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Horizontal Initiatives



Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $4.9 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement):

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, which received funding in the 2001 and 2003 federal budgets, is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects. To date, funding has been approved to support 75 projects.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance, and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians. The fund is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations. Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public. The categories eligible under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are:

  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High-Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

More information on the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/csif-fcis-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects which:

  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canada’s National Highway System for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canada’s surface transportation system;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world;
  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean, and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater; and expand broadband networks in Canada.

9. Governance Structure(s):

All Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients. It also develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee usually as the federal co-chair, except for transportation projects where Transport Canada is the lead.

  2. An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. The implementing department/agency will support implementation of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support.

  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-2010 15. Actual Spending for 2009-2010 16. Expected Results for 2009-2010 17. Results Achieved in 2009-2010
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA1 a. $152.8 Million $9.3 Million $11.4 Million

Corner Brook Water Treatment System Improvement Project (Newfoundland): The project will consist of the design and construction of a new, centralized water treatment plant, water storage reservoir, transmission mains and pumping facility for the city of Corner Brook and surrounding communities of Massey Drive and Mount Moriah.

Saint John Harbour Clean Up (New Brunswick): The project will consist of the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility and the installation of a number of pumping stations and sewer collectors in the city of Saint John. The project will eliminate the outfall of raw sewage from a number of locations into the Saint John Harbour.

Stratford Water & Wastewater System Expansion: The project will consist of the expansion and upgrade of the municipal water and sewer systems and sewage treatment facilities.

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program.

In 2009-2010, two projects began their construction phases: The Corner Brook Water Treatment System Improvement in Newfoundland with a total federal contribution of $12 million (total project costs of $43.4 million), and the Saint John Harbour Clean-Up in New Brunswick with a total federal contribution of $26.6 million (total project costs of $79.8 million).

Also during the same period, Infrastructure Canada, with its partner ACOA, completed the Stratford Water and Wastewater System Expansion Project in Prince Edward Island, which represents a total federal contribution of $3.6 million and total project cost of $10.8 million. The completion of this project contributed towards meeting various strategic outcomes by ensuring that drinking water is safe, clean and reliable at drinking water facilities and ensuring sustainable treatment of wastewater.

2. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) PA1 a. $144.5 Million $43.1 Million $9.7 Million

The Rivire Saint Charles Wastewater Project in Qubec City will aid in the protection of the river environment by minimizing the quantity of contaminated wastewater that overflows into it, and re-establishing the natural habitat of the riverbanks, making them more suitable for recreational purposes.

The Station Mont Tremblant Project will consist of the development of publicly accessible infrastructure for two new villages, Versant Soleil and Versant Nord. It will include other related components, such as a multi-purpose centre, inter-village transportation and multi-use trails.

Atwater/Des Ballets Water Project: The Atwater (Borough of Verdun) and Charles-J. Des Baillets (Borough of LaSalle) water treatment plant facilities will be repaired and modernized to ensure the reliability and safety of the drinking water supply. The project will serve to upgrade and/or replace equipment, as certain equipment have exceeded its useful life. Improvements in the quality of existing filtration, disinfection and ozonation processes will take place.

During 2009-2010, Infrastructure Canada and the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program in Quebec.

The following projects have continued to progress in 2009-2010:

  • The Rivire Saint Charles Wastewater Project (total federal contribution of $36.5 million (total project cost of $110 million);
  • The Station Mont Tremblant Project total federal contribution of $47.5 million (total project cost of $95 million); and
  • The Atwater/Des Ballets Water Project with total federal contribution of $58.5 million and total project cost of $253.8 million.
3. Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) PA1 a. $398.0 Million $34.6 Million $40.9 Million

The Toronto International Film Festival Project will include construction of a five-storey podium building to act as the headquarters (Festival Centre) for the Toronto International Film Festival.

The Evergreen Brickworks Project will re-develop the former Don Valley Brick Works site in Toronto, Ontario and its 15 heritage buildings into a multi-use, multi-component building complex that will serve as an environmental education and community-focused centre.

