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Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

2.1. Strategic Outcome 1: Canada's International Agenda

2.1.1. Program Activity 1: International Policy Advice and Integration

Context: This program activity provides strategic direction, intelligence and advice. It enables the department to plan and strategically coordinate its international activities, with a view to integrating Canada's foreign and international economic policies. This includes development and use of strategies that are targeted to specific countries and multilateral organizations and that are used to inform Canada's bilateral and regional relations. Policies and programs are developed for issues related to Canada's international agenda, such as trade and investment, human rights, democracy, environmental stewardship and international security. The department uses this program activity to shape the international agenda to Canada's benefit and advantage, in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

The complexity of the global environment in which DFAIT operates requires highly targeted policy development to ensure the advancement of objectives. But it also demands a very flexible policy capacity to enable the department to refocus rapidly and effectively on changing priorities and new challenges, such as the global economic downturn that began in late 2008. Another major development in global affairs-the coming into office of the Obama administration-also generated re-evaluation of foreign and trade policies in many countries. Meanwhile, many ongoing policy issues, including the NATO-led Afghan mission, the Canada-United States border, climate change, the Arctic, and the slow pace of the Doha Round of World Trade Organization (WTO) talks, continued to require close attention. Finally, the growing number of horizontal files (cutting across the mandates and operations of more than one player) were addressed through intensified consultation and collaboration with DFAIT's federal partners and other stakeholders.

Benefits to Canadians: This program activity ensures Canada's international policy coherence through planning, integration and coordination across the federal government. With respect to Canada's global commerce policies, this program activity develops country-specific and multilateral strategies to deliver Canada's bilateral and regional trade agenda. This includes strategic research and analysis of issues of interest to the domestic and international communities, and involves collecting, evaluating and disseminating intelligence to the Government of Canada.


Program Activity 1: International Policy Advice and Integration
2008-2009 Financial Resources 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
140.0 150.8 150.3 1,001 956 (45)

The following table lists significant accomplishments that the department achieved under this program activity in relation to the expected results in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities.

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Coherent whole-of-government Canadian policy creates the foundation for a more stable and self-reliant Afghanistan that does not constitute a threat to international security. Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government direction-setting inside and outside DFAIT

Senior management provided with information, intelligence and advice

Status: Met all
Coordinated policies through a whole-of-government collaboration on Afghanistan security, including civilian police mentoring programs and cooperation on Afghanistan-Pakistan border initiatives.
Developed policy priorities and programming, communications, advocacy and benchmarking approaches for Canada's engagement in Afghanistan.
Provided policy research and advice to the Deputy Ministers' Committee on Global Affairs, Security and Human Rights to ensure whole-of-government policy coherence and alignment.
Produced and delivered the third quarterly report on "Canada's Engagement in Afghanistan" in March 2009, which was tabled in Parliament in June 2009.
Canada's engagement in the Americas is coherent, coordinated on a whole-of-government basis, optimizes existing resources, advances Canadian interests. Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government Americas engagement

Status: Met all
Coordinated Canada's whole-of-government engagement in the Americas as a government priority.
Enhanced whole-of-government policy coherence and alignment through communications strategies, interdepartmental networks and planning consultations. DFAIT led realignment of resources across government (e.g. Department of National Defence and Canadian Forces Engagement Strategy for the Americas); also, among the Canadian International Development Agency's 20 countries of focus, five countries and one region are in the Americas, resulting in increased Canadian presence in the field and more ministerial visits to the region, including by other departments.
Led the development of whole-of-government positions regarding support to the Inter-American Development Bank and the Caribbean Development Bank in their response to the economic/financial crisis.
Developed a new scholarship program, "Emerging Leaders in the Americas Program," which was a signature announcement of the Prime Minister at the April 2009 Summit of the Americas.
Canada's interests are integrated and coordinated on bilateral issues with the United States. Reflection of Canadian policy positions in bilateral and multilateral actions, decisions, declarations and agreements

Formal and informal consultation mechanism established

Identification and endorsement of policy priorities

Status: Exceeded
Promoted Canadian engagement in Afghanistan, focusing on Canada-U.S. cooperation in Kandahar, and concluded successful high-level bilateral policy consultations on security, immigration, public security and defence.
Coordinated whole-of-government strategy for the Canada-U.S. border, including agreement to jointly monitor implementation of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) and establish a Border Facilitation Working Group.
Coordinated with the United States and Mexico to advance coherent and coordinated positions at meetings of the G20 and the OAS and at the North American Leaders Summit.
Developed coherent whole-of-government policies on issues of joint concern to North American partners: disaster risk management, H1N1, international security and the environment.
Canada's policies for priority bilateral and regional relationships are coordinated, aligned to whole-of-government priorities and integrated in Canada's network of missions abroad. Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government direction-setting agenda inside and outside DFAIT

Number of reports developed on countries of key security interest to Canada that are used by decision makers

Status: Met all
Developed whole-of-government policy options and strategies to engage priority bilateral and regional partners, including Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, the European Union, China, Brazil, India, Haiti, Sudan, Pakistan and North Korea.
Developed headquarters-field consultative mechanisms to ensure that Canada's network of missions abroad provide strategic and timely intelligence to inform the development of whole-of-government positions on climate change, energy security, and financial and economic issues.
Provided guidance and training to Canada's missions to facilitate their international climate change advocacy activities.
Coordinated the Government of Canada's response to humanitarian emergencies in Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Burma.
Global Security Reporting Program officers at 16 missions abroad developed-and provided to decision makers-over 700 reports on countries of key security interest to Canada.
Canada's policies on freedom and security, democracy, the rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship are coordinated effectively. Canadian leadership demonstrated at multilateral forums and institutions through statements, studies, leadership on resolutions, hosting or chairing of major events

Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government direction-setting agenda within and outside DFAIT

