-2007. This amount is only marginally larger than the planned spending identified in our 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities. The 2006-2007 fiscal year continued the transition for the Department and continued with a major reorganization exercise.

The Canada Emission Reduction Incentives Agency (CERIA) did not incur any of its planned spending for fiscal year 2006-2007, as outlined in Environment Canada's 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities.  The funds, approved in principle by Treasury Board, were frozen and required further detailed descriptions of activities prior to their release.  The programs under this Agency were cancelled in 2006-2007.

Summary financial data, such as the information presented in Table 1, are displayed using four separate headings. For clarity, these headings are defined as:

  • Main Estimates - Amounts shown in the 2006-2007 Main Estimates;
  • Planned Spending - Amounts shown in the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities;
  • Total Authorities - Planned spending plus any additional amounts Parliament has approved for departments to reflect changing priorities and unforeseen events; and
  • 2006-2007 Actual Spending - The amounts actually spent for the fiscal year

Note: Some totals may differ from one table to another due to the rounding of the figures.

 

Table 1: Comparison of Planned to Actual Spending (including Full-time Equivalents)

This table offers a comparison of the Main Estimates, Planned Spending, Total Authorities, and Actual Spending for the most recently completed fiscal year, as well as historical figures for Actual Spending.


2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007
($ millions) Actual Spending (1)  Actual Spending (1) Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Authorities
Biodiversity is conserved and protected 126.2 130.5 125.3 125.6 136.0 143.5
Water is clean, safe and secure 51.7 60.1 54.9 59.7 86.2 95.7
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 76.7 79.4 71.8 80.9 76.7 59.6
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making 123.1 130.8 117.6 121.8 136.4 138.9
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 148.4 174.9 151.6 151.0 151.3 142.1
Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced 219.3 344.2 236.3 238.5 241.8 229.8
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches 24.5 44.1 26.6 26.5 31.1 29.7
Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced 155.4 76.5 18.5 32.6 25.0 24.4
Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effects 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.9 3.9 4.8
Total 926.7 1,041.5 803.9 838.4 888.3 868.4
Less: Non-respendable revenue (9.0) (10.7) N/A (12.1) N/A (11.8)
Plus: Cost of services received without charge (2) 72.2 75.5 N/A 71.7 N/A 81.3
2006-2007 Net Cost of Department 989.9 1,106.3 N/A 898.0 N/A 938.0
Full Time Equivalents 6,086 6,463 N/A 6,363 N/A 6,646

Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

Note: Excludes respendable revenues

(1) Due to the change in reporting structure, the amounts by Program Activity were calculated based on our departmental crosswalk. Refer to Environment Canada's previous Departmental Performance Reports for detailed financial information.

(2) Services received without charge include accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), the employer's share of employees' insurance premiums, and expenditures paid by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)  (excluding revolving funds), Worker's Compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada, and services received from the Department of Justice Canada (see Table 4).

Changes between 2005-2006 Actual Spending and 2006-2007 Actual Spending
The actual spending for the Department was $1,041.5 million in 2005-2006 and $868.4 million in 2006-2007, which represents a decrease of $173.1 million. This decrease is mainly attributable to the one-time $150 million grant provided in 2005-2006 to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities for the Green Municipal Fund.

Table 2: Resources by Program Activity

This table presents Main Estimates, Planned Spending, Total Authorities, and Actual Spending by Program Activity and by Vote.


2006 - 2007 ( $ millions)

Program Activity Operating (1) Capital Grants Total:  Gross Budgetary Expenditures Less: Respendable Revenue Total:  Net Budgetary Expenditures
Biodiversity is conserved and protected
Main Estimates 102.0 0.5 24.0 126.5 (1.2) 125.3
Planned Spending 102.3 0.5 24.0 126.8 (1.2) 125.6
Total Authorities 112.2 1.8 23.2 137.2 (1.2) 136.0
Actual Spending 120.7 1.6 21.9 144.2 (0.7) 143.5
Water is clean, safe and secure
Main Estimates 55.3 2.3 0.5 58.0 (3.1) 54.9
Planned Spending 60.0 2.3 0.5 62.8 (3.1) 59.7
Total Authorities 83.6 5.0 0.8 89.4 (3.1) 86.2
Actual Spending 93.0 4.7 0.8 98.4 (2.7) 95.7
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes
Main Estimates 68.4 0.7 4.5 73.5 (1.7) 71.8
Planned Spending 77.4 0.7 4.5 82.6 (1.7) 80.9
Total Authorities 70.2 0.7 7.5 78.4 (1.7) 76.7
Actual Spending 51.9 0.3 7.5 59.7 (0.1) 59.6
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making
Main Estimates 113.4 12.5 0.3 126.1 (8.5) 117.6
Planned Spending 117.6 12.5 0.3 130.3 (8.5) 121.8
Total Authorities 131.6 12.8 0.6 144.9 (8.5) 136.4
Actual Spending 142.6 11.5 0.5 154.7 (15.8) 138.9
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions
Main Estimates 189.7 7.2 7.5 204.4 (52.9) 151.6
Planned Spending 189.2 7.2 7.5 203.9 (52.9) 151.0
Total Authorities 190.4 7.5 6.2 204.1 (52.9) 151.3
Actual Spending 169.2 7.2 6.2 182.6 (40.5) 142.1
Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced
Main Estimates 226.8 6.2 10.4 243.4 (7.1) 236.3
Planned Spending 229.0 6.2 10.4 245.6 (7.1) 238.5
Total Authorities 233.4 8.1 7.4 248.9 (7.1) 241.8
Actual Spending 219.8 7.9 6.9 234.7 (4.8) 229.8
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches
Main Estimates 23.3 3.3 - 26.7 (0.0) 26.6
Planned Spending 23.3 3.3 - 26.6 (0.0) 26.5
Total Authorities 24.2 3.3 3.6 31.2 (0.0) 31.1
Actual Spending 24.9 1.2 3.6 29.7 (0.0) 29.7
Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced
Main Estimates 18.1 0.4 - 18.5 (0.1) 18.5
Planned Spending 32.3 0.4 - 32.6 (0.1) 32.6
Total Authorities 24.2 0.5 0.3 25.1 (0.1) 25.0
Actual Spending 23.8 0.3 0.3 24.4 (0.0) 24.4
Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effects
Main Estimates 1.3 - - 1.3 (0.0) 1.3
Planned Spending 1.9 - - 1.9 (0.0) 1.9
Total Authorities 3.4 0.4 0.1 3.9 (0.0) 3.9
Actual Spending 4.7 0.1 0.1 4.9 (0.1) 4.8
Total
Main Estimates 798.5 33.0 47.1 878.5 (74.7) 803.9
Planned Spending 833.0 33.0 47.1 913.1 (74.7) 838.4
Total Authorities 873.3 40.0 49.7 963.0 (74.7) 888.3
Actual Spending 850.6 34.8 47.9 933.3 (64.8) 868.4

Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

(1) Operating includes salaries, contributions to employee benefit plans, the Minister's salary and car allowance, and the proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets.

Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items

This table explains the way that Parliament votes resources to Environment Canada.


Vote or Statutory Item Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording

2006-2007 ($ millions)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
1 Operating expenditures 648.2 682.6 716.2 703.7
5 Capital expenditures 33.0 33.0 40.0 34.8
10 Grants and contributions 47.1 47.1 49.7 47.9
(S) Minister of the Environment -- Salary and motor car allowance 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 75.5 75.6 81.3 81.3
(S) Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets - - 1.0 0.7
  Total Department 803.9 838.4 888.3 868.4

Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.
Note: Excludes respendable revenues.

Table 4: Services Received Without Charge

This table is designed to show the services received without charge by the Department.


 ($ millions) 2006-2007
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) 37.5
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by TBS (excluding revolving funds) 38.3
Workers' Compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada 1.3
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 4.2
Total 2006-2007 services received without charge 81.3

Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Resources of Respendable Revenue


($ millions) Actual 2004-2005 (1) Actual 2005-2006

2006-2007

Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual Revenue
Biodiversity is conserved and protected
Information Products 0.0 0.1 - - 0.0 0.0
Miscellaneous - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 -
Realty (Accommodation) 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2
Regulatory Services 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 -
Scientific and Professional Services 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.5
Sub-total 1.1 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.2 0.7
Water is clean, safe and secure
Information Products 0.3 0.2 - - 0.0 0.1
Realty (Accommodation) 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.1
Scientific and Professional Services 2.6 2.1 2.7 2.7 2.7 2.5
Sub-total 3.0 2.4 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.7
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural and working landscapes
Information Products 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Realty (Accommodation) 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0
Regulatory Services 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -
Scientific and Professional Services 1.9 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.2 0.1
Sub-total 2.4 1.9 1.7 1.7 1.7 0.1
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making
Information Products 21.7 20.7 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.7
Miscellaneous 0.2 0.0 - - 0.0 -
Realty (Accommodation) 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4
Scientific and Professional Services 6.5 6.9 2.2 2.2 2.2 8.7
Sub-total 28.5 27.9 8.5 8.5 8.5 15.8
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions
Information Products 23.0 22.8 38.5 38.5 38.5 36.9
Miscellaneous 0.2 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 -
Realty (Accommodation) 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4
Scientific and Professional Services 7.1 7.8 13.8 13.8 13.8 3.2
Sub-total 30.5 31.0 52.9 52.9 52.9 40.5
Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced
Information Products 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Realty (Accommodation) 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Regulatory Services 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.9 0.2
Scientific and Professional Services 5.2 4.1 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.5
Sub-total 7.0 6.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 4.8
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches
Regulatory Services 0.2 0.2 - - 0.0 -
Scientific and Professional Services 0.5 0.4 - - 0.0 0.0
Sub-total 0.7 0.6 - - 0.0 0.0
Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced
Scientific and Professional Services 0.8 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Sub-total 0.8 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effects
Information Products 0.2 0.0 - - 0.0 0.1
Sub-total 0.2 0.0 - - 0.0 0.1
Total Respendable Revenue 74.3 71.0 74.7 74.7 74.7 64.8

Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue


($ millions) Actual 2004-2005 (1) Actual 2005-2006

2006-2007

Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual Revenue
Biodiversity is conserved and protected
Fines 0.1 0.0 - - - -
Licenses and Permits 2.8 3.2 4.2 4.2 4.2 3.1
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 0.0 0.1 - - - 0.0
Regulatory Services 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.1
Miscellaneous 0.0 0.3 - - - 1.6
Sub-total 3.1 3.8 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.8
Water is clean, safe and secure
Scientific and Professional Services - - 0.2 0.2 0.2 -
Miscellaneous 0.0 0.0 - - - 0.1
Third Party Agreements 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3
Sub-total 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural and working landscapes
Scientific and Professional Services - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 -
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 0.0 0.0 - - - 0.0
Miscellaneous 0.0 0.1 - - - 0.0
Sub-total 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making
Information Products 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.1
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 0.0 0.1 - - - 0.1
Miscellaneous 1.6 1.6 2.3 2.3 2.3 0.6
Royalties 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.4
Sub-total 2.4 2.6 3.4 3.4 3.4 1.2
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions
Information Products 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.6
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 0.0 0.1 - - - 0.0
Miscellaneous 1.8 1.8 2.5 2.5 2.5 3.9
Royalties 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0
Sub-total 2.6 3.0 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.5
Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 0.0 0.2 - - - 0.5
Miscellaneous 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Royalties 0.1 0.1 - - - 0.2
Sub-total 0.3 0.6 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.7
Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced
Royalties 0.2 0.1 - - - -
Sub-total 0.2 0.1 - - - -
Total Non-Respendable Revenue 9.0 10.7 12.1 12.1 12.1 11.8
Total Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue 83.3 81.7 86.8 86.8 86.8 76.6

Totals may differ between and within tables due to the rounding of figures.

