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Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Polar Year

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (formerly INAC) – Northern Affairs Program

Lead Department Program Activity: Healthy Northern Communities

Start Date: April 1, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $150 million over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To support Canada's participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over six years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada IPY program is led by AANDC and involves 12 federal departments and agencies, including Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry Canada), Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canada's significant involvement and investment in IPY contributes to the government's stewardship of Canada's Northern Region. The Government of Canada IPY program is working with Canadian scientists and Northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada IPY program include:

  • Undertaking new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of Northern communities
  • Ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North
  • Communicating information about the program and the science undertaken
  • Building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners, aimed at enhancing participation in Northern scientific research
  • Ensuring that the resulting scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible
  • Supporting the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research

Funds are distributed among federal departments and agencies according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program. The Northern IPY coordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada's IPY program in four Inuit regions across the North. Federal departments and agencies participating in IPY are undertaking research projects, delivering support for logistics and emergency preparedness and contributing to projects for training, communications and outreach.

Shared Outcome(s):

The IPY program works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Increased understanding of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of Northern communities informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North
  • Northern research capacity is enhanced through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners

Governance Structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on IPY/Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) (chaired by the ADM of Northern Affairs, AANDC)
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at AANDC)
  • Directors general communications committees on IPY
  • IPY advisory subcommittees

Performance Highlights:

From a horizontal perspective, 2010-2011 produced a subsequent series of positive results for the Government of Canada Program for International Polar Year (IPY). During the past year, IPY undertook a cultural shift in redirecting resources and initiatives toward lasting legacy pieces. To ensure an optimal return on investment for each project, managers directed their focus on analyzing results, communications, consultation, deriving next steps and accessing and preserving information. Several key activities intended to synthesize the efforts of all stakeholders include the continued engagement of Northerners; the ongoing operation of the Northern Coordination and Licensing Offices; the establishment of data assembly centres; and preparations for the global IPY 2012 “From Knowledge to Action” conference, to be held April 22-27, 2012, in Montréal, Quebec. Each of these essential success components has been undertaken and continues to positively drive toward its scheduled completion and delivery before the conclusion of the Program.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)

2010– 2011

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC

Healthy Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$59,694,657

$13,591,756

$7,653,460

Dissemination to Northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects

Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities

Dissemination to Northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects

Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities

Established legacy initiatives to preserve and maintain accessible forms of IPY data

Health Canada

Sustainable Environmental Health

Environmental Health Surveillance

(Dietary Choice and Health)

 

$158,234

$575

$575

Increased understanding of the gender-specific determinants of food choices

Identification of culturally acceptable strategies to promote healthy dietary choices

Access was found to be a major determinant of food choices among men and women.

A number of culturally acceptable strategies were found, such as community freezers and increased support to local hunters. Final results will be available in March 2012.

Environment Canada

Biodiversity –Wildlife and Habitat

Water Resources

Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Government of Canada IPY program

$11,169,875

$568,740

$973,436

Continued research on climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of Northern communities; the focus for 2010-2011 will be to complete field work and a data analysis, undertake data management, begin to publish results, and conduct outreach.

Science: EC science projects completed their IPY activities in 2010-2011. While some field work was conducted, activities focused on data analysis, publication and outreach, especially in Northern communities. Four of five EC-led projects presented at the Oslo Science Conference, where EC also distributed approx. 1,800 copies of the ‘EC IPY Achievements Report’ funded in 2009-2010.

Logistics:
EC completed work on infrastructure projects at Eureka and Alert. Funding also supported the ongoing operation of infrastructures at the PEARL facility (heating, lighting, etc.).

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Oceanography and Climate Aquatic Ecosystem Science

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,542,477

$314,530

$314,530

Research conducted on the impacts of climate variability and change on Arctic marine ecosystems under the IPY program; in 2010-2011 the focus will be on publishing scientific results, data management, and continuing the sample and data analysis

Research was conducted on the impacts of climate variability and change on Arctic marine ecosystems under the IPY program; in 2010-2011 the focus was on publishing scientific results, data management, and continuing the sample and data analysis

Natural Resources Canada

 

Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Climate Change Geoscience, Public Safety Geoscience

$3,063,000

 

$147,500

 

$147,500

 

Canada adapts to a changing climate and has the knowledge and tools to manage risks associated with natural hazards and hazards arising from human activities

The program wrapped up its IPY commitments this year, including the development and implementation of seven Northern community adaptation plans that included plans for several coastal communities.