Status: Met all
Developed and coordinated whole-of-government policy responses to the economic, financial and food crises, including policy preparation for two G20 summits, support to the regional development banks, an additional $65 million in crisis pool funds for humanitarian assistance and food aid in Africa, and untying food aid.
Developed and communicated Canada's Arctic foreign policy to domestic and international audiences, as the international element of the government's Northern Strategy.
Led and coordinated interdepartmental delegations of policy and operational anti-crime and anti-terrorism experts at meetings of the G8 Roma/Lyon Group.
Worked with Finance Canada and the Canadian International Development Agency to achieve interdepartmental agreement on the thematic priorities for the International Assistance Envelope.
Policies on global issues are developed for delivery in multilateral forums and institutions. Whole-of-government Canadian policies delivered in multilateral forums and institutions

Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government direction-setting agenda inside and outside DFAIT

Status: Met all
Developed policy positions on global issues, including climate change, energy, food security, and development, for the 2008 G8 Summit and led interdepartmental policy development, coordination and preparation for Canada's 2010 G8 presidency.
Coordinated whole-of-government strategy for the Canada-U.S. border, including agreement to jointly monitor implementation of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) and establish a Border Facilitation Working Group.
Led preparation and policy development for the 2008 Francophonie Summit in Quebec City.
Led Canada's policy development for the International Maritime Group's Maritime Security Committee and the UN-endorsed Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia, which involves supporting the deployment by the Department of National Defence of its naval assets on NATO patrols and as part of the Standing NATO Maritime Group patrols to escort World Food Programme ships delivering humanitarian aid to Somalia.
Developed and coordinated, with partner departments, provinces and territories, Canada's policy positions on education at almost 50 multilateral ministerial and working-level conferences (UNESCO, OECD and OAS) and finalized international education agreements with Chile, Poland and Spain.
Canada's economic interests are supported by appropriate international trade policies and programs. Reflection of Canadian policy positions in bilateral and multilateral actions, decisions, declarations and agreements

Quality and timeliness of political and economic intelligence and analysis

Status: Met all
Developed whole-of-government policy options related to Canadian engagement with the European Union (EU) for the Canada-EU Summit in October 2008, and completed the Canada-EU joint study on the costs and benefits of a closer economic partnership, 13 which was released in 2008. The study found that trade liberalization would benefit both the EU and Canada and laid the foundation for the launch of negotiations in May 2009.
Used extensive stakeholder consultations to help develop the government's Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy, which will help Canadian mining, oil and gas companies meet and exceed their social and environmental responsibilities when operating abroad.
With Natural Resources Canada and input from corporate stakeholders, developed and launched oil sands engagement strategies with our key economic partners in the sector, the United States and Europe.
Conducted research on 35 U.S.-based multinational enterprises, which led to 26 business leads for opportunities to participate in global value chains.
Produced analyses of the economic crisis to inform policy and program development and support Canadian business (e.g. an analysis of trade impacts for the Minister, numerous presentations to advisory groups, an inventory of infrastructure spending in stimulus packages around the world, which was published in CanadExport, an analysis of impact of protectionism, which was published online) as well as other analysis relevant to Canadian competitiveness (e.g. an analysis of Canadian direct investment abroad, a presentation on BRIC countries [Brazil, Russia, India, China], which was published online, and organization of an international seminar on trade and productivity).
Actively monitored protectionist actions by other countries in the wake of the economic crisis, and supported the WTO, the G20 and APEC in countering protectionism through transparency and discussion.

Performance Highlights: The work of this program activity is central to the department's ability to serve as the government's centre of expertise on foreign policy and international commerce for the simple reason that all activities-and all results-flow from clear and decisive policies that advance Canada's interests and priorities.

A primary focus in the latter part of 2008-2009 was on policy development and coordination related to addressing the global economic downturn. For instance, the department led development of whole-of-government policy responses to the economic, financial and food crises, which included preparation for two G20 leaders summits focused on the international economic and financial crisis (November 2008 in Washington and April 2009 in London), support for the regional development banks and their response to the crises, and additional funds for humanitarian assistance and food aid in Africa, as well as untying food aid. An inventory of infrastructure spending in stimulus packages around the world was published for Canadian businesses so that they would be better placed to capitalize on new opportunities.

The department achieved important results in relation to the relevant key priorities (in italics below) identified in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, as follows:

Afghanistan: DFAIT spearheaded whole-of-government policy priorities as well as related programming, communications, advocacy and benchmarking approaches for Canadian engagement in the NATO-led mission in Afghanistan. In addition to policy development, DFAIT developed programs on Afghan security, including judicial sector reform and border initiatives. DFAIT played a lead role in ensuring whole-of-government policy integration, coordination and coherence for the Government of Canada's engagement in Afghanistan.

North America and the hemisphere: Canada promoted North American collaboration and policy coherence in many ways, including through the Security and Prosperity Partnership, on key issues such as pandemic influenza, regulatory cooperation, intellectual property protection, cooperation in energy, science and technology, and smart/secure borders.

Canada's engagement in the Americas is centred on advancing three key interrelated and mutually reinforcing objectives: enhancing the prosperity of Canadians and other citizens of the region; building a safe and secure hemisphere; and strengthening support for democratic governance. Accordingly, DFAIT led whole-of-government efforts and worked closely with key hemispheric partners and regional multilateral institutions such as the OAS and the Inter-American Development Bank to search for joint solutions to hemispheric challenges, notably in the areas of economic integration and trade liberalization; science and technology and innovation agreements; scholarships and youth mobility agreements; support to democratic practices and institutions, civil society, elections monitoring and free media; and capacity building in the area of security and justice. In the Caribbean, DFAIT continued to work toward disaster risk reduction and building partnerships to support security and democracy in Haiti. In addition, DFAIT engaged and consulted with key stakeholders, experts and civil society to discuss policy options and opportunities for Canadian leadership in the Americas, and coordinated the production of a whole-of government suite of communications products on the priorities and progress of Canada's engagement in the Americas http://www.international.gc.ca/americas-ameriques/priorities_progress-priorites_progres.aspx?lang=eng.