This table lists various sources of respendable and non-respendable revenue. To clarify the types of revenues that fall under these sources, short definitions are given below:
Scientific and Professional Services: research and analysis, telecommunications, hydrometrics, consulting services, training, and wildlife studies and surveys.
Information Products: data extracts and access, publications, and hydrometric and weather products.
Miscellaneous: Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) recoveries and student parking fees.
Regulatory Services: ocean disposal permit applications and monitoring fees, new chemical notification, and other permits and fees.
Realty (Accommodation): living accommodations, rentals, entry fees, concessions, and National Water Research Institute building recoveries.
Royalties: revenues collected from the licensing of Intellectual Property.
Co-Marketing Initiatives: marketing and advertising sales.
Licences and permits:  Migratory Bird Hunting Permit and Stamps and Taxidermy and Aviculture Permits.
Fines:  fines levied under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and other miscellaneous fines.
Third Party agreements:  agreements for Water Management Services under the authority for Lake of the Woods Control Board (Salaries) and Ottawa River Regulation Secretariat (Salaries).
Proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets:  gains on the sale of non capital assets and proceeds from the sale of capital assets excluding real property.

(1) Due to the change in reporting structure, the amounts by Program Activity were calculated based on our departmental crosswalk. Refer to Environment Canada's previous Performance Reports for detailed financial information.

Respendable Revenues:  The most significant decline in anticipated revenue is due to a change in the accounting treatment for the funds the Department receives from Natural Resources Canada for the Program of Energy Research and Development (PERD). Beginning in 2006-2007, transactions related to this program are now accounted for in an OGD suspense account rather than vote netted revenues (VNR).  We have also seen a decline in revenues under the contract between Environment Canada and NAV CANADA as well as with our interdepartmental agreements with the Canadian Coast Guard and the Department of National Defence (DND). Some projects from DND Search and Rescue funds entered the Department through the Supplementary Estimates rather than VNR. The other minor variances are mainly due to lower overall commercial revenues.

Table 6a: User Fees Act


Regulatory Services
Fee Name Ocean Disposal Permit Application Fees
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority CEPA, 1999, ss.135(1); Disposal at Sea Regulations
Date Last Modified 2001
Performance Standards Under the application fee, each application is reviewed according to Schedule 6 of CEPA (Canadian Environmental Protection Act) and the Disposal at Sea Regulations. This involves public notice, an application that provides detailed data, scientific review and payment of fees. Each permit is published in the Canada Gazette from about 120 days of applying if the application is complete and there are no issues from other stakeholders. Under the permit fee, Environment Canada is committed to annual client meetings to review monitoring plans, conduct representative disposal site monitoring according to National guidelines, produce an annual report on activity, produce a financial summary of revenues, expenses and value for clients, and report results of monitoring to the London Convention office.
Performance Results Met service standards. Applications were reviewed within the 120 day timeframe. Advice was provided to applicants to assist timely permit reviews. Monitoring plans were reviewed with key clients. Disposal site monitoring was conducted and reported. For further details see Environment Canada's Disposal at Sea Program website (20).
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 (1) 2008-2009 (1) 2009-2010 (1)
Forecast Revenue 200.0 200.0 200.0 200.0
Actual Revenue 217.5 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost Unknown (1) Unknown Unknown Unknown
 
Fee Name Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring Fees
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority FAA, par. 19.1(a); Ocean Dumping Permit Fee Regulations (Site Monitoring)
Date Last Modified 2001
Performance Standards The permit holder has access to a permitted site and ability to dispose of 1000 cu m of dredged or excavated material for each $470 paid.  The collected revenue is used by the disposal at sea program to operate a representative national disposal site monitoring program which allows the client group as a whole to continue to have access to suitable disposal sites and demonstrates that the resource is used sustainably for the Canadian public.
Performance Results Met the service standards.  Permit holders disposed of dredged and excavated material as authorized by their permits.  Representative monitoring was carried out in accordance with monitoring guidelines.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 (2) 2009-2010 (2)
Forecast Revenue 1,200.0 1,400.0 1,500.0 1,500.0
Actual Revenue 1,465.2 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 1,300.0 1,300.0 1,600.0 1,600.0
 
Fee Name New Substance Notification
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority CEPA, 1999, s. 328, New Substances Fees Regulations
Date Last Modified 2002
Performance Standards All notifications are reviewed and decisions taken within the prescribed timeframes. Requests are acknowledged by letter, e-mail or fax within 10 business days of receipt.
Performance Results All new substances notifications are processed and decisions taken within the legislative time period. Requests made by letter, email or fax are responded to 95% of the time within 10 days
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 400.0 400.0 400.0 400.0
Actual Revenue 500.0 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 2,200.0 2,200 2,200 2,200
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit (3)
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority MBCA, 1994, s. 12; Migratory Bird Regulations C.R.C., c. 1035
Date Last Modified 1998 - SOR/98-314
Performance Standards Hunting permits are sold for $8.50 at Canada Post Corporation (CPC) offices and selected provincial and private vendors from August 1st until March 10th the following year. The performance standard is to ensure adequate numbers of permits are available for distribution within that timeframe. Permits validated by the Habitat Conservation Stamp are mandatory for migratory game bird hunting.  The hunter and/or his/her representative must physically go to a vendor that sells the permit.  The permit is bought on the spot, therefore, per the service standard; the hunter can get a hunting permit upon request.  People purchasing the permit should receive one within minutes of completing the transaction.
Performance Results 99.9% of permits were available to meet hunter demand within the specified time period. All permits that were purchased were delivered within minutes of buying one.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 2,006.0 2,006.0 2,006.0 2,006.0
Actual Revenue 1,451.0 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 960.0 960.0 960.0 960.0
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Habitat Conservation Stamp
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority MBCA, 1994, s. 12; Migratory Bird Regulations
Date Last Modified 1998
Performance Standards

Conservation Stamps are sold for $8.50 each and must be affixed to the Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit to validate it. The performance standard is to ensure adequate numbers of stamps are available for distribution at Canada Post Corporation (CPC) offices and selected provincial and private vendors from August 1st until March 10th the following year. Stamps are also sold as collectables through CPC offices and vendors selected by Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC). One cannot purchase a permit without the stamp pre-affixed to it, therefore, the hunter and/or his/her representative must physically go to a vendor that sells the permit.  The permit is bought on the spot, thus the service standard is that the hunter receives a wildlife stamp affixed to the permit.  People purchasing the permit should receive the stamp within minutes of doing the transaction.

For Collectors: Stamps bought from CPC can be purchased by mail order, telephone, FAX and at selected CPC offices and require a two week processing period.  Stamps bought from WHC selected vendors can be ordered in person, by telephone and mail order.  Processing time is two weeks if not bought in person. 
Performance Results Enough stamps to meet hunter and collector demands were available for purchase within the specified time period. Stamps bought from CPC by mail order, telephone, FAX and at selected CPC offices have been processed within the two-week processing period. Stamps bought from WHC selected vendors either in person, by telephone or mail order, were processed within the two-week processing period. With funds generated from Stamp revenue, Wildlife Habitat Canada funds several habitat conservation programs and projects that contribute to Environment Canada's key result "Biological diversity is conserved".
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 2,200.0 2,200.0 2,200.0 2,200.0
Actual Revenue 1,583.8 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 1,583.8 2,200.0 2,200.0 2,200.0
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Avicultural permits, Taxidermist permits and Eiderdown permits
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority MBCA, 1994, s. 12; Migratory Bird Regulations
Date Last Modified Prior to 1978
Performance Standards These permits are issued by Environment Canada's regional offices for a fee of $10.00 each after reviewing applications from the public. To be successful, there are requirements that must be met, described in the CWS Permit Policy - for example with respect to aviculture, a person must demonstrate that they will wing-clip or keep the birds in an enclosure to prevent mixing with wild populations. Each region can attach specific conditions to each permit. Permits generally expire December 31st of the year issued.  The performance standard is to review all applications received and issue permits or notify applicants of the reasons a permit is denied within 30 days of receiving the application.
Performance Results All applications are processed within the 30 days timeframe unless site inspections are required.  In those cases (10% of all the applications), an additional 30 days were required to process the application.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 8.7 8.2 8.2 8.2
Actual Revenue 10.1 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 34.0 34.0 34.0 34.0
 
Fee Name Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area - Permit Sales
Fee Type R
Fee Setting Authority CWA, s. 12; Canada Wildlife Act. Area Regulations
Date Last Modified 2001
Performance Standards To ensure hunter satisfaction during the hunting season in Cap-Tourmente, we make sure that there are well-maintained facilities such as attractive trails, pleasant eating areas that are appreciated by hunters, sufficient parking spaces, bathrooms, etc.). Such spaces are necessary in meeting the needs of hunters so that they have a pleasant hunting trip and will return in future years.
Performance Results According to a survey of 2005 license holders, hunters were greatly satisfied with the quality of facility maintenance.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 190.0 190.0 190.0 190.0
Actual Revenue 99.1 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 152.1 225.0 225.0 225.0
 
Other Products and Services
Fee Name Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Fee Type O
Fee Setting Authority Access to Information Act, ss. 11(1) and par. 77(1)d); Access to Information Regulations
Date Last Modified 1992
Performance Standards

A response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. A notice of extension must be sent within 30 days after receipt of the request.  The Access to Information Act website (21) provides further details.