 

Ecosystem Risk Management

Environmental Geoscience Program

Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC)

Science for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Health and Well-being of Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,290,669

$2,169,680

3,856,079

Funds provided to 37 university-based researchers working on 19 IPY projects in the areas of climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of Northern communities

Funds were allocated to university-based researchers for projects described in the original application.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Strategic Priority Research

Government of Canada IPY program

$9,747,988

$723,136

$958,015

Sustainable, healthy and resilient Northern communities built

Ecosystem and community vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity assessed

Research projects that will help identify ways that Northerners’ health is being affected by climate and cultural change and inform adaptation and health promotion strategies for people living in Northern communities were funded.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Parasitology

$414,500

$11,250

$11,250

Trichinellosis: Testing of samples and analysis of prevalence data based on recovery of trichinella larvae from muscle tissue

Toxoplasmosis (serology): Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum or hemolyzed blood samples: analysis of validation data; wildlife used for food and disease reservoirs

Toxoplasmosis (RT-PCR): Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues and blood (analysis of validation data) and analysis of prevalence data based on the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues or blood samples

A total of 1,547 samples from 614 animals of 18 species were tested. Positive results were obtained from both terrestrial and marine carnivores.

A toxoplasma serological test was developed and game animals and carnivores were tested. Validation work needs to continue.

The qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) used to detect Toxoplasma DNA was conducted on 342 samples collected from 9 game species. All but two species yielded melting curve results within the range associated with Toxoplasma.

 

Parks Canada Agency

Conserve Heritage Resources

IPY Climate Change Impacts on the Canadian Arctic Tundra

$825,000

$115,000

$115,000

Standard methods developed and applied for conducting terrestrial ecological inventories and ecological integrity monitoring in Ukkusiksalik National Park

Due to logistical issues, we did not work in Ukkusiksalik National Park this year. The funds were used to conduct ecosystem mapping in three national parks and develop applications to climate change vulnerability and adaptation.

 

 

IPY Freshwater Systems

$525,000

$45,000

$45,000

Reconnaissance inventories conducted and ecological integrity monitoring methods developed for Arctic national parks

All expected results were achieved. Freshwater inventories and a set of monitoring methods were developed and are being added for operational use by Northern national parks.

Parks Canada Agency Total

$1,350,000

$160,000 

$160,000

 

 

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Government of Canada IPY program

$617,000

$0

$0

No activities planned and, hence, no expected results for 2010-2011

 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Agriculture and Agri-food

Government of Canada IPY program

$156,400

$0

$0

A scientific paper to be presented at the 19th World Congress of Soil Science in 2010; work on data analysis and compilation will continue. However, no IPY-related budget allocations were made for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011

Not applicable

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Government of Canada IPY Program

$795,200

$32,000

$144,301

Inuit History: Climatic Change and Historical Connections in Arctic Canada, 1000-1500 A.D.

Helluland Archaeology Project and Beaufort Sea Archaeological Project components:

Analysis and interpretation of archaeological data

Working in cooperation with local communities on the development of outreach products and teaching resources

Training of students and teachers

Workshop for the principal investigators on the four components of the Inuit history project

Presentations for general and scientific audiences

Preparation of publications

Evidence recovered from archaeological research on southern Baffin Island continues to produce indications of a medieval European presence in the area during the centuries around 1000 AD. The analysis of collections from this locality and from other Dorset Palaeo-Eskimo (Tuniit) and early Inuit sites in the eastern Arctic suggests that contact between Indigenous peoples and Europeans occurred through much of the past millennium. (CMC Helluland Archaeology Project).

Archaeological excavation at an early Inuit village at Resolute Bay indicates two—and perhaps three—distinct early occupations of the High Arctic region during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. (CMC/McGill High Arctic Thule Project).

Knowledge of human adaptation in the Mackenzie Delta-Beaufort Sea region has been advanced through the compilation and correlation of archaeological data and museum collections with traditional knowledge pertaining to the occupation of Banks Island and the Mackenzie Delta region over the past 700 years. (PWNHC Beaufort Sea Archaeological Research Project).