Growing/emerging markets, with a focus on China and India: As part of the Global Commerce Strategy, 13 market plans have been established (for the United States, Mexico, China, India, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Russia, Japan, South Korea, Australia/New Zealand, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Gulf Cooperation Council). The emphasis is on helping Canadian business explore new opportunities in global markets that have the greatest importance and potential.

Lessons Learned

What worked well: Chairing cross-cutting working groups on environment- and energy-related policy areas has proven to be a successful model for coordinating Government of Canada policies on environmental stewardship, and has informed other policy discussions of priority interest to DFAIT, including trade and security.

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: DFAIT improved its coordination with federal partners involved in Canada's emergency planning, enabling a quicker and more efficient response to international incidents. DFAIT also broadened its Consular function, creating the new Emergency Management Bureau in September 2008 to enhance the government's ability to plan, prepare for and respond to emergency crises affecting Canadians and the international community.


13 www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/assets/pdfs/EU-CanadaJointStudy-en.pdf


2.1.2. Program Activity 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Context: This program activity ensures the delivery of domestic and international programs and diplomacy, engaging Canadian stakeholders and partners as well as foreign governments and international players. Within Canada, this program activity engages provincial, territorial and other stakeholders to inform foreign and international trade policy. This involves raising awareness and understanding of Canada's policies, interests and values as they pertain to the government's international agenda. It also includes delivering programs on Canada's behalf to address specific international issues and paying Canada's annual contributions associated with its membership in international organizations.

Given the pre-eminence of the United States in world affairs and Canada's close relationship with that country, it is critical for Canada to maximize bilateral collaboration on diplomatic, military and economic issues. This required particular attention at the time of the change in U.S. administration in January 2009. Another key focus of this program activity, especially in the latter part of the fiscal year, was the global economic downturn, which overshadowed most other international issues and which will continue to be, at least in the short term, the lens through which many other issues are viewed.

Against this background, DFAIT remains keenly aware of the complexity of maintaining and extending diplomatic influence in a world of multiple and shifting centres of power.

Benefits to Canadians: This program activity connects Canada and Canadians to the world by managing Canada's bilateral and multilateral relations and by delivering programs that advance this country's international interests and values. It also raises international awareness of Canada, its policies, interests and values, while engaging Canadians inside and outside the country on key global issues.


Program Activity 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
1,061.0 1,102.1 1,098.2 1,849 1,698 (151)

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Protocol services are provided to the Governor General, the Prime Minister and government representatives travelling abroad as well as to the foreign diplomatic community. Level of stakeholder satisfaction with visits of the Governor General and Prime Minister and ministers of the international portfolio

Level of stakeholder satisfaction with ministerial visits by heads of state and government representatives to Canada, and related official events

Status: Met all
Organized and managed the Governor General's visits to 11 countries and the Prime Minister's visits to eight countries, as well as visits by 44 foreign dignitaries to Canada.
All deadlines were met, as defined in the standards for accreditation, and the department received no complaints from clients or stakeholders.
Provinces, territories, and other domestic and international stakeholders are engaged in Canada's foreign and international trade policies and priorities Number of occasions when the department led development of policy positions with other levels of government

Processes and consultation mechanisms developed to manage whole-of-government direction-setting agenda within and outside DFAIT

Status: Met all
Organized four "C-Trade" (Commerce-Trade Committee) consultations with provinces and territories to update stakeholders on Canadian trade negotiations and ongoing disputes, and managed regular engagement with provincial and territorial stakeholders, the academic community and the general public.
Consulted regularly with partner departments and agencies, the provinces and territories to ensure that stakeholder interests were reflected in the department's management of the Canada-U.S. Softwood Lumber Agreement and the NAFTA.
Contributed to Canada's whole-of-government policy coherence and alignment by conducting regular consultations with provincial and territorial stakeholders to incorporate their interests into policy development and inform them of Canada's foreign affairs and international trade activities and priorities.
Conducted two rounds of interactive eDiscussions with the public and academic institutions, the first on Canada's Engagement in the Americas and the second on the Arctic, generating 447 public submissions and 29,345 visits to the eDiscussions website.
Canada's Afghanistan policies and programs improve safety, stability and reconstruction and promote democracy, human rights, the rule of law, conflict prevention and public safety in that country. Number and value of peace- and security-related projects implemented as planned

Agreements that resulted in Canadian policies and programs being implemented by international partners and institutions in Afghanistan

Status: Met all
Disbursed over $42 million through more than 50 projects for security sector development in Afghanistan, including funds to enable the Afghanistan National Security Forces in Kandahar to ensure a more secure environment and promote law and order.
Promoted rule of law through police, corrections and justice programming, including $21 million to strengthen rule of law in Afghanistan.
Canada advocated for adoption of NATO's vision statement and political-military plan for Afghanistan in April 2008 to ensure that NATO efforts are coordinated with those of other international actors.
Brokered a joint border management plan between Afghan and Pakistani officials.
Through negotiation at the UN, secured better terms and conditions for UN staff in Afghanistan, which will improve recruitment and retention in support of allied efforts.
Canadian interests, including security, prosperity and competitiveness, are enhanced through a strengthened North American partnership. Status of negotiations in North America that enhance the security and competitiveness of Canada

Reflection of Canadian policy positions in bilateral and multilateral actions, decisions, declarations and agreements

Status: Exceeded
Through the Security and Prosperity Partnership, promoted North American cooperation on disaster risk management, avian and pandemic influenza, regulatory mechanisms, intellectual property protection, energy, science and technology, product import safety, emergency management and smart/secure borders.
Strengthened North American cooperation on issues of common interest in the Americas, including disaster risk management and building of partnerships to support security and democracy in Haiti.
Cooperated with the United States on issues of shared concern such as the Arctic, and on efforts to shape the agendas of NATO and the OSCE to make a meaningful contribution to North American security, including support of NATO's efforts in Afghanistan.
Implemented the North American Platform Program to promote Government of Canada priorities, support advocacy and business development, and serve the needs of Canadian business in the United States and Mexico.
Led security consultations with Mexico, which increased cooperation on transnational crime, organized crime, illicit drugs, trafficking in firearms and money laundering.
The government's engagement in the Americas enhances strategic partnerships in Latin America and the Caribbean, promotes economic prosperity, security and sustainable development, and reflects the Canadian values of freedom, democracy, human rights and rule of law. Canadian leadership demonstrated at regional and multilateral institutions through statements, studies, leadership on resolutions, and hosting or chairing of major events.