Performance Results Statutory deadlines were met 83% of the time. It is the Department's practice to waive fees where the total owing per request amounts to less than $25.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 12.7 13.1 13.6 14.1
Actual Revenue 12.7 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 657.6 970.0 1,000.0 1,030.0
 
Fee Name Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area - Entry Sales
Fee Type O
Fee Setting Authority CWA, s. 12; Canada Wildlife Act. Area Regulations
Date Last Modified 2003
Performance Standards To ensure hunter satisfaction during the operating season in Cap-Tourmente, we make sure that clients can make use of well-maintained facilities such as attractive trails, pleasant eating areas that are appreciated by hunters, sufficient parking spaces, bathrooms, etc.). Such spaces are necessary in meeting the needs of hunters so that they have a pleasant hunting trip and will return in future years. Visitors also have access to bilingual greeting and interpretation services so they can learn more about the Cap-Tourmente site and thereby meet their need to know more about the nature of the site.
Performance Results According to comments from a number of visitors, they are generally satisfied with the greeting and interpretation services offered as well as with facilities maintenance.
(Thousands of Dollars) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 231.0 226.0 226.0 226.0
Actual Revenue 173.7 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 338.2 260.0 260.0 260.0
 
Subtotal R (Thousands) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 6,204.7 6,404.2 6,404.2 6,404.2
Actual Revenue 5,326.7 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 6,229.9 6,919.0 7,219.0 7,219.0
 
Subtotal O (Thousands) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 243.7 239.1 239.6 240.1
Actual Revenue 186.4 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 995.8 1,230.0 1,260.0 1,290.0
 
Subtotal O (Thousands) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Forecast Revenue 6,448.4 6,643.3 6,743.8 6,744.3
Actual Revenue 5,513.2 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Estimated Full Cost 7,225.6 8,149.0 8,479.0 8,509.0

Notes:

(1) An analysis to determine the current cost of reviewing a permit is on hold pending budget availability.
(2) Amount is expected to increase if ocean disposal activities and therefore monitoring requirements increase in the North.
(3) Fees for rights and privileges may exceed the cost of administering the program ensuring a fair market return for Canadian citizens.  

 

Table 6b: Policy on Service Standards for External Fees


Regulatory Services
Fee Name Ocean Disposal Permit Application Fees
Service Standards Under the application fee, each application is reviewed according to Schedule 6 of CEPA (Canadian Environmental Protection Act) and the Disposal at Sea Regulations. This involves public notice, an application that provides detailed data, scientific review and payment of fees. Each permit is published in the Canada Gazette from about 120 days of applying if the application is complete and there are no issues from other stakeholders. Under the permit fee, EC is committed to annual client meetings to review monitoring plans, conduct representative disposal site monitoring according to National guidelines, produce an annual report on activity, produce a financial summary of revenues, expenses and value for clients, and report results of monitoring to the London Convention office.
Performance Results

Met service standards.

Applications were reviewed within the 120 day timeframe.  Advice was provided to applicants to assist timely permit reviews.

Monitoring plans were reviewed with key clients.  Disposal site monitoring was conducted and reported. 

For further details see the Disposal at Sea Program website (22).
Stakeholder Consultation Application fees set in 1993 were rolled over in 2001. A Regulatory Impact Assessment Statement and multi-stakeholder consultations were conducted before each regulation was enacted.  Multi-stakeholder consultations were carried out in 1996-98 for setting the permit fee.  There was general acceptance for the fee, but concern for how it would be set. Permit holders indicated that a proportional volume-based fee was preferred. As well, EC (Environment Canada) committed to regular meetings with permit holders, reporting, and to review the fee three years after implementation.  The review was done in 2003 and its report concluded no change to the fee was needed. All consultations from 1993-2003 involved discussion papers, public meetings and final reports. For further details see Disposal at Sea Program website (23).
 
Fee Name Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring Fees
Service Standards The permit holder has access to a permitted site and ability to dispose of 1000 cu m of dredged or excavated material for each $470 paid.  The collected revenue is used by the disposal at sea program to operate a representative national disposal site monitoring program which allows the client group as a whole to continue to have access to suitable disposal sites and demonstrates that the resource is used sustainably for the Canadian public.
Performance Results Met the service standards.  Permit holders disposed of dredged and excavated material as authorized by their permits.  Representative monitoring was carried out in accordance with monitoring guidelines.
Stakeholder Consultation Multi-stakeholder consultations were carried out in 1996-98 for setting the permit fee.  There was general acceptance for the fee, but concern for how it would be set. Permit holders indicated that a proportional volume-based fee was preferred. As well, EC committed to regular meetings with permit holders, reporting, and to review the fee three years after implementation.  The review was done in 2003 and its report concluded that no change to the fee was needed. Further consultations were undertaken from 1993-2003 involving discussion papers, public meetings and final reports. For further details see the Disposal at Sea Program website (24). Current consultations are ongoing through a discussion document to examine ways of reducing or improving delivery of the fees.
 
Fee Name New Substance Notification
Service Standards All notifications are reviewed and decisions taken within the prescribed timeframes. Requests are acknowledged by letter, e-mail or fax within 10 business days of receipt.
Performance Results All new substances notifications are processed and decisions taken within the legislative time period. Requests made by letter, email or fax are responded to 95% of the time within 10 days.
Stakeholder Consultation Amendments to the New Substances Notifications Regulations published in Canada Gazette Part II in September 2005. Under the Service Delivery Improvement Initiative of the New Substances Division, a Service Charter was developed.  Other government departments, regional compliance promotion groups and industry had an opportunity for input into the service charter and standards. The Service Charter and standards was published in 2006.
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit
Service Standards Hunting permits are sold for $8.50 at Canada Post Corporation (CPC) offices and selected provincial and private vendors from August 1st until March 10th the following year. The performance standard is to ensure adequate numbers of permits are available for distribution within that timeframe. Permits validated by the Habitat Conservation Stamp are mandatory for migratory game bird hunting.  The hunter and/or his/her representative must physically go to a vendor that sells the permit.  The permit is bought on the spot, therefore, per the service standard; the hunter can get a hunting permit upon request.  People purchasing the permit should receive one within minutes of completing the transaction.
Performance Results 99.9% of permits were available to meet hunter demand within the specified time period. All permits that were purchased were delivered within minutes of buying one.
Stakeholder Consultation No recent consultations have been conducted.  The revenues collected from the sale of the permit are deposited directly into the Consolidated Revenue Fund.  Program costs incurred by the department to deliver the permit program come out of the CWS A-base budget.  There is an average of 4-5 complaints each year that permits were not available from CPC because the CPC outlet did not re-order more stock.  Issues like this are rectified by CPC within 2 days.  The permit fee was increased by $5.00 in 1998.
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Habitat Conservation Stamp
Service Standards Conservation Stamps are sold for $8.50 each and must be affixed to the Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit to validate it. The performance standard is to ensure adequate numbers of stamps are available for distribution at Canada Post Corporation (CPC) offices and selected provincial and private vendors from August 1st until March 10th the following year. Stamps are also sold as collectables through CPC offices and vendors selected by Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC). One cannot purchase a permit without the stamp pre-affixed to it, therefore, the hunter and/or his/her representative must physically go to a vendor that sells the permit.  The permit is bought on the spot, thus the service standard is that the hunter receives a wildlife stamp affixed to the permit.  People purchasing the permit should receive the stamp within minutes of doing the transaction.
For Collectors: Stamps bought from CPC can be purchased by mail order, telephone, FAX and at selected CPC offices and require a two week processing period.  Stamps bought from WHC selected vendors can be ordered in person, by telephone and mail order.  Processing time is two weeks if not bought in person. 
Performance Results Enough stamps to meet hunter and collector demands were available for purchase within the specified time period. Stamps bought from CPC by mail order, telephone, FAX and at selected CPC offices have been processed within the two-week processing period. Stamps bought from WHC selected vendors either in person, by telephone or mail order was processed within the two-week processing period. With funds generated from Stamp revenue, Wildlife Habitat Canada funds several habitat conservation programs and projects that contribute to EC's key result "Biological diversity is conserved".
Stakeholder Consultation The CWS (Canadian Wildlife Service) will be conducting in 2007 a Public Consultation on the future of the Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp program.  CWS conducted a program evaluation in 2005-06 of WHC (Wildlife Habitat of Canada) and the stamp program.  Stakeholders within the Federal/Provincial governments as well as those in the NGO (Non-Government Organizations) community were interviewed.  The published results can be found on Environment Canada's, Audit and Evaluation website (25).  The prices of single stamps are fixed by Regulations.  Booklets of Stamps, etc. are sold at a retail price mutually agreed to by both EC and WHC and in accordance with established practices of the philatelic industry; TB re-approved the contribution agreement in 2002 (26). No complaints have been received that stamps were unavailable. Stamp fees increased by $1.00 in 1991.
 
Fee Name Migratory Bird Program - Avicultural permits, Taxidermist permits and Eiderdown permits
Service Standards These permits are issued by EC regional offices for a fee of $10.00 each after reviewing applications from the public. To be successful, there are requirements that must be met, described in the CWS Permit Policy - for example with respect to aviculture, a person must demonstrate that they will wing-clip or keep the birds in an enclosure to prevent mixing with wild populations. Each region can attach specific conditions to each permit. Permits generally expire December 31st of the year issued. The performance standard is to review all applications received and issue permits or notify applicants of the reasons a permit is denied within 30 days of receiving the application.
Performance Results All applications are processed within the 30 days timeframe unless site inspections are required. In those cases (10% of all the applications), an additional 30 days were required to process the application.
Stakeholder Consultation Since revenues and cost are insignificant and since no complaints occurred, consultations are not currently planned.
 
Fee Name Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area - Permit Sales
Service Standards To ensure hunter satisfaction during the hunting season in Cap-Tourmente, we make sure that there are well-maintained facilities such as attractive trails, pleasant eating areas that are appreciated by hunters, sufficient parking spaces, bathrooms, etc.). Such spaces are necessary in meeting the needs of hunters so that they have a pleasant hunting trip and will return in future years.
Performance Results According to a survey of 2005 license holders, hunters were greatly satisfied with the quality of facility maintenance.
Stakeholder Consultation No formal consultation was conducted this year given that the very high level of satisfaction among hunters. Hunters were given the opportunity to complete a survey to make comments and suggestions. When they suggested minor improvements for facility maintenance, these were implemented as quickly as possible. It was also noted that there were not many snow geese, but this phenomenon is beyond our control.
 
Information Services
Fee Name Hydrometric Data
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated contracts with provincial and territorial agencies for the provision of hydrometric data. (e.g., water quantity).
Performance Results Performance results and standards are defined in contracts (e.g., quality control of data).
Stakeholder Consultation Consultation is done directly with clients, sometimes in partnership with the provincial representative. The recourse mechanism is defined in the contracts. During negotiations stakeholders and Environment Canada agree on all terms before the contract is signed.
 