Paleolimnological analyses of pond sediment cores demonstrate that occupation by both Thule Inuit and Dorset Palaeo-Eskimos (Tuniit) can be tracked through their effects on local pond water eutrophication.

Modern climate warming signals are also noted in the upper levels of the cores. (U of Alberta/Queen’s U. Archaeology Palaeolimnology Project).

Grand Total

$150,000,000

$17,719,167

$14,219,146

 

 

 

Comments on Variances:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada: The forecasted budget of $13,591,756 was overstated and the initial allocation for fiscal 2010-2011 was actually $12,329,261. The largest contributing factor to the variance was the result of a denied $3.73 million annual reference level update request. This request was intended to act as a funding source for the IPY 2012 “From Knowledge to Action” conference, which was identified as an international ministerial commitment, scheduled to take place April 22 to 27, 2012, in Montréal, Quebec. After the request was denied, the identified funds were never returned to the IPY budget for reallocation. As part of regular business practices, the AANDC budget was reduced as a result of transfers to OGDs through the supplementary estimates in the amount of $346,300.00.

Contact Information:

Robert Fortin
Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
360 Albert Street, Suite 1010
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H4
Tel.: 613-995-6587
Fax: 613-995-7038
Robert.Fortin@ainc-inac.gc.ca

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead Department Program Activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $68.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to help respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations, Aboriginal people and the private sector to support projects that address local priorities.

In 2007, Canada decided to set national priorities that focus on greater economic participation and made a long-term commitment by investing $68.5 million over five years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared Outcome(s):

The primary goal of the UAS is to better address issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada, working toward the achievement of the following outcomes:

  • Urban Aboriginal socioeconomic needs are targeted within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate.
  • Access to and coordination of programs and services is improved.
  • Partners coordinate the development and communication of research, policies and knowledge.
  • Horizontal linkages and policy integration within the federal government are improved for seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e., the federal government, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups and the private sector).

To accomplish these outcomes, UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Governance Structure(s): Steering committees are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions and coordinating work through the UAS—along with other community activities—to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. Each UAS steering committee is composed of a cross-section of the Aboriginal community to ensure that the steering committee's decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. While the steering committee structure is meant to be reflective of local circumstances, each steering committee includes representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the steering committees is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and the community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through an incorporated community organization that has been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners. Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community organization, by federal officials or by a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote cooperation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.

Performance Highlights: The OFI’s partnership work has resulted in strengthened community capacity, legitimacy, and decision making and funding of over 144 community-based projects (34 included other federal partners) to improve life skills; promote job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and support Aboriginal women, children and families. Examples of this include work on the AANDC Active Measures Initiative; joint funding with Public Safety on an anti-gang strategy that helps young men and women exit the gang life; and also joint funding with Canadian Heritage, through Cultural Connections Canada, on six initiatives that focused on leadership training, career development, continued education and cultural programming.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC – Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

5.1 Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

$68.5

$13.5*

$2.72**

UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

To address the issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities, the OFI partnered with 3 other federal partners on 34 separate projects in the areas of life skills; job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families to increase urban Aboriginal people’s economic participation and empower them to make important life choices.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/ Service Canada

 

Youth Employment Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.153

 

The UAS and the Youth Employment Strategy carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • The Music, Arts and Culture program served as a culturally inclusive learning environment for over 3,000 Aboriginal youth.
  • 80 Aboriginal students were retained in the Edmonton school system due to an attendance circle initiative.
  • 3,551 Aboriginal citizens who were relocating and/or living in Winnipeg were provided with transitional services and programs, and an Aboriginal Service Provider Forum was hosted.
  • More than 50 high-risk youth participated in hands-on training in basic carpentry and minor building renovation.

 

 

Youth Employment Strategy – Skills Link

 

Unknown

$0.520

 

The UAS and the Youth Employment Strategy – Skills Link carried out three joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Life skills and leadership training was offered to 21 Aboriginal youth in Richmond, BC, which helped develop their self-esteem, cultural awareness and interpersonal skills.
  • 37 youth completed the 12-week group-based employment skills and career management training to assist them in preparing for, obtaining and maintaining employment or further education, with an additional 15 taking part in work placements.
  • Additional information will be available once the final report from the recipient is received in mid-June.