Reflection of Canada's Americas policy priorities in bilateral and multilateral actions, decisions, declarations and agreements.

Status of negotiations on agreements and cooperative arrangements (e.g. bilateral, regional and those related to multilateral trade and investment) with key trading partners

Status: Exceeded
Advanced Canadian political and economic interests and promoted democracy in the Americas through key regional and multilateral forums, including meetings of the Inter-American and Caribbean Development Banks, the Conference of Defence Ministers of the Americas, the Francophonie Summit and the 39th OAS General Assembly, as well as through Canada's support to Peru for the 2008 APEC Summit and to Trinidad and Tobago for the 2009 Summit of the Americas.
Strengthened democratic institutions by providing over $1 million through the Glyn Berry Program to support democracy promotion initiatives in the Americas and began planning for a new regional democracy centre in Lima, Peru.
Advanced democracy, governance and institution building at the multilateral level, in the framework of the OAS; at the bilateral level through programming in target countries; and through joint efforts with regional partners as well as the EU, France, Spain, the United States and Mexico.
Addressed the threats of drugs, organized crime, health pandemics and natural disasters through participation in multilateral and regional forums (such as the UN and OAS) and delivery of Global Peace and Security Fund programming, notably in Haiti and Colombia.
Worked within the UN Regional Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction in the Americas to promote disaster preparedness and mitigation activities.
Through the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Fund, allocated $4.8 million to the Caribbean region and Central America to enhance regional stability and security by addressing the threats of drugs, organized crime, health pandemics and natural disasters.
Signed free trade agreements, labour cooperation agreements and environment agreements with Peru and Colombia, and launched FTA negotiations with Panama
Through the Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF), provided approximately $20 million for police, justice, corrections, borders and human rights initiatives in Haiti and Colombia.
Canada's interests and relations with the United States are strengthened. Number, range and breadth of strategic promotion and public diplomacy activities to promote Canadian views on important global issues

Status of negotiations on agreements and cooperative arrangements (e.g. bilateral, regional and multilateral trade and investment) with key trading partners

Status: Met all
Cemented relationships with the Obama administration and with key stakeholders in the United States, including hosting President Obama on his first official international visit.
Cooperated with the United States on shared foreign and defence policy interests and priorities such as the Americas, Afghanistan and Haiti.
Continued advocacy and collaboration on Afghanistan security issues, including joint deployments of civilian police in mentoring programs and embedding of Canadian and U.S. officials in respective national command structures, and close cooperation on Afghanistan-Pakistan border initiatives.
Continued to elaborate a Government of Canada strategy and vision for the Canada-U.S. border to facilitate movement of legitimate goods, people and services while improving security.
Cooperated with the United States on shared foreign and defence policy issues, concluding the 2008 Canada-U.S. Agreement on Emergency Management Cooperation and implementing the Integrated Lines of Communication Agreement on military transportation.
Defended Canada's interests by engaging on bilateral issues such as the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (through agreement to joint monitoring of WHTI implementation and the establishment of a Canada-U.S. Border Facilitation Working Group) and the "Buy American" provisions in the U.S. economic stimulus legislation.
Canada's interests and values are advanced in multilateral forums, particularly with respect to human rights, democracy, governance and environmental stewardship. Reflection of Canadian foreign and international economic policy priorities in bilateral and multilateral actions, decisions, declarations and agreements

Canadian leadership demonstrated at multilateral forums/institutions through statements, studies, leadership on resolutions and hosting or chairing of major events

Status: Met all
Led the UN General Assembly resolution focusing international attention on the human rights situation in Iran and addressed human rights situations in Burma, Haiti and Somalia at the UN General Assembly and UN Human Rights Council.
Advanced Canada's candidacy for a UN Security Council seat for the period 2011-2012 through extensive lobbying and advocacy.
Advanced Canada's climate change objectives at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change by fielding lead negotiators, integrating Canadian climate change priorities into the activities of Canada's missions abroad and ensuring that climate change was at the forefront at bilateral and multilateral discussions with the United States, Brazil, China and India, stressing the view that a post-2012 climate change agreement must include all major emitting countries.
Ensured that Canadian economic, financial and development priorities were reflected in G20 outcome documents (the November 2008 Communiqu from the Meeting of Ministers and Governors and the Declaration of the Summit on Financial Markets and the World Economy).
Contributed to NATO Allies' concerted, strong stance towards Russia in the aftermath of the August 2008 Georgia-Russia conflict by ensuring a principled, measured approach to the resumption of cooperation between NATO and Russia at the March 2009 NATO Foreign Ministers meeting.
Hosted the 12th Summit of the Francophonie in October 2008, where DFAIT promoted human rights and democracy and announced $100 million in adaptation funding for those countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.
Delivered several speeches on Canada's new foreign policy for the Arctic, concluded the Ilulissat Declaration on the Arctic Ocean, and extended coverage of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act to 200 nautical miles.
Due to Canadian action, the G8 moratorium on the transfer of enrichment and reprocessing technology, in place since 2004, was lifted and Canada's rights to access this technology were maintained.
Initiated negotiations with Jordan on a nuclear cooperation agreement, which was signed in February 2009, the first such agreement in 10 years.
Contributed to the UN Secretary-General's report on the Responsibility to Protect and delivered two statements to the UN Security Council on the protection of civilians in armed conflict.
Advanced Canada's international trade and investment policy objectives at the WTO, OECD, APEC, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and G8 by facilitating capacity building for developing states and pursuing expanded market access coverage.
Canada's bilateral relationships are managed effectively to improve freedom and security, human rights, good governance, democracy and the rule of law in countries and regions of priority interest to Canada. Number of bilateral agreements reached that successfully negotiate key international policy issues of interest to Canada