Fee Name Weather Data
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated contractual arrangements with a wide variety of users for climate data (e.g., minimum and maximum temperature). Charges are generally for delivery and packaging of data. Some products are delivered via monthly subscriptions for data.
Performance Results Met service standards as established in contract. E.g. quality control.
Stakeholder Consultation Consultation is done directly with clients (for contracts) during which the recourse mechanism is defined and client representatives are identified. During negotiations, stakeholders and Environment Canada agree on all terms before the contract is signed.
 
Fee Name Weather Forecasts/Products
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated contracts for weather forecasts, products and services, e.g., consultations with meteorologists, graphic or weather products, etc.
Performance Results All products and services are fairly unique or one-off in nature. Service standards are established under contract. Most products are monitored for accuracy and consistency; many contractual agreements include access to forecasters and service representatives if issues arise.
Stakeholder Consultation Contractual agreements are negotiated with the clients. A client representative is identified for recourse mechanism and dispute resolution purposes. Draft standards are being developed for more standardized products such as 1-900 telephone consultation.
 
Fee Name Laboratory & Other Scientific Services
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated contracts for tests and/or analysis on crude oil samples and weathered oils; air quality; exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. Environment Canada details in the agreement the service standards. Generally, EC provides sample bottles (washed and free of contaminants), logs samples and all pertinent field information on the Laboratory Information Management System; carries out all necessary laboratory QA/QC testing (the lab is accredited by CAEAL (Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories), under International Organization for Standardization 17025); prepares and submits reports (hard copy or spreadsheet format) on samples submitted; provides statistical analysis of results. The number of days that the lab has to deliver results varies according to the contract.
Performance Results All services are fairly unique or one-off in nature. Met service standards as established in contract (standards/methodology/protocols to be followed are described in the contract). Internal control processes are followed, sample results are delivered in a timely manner and discussions are held with clients to ensure that there are no complaints or concerns. Results have been delivered within the timeframe previously agreed in 100% of the contracts.
Stakeholder Consultation Consultations are done through contractual agreements negotiated with the clients -- clauses on schedule, quantity (e.g. number of samples), cost and standards/methodology/protocols to be followed are included in the contract. Stakeholders and Environment Canada agree on all terms before the contract is signed. Work does not commence until both parties have signed the agreement.
 
Scientific and Professional Services
Fee Name Quality Assurance Program
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated agreements and contracts with provincial, territorial and non-government agencies (i.e., providing all the documentation for quality systems).
Performance Results All services and products are fairly unique or one-off in nature. Service standards are negotiated in the contract or agreement.
Stakeholder Consultation Consultation is done directly with clients (i.e., determining analysis output). The recourse mechanism is defined in existing contracts and agreements, with client representatives identified.
 
Fee Name Water Management Services
Service Standards Services include individually negotiated agreements and contracts with provincial, territorial and non-government agencies (i.e., determining the success of the remediation by monitoring concentrations of PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) in water samples).
Performance Results All services and products are fairly unique or one-off in nature. Service standards are negotiated in the contract or agreement.
Stakeholder Consultation Consultations are done directly with clients (i.e., number of samples to be analyzed). The recourse mechanism is defined in existing contracts and agreements, with client representatives identified.
 
Other Products and Services
Fee Name Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Service Standards A response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. A notice of extension must be sent within 30 days after receipt of the request.
The Access to Information Act website (27) provides further details.
Performance Results Statutory deadlines were met 83% of the time. It is the Department's practice to waive fees where the total owing per request amounts to less than $25.
Stakeholder Consultation The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments done in 1986 and 1992.
 
Fee Name Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area - Entry Sales
Service Standards To ensure hunter satisfaction during the operating season in Cap-Tourmente, we make sure that clients can make use of well-maintained facilities such as attractive trails, pleasant eating areas that are appreciated by hunters, sufficient parking spaces, bathrooms, etc.). Such spaces are necessary in meeting the needs of hunters so that they have a pleasant hunting trip and will return in future years. Visitors also have access to bilingual greeting and interpretation services so they can learn more about the Cap-Tourmente site and thereby meet their need to know more about the nature of the site.
Performance Results According to comments from a number of visitors, they are generally satisfied with the greeting and interpretation services offered as well as with facilities maintenance.
Stakeholder Consultation No formal consultation was conducted this year. There is a suggestion box at the site so visitors can make comments or suggestions. In order to plan student visits, we meet with the school teachers in advance so we can accommodate their expectations in terms of information disseminated and how the visits are conducted.
 
Fee Name Entry fees - Montreal Biosphere
Service Standards Biosphere visitors have year-round access to greeting and interpretation services in the presentation rooms, facilitation services on various environmental themes and education workshops aimed mostly at groups, as well as maintained facilities (presentation rooms, rest areas, lookouts, parking, etc.).
Performance Results According to written comments gathered daily from visitors and evaluation sheets completed by people responsible for the groups, visitors are for the most part very satisfied with their visit experience, individually or as a group, and other services that are offered.
Stakeholder Consultation When there are group visits, the person responsible (e.g. teacher) must complete an evaluation of the services received. As for individual visitors, a sampling survey is conducted every three years or so.
 
Fee Name Haying & Grazing (CWS Agricultural Activity)
Service Standards A standing request list - "Notice of Interest" - is searched to identify applicants interested in the activity e.g., haying, grazing, crop. If no interest is shown then a call for applications is made through ads in local papers or other suitable means. Interested persons are asked to fill out a Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) agricultural activity application form. Application forms are reviewed to determine the most suitable candidate and a reference check of the candidate(s) is conducted.
The current CWS agricultural permit application form was developed in 1984 and based on the Saskatchewan Environment & Resource Management and Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food permit process. It was revised in 1988 in response to drought conditions.
Permits are issued for a period of less than one year and expire on December 31st of the year issued. The fee structure for haying and grazing is based upon the current rates used by Saskatchewan Environment and Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food to ensure "equal service for equal fee" between departments is achieved.
Performance Results Federal lands are monitored to ensure permit conditions are being met and habitat management goals (e.g., maintain native plant community and habitat for wildlife and reduce weed and exotic species invasion) are achieved through the activity. If so, the permit will be granted in subsequent years (subject to annual review).
Stakeholder Consultation The most suitable applicant is contacted to confirm their interest in obtaining a permit. Discussions are held to ensure the applicant understands and agrees to all conditions that will be on the permit. It is also ensured that the applicant understands the permit is only for one season, and that if any conditions of the permit are not followed, the permit may be immediately revoked by the Minister.
Prospective grazing patrons must also submit a grazing plan which is reviewed and refined if required. Changes are reviewed with the patron to make sure they understand and agree with final grazing plan and permit conditions.
 
Fee Name National Pollutants Release Inventory Workshops & Seminars
Service Standards The number of workshops and their length (i.e. half-day, full-day, etc.) is determined by the changes in the program each year. The changes in the program influence the needs of the participants (e.g., no changes mean a moderate interest in workshops; a lot of change generates a high interest in workshops). Therefore, a high volume of requests from participants through phone, e-mail, etc. indicates a significant need for workshops. Each year we assume that 80% of the participants will be satisfied with the workshops. We assume 80% as some participants are looking for more detail while others are looking for less detail. We try to rectify this by offering two types of workshops, one for experienced reporters and another for inexperienced reporters, however, some participants can only attend based on date and availability and therefore end up in a workshop that does not provide them with full satisfaction. Starting fiscal year 2007/08, participants will no longer be charged for attending these workshops and seminars.
Performance Results An 80% satisfaction rate was registered from the survey.
Stakeholder Consultation Participants provided input through the Evaluation Sheet handed out at the end of workshop on course material, course delivery and facilities. Areas of improvement were identified from participants' feedback from the survey. A report is also compiled from the survey and submitted to headquarters.
 
Fee Name Sable Island Logistical Support Fees
Service Standards

Logistical support fees are charged to visitors of Sable Island for such things as aircraft landing, fuel, accommodations and access to food supplies, etc.  Recovery of costs is for work performed on the Island for various projects.

Specific fees are included in the CCG Visitors Guidelines provided to clients when they initially request permission to visit. 
Performance Results Operational groups that work on Sable Island are satisfied with the services they receive and the subsequent fees that are charged.  All fees are derived by computing true costs of delivering the service(s).  Fees are presented to clients in a very transparent manner so that they are fully aware of which service they are paying for and the associated cost.  Some short-term visitors have expressed their unhappiness with the costs due to their limited resources.  Again, these fees are supported by the fact that they reflect the true costs of delivering the service(s). Nevertheless close to 95% of our clients have been satisfied this year.
Stakeholder Consultation Fees are calculated on a purely cost recovery basis, there is no profit being generated for Environment Canada. Stakeholders are advised of logistical fees in advance of using services on Sable Island.
 
Fee Name Publications and publication services
Service Standards Most publications are provided free of charge. Some publications are sold to cover the printing costs of the Publications section and to underwrite the cost of production (translation, editing, design and layout). Publications are promoted through various vehicles and tools including catalogue (online), conferences, trade fairs, promotional flyers, and the Canada Gazette. Clients include departments, corporations, institutions, as well as the public. Orders are received online via an ordering site or by phone, e-mail and facsimile. Each order is treated chronologically and an order tracking system is in place. Orders are categorized by priority with those involving legal statutes, ministerial enquiries and rush orders being treated as high priorities. Turn-around time for individual orders (actual invoicing, packaging and shipping) is within 3-5 working days. The packaging and shipping is done at a separate location (Distribution Centre - 151, Jean-Proux, Gatineau QC, K1A 0H3). Items are, for the most part, shipped by Canada Post unless the client chooses alternative means in which the cost associated is fully recovered by the Department. In addition to direct mail, publications are also distributed through government libraries, electronic distribution, and conferences.
Performance Results The online ordering setup has a built-in tracking system. For audit purposes, all supporting documentation (purchase orders, requests, etc.) are attached to the invoice. Most items are prepaid with the exception of other government departments and Canadian companies set up for purchase orders. For international orders, we ask for prepayment before shipping the items in an effort to prevent minimal recoveries at year-end.
The only delays that we have experienced in the past are on the reprinting end. The online order tracking system allows us to view the orders, post invoicing, work order and shipping information and finally to chronologically list all correspondence with the client. Items are categorized as PENDING, PROCESSING and COMPLETED and are viewed on a daily basis to make sure that all orders are completed in a timely fashion.
Stakeholder Consultation Clients have our 1-800 number in order to voice concerns / complaints.