The Niagara Convention and Civic Centre (NCCC) Project will involve the construction of a convention centre in the City of Niagara Falls, Ontario with 100,000 square feet of exhibition space and 30,000 square feet of meeting space. The Niagara Convention and Civic Centre will occupy a 25 acre parcel of land in the Fallsview District of the city, approximately 500 metres from the Horseshoe Falls.

The Ontario Wastewater Treatment Bundle-Sarnia and Brockville Project will consist of two different projects. The Brockville Project will bring its Water Pollution Control Centre to secondary level of treatment, reducing concentrations of ammonia, chlorine and other pollutants, and accommodating waste from private septic systems. The project is designed to account for expected population growth during the next 25 years. In Sarnia, the City will upgrade its sewer system, including the installation of a main sewer and related infrastructure, and the separation of existing combined sewers.

The Hamilton Harbour Clean-Up Project is designed to enhance the quality of life for the residents of the City of Hamilton and to contribute to the protection and improvement of public health and the environment. The positive results of this work will help in removing Hamilton Harbour from the Area of Concern List, under the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

The Kingston (Ravensview) Water Pollution Control Project will result in the reduction of effluent biochemical oxygen demand and total solids, improvements in nutrient removal in discharge of non-toxic effluent and improvements in energy efficiency by upgrading or replacing aging equipment.

The Thunder Bay Water and Wastewater Treatment Project will include upgrading the Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) from primary level, to secondary level treatment. It will also remove ammonia and chlorine from effluent, reducing surface water and infiltration water affecting the Water Pollution Control Plant’s performance. It will reduce discharge of untreated sewage to water courses and risk of basement flooding, and transfer backwash water from the Bare Point Water Treatment, to the city’s sanitary system for treatment at the Water Pollution Control Plant.

Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund program.

During 2009-2010, two projects have continued making progress: The Toronto International Film Festival Project with a total federal contribution of $25 million and total project cost of $114.5 million; and the Evergreen Brickworks Project with a total federal contribution of $20 million and total project cost of $55 million.

During the same period, the following projects started construction: The Niagara Convention and Civic Centre project with a total federal allocation of $35 million and total project cost of $79.2 million; the Ontario Wastewater Bundle: Sarnia/Brockville project with a total federal contribution of $40.5 million and total project cost of $81 million and the Hamilton Harbour Clean-Up Project with a total federal contribution of $35 million and total project cost of $91.6 million.

Finally, two projects were completed in 2009-2010: Kingston (Ravensview) Water Pollution Control Project and Thunder Bay: Water and Wastewater Treatment Project. Each project received $25 million in total federal contribution, and represented project total cost of $80 million (Kingston) and $91 million (Thunder Bay).

4. Canadian Northern Development Agency (CanNor) PA1 a. $41.0 Million $12.6 Million $0.9 Million

The Yukon Community Waterfront Project will cover a series of urban development initiatives aimed at upgrading the function and appearance of the waterfronts in Whitehorse and Carcross and enabling further development. Work will include water, sewer, street improvements and extensions, landscaping, construction of the wharf, restoration of heritage buildings and other aesthetic improvements. The funding will also be used to support arts and culture facilities, dock improvements, trolley extension and other projects.

During 2009-2010, Infrastructure Canada and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreement for the implementation of development initiatives under the Yukon Community Waterfront Project.

This project was to receive initially a total federal contribution of $11 million, but an amendment to the contribution agreement was signed on March 31, 2010. This amendment increased the federal funding in the amount of $9 million for the construction of the Kwanlin Dun First Nation Cultural Centre and the Carcross Waterfront Development Phase II. The total project cost for the Yukon Community Waterfront project is over $50.4 million.

5. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA1 a. $655.5.0 Million $69.16 Million $43.7 Million

The Winnipeg Red River Floodway Expansion Project, to be completed in three phases, will enhance components of the existing floodway to increase flood protection for the City of Winnipeg from a 1-in-90 year level of protection, to a 1-in-700 year level of protection. It will include increasing the capacity of the floodway channel from 1,700 cubic metres of water per second to 4,000 cubic metres per second, replacing and upgrading bridge crossings, re-trenching and re-configuring utility crossings (water and electrical), upgrading and re-furbishing the Inlet Control and Outlet Structures, and the expansion of the West Dyke.