Programs and advocacy campaigns implemented

Status: Met all
Engaged bilateral partners in the Americas to enhance Canadian prosperity, build a safe and secure hemisphere and strengthen support for democratic governance.
Enhanced engagement with Mexico on bilateral and regional issues, notably human rights, indigenous issues, disarmament, UN reform and environmental policy.
Implemented Canada's assistance package of $300 million over five years in support of Palestinian reform, and promoted peace in the Middle East through high-level bilateral engagement.
Promoted Middle East peace through the visit of Palestinian President Abbas to Canada and Foreign Affairs Minister Cannon's visit to Jordan, Israel and Egypt, as well as by participation in the Conference in Support of the Palestinian Economy for the Reconstruction of Gaza, held in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt, in March 2009.
Engaged in advocacy and representation on human rights in China, while positioning Canada as one of China's interlocutors with respect to global and multilateral issues.
Promoted democracy, governance and human rights in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Belarus and the Western Balkans.
Coordinated Canada's timely responses to 16 natural disasters in 20 countries, including Cyclone Nargis in Burma, the Sichuan earthquake in China and the hurricane season in Haiti, while responding to conflict, governance and humanitarian crises in Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo/Great Lakes region and Zimbabwe with financial and diplomatic action, in cooperation with like-minded countries, African partners and regional organizations.
The delivery of Canada's peace- and security-related programs reduces threats posed by international instability, terrorism, international crime and weapons of mass destruction. Progress in the development of counterterrorism plans, policies, legislation, regulations and controls in beneficiary states

Number of nuclear submarines defuelled by Canada

Status: Met all
The Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program provided $11 million to states to enhance their ability to combat terrorism, directing programming to transportation and border security, financing of terrorism, law enforcement, and military and intelligence training; over 220 projects funded and approximately $150 million disbursed through the GPSF to support conflict prevention, peacebuilding and stabilization.
Through the GPSF, supported 25 projects in Sudan with over $50 million in funding for peacekeeping, peacebuilding and mine action and allocated $15 million to Haiti to provide technical and financial support for police, corrections and border management reform, including deployment of up to 100 Canadian police and eight corrections officers to the UN Stabilization Mission.
Through the G8 Global Partnership Program (GPP), defuelled two nuclear submarines (four reactors); contributed $4.9 million to upgrade border security in Ukraine; contributed $5 million to remove the remaining radioisotope thermoelectric generators in Russia's Far East; funded over $11 million in projects at the Kizner chemical weapons destruction facility in Russia; and upgraded security at three biological facilities in the Kyrgyz Republic.
Through the GPP, contributed $6.9 million to fund 40 projects involving 460 former weapons scientists in Russia, Ukraine and former Soviet Union countries. http://www.international.gc.ca/gpp-ppm/global_partnership-partenariat_mondial.aspx
Provided over $7 million for mine clearance in Afghanistan, Georgia, Tajikistan, Sudan, Uganda, Chad, Colombia and Nicaragua and support to tribunals (including Sierra Leone, Lebanon and Cambodia) to facilitate reconciliation and the restoration of peace and the rule of law.
Canada's multilateral, bilateral and regional trade policy objectives, including market access, trade liberalization, and promotion and protection of Canadian trade and investment, are improved through effective management of international trade relationships and phased implementation of the Global Commerce Strategy. Status of negotiations on agreements and cooperative arrangements (e.g. bilateral, regional and those related to multilateral trade and investment) with key trading partners

International disputes that are settled in favour of Canada

Status: Met all
Concluded FTA negotiations with Jordan; tabled legislation to implement FTAs with the European Free Trade Association (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), Peru and Colombia; launched FTA negotiations with Panama; completed a joint study and joint report with the European Union, which led to the launch of negotiations toward a comprehensive economic and trade agreement; announced exploratory discussions with India and Morocco; continued efforts to advance FTA negotiations with South Korea, Singapore, the Central American Four (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador), the Caribbean Community and the Dominican Republic; and made efforts and progress toward modernizing existing FTAs with Chile and Costa Rica.
Concluded two foreign investment promotion and protection agreements (FIPAs) with Kuwait and Madagascar; started new FIPA negotiations with Bahrain and Tunisia; made further progress in ongoing negotiations with China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Mongolia and Tanzania; and started exploratory discussions with Cuba, Russia, Malaysia and Ghana.
Concluded seven air transport agreements, including with the European Union, which covers 27 countries.
Represented Canada's interests in 13 ongoing WTO disputes; two of three Canadian-supported claims were upheld against China in intellectual property rights case; gained or expanded market access for Canadian beef and cattle to nine countries; removed EU barriers to genetically modified canola seed and oil

Performance Highlights: The work of this program activity is an essential component of efforts to advance Canada's international agenda because it carries out purposeful dialogue and interaction with domestic stakeholders and international players on issues of importance to this country.

Given the high profile of global actions to address the economic downturn in late 2008-2009, the department made considerable efforts to ensure that Canadian economic and development priorities were reflected in the final documents released at the two G20 leaders summits (November 2008 in Washington and April 2009 in London). DFAIT also expanded Export Development Canada's mandate to include support to Canadian business in the domestic market and worked with federal partners to provide EDC with the capacity and flexibility to respond to the credit needs of Canadian business. New financial tools were also designed for Canadian companies' international marketing initiatives and direct investments abroad.