Legend:
CEPA = Canadian Environmental Protection Act
CWA = Canada Wildlife Act
FAA = Financial Administration Act
MBCA = Migratory Birds Convention Act
R = Regulatory
O = Other Products and Services

Table 7: Progress against the Department's Regulatory Plan


Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) Regulatory Initiatives (2006-2007)
Regulation Amendments to the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Amendment will establish more stringent "Tier 4" emission standards for the 2008 and later model year diesel engines used in construction, agriculture, mining and forestry equipment. These planned amendments will maintain alignment with the emission standards of the U.S. and will reduce allowable emission levels by up to 95% for particulate matter and up to 86% for NOx and hydrocarbons, depending on the power category.
Measurement Criteria Smog-forming emissions from new engines covered by the Regulations will be reduced.
Achievement of environmental objectives can be assessed by confirming that individual new engines comply with the more stringent emission standards. This can be accomplished by carrying out laboratory emission tests on a sample of new engines representative of those offered for sale in Canada.
In the longer term, total emissions from the in-use fleet of engines is expected to be reduced as cleaner new products replace a significant portion of the older, higher emitting vehicles and engines (impacts can be estimated through emissions modelling).
Results Achieved Development of proposed amendments on-going, planned for publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, in Fall 2007.
 
Regulation Marine Spark-Ignition Engine and Off-Road Recreational Vehicle Emission Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results New regulations to establish in Canada emission standards for 2008 and later model year outboard engines, personal watercraft, snowmobiles, off-road motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles. These regulations will align smog-forming emission standards with those of the U.S. and set stringent emissions limits for NOx, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. For example, the allowable levels of HC and CO from snowmobiles will be reduced, on a per vehicle basis, by approximately 50% and 31% respectively, compared to current average emission levels. Similarly, the allowable levels of HC and CO from off-road motorcycles and ATVs will be reduced by up to approximately 96% and 26%, respectively.
Measurement Criteria Smog-forming emissions from new engines covered by the Regulations will be reduced.
Achievement of environmental objectives can be assessed by confirming that individual new vehicles and engines comply with the more stringent emission standards. This can be accomplished by carrying out laboratory emission tests on a sample of new products representative of those offered for sale in Canada.
In the longer term, total emissions from the in-use fleet of vehicles and engines is expected to be reduced as cleaner new products replace a significant portion of the older, higher emitting vehicles and engines (impacts can be estimated through emissions modeling).
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-12-30, planned for publication in Canada Gazette, Part II, in Fall 2007
 
Regulation Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS) Regulations, 1998 (Canada Gazette, Part I and II)
Expected Results The amendments to the Regulations will minimize and control exempted uses of methyl bromide by: strengthening the domestic critical and emergency use processes, optimizing the use and increasing the flexibility of the Regulations; helping Canada implement its Canadian National Management Strategy for the Phase-out of Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemptions; and by improving tracking by imposing further reporting requirements as required under the Montreal Protocol.
Measurement Criteria The Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS) Regulations, 1998 contains a thorough licensing system as well as the requirement to report consumption of ozone-depleting substances to Environment Canada on an annual basis. In turn, Environment Canada reports this information to the Secretariat for the Montreal Protocol. Canada has consistently met its obligations under the Montreal Protocol.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-12-02
 
Regulation Amending the Vinyl Chloride Release Regulations, 1992 (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results Vinyl Chloride is a known carcinogen, harmful to the environment and a danger to human health. The intent of the amended Regulations is to continue to protect the environment and health of Canadians by providing improved clarity to the language of the regulation and incorporated reference method.
Measurement Criteria Compliance with emission limits and a plan for the control of fugitive emissions
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2004-04-03
 
Regulation Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and its Salts and Certain Other Compounds Regulations (PFOS) (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Prohibition on manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale and import of PFOS, its salts and its precursors and products or formulations containing PFOS, its salts and its precursors.
Measurement Criteria As the regulations are finalized (published in Canada Gazette, Part II), compliance strategy will be developed. The regulations are not yet in force.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-12-16
 
Regulation Chromium Electroplating, Chromium Anodizing and Reverse Etching Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results The new Regulations will control air releases of hexavalent chromium from the electroplating sector either by limiting release at a point source or by specifying the conditions of use. Result will be a uniform approach to the control of hexavalent chromium releases from this sector in Canada.
Measurement Criteria Compliance with the Regulations when promulgated
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2004-11- 06
 
Regulation Regulations Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content in Architectural and Industrial Maintenance (AIM) Coatings (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results These new regulations will implement national VOC product content standards for certain categories of products; align with existing requirements in the U.S. to reduce air emissions of VOCs, which are precursor pollutants contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone and particulate matter.
Measurement Criteria The VOC limits in the regulated products will be verified using standard laboratory tests.
Results Achieved Multi-stakeholder meetings were held in April 2005, January and September 2006. Planning to publish this new regulation by end of 2007.
 
Regulation Regulations Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content in Consumer Products (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results These new regulations will implement national VOC product content standards for certain categories of products; align with existing requirements in the U.S. to reduce air emissions of VOCs, which are precursor pollutants contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone and particulate matter.
Measurement Criteria The VOC limits in the regulated products will be verified using standard laboratory tests.
Results Achieved Multi-stakeholder meeting was held in September 2006. Planning to publish this new regulation by end of 2007.
 
Regulation Regulations Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content in Automotive Refinish Coatings (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results These new regulations will implement national VOC product content standards for certain categories of products; align with existing requirements in the U.S. to reduce air emissions of VOCs, which are precursor pollutants contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone and particulate matter.
Measurement Criteria The VOC limits in the regulated products will be verified using standard laboratory tests.
Results Achieved Multi-stakeholder meetings were held in May and October 2006. Planning to publish this new regulation by end of 2007.
 
Regulation Amending 2-Butoxyethanol Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results Protect the health of Canadians by setting limits for the concentration of 2-butoxyethanol (2-BE) in products designed for indoor use.
Measurement Criteria Products containing 2-BE are below established limits.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-12-27
 
Regulation Amendments to the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) Under the Fisheries Act (Canada Gazette, Part I and II)
Expected Results Address some technical matters identified through implementation of the regulations; improve the clarity of interpretation; harmonize some MMER requirements with relevant components of the recently amended Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations; and to designate two fish-bearing waters as tailings impoundment areas.
Measurement Criteria Regulated facilities are required to submit quarterly and annual reports of monitoring results to Environment Canada. Exceeding the prescribed standards must be reported without delay to enforcement officers. Environment Canada officials prepare and publish an annual status report summarizing the performance of mines with respect to the prescribed effluent standards. This report is provided to the regulated community and stakeholders and is available on Environment Canada's website.
Results Achieved

Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-04-08

Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-10-18
 
Regulation Amendment to the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulations, 2005 (2-Methoxyethanol, Pentachlorobenzene and Tetrachlorobenzenes) (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results Restrict the manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale and import of toxic substances 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME), and prohibit the manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale and import of pentachlorobenzene (QCB), and tetrachlorobenzenes (TeCBs) to ensure that the environment and health of Canadians is protected from the potential harmful effects attributed to these toxic substances.
Measurement Criteria The quantity of 2-ME imported into Canada is reduced. Progress towards virtual elimination of QCB and TeCB is achieved.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-11-29
 
Regulation Amendment to the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulations, 2005, Fluorotelomer-based Substances (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Prohibit toxic substances (New Fluorotelomer-based Substances) that pose serious risks to Canadians' health or their environments, to ensure the substances are not introduced into the Canadian market.
Measurement Criteria To maintain the prohibitions under the New Substances provisions of CEPA 1999 published on 2004-06-23.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-06-17
 
Regulation Final Ministerial Order to add hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) to the Virtual Elimination List (VE) (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results This order will establish the Virtual Elimination List, with the addition of this substance (HCBD).
Measurement Criteria The Virtual Elimination List was established with the addition of HCBD in December of 2006.
Regulatory instrument to reduce the release of HCBD into the environment are in place:
  • Addition of HCBD to the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulation, 2005 prevents the deliberate manufacture, sale, import or use of HCBD.
  •  Release of HCBD has been reduced as a result of Solvent Degreasing Regulations and Tetrachloroethylene (Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations which reduce the release of 2 chlorinated solvents in which HCBD occurs as an incidental contaminant.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-12-13
 
Regulation Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Provide a more effective and comprehensive framework for ending the use of PCBs and destroying PCBs in storage. Set specific end of use and destruction dates and establish reporting and monitoring requirements to measure progress. Ensure Canada fulfills its international obligations.
Measurement Criteria There is a reduction in the total volume of PCBs remaining in use and an increase in the total volume of PCBs destroyed. The total volume of PCBs in storage will also be reduced.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-11-04
 
Regulation Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Prohibit the manufacture of PBDEs (tetraBDE, pentaBDE, hexaBDE, heptaBDE, octaBDE, nonaBDE and decaBDE). Prohibit the use, sale, offer for sale and import of tetraBDE, pentaBDE, hexaBDE, and mixtures, polymers and resins containing these substances and will prohibit the manufacture of these mixtures, polymers and resins.
Measurement Criteria Progress towards virtual elimination of tetraBDE, pentaBDE and hexaBDE is achieved.
Results Achieved Published in the Canadian Gazette, Part I, 2006-12-16
 
Regulation Federal Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products Storage Tank Systems Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Provide a more comprehensive framework in order to effectively prevent soil and groundwater contamination from storage tank systems of the Federal House and on Aboriginal lands.
Measurement Criteria There is an increase in the percentage of storage tank systems meeting the technical requirements of the regulations. There is a decrease in the number of spills reported and a decrease in the total volume of product spilled.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2007-04-07.
 
Regulation Amendments to the Environmental Emergency Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Amending the regulations to add 34 substances and associated thresholds quantities to the current list of 174 substances which require facilities to develop and implement environmental emergency plans that address prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery. Amendments will also clarify requirements for propane, ammonia, and annual testing, and eliminate potential duplication with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act.
Measurement Criteria Regulated facilities are required to submit notices through our online reporting database, within the mandated timelines, to Environment Canada if they exceed the prescribed thresholds for the published substances and prepare an environmental emergency (E2) plan. The E2 plans are to be tested and updated yearly. The amendments would bring an increase in the number of facilities that must prepare E2 plans, resulting in decreased risks, both in terms of frequency and severity of incidents, hence enhanced safety for the general public. Facilities non-compliant with the Regulations will be referred to enforcement officers.
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2007-06-09.
 