The Saskatchewan Regional Rural Water Supply Bundle Project will provide funding towards the development or upgrade of new water treatment and regional distribution facilities for about 20 communities in the regions of Water West, Saskatchewan Landing, Caronport and La Ronge.

The Saskatoon South Downtown Re-Development Project.

The Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program.

During 2009-2010, two projects have continued making progress: The Winnipeg Red River Floodway Expansion-West Dyke Project, with a total federal allocation of $332.5 million for all its phases (which represents total project cost of $665 million) and the Saskatchewan Regional Rural Water Supply Bundle Project, with a total federal allocation of $27.3 million and total project cost of $63 million.

During the same period, the following projects were completed:

  • The Saskatoon South Downtown Re-Development Project, which received a total federal contribution of $13.7 million, and total project cost of $31.9 million; and
  • The Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre (the International Broadcast Center during the 2010 Winter Olympics), which received a total federal contribution of $222.5 million and total project cost of $883.2 million.
6. Transport Canada PA1 a. $3,340.5 Million $332.6 Million $308.8 Million    
Total: $4,732.3 Million $501.3 Million $415.4 Million  

18. Comments on Variances: None.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a.

20. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Border Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Border Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Border Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $675 Million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement):

The Border Infrastructure Fund, which was announced in Budget 2001, is a $675 million cost-shared contribution program. It complements some of the Government of Canada’s other infrastructure programs such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program, a Transport Canada program.

As part of “Canada’s commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada – United States border”, the Border Infrastructure Fund contributions are directed at or on routes leading to Canada’s border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and,
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

The fund also directs some funding toward smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under the Border Infrastructure Fund will help alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration (a Canada – US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

More information on this fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/bif-fsif/bif-fsif-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results that Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Border Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity, and to increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

9. Governance Structure(s):

All Border Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review and selection. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and is responsible for the evaluation of the program. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.

  2. Transport Canada: This department has the project-specific technical knowledge with regard to each project. Transport Canada provides analysis and advice for the review and approval of projects. It is responsible for implementing the Border Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: environmental assessment, the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, the provision of information pertaining to cash flow and budget, the approval of invoices, making payments, the conducting of audits and evaluation of the projects. Transport Canada reviews the business case for the project, and determines the costs and benefits. It works with Infrastructure Canada to jointly negotiate the project agreement and prepares the Treasury Board submission; the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities signs both documents. Transport Canada is the federal co-chair of the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. It also ensures adherence to information management requirements to capture, monitor and report on project information.

  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial or local government, private partner or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, the funding recipient enters into negotiations with Infrastructure Canada to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-2010 15. Actual Spending for 2009-2010 16. Expected Results for 2009-2010 17. Results Achieved in 2009-2010
1. Transport Canada) PA1 a. $542 Million $66.7 Million $80.8 Million

The Windsor/ VACIS project is a joint project with the Canadian Pacific Railway and secures the 7.5 km CPR rail corridor from Walker Road in Windsor to the United States’ border by protecting that length of track and preparing the site for the installation of a Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System by the United States Government.

Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada have continued to oversee and manage projects under the Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF) program across Canada.

Total: $542 Million $66.73 Million $80.8 Million  

18. Comments on Variances: None.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a.

20. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004-2005

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $1.1 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement):

The $1.1 billion Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments.

The fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live, work and raise families. It targets communities of less than 250,000  residents as well as First Nation communities. Like other infrastructure programs, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the Government of Canada, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on ‘green’ projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gases.

Through the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects will be vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The fund is cost-shared, with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder of these costs. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute a higher percentage of total project eligible costs.
More information on the fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/mrif-fimr/mrif-fimr-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture and recreation; and
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund is based on a federal partnership arrangement between Infrastructure Canada and five federal departments: Western Economic Diversification, Industry Canada (for Ontario projects), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. It involves 14 sub-programs, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations communities. Each of the 14 sub-programs follows the same general conditions, priorities and approaches. Also, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the various agreements reflect the nature of the partnership as it relates to the order of government.