The department achieved important results in relation to the relevant key priorities (in italics below) identified in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities:

Afghanistan: Canada engaged in bilateral and multilateral diplomacy and advocacy to advance Canada's Afghanistan-related priorities and support for the UN-mandated, NATO-led mission in that country. DFAIT's programs delivered significant results on governance and institutional development, human rights and the rule of law, including with respect to advancing police, corrections and justice sector reform. DFAIT disbursed over $42 million through more than 50 Global Peace and Security Fund projects, seeking to reinforce the Government of Afghanistan's ability to establish a more secure environment for its citizens, where their rights will be respected. Critical in this regard has been DFAIT's support for the UN Development Programme's Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan, the main instrument for paying Afghan police and prison officers' salaries. In addition, to foster peace and cooperation in the wider region, DFAIT brought together Afghan and Pakistani officials in Dubai, where they adopted a joint border management plan. It is hoped these measures will lead to greater cooperation and confidence between these two important neighbours, with benefits both to their people and to Canadians. Canada and the United States collaborated on Afghan security issues, including through joint deployments of civilian police in mentoring programs, embedding of Canadian and U.S. officials in their respective national command structures, and close cooperation on Afghanistan-Pakistan border initiatives. Through negotiation at the United Nations, Canada secured better terms and conditions for UN staff in Afghanistan, which will improve recruitment and retention in support of allied efforts.

North America and the hemisphere: The 50th anniversary of NORAD in May 2008 demonstrated the strength and endurance of the Canada-U.S. relationship and enhanced Canada's image as the United States' closest and longest-standing ally. The department cemented relationships with the Obama administration, Congressional leaders, new legislators and key governors-links that are crucial to advancing Canadian interests in that country. It also built alliances with American stakeholders who support Canadian positions and rely on an efficient border between the two countries. With respect to Canada-Mexico relations, the department renewed cooperation on human rights, indigenous issues, security and governance, while expanding the bilateral program that enables increased dialogue and visits between Canadian and Mexican parliamentarians.

Canada enhanced regional stability and security in the Americas by addressing drugs, organized crime, health pandemics and natural disasters, working with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime and the OAS Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission, as well as through anti-crime initiatives, the Global Peace and Security Fund, humanitarian relief efforts after natural disasters, and health initiatives. Part of this broad engagement strategy included advancing mutually supportive North American positions in the G20. Canada also promoted its approach to democracy support in the Americas through interventions at the 2009 Summit of the Americas and resolutions adopted at the 39th OAS General Assembly, and supported several democracy promotion initiatives and activities within the Americas, including preparation for a new regional democracy centre in Lima, Peru.

In support of security and the rule of law, the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) advanced the development of a regional small-arms control agreement in the Caribbean, and led efforts to establish an international roster for justice rapid response, a mechanism to identify, collect and preserve information concerning allegations of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. In related work, the Global Peace and Security Fund contribution for the promotion of victims' rights and the strengthening of institutions of truth, justice and reconciliation has enabled Colombia to consolidate its peace and security gains. Canada's support to the OAS Mission to Support the Peace Process in Colombia contributed to the demobilization of 35,000 United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia (AUC) paramilitaries in accordance with the rules established by the peace process.

Growing/emerging markets, with a focus on China and India: Through the government's Global Commerce Strategy, DFAIT continued to pursue an ambitious bilateral agenda to secure competitive terms of access for Canadian businesses, attract and encourage global investment and expand Canada's international commercial network. In 2008-2009, Canada concluded FTA negotiations with Jordan, and tabled legislation to implement FTAs with the European Free Trade Association (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), Peru and Colombia. Following a detailed exploratory process, FTA negotiations were launched with Panama. A joint study and joint report were completed with the European Union, which led to the launch of negotiations toward a comprehensive economic and trade agreement, and exploratory discussions were announced with India and Morocco. Negotiators continued efforts to advance FTA negotiations with South Korea, Singapore, the Central American Four (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador), the Caribbean Community and the Dominican Republic, and made efforts and progress toward modernizing existing FTAs with Chile and Costa Rica. Canada also concluded foreign investment promotion and protection agreements with Kuwait and Madagascar, and concluded seven air service agreements, including an agreement covering the 27 countries of the European Union. The department implemented market plans for the United States, Mexico, China, India, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Russia, Japan, South Korea, Australia/New Zealand, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Gulf Cooperation Council.

Pursuing expanded market access, Canada (DFAIT and partner departments) coordinated with other WTO members in negotiations toward the conclusion of the WTO Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations, and DFAIT represented Canada's interests in 13 ongoing disputes at the WTO. These included resolution of a European Communities case against Canada on excise taxes and successful settlement of the dispute initiated by Canada against China on treatment of financial information service suppliers in that country.

Lessons Learned

What worked well: The department continued to develop a more active web presence with more pages and features, such as highlights and videos on the main website and that of the Trade Commissioner Service, as well as more videos and podcasts posted on sites such as YouTube. The objective is to deliver an innovative and targeted message in the most cost-effective way possible.

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: The department recognized that international youth and education programming could be improved through increased collaboration with federal partners and more effective use of resources. DFAIT undertook several initiatives to raise the profile of this type of programming, in alignment with government priorities. Another significant lesson learned was that the department's program delivery would benefit from greater consolidation of program management and delivery.

Strategic Outcome 2: International Services for Canadians

2.2.1. Program Activity 3: International Commerce

Context: This program activity works to achieve the objectives of the government's Global Commerce Strategy, which are:

  • to expand the participation of Canadian entrepreneurs in world markets;
  • to increase their interaction with global business partners; and
  • to promote Canada as a competitive location and partner for investment, innovation and value-added production.

The downturn in the global economy in the second half of the fiscal year had a negative impact on global trade and investment flows, including investment into Canada. The WTO noted that global trade increased by only 2 percent in 2008 (compared with a 6 percent rise in 2007), while forecasting a 9 percent drop in 2009 (www.wto.org/english/news_e/pres09_e/pr554_e.htm). Meanwhile, UNCTAD reported that foreign direct investment (FDI) worldwide fell sharply in the last quarter of 2008. This decline continued in the first quarter of 2009, when global FDI inflows dropped by 54 percent compared with the same period the year before (www.unctad.org/Templates/Webflyer.asp?docID=11666&intItemID=1528&lang=1).