Regulation Amendments to the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Develop amendments to the Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program to further target monitoring efforts and resources where they are needed most. Amendments would incorporate opportunities for program improvements identified through departmental implementation experience and a recent multi-stakeholder smart regulation project on EEM.
Measurement Criteria There is compliance with regulations.
Results Achieved Completed public consultations on proposed amendments to the PPER in September 2006. Ongoing preparation for publication in Canada Gazette, Part I
 
Biodiversity Conservation Regulatory Initiatives
Regulation Amendments to Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) (Canada Gazette, Part I and II)
Expected Results Amend Schedule 1 to modify the legal list of species which immediately provides the protection provisions prescribed under the Act and other provisions as needed.
Measurement Criteria Amendment was completed within prescribed timelines
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-09-06
 
Regulation Amendments to the Migratory Birds Regulations and Wildlife Area Regulations (Canada Gazette, Part I and II)
Expected Results Update the definition of non-toxic shot to include tungsten-iron-nickel-copper as an approved non-toxic shot alternative for hunting migratory game birds.
Measurement Criteria Amendment is completed
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part I, 2006-12-09
 
Regulation Annual hunting regulations, under the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) (Canada Gazette, Part II)
Expected Results To establish hunting season dates and bag and possession limits for migratory game birds at sustainable levels using the best available science.
Measurement Criteria  
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-04-05
 
Regulation Overabundant Snow Geese, under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, to establish a special conservation season (MBCA), (Canada Gazette, Part I and II)
Expected Results Maintain a spring hunting season for snow geese as a population control measure, where needed.
Measurement Criteria  
Results Achieved Published in Canada Gazette, Part II, 2006-04-05
 
Regulation Amendment to the Wildlife Area Regulations under the Canada Wildlife Act (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Amendment to maintain and establish protected areas for the conservation of habitat and wildlife. Establish two new National Wildlife Areas, Igaliqtuug and Cape Searle and Reid Bay.
Measurement Criteria  
Results Achieved Ongoing
 
Regulation Amendments to the Wildlife Animal and Plant Trade Regulations under the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (WAPPRIITA) (Canada Gazette, Part I)
Expected Results Establish provisions for pre-Convention and exemption regulations for certain specimens as authorized under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
Measurement Criteria  
Results Achieved Ongoing

Table 8: Details on Project Spending

In 2006-2007, Environment Canada managed the following projects that exceeded their delegated project approval level:

  • Weather station construction Eureka, N.W.T.
  • Hydrometric Program
  • Canadian Meteorological Centre - Facility Extension
  • Supercomputer Facility Upgrade to Electrical and Cooling Capacity
  • Modernization of the Climate Observing Program
  • UPS Replacement - Dorval Facility

Additional information on Environment Canada's projects can be found at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

Table 9: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

In 2006-2007, Environment Canada managed the following transfer payment programs in excess of $5 million:

  • Contributions to support environmental and sustainable development initiatives
  • Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program
  • Contribution to EcoAction - Community Funding Initiative

 Additional information on Environment Canada's transfer payment programs can be found at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

Table 10: Conditional Grants (Foundations)

Environment Canada has provided conditional grants to the independent foundations identified below:

  • Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC)
  • The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) Green Municipal Funds (GMF)
  • Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT)
  • Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences (CFCAS)

Additional information on Environment Canada's conditional grants to independent foundations can be found at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

Table 11: Financial Statements

Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2007 and all information contained in these statements rests with departmental management. These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management's best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the department's financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the department's Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds. Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout the department.

The financial statements of the department have not been audited.
 

 

FinancialStatementSignatures


Michael Horgan, Deputy Minister Basia Ruta, ADM, Finance & Corporate, Chief Financial Officer

August 15, 2007
Gatineau, Canada
 

Environment Canada
Statement of Operations (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31

 


Expenses (Note 4)

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced

322,239,498

 

224,138,992

Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions

224,456,742

 

-

Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making

200,889,758

 

247,365,000

Biodiversity is conserved and protected

191,808,469

 

150,029,578

Water is clean, safe and secure

114,538,605

 

87,664,062

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscape

89,319,219

 

-

Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches

38,909,456

 

72,231,493

Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced

37,461,802

 

82,563,630

Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effects

5,368,089

 

100,032,079

Improved Air Quality

-

 

103,865,220

 

 

 

 

Total Expenses

1,224,991,638

 

1,067,890,054



Revenues (Note 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced

5,678,825

 

10,014,630

Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions

45,220,514

 

 

Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making

17,804,665

 

63,526,631

Biodiversity is conserved and protected

5,113,568

 

5,373,730

Water is clean, safe and secure

4,236,793

 

4,716,044

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscape

255,175

 

-

Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches

57,907

 

1,332,617

Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced

29,330

 

243,298

Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effects

133,553

 

2,380,654

Improved Air Quality

-

 

1,369,112

 

 

 

 

Total Revenues

78,530,330

 

88,956,716

Net Cost of Operations

1,146,461,308

 

978,933,338


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Environment Canada
Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
At March 31


 

2007

 

2006

ASSETS

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

Accounts receivable and advances (Note 6)

14,979,585

 

7,561,323

Total financial assets

14,979,585

 

7,561,323

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

Prepaid expenses

1,556,068

 

1,841,278

Inventory

2,640,884

 

3,486,850

Tangible capital assets (note 7)

338,322,332

 

335,513,930

Total non-financial assets

342,519,284

 

340,842,058

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

357,498,869

 

348,403,381


 

LIABILITIES

       
         
 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

367,528,561

 

136,317,214

 

Vacation pay & compensatory leave

31,096,975

 

31,833,460

 

Deferred revenue (Note 8)

57,681

 

44,611

 

Lease obligation for tangible capital assets (Note 9)

15,368,902

 

15,780,415

 

Environmental liabilities (Note 11)

63,266,228

 

83,837,800

 

Employee severance benefits (Note 10)

110,801,226

 

100,722,879

 

Other liabilities

7,420,106

 

7,332,785

   

595,539,679

 

375,869,164

         

Equity of Canada

 

(238,040,810)

 

(27,465,783)

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

357,498,869

 

348,403,381

           

Contingent Liabilities (Note 11)
Contractual Obligations (Note 12)
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements

 

Environment Canada
Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31


 

2007

 

2006

       
 

Equity of Canada, beginning of year

(27,465,783)

 

(260,143,381)

 

     

Net cost of operations

(1,146,461,308)

 

(978,933,338)

Current year appropriations used (Note 3)

868,438,867

 

1,041,546,538

Revenue not available for spending

(13,644,670)

 

(17,820,029)

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund
(Note 3)

(180,462)

 

112,394,858

Services provided  without charge by other government
departments (Note 13)

81,272,546

 

75,489,569

 

     

Equity of Canada, end of year

(238,040,810)

 

(27,465,783)


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements

 

Environment Canada
Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31


 

2007

 

2006

       

Operating activities

     

 

     

Net cost of operations

1,146,461,308

 

978,933,338

Non-cash items:

 

 

 

Services provided without charge

(81,272,546)

 

(75,489,569)

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(34,997,054)

 

(35,340,897)

Loss on disposal and write-down of tangible capital assets

(2,685,064)

 

(10,720,943)

Found assets credited to Revenue

671,414

 

4,400,939

Other non-cash items

46,699

 

728,238

       
       

Variations in Statement of Financial Position:

     

Increase (decrease) in financial assets

6,287,086

 

(2,932,028)

Decrease (increase) in liabilities

(219,670,413)

 

243,100,609

 

 

 

 

Cash used by operating activities

814,841,430

 

1,102,679,687

       
       

Capital investment activities

     

Acquisitions of tangible capital assets

37,871,420

 

31,715,817

Salary costs transferred to Work in Progress accounts

2,348,633

 

1,632,991

Acquisition of tangible capital assets with Specified Purpose
Accounts

73,909

 

432,073

Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets

(521,658)

 

(339,201)

 

 

 

 

Cash used by capital investment activities

39,772,304

 

33,441,680

       
       

Financing activities

     

Net cash provided by Government of Canada

(854,613,734)

 

(1,136,121,367)


The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

 

Environment Canada
Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1.      Authority and Objectives

Environment Canada (EC) was established under legislation by the Department of the Environment Act.  Under this Act, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment extend to and include matters relating to:

  • The preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment (including water, air and soil quality);
  • Renewable resources, including migratory birds and other non-domestic flora and fauna;
  • Water;
  • Meteorology;
  • Enforcement of any rules or regulations made by the International Joint Commission relating to boundary waters; and
  • Coordination of the policies and programs of the Government of Canada respecting the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment.

Environment Canada delivers its mandate through the following 9 programs:

  • Risks posed by pollutants or other harmful or dangerous substances in the environment are reduced
  • Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions
  • Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making
  • Biodiversity is conserved and protected
  • Water is clean, safe and secure
  • Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscape
  • Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches
  • Net emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced
  • Canadians understand the impacts of climate change and adapt to its effect

In addition, Environment Canada has authority under a number of pieces of legislation which affect how the department operates.  The most significant Acts are as follows:

  • Antarctic Environmental Protection Act
  • Canada Water Act
  • Canada Wildlife Act
  • Canadian Environment Week Act
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Act
  • Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
  • Department of the Environment Act
  • Fisheries Act (Sections 36-42)
  • International River Improvements Act
  • Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994
  • National Wildlife Week Act
  • Species at Risk Act
  • Weather Modification Information Act
  • Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act

2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a) Parliamentary appropriations – the Department is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations.  Appropriations provided to the department do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements.  Consequently, items recognized in the statement of operations and the Statement of financial position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament.  Note 3 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

(b) Net Cash Provided by Government – The department operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF).  The CRF is administered by the Receiver General for Canada.  All cash received by the department is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the department are paid from the CRF.  Net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.

(c) Revenues – Revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.  Revenues that have been received but not yet earned are presented as deferred revenues (note 8).

(d) Change in net position in the Consolidate Revenue Fund is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non respendable revenue recorded by the department.  It results from timing difference between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.

(e) Expenses – Expenses are recorded on the accrual basis:

o       Grants are recognized in the year in which payment is due or in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria.  In the case of grants which do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements;

o       Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement;

o       Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.

o       Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

(f) Employee future benefits

(i)  Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer administered by the Government of Canada.  The department's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan.  Current legislation does not require the department to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.

(ii) Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment.  These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them.  The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

(g) Accounts and loans receivables are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

(h) Contingent liabilities – Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  To the extent that the future event is likely to occur of fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded.  If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(i)  Environmental liabilities – Environmental liabilities reflect the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of environmentally contaminated sites.  Based on management's best estimates, a liability is accrued and an expense recorded when the contamination occurs or when the department becomes aware of the contamination and is obligated, or is likely to be obligated to incur such costs.  If the likelihood of the department's obligation to incur these costs is either not determinable or unlikely, or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the costs are disclosed as contingent liabilities in the notes to the financial statements.

(j)  Inventory – Inventory consist of parts, material and supplies held for future program delivery and not intended for re-sale.  They are valued at cost.  If they no longer have service potential, they are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

(k) Tangible capital assets – All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost.  The department does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian Reserves and museum collections.