To achieve expected outcomes, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund eligible projects must conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline, but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of the fund projects. The program relies on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives are involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-2010 15. Actual Spending for 2009-2010 16. Expected Results for 2009-2010 17. Results Achieved in 2009-2010
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)) PA1 a. $143.4 Million $37.5 Million $26.6 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) will continue to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

Since the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund program in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, the status of projects in these provinces are:

  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 156 projects have been approved. From these, 49 projects are completed, and 72 projects are underway
  • Prince Edward Island: 97 projects have been approved. 67 of these projects are completed, and 28 projects are underway.
  • Nova Scotia: 81 projects have been approved. 71 projects are completed and the remaining 10 projects are underway.
  • New Brunswick: 59 projects have been approved. 51 projects have been completed or nearly completed their construction phase. The remaining 8 projects are underway.
2. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) PA1 a. $241.8 Million $166.3 Million $47.0 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions will continue to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program in Quebec.

Infrastructure Canada and Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions (CEDQR) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program in Quebec.

3. Western Economic PA1 a. $286.3 Million $151.3 Million $81.9 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

Since the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund program in Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, the status of projects in these provinces are:

  • Saskatchewan: 300 projects have been approved. 251 projects are completed, 49 projects are underway and one project was expected to start in early summer 2010.
  • Alberta: 85 projects have been approved. 21 projects are now completed, and 44 projects are underway.
  • British Columbia: 102 projects have been approved. 17 projects are completed, and 82 projects are underway.
4. Federal Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) PA1 a. $373.3 Million $99.1 Million $54.9 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Development Agency for Southern Ontario will continue to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program in Ontario.

Since the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund program in Ontario, 744 projects have been approved, and 440 projects have been completed.

5. Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) PA1 a. $59.1 Million $29.5 Million $10.8 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) will continue to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

Since the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund program in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, the status of projects in these territories is:

  • Yukon: 20 projects have been approved. 13 projects are completed, while five projects are underway
  • Northwest Territories: 17 projects have been approved. 12 projects are completed and five projects are underway.
  • Nunavut: 12 projects have been approved. Four projects are completed and eight projects are underway.
Total: $1,103.9 Million $483.7 Million $221.2 Million  

18. Comments on Variances: None.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a.

20. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Infrastructure Canada Program

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Infrastructure Canada Program

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: In the former program activity architecture (PAA) structure, this program was under the Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding program activity. Since this program is scheduled to sunset in 2010-2011, it did not become a program activity on its own under the current (PAA) structure.

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000-2001

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $2.05 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement):

The Infrastructure Canada Program is a contribution program introduced in 2000 for local municipal infrastructure projects. The Government of Canada matches the provincial/territorial governments’ contributions, providing up to one-third of the cost of each municipal infrastructure project.  It is a $2.05 billion program in effect until 2010-2011. The fund is well underway and projects are ongoing across the country. Most of the funding has either been committed for approved projects or notionally allocated to those that are under review.

The fund’s first priority for funding is “green municipal projects”, i.e. projects with environmental benefits that enhance the quality of the environment or health benefits that enhance the quality of human life. Other priorities include affordable housing, culture, tourism and recreation, rural and remote telecommunication, high-speed access for local public institutions and local transportation. Recognizing that individual communities know their needs best, the program operates in a "bottom-up" fashion, with the flexibility for municipalities and First Nations to identify their own infrastructure priorities. It also includes provisions to ensure an equitable balance of funding between urban and rural communities.