Benefits to Canadians: The Trade Commissioner Service (TCS), with staff located in more than 150 cities worldwide, at regional offices in Canada and at the department's headquarters, helps Canadian businesses prepare for international markets, assess market potential, identify qualified contacts and solve problems. TCS investment officers posted at Canada's missions in key markets abroad collaborate with partner organizations in Canada to promote this country as a preferred destination for FDI (http://investincanada.gc.ca/). The International Commerce program activity is also delivered online, through the Virtual Trade Commissioner (www.infoexport.gc.ca) and the Export and Import Controls Bureau (www.international.gc.ca/controls-controles/index.aspx) websites. This program activity also monitors and authorizes trade in certain goods, ensuring the security of Canada and its allies by restricting trade in certain military and strategic goods and in other materials such as arms, ammunition, and nuclear materials and equipment.


Program Activity 3: International Commerce
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
329.0 16,248.1 952.3 1,832 1,556 (276)

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results 14 Performance Indicators Performance Summary
High-quality international commerce services are delivered to Canadian exporters, importers, investors and innovators. Client satisfaction and adherence to published service standards for timeliness, confidentiality and access to services in both official languages (Target: client satisfaction of 80%; 15 adherence to service standards: obtain baseline measures 16)

Status: Results to be assessed in autumn 2009 through TCS client survey
2008-2009 client survey for TCS is scheduled for autumn 2009.
Of 164,572 applications for softwood lumber export permits, 99.24% were processed within the identified service standard of four hours, an increase of 0.15% from last year.
Enhancements to both online export and import permit application systems were completed to enhance client service.
Canada's employment, productivity and international competitiveness are improved through expanded FDI. Number and value of foreign direct investments into Canada that DFAIT's investment network facilitated (Target: 148 investments facilitated)

Status: Somewhat met
DFAIT facilitated 97 foreign direct investments into Canada, down from 148 the previous year.
International commercial opportunities pursued by Canadian clients related to exports, direct investments abroad and technology commercialization have increased. Number of agreements related to exports, direct investment abroad and technology commercialization signed by TCS Canadian business clients (Target: obtain baseline information)

Status: Results of TCS client survey required for performance assessment
2008-2009 client survey for TCS is scheduled for autumn 2009.
Canada's export controls achieve a successful balance between international security and economic prosperity. Level of business compliance with Export and Import Permit Act regulations

Status: Met all
New items were added to the control list necessary to ensure the security of Canada and its allies; other items that no longer need to be controlled were removed.

Regulatory changes have improved market access for Canadian firms in the defence sector.

Performance Highlights: The following key accomplishments of this program activity in 2008-2009 correspond to three departmental priorities listed in the year's Report on Plans and Priorities: growing/emerging markets with a focus on China and India; greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business; and launching the department's transformation process, including meeting the challenge of strengthening Canada's global mission network.

In 2008-2009, the department made real progress in its ongoing implementation of the government's Global Commerce Strategy. For instance, in response to the strategy's identification of 13 priority markets worldwide for Canadian business, the department opened new TCS offices in China, India, Mongolia and Brazil. It also opened new regional offices in Victoria, Windsor, Kitchener and Ottawa and increased staff at existing TCS offices.

As a key element of the Global Commerce Strategy, the department has prepared and is continuing to implement targeted and sector-based plans for the 13 priority markets (www.international.gc.ca/commerce/strategy-strategie/r.aspx). In nine of these priority markets, the number of clients served went up compared with the previous year. The opening of new offices contributed to an increase in the number of clients served in all five countries noted in the preceding paragraph (percentage increase in clients, year over year: Brazil 69 percent; China 5 percent; India 64 percent; Mexico 23 percent; and Mongolia 157 percent). The number of clients served by domestic offices grew by over 40 percent.

There was rising demand for TCS services throughout 2008-2009. The number of Canadian clients increased by 2.5 percent over the previous year (from 11,653 to 11,943). Total service transactions increased by 3.5 percent (from 32,470 to 33,623). In the midst of deteriorating conditions in the global economy, the number of clients obtaining TCS services was considerably higher in the final quarter of 2008-2009 than in any other quarter during the previous 24 months.

The department provided information and advice to the Minister on 6 transactions under the Canada Account in 2008-2009 in support of the automotive sector, exports to Cuba and a strategic Canadian shipyard. The high volume of transactions under the Canada Account, which is used to support transactions that are beyond the risk capacity of Export Development Canada but in the national interest, arose out of the severe tightening of credit available to Canadian business during the financial crisis.

To further encourage international trade and commerce, the department organized several important trade missions last year involving Canadian business delegates. Destinations included established and developing markets: Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, China (in collaboration with Transport Canada), Libya and South Africa. There was also a European Union mission, with events in Great Britain, Denmark and Italy.

The TCS maintains an inventory of over 600 market sector reports, which are available online (www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca/eng/market-report-access.jsp). During 2008-2009, the department produced, translated and published 96 new market sector reports and updated 97 existing reports pertaining to over 30 industry sectors in key overseas markets. The annual target was 200 new and updated reports. These reports were downloaded over 25,800 times during the most recent annual cycle and clients ranked the reports favourably (four out of a possible five points, on average) in terms of overall quality, utility and relevance. Improvements to the interface of the market report website, as well as direct mail, direct email and advertising contributed to public awareness of these important sources of market information.

DFAIT provided 681 referrals of potential foreign investors (729 in the previous year) to its domestic partners, primarily provinces, territories and municipalities. The department tracked 97 actual foreign direct investments in Canada that its investment network facilitated, compared with 148 the previous year. The decline in numbers was a result of the reduced ability and willingness of international business to make foreign investments during the global economic downturn.