Capital assets are amortized on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:


Asset Class

Amortization (Years)

Buildings

Maximum 25

Works and Infrastructure

20 to 40

Machinery and Equipment

1 to 15

Vehicles

3 to 25

Leasehold Improvements

Term of Lease

Assets under construction

Once in service, in accordance with asset type

Leased tangible capital assets

In accordance with asset type


(l)  Measurement uncertainty – The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements.  At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable.  The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, environmental liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets.  Actual results could differ from those estimated.  Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3.      Parliamentary Appropriations

The Department receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations.  Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years.  Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis.  The differences between net results of operations and appropriations are reconciled in the following tables.

(a)    Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used:

 

 

2007

 

2006

       

Net cost of operations

1,146,461,308

 

978,933,338

 

     

Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting appropriations:

     

Add (Less):

     

Amortization of tangible capital assets

(34,997,054)

 

(35,340,897)

Project deposits - Environment

(3,124,968)

 

(4,250,385)

Prepaid expenses previously charged to appropriation

(287,132)

 

(128,492)

Vacation pay and compensatory leave

686,515

 

(3,798,982)

Other

(518,591)

 

(9,182,036)

Environmental Damage Fund

(320,458)

 

(249,141)

Bad debt expense

(119,038)

 

(147,537)

Foreign exchange losses

(26,946)

 

(34,171)

Expenses not being charged to Appropriations at the same time

(225,000,000)

 

150,000,000

Expenses for claims pending litigation

2,175,000

 

-

Adjustments for prior years PAYE

4,930,551

 

1,769,011

Refund of previous year's expenses

2,694,558

 

1,242,308

Revenues not available for spending

13,644,670

 

17,820,029

Inventory

(845,965)

 

(399,010)

Expenses related to Environmental Liabilities

20,571,572

 

8,914,881

Services received without charge

(81,272,546)

 

(75,489,569)

Employee Severance Benefits

(10,078,347)

 

(15,817,817)

Justice Canada fees

(4,417,195)

 

(4,031,574)

 

830,155,934

 

1,009,809,956

Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting appropriations

     

 

     

Add (Less): Acquisition of tangible capital assets

37,871,420

 

31,715,817

Capital lease payments

411,513

 

20,765

Current year appropriations used

868,438,867

 

1,041,546,538


(b)   Appropriations provided and used

 

 

                Appropriations Provided

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

       

Vote 1 - Operating expenditures

716,182,561

 

748,334,367

Vote 5 - Capital expenditures

40,000,001

 

33,822,100

Vote 10 - Grants & Contributions

49,719,502

 

69,250,340

Statutory amounts

82,406,977

 

234,455,327

 

888,309,041

 

1,085,862,134

Less:

     

Appropriations available for future years

(284,065)

 

(321,064)

Lapsed appropriations

(19,586,109)

 

(43,994,532)

 

(19,870,174)

 

(44,315,596)

Total appropriations used

868,438,867

 

1,041,546,538


(c)    Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used

 

 

2007

 

2006

       

Net Cash provided by Government

854,613,734

 

1,136,121,367

Revenues not available for spending:

13,644,671

 

17,820,029

 

868,258,405

 

1,153,941,396

 

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund

     

Variation in accounts receivable and advances

(7,517,714)

 

2,399,006

Variation in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

8,486,738

 

(103,832,355)

Variation in deferred revenue

13,070

 

40,500

Other adjustments

(801,632)

 

(11,002,010)

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund

180,462

 

(112,394,858)

Current year appropriations used

868,438,867

 

1,041,546,538


4.      Expenses

 

2007

 

2006

       

Operations and administration

     

 

     

Salaries and employee benefits

615,278,953

 

600,789,653

Professional and special services

82,703,435

 

92,970,773

Accommodation

42,681,107

 

41,400,094

Travel

41,889,706

 

44,715,033

Amortization

34,997,054

 

35,340,897

Other contracted services

32,361,075

 

37,538,678

Rentals

26,167,708

 

31,176,215

Machinery & equipment

25,345,694

 

39,876,531

Materials and supplies

25,266,374

 

26,470,187

Telecommunications

16,534,497

 

15,592,954

Equipment repair and maintenance

14,909,048

 

13,451,732

Information services - communications

7,052,768

 

6,674,059

Postage

3,133,364

 

3,696,858

Loss on write-down

2,378,257

 

4,362,708

Loss on disposal of capital assets

488,966

 

6,452,319

Other

300,758

 

8,565,982

Environmental liabilities

(20,571,572)

 

(8,914,881)

 

     

Sub-total Operations and administration

950,917,192

 

1,000,159,792



Transfer payments

 

 

 

Non-profit organizations

261,718,475

 

47,720,666

Other countries and international organizations

6,539,067

 

11,803,093

Other to individuals

3,359,694

 

3,652,184

Other levels of governments within Canada

2,020,186

 

1,895,319

Industry

437,024

 

2,659,000

Sub-total transfer payments

274,074,446

 

67,730,262

 

     

Total Expenses

1,224,991,638

 

1,067,890,054


5.      Revenues


 

2007

 

2006

       

Sales of goods and services

     

Sales of goods and information products

43,684,311

 

43,806,172

Services of a non-regulatory nature

18,743,797

 

25,027,367

Services of a regulatory nature

5,849,109

 

5,733,486

Lease and use of public property

1,251,878

 

1,238,084

Rights and privileges

659,362

 

683,328

Other

16,497

 

11,214

Sub-total sales

70,204,954

 

76,499,651



Joint projects and cost sharing agreements

3,142,747

 

4,681,754

Other

3,111,523

 

2,542,327

Environmental damages fund

903,314

 

355,632

Found assets credited to revenue

671,414

 

4,400,939

Gain on disposal of assets

370,104

 

237,393

Gain on foreign exchange

64,926

 

103,572

Interests and penalties

44,581

 

75,059

Fines

16,767

 

60,389

Sub-total

8,325,376

 

12,457,065

 

Total revenues

 

78,530,330

 

 

88,956,716


 

6.      Accounts Receivable and advances

 

 

2007

 

2006

       

External Parties

4,075,919

 

3,476,635

Other Government Departments

11,180,556

 

4,261,948

 

15,256,475

 

7,738,583

Less: allowance for doubtful accounts on external
receivables

(443,435)

 

(343,983)

       

Net accounts receivables

14,813,040

 

7,394,600

Advances to employees

166,545

 

166,723

Total

14,979,585

 

7,561,323


 

2.      Tangible Capital Assets


Cost

Accumulated amortization

 

Capital asset class

Opening balance

Acquisitions

Disposals and write-offs

Closing balance

Opening balance

Amortization

Disposals and write-offs

Closing balance

2007

Net book value

2006

Net book value

Land

25,242,821

1,600

-

25,244,421

-

-

-

-

25,244,421

25,242,821

Buildings

148,335,424

1,671,180

201,400

149,805,204

72,810,216

5,642,526

112,301

78,340,441

71,464,763

75,525,208

Works and infrastructure

3,720,359

-

-

3,720,359

1,672,385

148,202

-

1,820,587

1,899,772

2,047,974

Machinery and equipment

398,965,807

24,237,289

5,451, 456

417,751,640

273,004,169

24, 061,134

5,270,346

291,794,958

125,956,682

125,961,637

Vehicles

34,702,805

4,129,132

2,443,443

36,388,494

22,570,556

3,001,358

1,862,801

23,709,112

12,679,381

12,132,249

Leasehold improvements

34,991,977

-

-

34,991,977

17,596,343

1,415,858

-

19,012,201

15,979,776

17,395,634

Assets under construction

61,920,912

16,676,148

8,059,042

70,538,018

-

-

-

-

70,538,018

61,920,912

Capital lease for office and laboratory space

18,198,560

-

-

18,198,560

2,911,065

727,976

-

,639,041

14,559,519

15,287,495

 Total

726,078,665

46,715,349

16,155,341

756,638,673

390,564,734

34,997,054

7,245,448

418,316,340

338,322,332

335,513,930


Amortization expense for the year ended March 31, 2007 is $34,997,054 (2006: $35,340,897).

 

8.      Deferred Revenue

Deferred revenue represents the balance at year-end of unearned revenue stemming from donations, which are restricted to fund studies related to endangered species.  Revenue is recognized each year in the amount of the total cost incurred. Details of the transactions related to this account are as follows:


 

2007

 

2006

 

 

       

Opening balance

44,611

 

4,111

 

Donations received

13,070

 

40,500

 

Revenue recognized

-

 

-

 

Closing balance

57,681

 

44,611

 

9.      Lease obligation for tangible capital assets

On October 13, 2000, the department has entered into an agreement to rent office and laboratory space from Carleton University, for the National Wildlife Research Centre (NWRC), under capital lease, with a cost of $18,198,560 and accumulated amortization of $3,639,041 as at March 31, 2007 ($18,198,560 and $2,911,065 respectively as at March 31, 2006)

 

The obligation for the upcoming years includes the following: 

Maturing year

2007

 

2006

       

2008

1,300,000

 

1,300,000

2009

1,300,000

 

1,300,000

2010

1,300,000

 

1,300,000

2011

1,300,000

 

1,300,000

2012 and thereafter

20,800,000

 

22,100,000

       

Total future minimum lease payments

26,000,000

 

27,300,000

Less: imputed interest (5.63%)

10,631,098

 

11,519,585

Balance of obligation under leased tangible capital assets

15,368,902

 

15,780,415

 

10.      Employee Benefits

(a)  Pension benefits: The department's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada.  Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings.  The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the department contribute to the cost of the Plan.  The 2006-2007 expense amounts to $59,920,597 ($61,912,269 in 2005-2006) which represents approximately 2.2 times the contributions by employees (2.6 times in 2005-2006).

The department's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

(b)  Severance benefits: The department provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:


 

2007

 

2006

       
       

Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year

100,722,879

 

84,905,062

Expense for the year

17,543,411

 

24,441,850

Benefits paid during the year

(7,465,064)

 

(8,624,033)

Accrued benefit obligation, end of year

110,801,226

 

100,722,879


11.      Contingent liabilities

(a)  Contaminated sites

Liabilities are accrued to record the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of contaminated sites where the department is obligated or likely to be obligated to incur such costs.  The department has identified 54 sites (40 in 2006) where such action is possible and for which a liability of $63,226,228 ($83,837,800 in 2006) has been recorded.  The department has estimated additional clean-up costs of $96,266,228 ($134,696,989 in 2006) that are not accrued, as these are not considered likely to be incurred at this time.  The department's ongoing efforts to assess contaminated sites may result in additional environmental liabilities related to newly identified sites, or changes in the assessments or intended use of existing sites.  These liabilities will be accrued by the department in the year in which they become known.