Further information may be obtained at http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/icp-pic/icp-pic-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results are that urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada is enhanced and Canadians’ quality of life is improved through investments that protect the environment and support long-term community and economic growth.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The key roles and responsibilities of partners are as follows:

  • Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities – overall program management and accountability to Parliament, including media relations, appointment of Management Committee members, project approval for projects where the federal share is between $1M - $10M;
  • Infrastructure Canada – oversight and monitoring of the program ensuring effective management and a coordinated approach to communications and provision of services including operational services, information management, and communications services;
  • Ministers or Ministers of State responsible for delivery (Industry Canada; Western Economic Diversification; Canada Economic Development – Quebec; Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) – with Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities joint authority to enter into contribution agreements with provinces/territories, and project approval where federal share is less than $1M;
  • Federal-Provincial/Territorial Management Committees (one per jurisdiction) – administration and management of the Infrastructure Canada Program in accordance with the terms and conditions of the applicable federal-provincial/territorial agreement;
  • Provinces/Territories – signatories to the negotiated agreements with the federal government;
  • Local governments – main applicants for Infrastructure Canada Program projects; also responsible for sponsoring projects with non-governmental organizations and/or private sector;
  • Non-governmental organizations and private sector – eligible to propose projects that are sponsored either by a municipality, a province/territory or the federal government; and
  • Other government departments - provide key expertise for all or some types of Infrastructure Canada Program projects (e.g., Transport Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency).
($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-2010 15. Actual Spending for 2009-2010 16. Expected Results for 2009-2010 17. Results Achieved in 2009-2010
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA1 a. $188.2 Million $0.0 Million $0.8 Million

In Nova Scotia, the Municipality of the County of Victoria-Baddeck, the upgrades to its wastewater treatment system will treat 287 houses to a higher quality of wastewater while connecting 80 more to wastewater treatment systems. The upgrades to New Brunswick’s Village of Dorchester’s water system will allow it to provide potable water to the residences there.

The Glenwood-Applewood Sewage Treatment Plant in Newfoundland and Labrador will increase the quality of potable water to 540 houses.

This project has been completed.

2. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) PA1 a. $525.3 Million $12.4 Million $11.7 Million

 

Since the beginning of the program, the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions administrated more than 890 projects, which represents a total federal contribution of $503.3 million.

3. Western Economic Diversification (WED)

PA1 a. $568.3 Million $6.8 Million $2.9 Million

 

The Western Economic Diversification managed over 1,600 projects funded under the Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP) since the inception of the program. These projects represent a total federal contribution of more than $540 million

4. Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) PA1 a. $693.8 Million $0.0 Million $3.7 Million

 

Since the beginning of the Infrastructure Canada Program, Industry Canada managed over 530 projects for a total federal contribution of nearly $671 million.

5. Canadian Northern Development Agency (CanNor) PA1 a. $40.0 Million $0.0 Million $0.0 Million

 

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) managed over 100 projects under the Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP). These projects represented a total federal contribution of more than $38 million.

Total: $2,015.6 Million $19.2 Million $19.1 Million  

18. Comments on Variances: None.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a.

20. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Building Canada Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Building Canada Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activities: Building Canada Fund-Communities Component, Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component and Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2016-2017

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $8.5 Billion1

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement):

The Building Canada Fund focuses on projects that deliver economic, environmental, and social benefits to all Canadians.

The national priorities for funding are core national highway system routes, drinking water, wastewater, public transit and green energy. Other eligible categories include projects that support economic growth and development (short-line rail and short-sea shipping, connectivity and broadband, tourism and regional and local airports), environmental projects (solid waste management), as well as projects that contribute to the ongoing development of safe and strong communities (disaster mitigation, culture, sport, local roads and bridges, and brownfield re-development). Funding is used to support public infrastructure owned by provincial, territorial and municipal governments and entities, as well as the non-profit sector and private industry, in certain cases.

Funding is allocated for projects in the various provinces and territories based on their population (as of the 2006 Census). In the provinces, the program operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component and the Communities Component. In the territories, in recognition of their very low per capita allocations, the Building Canada funding has been rolled into the Provincial-Territorial Base Funding Program and is managed under the terms of this latter program in each territory.

The Major Infrastructure Component targets larger, strategic projects of national and regional significance. Under this component, two-thirds of national funding is directed to the above-mentioned national priorities. Projects under the Major Infrastructure Component are selected jointly on the basis of merit through a federal-provincial/territorial negotiation process, and all projects are required to meet criteria targeting environmental, economic and quality-of-life objectives. Innovative technologies and partnerships will also be emphasized.