 

 

Canada Summer Jobs

 

Unknown

$0.010

 

The UAS and Canada Summer Jobs carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • 900 people participated in cultural events, 1 employment development service was created, 10 partnerships were developed to improve the delivery of programs and services, 20 people successfully completed training in various capacity-development areas.
  • Provided legal assistance in a variety of areas (e.g., tenancy issues, maintenance support, income support) to 365 low-income clients in the community of Saskatoon. They also provided 1,505 referral services for individuals seeking legal assistance.

 

 

Skills and Partnership Fund

 

Unknown

$0.151

 

The UAS and the Skills and Partnership Fund carried out one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided 44 participants with customized training designed to increase employment success and retention. As a result of this project, 37 Aboriginal people are employed at TD Bank, Fortis BC and Friendship Catering or are attending either the Vancouver Community College or the BC Institute of Training and Technology.

 

 

New Horizons for Seniors

 

Unknown

$0.025

 

The UAS and New Horizons for Seniors carried out one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided a positive, culturally inclusive learning environment to 306 Aboriginal students. Students learned about sustainable growing practices and environmental responsibility and accessed traditional knowledge from local elders.

 

 

Aboriginal Skills Employment and Training Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.129

 

The UAS and the Aboriginal Skills Employment and Training Strategy carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • 25-30 elders attended monthly meetings to learn about the services available in the community, took life skills workshops on financial management and participated in cultural activities.
  • Provided academic upgrading to 14 urban Aboriginal, enabling them to obtain the adult dogwood diploma.

 

 

Homelessness Partnering Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.468

 

The UAS and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy carried out eight joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided nutritious meals, support, education and referrals to 500 Aboriginal children and youth from Aboriginal families to help them succeed in their daily school activities.
  • 177 Aboriginal people living with HIV/AIDS and/or HCV and those at risk for HIV and HCV received life skills support designed to enhance their adaptive skills for day-to-day living as well as substance abuse counselling.
  • Provided direct and critical support to the target group of Aboriginal women and children facing homelessness. Out of 586 clients, 196 are single women and 80% of clients are of Aboriginal descent. The housing outcomes include 52% of clients having stayed at "My Aunt's Place" securing stable housing.
  • Offered a unique concept of recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. The organization is part of a self-supported non-profit program that provides a North American network for the 1,500+ existing Oxford Houses. The Oxford House concept is based on a proven self-sustaining model. Approximately 80% of addicts who stay in an Oxford House remain sober.
  • Provided housing services to Aboriginal families in urban centres across Manitoba. Its membership manages 1,580 housing units in Manitoba, including 962 housing units in Winnipeg. The program increases community awareness of Aboriginal social housing issues through strategic collaborations, networking and communication activities and delivers training to enhance organizational capacity.
  • Provided nurturing and caring support, guidance, cultural teachings, life skills lessons and skills training to help Aboriginal women build their personal capacity and promote them into leadership roles within their communities.
  • Counselling and support was provided to 60 individuals who rely on emergency housing to help them take the first steps toward improved life skills, employment activities and more stable housing.
  • Provided holistic treatment services to 20 men to eliminate their violent behaviour, both generally and specifically within the family.

Canadian Heritage

 

Aboriginal Women’s Program element

 

Unknown

$0.067

 

The UAS and the Aboriginal Women's Program element carried out three joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Skills training and cultural support to 26 Aboriginal women who suffered from physical and psychological abuse.-Enhanced knowledge and life skills for 11 Aboriginal women involved in the survival sex trade.
  • Various financial education workshops and knowledge on personal finances, valuable life skills and self-esteem were given to 101 Aboriginal women.

 

 

Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth

 

Unknown

$0.531

 

The UAS and Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth carried out six joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Life skills and leadership training was offered to 21 Aboriginal youth in Richmond, BC, which helped develop their self-esteem, cultural awareness and interpersonal skills.
  • 22 youth benefitted from increased community participation in cultural activities as well as increased awareness of and participation in community resources.
  • 7 urban Aboriginal youth participants gained access to life skills and career development resources, and explored culture, language and identity through the development of a facilitated workshop.
  • 12 urban Aboriginal youth gained access to professional filmmaking training, life skills training and cultural support.
  • 86 students stayed in school and 102 students participated in cultural events allowing them to be successful in their educational and personal pursuits.
  • Provided cultural and recreational evening programs for 600 urban Aboriginal youth at the Bernice Sayese Centre including sports, life skills training and Aboriginal awareness activities and workshops.