(b)  Claims and litigation

Claims have been made against the department in the normal course of operations.  Legal proceedings for claims totaling approximately $25,000 ($2,200,000 in 2006) were still pending at March 31, 2007.  Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  To the extent that the future events is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

12.      Contractual Obligations

The nature of the department's activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby the department will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received.  Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Thereafter

Total

Operating leases

7,900,000

7,900,000

7,900,000

7,900,000

7,900,000

237,000,000

276,500,000

Other

7,930,925

7,930,925

3,341,652

-

-

-

19,203,502

Total

15,830,925

15,830,925

11,241,652

7,900,000

7,900,000

237,000,000

295,703,502


13.      Related party transactions

The department is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations.  The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge.  The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General are not included as an expense in the department's Statement of Operations.  There are other types of services that are not considered to be in the normal course of operation because they are not consistently provided without charge to all departments.  These services include: accommodation, certain employee benefits, workers' compensation cost and legal services.  The costs of these services have been included as an expense in the department's Statement of Operations in the following amounts:

(a)  Services provided without charge:

 

2007

 

2006

       

Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans

38,283,629

 

36,080,958

Accommodation

37,479,902

 

36,231,374

Legal services

4,160,389

 

1,640,289

Workers' compensation cost

1,348,626

 

1,536,948

Total

81,272,546

 

75,489,569


(b)  Payables and receivables outstanding at year-end with related parties:

 

2007

 

2006

       

Accounts receivable from other government departments and agencies

7,582,038

 

423,604

Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies

17,424,138

 

14,513,117

 

14.  Comparative information

Comparative figure have been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation.

Table 12: Responses to Audits and Evaluations

Environment Canada has been tracking progress against recommendations made by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD) and the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) and reporting the results to the OAG and CESD since 2002. Internal audit recommendations as well as those stemming from evaluations were tracked through follow-up work carried out on a two-year cycle.

In 2005, in order to increase the frequency of monitoring progress against all recommendations and in anticipation of certain requirements, a new and comprehensive approach to tracking Environment Canada's responses to recommendations was put in place. Under this approach, both internally generated as well as externally developed recommendations are tracked. Reports on the state of progress against commitments made in response to recommendations are made to the Departmental Audit and Evaluation Committee semi-annually. This provides senior management with timely information to assist in determining how well the Department is addressing and resolving risks or deficiencies and to act on identified opportunities. Environment Canada's audits, evaluations and their recommendations and management responses may be found at the Audit and Evaluation Report website (28).

Audits conducted by the OAG or the CESD may be found at the OAG website (29)

Evaluations completed and approved in 2006-2007

Co-locating of Science Research Centres on University Campuses Approved in May 2006
Departmental Climate Change: One Tonne Challenge (OTC) Approved in July 2006
Departmental Climate Change: Pilot Emission Removal Reductions (PERRL) Approved in July 2006
Departmental Climate Change: Opportunities Envelope Approved in July 2006
Federal Species at Risk Programs Approved in July 2006
Intellectual Property Management Approved in July 2006
Bilateral Cooperation Program under the Multilateral Fund of the Montreal Protocol Approved in March 2007
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products (interdepartmental, led by Health Canada) Approved in March 2007

Internal Audits completed and approved in 2006-2007


Climate Change: Eleventh Session of the Conference of the Parties (CoP 11) Approved in July 2006
Continual Auditing: Acquisition Cards Approved in July 2006
Continual Auditing: Compensation Approved in October 2006
Environment Canada's Bilateral Cooperation Program for Implementation of the Montreal Protocol Approved in March 2007

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations (Next three fiscal years)

The Departmental Audit and Evaluation Plan for 2007-2008 to 2009-2010 may be found at Environment Canada's Audit and Evaluation website (30).

Table 13: Sustainable Development Strategy

Environment Canada's Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) 2004-2006 highlighted for Canadians key commitments that the Department completed over the three-year period of the SDS to further our sustainable development objectives.

Sustainable Development Strategy 2004-2006 focuses on four themes that enhance Environment Canada's capacity for integrated decision making and that strengthen the sustainability of departmental operations:
  • Information for Decision Making
  • Innovative Instruments
  • Partnerships for Sustainable Development
  • Managing for Sustainable Development

The final report on progress for SDS 2004-2006 has been compiled and outlines results achieved during the period from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2007. This information is intended to provide parliamentarians and Canadians with an accounting of results achieved and progress made over the course of the three years of the Department's Sustainable Development strategy implementation.

At the same time, performance reporting on SDS 2004-2006 informed the renewal of the Department's SDS which was tabled in Parliament in December 2006. The Department's fourth SDS, for the time period 2007-2009, will build on results achieved under the current Strategy, strengthen results-based performance measurement and reporting, and support the coordinated federal approach to the fourth round of sustainable development strategies. This is a government-wide initiative coordinated by Environment Canada in the spring of 2006 that resulted in a set of federal sustainable development goals and a common reporting framework for departmental sustainable development strategies. More information regarding the federal Sustainable Development Goals can be viewed on the Sustainable Development Information System website (31).

The Sustainable Development Strategy 2004-2006 and performance information for the entire reporting period may be viewed at the Sustainable Development Strategy website (32).

Table 14: Service Improvement

Environment Canada continues to provide timely weather and environmental services and information to Canadians in a wide range of formats. This information includes historical data, current conditions, and immediate warnings of hazardous situations and forecast of future conditions in a range of hours to decades. Environment Canada is constantly improving its services via consultation with users, and learning from others to meet the needs of users.

Client satisfaction measurement and progress toward achieving satisfaction targets:

In a survey questionnaire conducted in 2007, 84% of Canadians who cite Environment Canada as the principle producer of weather information are satisfied or very satisfied with the accuracy of weather information and services provided. The survey results are as follows:

Environment Canada Weather Services

Awareness of Service Awareness and Usage of Service
1997 2002 2007 1997 2002 2007
WEATHERRADIO 22% 23% 23% 10% 8% 34%
Weatheroffice 28% 49% 52% 7% 31% 60%
Recorded Weather Forecast Messages 50% 50% 50% 27% 25% 48%
Weather One-on-One 14% 15% 12% 1% 2% 13%


Environment Canada Weather Services Level of Satisfaction
Very Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Very Dissatisfied
2002 2007 2002 2007 2002 2007 2002 2007 2002 2007
WEATHERRADIO 37% 38% 30% 40% 26% 16% 3% 3% 2% 1%
Weatheroffice 27% 36% 37% 48% 28% 13% 3% 1% 1% 0%
Recorded Weather Forecast Messages 28% 28% 50% 53% 14% 11% 2% 4% 2% 0%
Weather One-on-One N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Main achievements in improving service from a client-centred perspective:

Environment Canada strives to continually improve services to clients and to achieve more accurate forecasts and warnings. Over the year, for instance, the Department issued about 1.5 million public weather forecasts and 444,000 aviation forecasts, along with over 10,000 warnings of hazardous weather conditions like severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, heavy snowfall, or freezing rain.

Environment Canada's weather office website (34) continues to be the most popular Government of Canada information website and it has invested in improvements to internal processing and displays so that more users can now access and move around the website efficiently with minimal slowdowns. In addition, new products, such as the North American Ensemble Forecasting system, will aid users with activity plans. Similarly, much of Environment Canada's current data, including model output, full radar imagery and observational and forecast data is freely available on weather office. Since making these service improvements, the number of visitors has increased significantly while the visits are now averaging six plus minutes per visit.

Environment Canada's National Inquiry Response Team (NIRT), which was created in 2004 to handle all weather-related enquiries from citizens, continued to serve Canadians in 2006-2007.

Reports from the NIRT are provided to senior management on a regular basis in order to factor into decisions on service improvements:

  • Weather and climate related public feedback channelled through the NIRT system rose from an annual total of 16,000 to 17,000 in 2006-2007, a 6% rise in activity;
  • NIRT's measurable quality objective is to provide a response to client feedback within two business days. For service delivery the average lag time for clients to receive a response from the NIRT system averaged 6.6 days at the start of the 2006-2007 and improved by 32% to 4.5 days by year's end;
  • NIRT uses 4 categories to monitor client satisfaction. From the total volume 23% were complaints, 60% were inquiries, 6% were comments and 2% were suggestions; and
  • The Department also measures appreciative comments and positive feedback after delivering a response or services in general; the results show that 10% of all public feedbacks received are positive.

Environment Canada continues to operate a user-pay 1-900 weather information line. During 2006-2007, there were approximately 35,000 calls for weather consultation, and in order to better serve Canadians, the Department has increased the hours of operation for this service.

Continuous improvement of the automated routine forecast production tool has enabled the weather forecasters to focus on high impact weather. Consistent performance measures for weather warnings across all Regions are being developed and will be made available on a quarterly basis. Temperature forecasts were accurate within +/-3 degrees 92% of the time on day one and 86% for day two. Canada typically ranks within the top five in the world when performance scores of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are compared against those of other major NWP Centres. In addition, Environment Canada ensures that its strategic partners benefit from service improvements. For example, Environment Canada implemented a performance measurement system for Canadian Coast Guard Ice Services Partnership. Monthly and seasonal reports were provided to the Canadian Coast Guard on products and services provided, as well as giving an update on applied research and scientific activities. Future developments will include a database to generate reports in a timely manner, and to facilitate searches for statistics and trend data.

Environment Canada is also supporting international initiatives such as the International Polar Year (IPY). With more than 60 countries and 10,000 investigators participating in the IPY 2007-2009, Environment Canada is doing its part to help ensure the safety of field researchers in the Canadian North and the success of the scientific investigations. In addition to enhanced weather warnings and forecasts, Environment Canada's Canadian Ice Service (CIS) is providing specialized sea ice and iceberg information. The CIS also led the development of an international Ice Logistics Portal – a website where all of the national ice services are contributing ice information products to provide a convenient point of access to global sea ice and iceberg information for the IPY community. For more information, please visit CIS IPY website (34) or the Polar View IPY ice portal (35).

Table 15: Horizontal Initiatives

In 2006–2007 Environment Canada contributed to the following horizontal initiatives:

  • An Accelerated Action Plan for Federal Contaminated Sites – FCSAAP (Succeeded by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005)
  • Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative
  • Canadian Group on Earth Observation
  • Interim Strategy on Existing Climate Change Programs
  • Implementation of the Species at Risk Act

Additional information on Environment Canada's horizontal initiatives can be found at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp

Table 16: Travel Policies

Environment Canada follows the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Special Travel Authorities.

Environment Canada follows the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Travel Directive, Rates and Allowances.