The Communities Component is focused on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000. Projects are selected through an application-based process and, like projects under the Major Infrastructure Component, are evaluated on the extent to which they meet environmental, economic and quality of life objectives. This will significantly help smaller communities address their infrastructure pressures and serve as a complementary instrument to the Gas Tax Fund.

More information on the Building Canada Fund can be found at: http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/funprog-progfin/target-viser/bcf-fcc/bcf-fcc-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are to deliver results that matter to Canadians—cleaner air and water, safer roads, shorter commutes, and prosperous, liveable communities while supporting the Canada's priorities—a stronger economy, cleaner environment and better communities.

9. Governance Structure(s):

i. Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund

All Major Infrastructure Component projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Priorities are identified through discussions with provinces, territories, including through the Infrastructure Framework Committees. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. Following due diligence, Treasury Board approval is required for contributions to any projects above the delegated threshold (e.g. $50 million federal contribution). At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The Major Infrastructure Component is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  • Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for identifying priorities, recommending approval of all Major Infrastructure Component projects to the Minister, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. In the case of non-transportation projects, Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for project review/due diligence, selection, and the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients. Infrastructure Canada develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. For transport-related projects, Transport Canada completes a project review/due diligence for Infrastructure Canada, negotiates the contribution agreements and the Treasury Board submissions. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. Infrastructure Canada is responsible for general oversight of all projects in this program.
  • An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. The implementing department/agency will support Infrastructure Canada in the implementation of the Major Infrastructure Componentprojects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluations of the projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to Infrastructure Canada’s information management requirements, including the use of Infrastructure Canada’s Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support to Infrastructure Canada.
  • The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement, except for transportation items which are handled by Transport Canada. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

ii. Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund

The Communities Component is governed by separate federal-provincial contribution agreements, each of which is managed by an Oversight Committee established by the Infrastructure Framework Committee that includes both federal and provincial senior officials. To support the operation of the Communities Component and Oversight Committees, each jurisdiction has a federal-provincial Joint Secretariat staffed by Federal Delivery Partners and provincial officials.

All project applications under the Communities Component are subject to a competitive, application-based process. This process is administered by the Joint Secretariat, but a material role for the respective provincial municipal association (for those provinces that have municipal associations) may also have been established as part of the application review process. Allowing some implementation flexibility to the Joint Secretariats and Oversight Committees, all competitive processes issue calls for applications (either one open window for applications or multiple shorter windows with set closing dates). Some provinces may limit the number of applications per community within and/or across all intakes.

Joint Secretariats provide the first level of due diligence, including engineering, environmental, and legal review of the applications, and prepare briefing material for the Oversight Committees. The Oversight Committees review and rank the application against the mandatory and additional leveraging criteria established in the Policy Leveraging Framework of the Building Canada Fund. The Oversight Committee presents the recommended list of projects to the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister for consideration, in accordance with the delegations of authority. After consulting with other Ministers who have a mandate in the substantive project area, the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister provide feedback on the list of projects to the Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee then performs a final review of the list and makes a recommendation to the appropriate Minister, in accordance with the delegations of authority. Federal funding for projects is announced once final approval has been granted in writing.

The Framework Agreements stipulate that individual federal-provincial contribution agreements govern the Communities Component in each province, and that these agreements are managed by an Oversight Committee, established under the Infrastructure Framework Committee. Each Oversight Committee includes both federal and provincial senior officials, and may also include representatives from provincial municipal associations (where applicable). The federal co-chair of the Oversight Committee is a senior official from Infrastructure Canada appointed by the Minister.

In the federal-provincial contribution agreement, the parties agreed to establish a Joint Secretariat to support the Oversight Committee and administer the Communities Component. This secretariat is staffed by officials from the provincial government and the Federal Delivery Partner.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-2010 15. Actual Spending for 2009-2010 16. Expected Results for 2009-2010 17. Results Achieved in 2009-2010
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) $12.0 Million $5.4 Million $12.7 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) will continue to jointly develop, oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) program.

In Prince Edward Island: Phase 2 of the wind farm development plan in Summerside was announced. The project involves a federal contribution of $4.5 million.