 

 

Canadian Heritage

 

Unknown

$0.067

 

The UAS and Canadian Heritage carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

 

  • Provided guidance and training to assist 12 elders in becoming mentors for youth. Elders in the program increased their self-confidence, the self-esteem of their youth mentees, and helped youth realize the importance of finishing high school and planning for the future.
  • 900 people participated in cultural events, 1 employment development service was created, 10 partnerships were developed to improve the delivery of programs and services, 20 people successfully completed training in various capacity-development areas.
  • 450 Aboriginal people gained knowledge and enhanced their capacity to address abuse, violence and injury-prevention issues
  • Provided 95 Aboriginal youth with cultural awareness/life skills training in the areas of active living, healthy eating and environmental stewardship. 1,011 participants were engaged in cultural learning/life skills activities including traditional teachings and cultural events promoting healthier lifestyle choices. 2 Aboriginal youth who managed this project received on-the-job skills training and career development training.

Public Safety Canada/Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

National Crime Prevention Centre

 

Unknown

$0.487

 

The UAS and National Crime Prevention Centre carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • The Music, Arts and Culture program served as a culturally inclusive learning environment for over 3,000 Aboriginal youth.
  • Provided nutritious meals, support, education and referrals to 500 Aboriginal children and youth from Aboriginal families to help them succeed in their day-to-day school activities.
  • Provided intensive gender-specific counselling in all life areas, such as domestic violence, cultural healing, family and relationship counselling and effective gang exit strategies. The project started with 10 women and ended with 6.
  • Provided 36 at-risk Aboriginal youth with certified health and safety training, cultural awareness, practical work experience and employment placements.

 

 

RCMP Foundation

 

Unknown

$0.02

 

The UAS and the RCMP carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided holistic treatment services to 20 men to eliminate their violent behaviour, both generally and specifically within the family.
  • Provided education support to 13 incarcerated Aboriginal youth and adults. This project included workshops on topics such as financial literacy, essential skills, literacy and employment opportunities.

Grand Total

$68.5

Unknown

$5.34

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: The UAS is an opportunity-driven strategy—rather than funding planned projects—designed to maximize federal, provincial, municipal and private investment in its three priority areas: life skills; job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. The primary aim of the UAS is to increase horizontality among federal departments, align programming with provincial and municipal governments and bring in other funding partners to maximize investments and increase the impact of that investment in urban Aboriginal communities.

* In 2010-2011, the UAS was allocated $13.5 M for its entire 2010-2011 budget. Not all UAS planned spending, however, went to horizontal federal initiatives because of the opportunistic nature of the UAS. The UAS spent $1.94 M in contributions and $0.777 M on O&M on the 34 horizontal projects that it undertook with other federal departments, which contributed an additional $2.63 M to the projects. The remaining amount of UAS funding was used for other projects that had provincial, municipal, Aboriginal, private and philanthropic funding partners. Total UAS investments ($10 M in contributions and $4.03 M in operating funds) in 2010-2011 amounted to $14.03 M.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): The UAS has proven effective in leveraging both monetary and in-kind contributions from a variety of funding partners. In the 34 UAS projects that had other federal funding partners in 2010-2011, the UAS also obtained additional contributions from provincial and municipal government partners, the private sector and Aboriginal organizations amounting to $4.1 M.

Contact Information:

Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H4
Telephone: 613-992-8186

 

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Community Infrastructure

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $735,639,806 for 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Of this amount, $202,500,000 in each of 2008–-2009 and 2009-2010 were funded from existing reference levels. New funds in the amount of $165,318,143 in 2008-2009 and $165,321,663 in 2009-2010, including employee benefit plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements, were sourced from the fiscal framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

The program was extended for an additional two years, with funding confirmed as part of Budget 2010. This will provide an additional $845,547,800 in investments into water and wastewater infrastructure over the two additional years, including funds from existing reference levels.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The primarye objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nation communities on reserves in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: infrastructure investments; operations and maintenance; training; monitoring and awareness; and standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national engineering assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities; consultations on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water; increased training through the Circuit Rider Training Program; the modification of existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water and wastewater services; investment in a national wastewater program; and the development of waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented as part of government commitments announced in Budget 2008, Budget 2010 and the 2007 Speech from the Throne to support First Nations' access to safe drinking water. It supports the continued commitment to promote access to clean water in Aboriginal communities announced in the 2011 Speech from the Throne.