In Nova Scotia: Six projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $54.7 million. This includes the $18.7 million contribution to support the creation of a new central library in the City of Halifax.

In New Brunswick: Two projects were announced involving a federal contribution of approximately $16 million. This includes the nearly $10 million contribution to support the building of a dam and reservoir along Tower Road, at Turtle Creek.
b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) $26.6 Million $9.3 Million $6.7 Million

St. John’s Harbour.

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program.

c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) $148.3 Million $30.0 Million $14.9 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) will jointly oversee the implementation of the amended contribution agreements as well as the progress of all federally funded projects.

Newfoundland: The entire $56.3 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation was committed. Over $100 million was leveraged from funding partners. Of 53 projects approved, three projects were completed and the remaining 51 projects are underway. In addition, the entire $7.4 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation was committed. Of 18 projects approved, one project was completed and the remaining 17 projects are underway.

Prince Edward Island: The entire $22 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation has now been fully committed. Over $40 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, 37 regular Communities Component projects were announced with a federal commitment of over $14.4 million. Approximately $28.5 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of the 53 projects funded under regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation, in total 19 projects were completed and the remaining 36 projects are underway. The one project funded under the Building Canada Communities Component Top-Up is underway. It involves a federal contribution of $2.1 million, and has leveraged $4.2 million from funding partners.

Nova Scotia: The entire $37 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation has now been fully committed. Over $70 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, 17 regular Communities Component projects were announced with a federal contribution of over $17 million. Over $32 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of the 49 projects funded under regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component, in total 10 projects were completed and the remaining 39 projects are underway. In addition, the entire $14 million Communities Component Top-Up allocation was fully committed. Approximately $28 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. Of 38 projects under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up, five projects are complete and the remaining 33 projects are underway.

New Brunswick: The entire $33 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation was fully committed. Over $60 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. Ten regular projects under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component were announced in 2009-2010. Of the 42 projects funded under the Building Canada fund-Communities Component, in total one project was completed and 40 projects are underway. In addition, the entire $11.1 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation was fully committed. Approximately $20 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 21 projects funded under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up, one project is completed, and 19 projects are underway.

d. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) $23.2 Million $8.5 Million $3.4 Million

 

Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

2. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) $40.0 Million $11.0 Million $14.0 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) will continue to jointly develop, oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC).

Ten projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $282.5 million. This includes the $46.8 million contribution to support the upgrading of drinking water treatment plants in Laval, Quebec, and the $63.8 million contribution to support upgrades to disinfection at the Jean R. Marcotte wastewater treatment facility in Montreal, Quebec.

b. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) $210.0 Million $0.0 Million $1.7 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR) will jointly oversee the implementation of the amended contribution agreements as well as the progress of all federally-funded projects.

Quebec: Approximately $188 million of the $210 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation has been committed. Nearly $330 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. 121 projects were announced in 2009-2010. Of these, 61 projects were scheduled to begin construction. In addition, the entire $112.5 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation was fully committed. Nearly $226 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. All 106 approved Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up projects were scheduled to begin construction.

c. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) $39.8 Million $19.8 Million $7.9 Million

 

Infrastructure Canada and Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions (CEDQR) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

3. Transport Canada

PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) $1,517.7 Million $239.2 Million $92.7 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada will continue to jointly develop, oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) program.

29 projects, involving a federal contribution of approximately $1.1 billion, were announced for public infrastructure projects across the country. This includes the $22.5 million contribution to support the Team Gushue highway extension in Newfoundland & Labrador, the $241.9 million contribution to support the completion of the twinning of Highway 185 in Quebec, the $333 million contribution to support the construction of light rail transit along Sheppard Avenue in Toronto, Ontario, and the $41.5 million contribution to support work on interchanges of Highway 63 in Alberta.

b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) $100.0 Million $32.6 Million $37.7 Million

New Brunswick Highways.

Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program.

4. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Fund (BCF-MIC) $100.0 Million $47.4 Million $44.5 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to jointly develop, oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) program.