The FNWWAP supports AANDC’s strategic outcome, The Land and The Economy: First Nations and Inuit benefit from their lands, resources and environment on a sustainable basis. The FNWWAP also supports the Health Canada (HC) strategic outcome of the department's First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services: Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information on these websites:

Backgrounder – First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Budget 2008, Responsible Leadership – Chapter 4: Leadership at Home and Abroad

RPP 2007-2008 Health Canada – Health Canada's Regional Operations: An Overview

Budget 2010 – New Investments in Jobs and Economic Growth – Chapter 3.3: Building on a Strong Economic Foundation

 

Shared Outcome(s): The FNWWAP works toward the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nations communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems.
  • Health risks associated with water quality and supply are reduced.
  • All First Nations community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards.
  • First Nations communities have increased confidence in their drinking water.

Governance Structure(s): The FNWWAP is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003-2008) and the AANDC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006-2008). A memorandum of understanding has been in place between AANDC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. AANDC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments; the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants; and action related to drinking water advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and the reasons for recommending drinking water advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee, which includes representatives from HC, AANDC, Environment Canada and the Assembly of First Nations, provides a forum for discussion to share information and coordinate joint action, although this is not a formal decision-making body. It also provides integrated and coordinated leadership to ensure safe drinking water for First Nations communities and to implement the FNWWAP.

Directors general and assistant deputy ministers from HC and AANDC meet when needed to exchange and coordinate actions on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.

Performance Highlights: The National Assessment—the largest, most in-depth study of on-reserve drinking water and wastewater services in Canadian history—was completed in the spring of 2011. This independent third-party assessment is the most comprehensive and rigorous survey of First Nations water and wastewater systems ever undertaken. This one-time assessment is an unprecedented reference tool that provides Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and First Nations a detailed account of the current state of water and wastewater systems on reserves. The assessment involved the review of 4,000 systems, including 1,300 communal water and wastewater systems, 800 wells and 1,900 septic fields in 571 First Nations communities across the country. The purpose of the assessment was to determine operational needs and establish long-term infrastructure development strategies and needs for each community on a sustainable basis.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC

Community Infrastructure

Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program

$671.0 M

$137.4

$127.5

Percentage of First Nations communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings (i.e., not high risk): 85% of systems will be either low or medium risk

The completed National Assessment indicated 314 high-risk systems out of 807 studied.

Therefore, 61% came in as low or medium risk.

The increased risk can be mainly attributed to a much more thorough and detailed National Assessment. This will serve to establish a new baseline for measuring progress in the future long-term water strategy.

Health Canada

First Nations and Inuit Health

Drinking Water Safety Program – FNWWAP funding

$54.6

$24.1

$21.8

(A1) Increased capacity of First Nations to monitor drinking water quality

(A1) In 2010-2011, out of a total of 770 community sites, 713 had access to a Community-Based Drinking Water Quality Monitor (CBWM), which represents a 2% increase from last fiscal year.*

* Note: Results exclude Saskatchewan due to delays in the data collection. Once data is received, results will be updated accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(A3) Increase EHOs to support drinking water quality monitoring

(A3.1) In 2010-2011, 32 out of 40 FNWWAP EHO positions were staffed.*

(A3.2) In 2010-2011, 60% of piped drinking water distribution systems were monitored weekly in First Nations communities, which represents a 7% increase from 2009-2010.*

(A3.3) In 2010-2011, a total of 127,430 water samples were taken and analyzed: 50,905 bacteriological samples were analyzed in accredited laboratories, 72,085 bacteriological samples were analyzed using a portable lab kit, 4,244 samples were analyzed for chemical parameters, and 196 samples were analyzed for radiological parameters.*

* Note: Results exclude Saskatchewan due to delays in the data collection.

Once data is received, results will be updated accordingly

 

 

Drinking Water Safety Program – A-base funding

$10.0

$5.0

$5.0

(B1) Implementation

of early warningdatabase.