Three projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $29.2 million. This includes the $18.2 million contribution supporting the construction of a new arterial roadway in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Saskatchewan: Three projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $22.5 million. This includes the $13 million contribution supporting the construction of a new art gallery in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Alberta: Three projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $107.1 million. This includes the $75.1 million contribution supporting public transit projects in Edmonton, Alberta.

British Columbia: A feasibility study, designed to help the Capital Regional District plan its wastewater treatment, was announced. It involves a federal contribution of $3.3 million.

b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) $170.5 Million $47.2 Million $27.0 Million

Red River Floodway.

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) program.

c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) $359.5 Million $47.5 Million $26.3 Million

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will jointly oversee the implementation of the amended contribution agreements as well as the progress of all federally funded projects.

Manitoba: The entire $41 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation was committed. Over $87 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 30 regular Communities Component projects approved, 22 projects are underway. In addition, the entire $18.1 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up contribution was committed. Nearly $40  million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 22 approved Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up projects, two projects are completed and the remaining 20 projects are underway.

Saskatchewan: The entire $98.6 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation is now fully committed. Approximately $196.6 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, 53 projects were announced with a federal commitment of nearly $65 million. $134.4 million was leveraged from funding partners. Of 99 regular Communities Component projects approved, 14 projects were completed and the remaining 85 projects are underway. In addition, the entire $15.1 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Top-Up allocation was committed. Nearly $30 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 48 approved Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up projects, three projects are completed and the remaining 45 projects are underway.

Alberta: The entire $88 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation is now fully committed. Approximately $197 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, 33 projects were announced with a federal contribution of over $60.4 million. Approximately $152.4 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners.   Of 53 regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component projects approved, six projects were completed, and the remaining 47 projects are underway. In addition, the $52 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation was fully committed. Of 38 approved Communities Component Top-Up projects, two projects were completed and 35 projects are underway.

British Columbia: $111 million of the original $136 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation has now been committed, with the remaining $25 million reserved for flood mitigation. Nearly $234 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, 27 projects were announced with a federal commitment of over $64 million. Over $132 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 67 regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component projects approved, three projects were completed and 51 projects are underway. In addition, the entire Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation of $64.4 million was committed. Over $148 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 58 approved Communities Component Top-Up projects, one project was completed and 49 projects are underway.

d. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) $58.5 Million $46.0 Million $0.0 Million

 

Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

5. Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) $50.1 Million $24.8 Million $30.8 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) will continue to jointly develop, oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) program.

Eight projects were announced, involving a federal contribution of approximately $204.3 million. This includes the $55 million contribution supporting the development of a high-speed broadband network in Eastern Ontario, and the $46.7 million contribution supporting upgrades and new construction at the Duffin Creek Water Pollution Control Plant located in the York Region, Ontario.

b. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) $362.0 Million $35.0 Million $56.9 Million

Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (Federal Delivery Ontario) will jointly oversee the implementation of the amended contribution agreements as well as the progress of all federally funded projects.

Ontario: The entire $362 million regular Building Canada Fund-Communities Component allocation has now been fully committed. Over $717 million in commitments has been leveraged from funding partners. In 2009-2010 specifically, two projects were announced with a federal allocation of $12.1 million. Over $24 million in commitments was leveraged from funding partners. Of 291 regular Communities Component projects approved, 48 projects were completed and 243 projects are underway. In addition, the $196 million Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up allocation was fully committed. Of 182 approved Communities Component Top-Up projects, 18 projects were completed and 153 projects are underway.

c. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) $64.0 Million $33.0 Million $11.0 Million

 

Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

d. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) $0.0 Million $0.0 Million $25.7 Million

 

 

6. Canadian Northern Development Agency (CanNor) PA1 a. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) $9.5 Million $6.3 Million $0.2 Million

 

Infrastructure Canada and the Canadian Northern Development Agency (CanNor) have continued to jointly oversee and administer the contribution agreements for the implementation of projects under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) program.

Total: $3,291.7 Million $643.0 Million $414.1 Million  

18. Comments on Variances: None.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a.

20. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


  1. The Building Canada Fund was originally allocated $8.8 billion in federal funding.  However, portions of the fund are now managed under different program funding mechanisms.