(B1) All regions have a water database in place to monitor sample results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B2) Investigate waterborne diseases and waterborne outbreaks

(B2) There were no instances where gastrointestinal illness was identified as a possible outbreak of waterborne disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B3) Review of water and wastewater project proposals

(B3) In 2010-2011, 40 water, wastewater and solid waste project proposals were reviewed at HQ from a public health perspective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B4) Development of a national wastewater program

(B4) The National Framework for the Environmental Public Health Program in First Nations Communities South of 60 was developed and implemented. This document contains a chapter that outlines the objectives, roles, responsibilities, activities and reporting requirements of Health Canada’s First Nations Environmental Public Health Program with regard to wastewater.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B5) Development of public awareness and educational materials

(B5) HC has developed and distributed the Procedural Guidelines for Waterborne Disease Events in First Nations Communities South of 60, an annual success stories newsletter on drinking water and environmental health issues, national door hangers to notify residents that an EHO or CBWM came by to test their drinking water and stickers providing residents with cleaning instructions for bottled-water coolers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B6) Development of a recruitment and retention strategy for environmental health officers

(B6) Recruitment and retention strategies are ongoing. These include the implementation of an EHO exchange initiative in collaboration with US Indian Health Services.

Health Canada Total

$64.6

$29.0

$26.8

 

 

Grand Total

$735.6

$166.5

$154.3

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: $10 M was reprofiled to 2011-2012 to address projects that were late starting.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Sébastien Labelle
Director
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
Program Design and Regional Partnerships Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
Telephone: 819-994-6466
sebastien.labelle@ainc-inac.gc.ca

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement – Health Supports component

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Managing Individual Affairs

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start date to end date): $112,353,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Health Supports component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that former students of Indian residential schools and their families can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The Health Supports component of the IRSSA is composed of the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program (formerly the Mental Health Support Program) and a 24-hour crisis line.

Health Canada (HC) delivers the Resolution Health Support Program, which allows eligible former Indian residential school students and their families, to access an appropriate level of health support services, through all components of the IRSSA. Program components include emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); cultural support services provided by elders; professional counselling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counselling, elder, and/or traditional healer services.

AANDC – Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector (RIAS) provides a national 24-hour toll-free Indian residential school crisis line (1-866-925-4419) to support individuals in crisis, which is operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counsellors. AANDC is also responsible for coordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for independent assessment and alternative dispute resolution processes, and truth and reconciliation and commemorative initiatives, so that health supports can be provided in a seamless fashion.

 

Shared Outcome(s): The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools and their families have access to an appropriate level of mental wellness support services.
  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance Structure(s): AANDC is responsible for the overall implementation of the IRSSA. AANDC is working in partnership with HC to coordinate and provide services to former Indian residential school students across all components of the IRSSA.

Planning Highlights:

The Health Supports component will:

  • Continue to deliver professional, paraprofessional and cultural supports to former Indian residential school students and their families through the Resolution Health Support Program (RHSP), as required under the IRSSA;
  • Provide former Indian residential school students and their families with access to a 24-hour national crisis line;
  • Undertake communication activities to ensure that the health supports program is well known; and
  • Strengthen research, knowledge and training initiatives to ensure that health supports are well-suited to meet the needs of Indian residential school claimants, their families and communities.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

Health Canada

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program

$112.4

$14.8

$53.8

Demand-driven health supports are provided to former IRS students and their families throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Provided over 4,000 health support interactions at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) first national event in Winnipeg, June 2010.

At Independent Assessment Process (IAP) hearings, provided support to all those who requested it (100%).

Provided health support services to former Indian Residential Schools (IRS) students and their families at community events, during TRC statement gatherings and during the TRC’s Northern tour.

Total

$112.4

$14.8

$53.8

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: Actual spending was higher than planned spending as a result of securing the Budget 2010 funding ($65.9 M over two years for the Resolution Health Support Program). This funding permitted the program to meet the increased number of IAP hearings and allowed for the commencement of the Truth and Reconciliation events.

 

Contact Information:

Health Canada
Andrea Challis
Manager, Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Health and Addictions Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Tel.: (613) 952-1377
andrea.challis@hc-sc.gc.ca

 

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Alia Butt
Director
Policy and Strategic Planning
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Tel.: 613-996-2603
alia.butt@ainc-inac.gc.ca