To attract foreign investors to Canada, DFAIT developed an online benchmarking program for 15 sectors in which Canada has a comparative advantage. The new interactive tool was used in advising potential investors and creating 14 sector-specific value propositions (promotional products showcasing Canada's competitiveness vis--vis other locations around the world).

In addition, the department promoted use of Canada's Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor to 42 of the world's largest shipping firms, through a collaboration between the public and private sectors. Of the shippers contacted after the promotion, 20 percent had begun to use Canadian west coast ports. The Gateway's market share of container traffic shipped from Asia to the west coast of North America increased by 8.9 percent between April 2008 and March 2009. This change in market share will be used as a benchmark to assess performance in future years. Other key marketing activities included worldwide distribution of 26,000 copies, in eight languages, of the 2008-2009 Invest in Canada (Go for Gold) report (http://investincanada.gc.ca/download/760.pdf) to prospective investors; and provision of speakers and networking champions at 34 events, under the Investment Champions program. It should be noted that visits to the investincanada.gc.ca website, which is available in nine languages, increased from 6,000 per month in 2002 to 41,000 per month in 2007 and to 50,000 per month in 2008.

Canada signed a memorandum of understanding on science and technology (S&T) cooperation with Chile in June 2008 and an S&T treaty with Brazil in October 2008. Further S&T collaborations were formalized under the International Science and Technology Partnership Program (ISTPP), resulting in 20 Canada-China projects worth $11 million, eight Canada-India projects worth more than $17 million, and eight new initiatives with Israel valued at over $2 million. Overall, the amount of partner contributions leveraged from ISTPP funding was in the order of 400 percent, double the ratio of last year, and the total value of projects funded increased from $4 million to $30 million. In addition, the Canada-California Strategic Innovation Partnership initiative announced a large-scale research and development collaboration to fight cancer through the Cancer Stem Cell Research Consortium (made up of international researchers, funding agencies, non-governmental organizations and private sector partners).

Canada continued to have a strong presence under the European Research Area and Canada (ERA-Can) program to increase the quantity, quality and impact of science and technology cooperation between Europe and Canada. Approximately 280 proposals involving Canadian researchers were submitted by mid-April 2009, 69 of which were selected for funding. The projects cover several fields of research, including information and communications technology, food, agriculture, biotechnology, health, nanotechnologies, transportation and space.

In DFAIT's ongoing efforts-as part of its transformation process-to improve client services, the department upgraded its online export and import permit application systems and published an export controls handbook, intended for use by exporters as the main reference tool on the subject. The Export and Import Controls Bureau website provides timely information to Canadian businesses and other stakeholders. For example, the posting of softwood lumber export data now occurs three times a day, and the website is kept up-to-date to reflect current policies. In addition, the Trade Controls Policy Division and the Softwood Lumber Division implemented a new risk management tool, which strengthened softwood lumber companies' compliance with the Export and Import Permits Act.

The TCS made client service improvements to support Canadian businesses along each of the routes they take in expanding internationally-through exports, two-way investment and innovation-as follows:

  • In March 2009, the government announced its new Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Strategy for the Canadian international extractive sector. The strategy will improve the competitive advantage of Canadian extractive sector companies operating abroad by enhancing their ability to manage social and environmental risks. A portion of the TCS Client Service Fund was dedicated, beginning in 2008-2009, to supporting CSR-related projects. As an example of the 25 initiatives supported during the year, a mining toolkit was used in Ecuador and Colombia to engage community stakeholders and increase awareness of Canadian CSR policies and programs. A CSR centre of excellence was to have opened during the year, but is still under development.
  • DFAIT's collaboration with federal partners on service delivery makes it easier for Canadian clients to access international commerce services. This service model brings together timely delivery of market leads on commercial opportunities with Canadian government guarantees and the financial tools clients need to win contracts abroad. A pilot project with the Canadian Commercial Corporation and Export Development Canada on public infrastructure opportunities, targeting high-value projects in Central and South America, has so far yielded one memorandum of understanding and six business leads for Canadian clients.
  • Client feedback has consistently highlighted the need for the TCS to employ more in-depth industry sector knowledge in its programs and services. In its second year of operation, the life sciences pilot project drew on input from private sector advisers to develop business plans tailored to priority international markets. It also updated an investment attraction target list, and helped restructure the TCS Client Service Fund to prioritize the projects undertaken at TCS offices in support of clients in the sector. This pilot project, which uses a new model for delivering service to Canadian business, is led by an industry expert and brings together departmental expertise in investment, innovation, international markets and the industry to coordinate programs, services and strategies for clients. The department worked during the year toward establishing sector practices for other industries.
  • The Global Commerce Support Program (GCSP) was established in December 2008 to provide a consolidated approach for Canadians to access international commerce funding from the department. The GCSP groups three previous contribution programs under one umbrella mechanism. The three programs are Invest Canada-Community Initiatives (formerly the Community Investment Support Program) for communities; Going Global-Innovation (formerly the Going Global Science & Technology Program) for companies and researchers; and Global Opportunities for Associations (formerly the Program for Export Market Development-Associations) for national associations. GCSP terms and conditions were developed in order to align with government priorities in the Global Commerce Strategy: to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment, to increase Canadian innovation and commercialization opportunities, and to increase Canadian business success in foreign markets.

An appraisal of the department's 2008-2009 performance in international commerce-related activities would be incomplete without noting views from outside the country:

Lessons Learned

What worked well: The department's market sector reports published online were downloaded over 25,800 times during the most recent annual cycle, and clients ranked the reports favourably (4 out of 5 points on average) in terms of overall quality, utility and relevance.

Improved guidance to exporters related to policies and procedures through outreach seminars and regular updates to the Export and Import Controls Bureau website promoted better compliance by exporters.

What could be improved and what are we doing about it: Terms and conditions of the Global Commerce Support Program take into account recommendations contained in recent evaluations of the three contribution programs it replaced. The creation of a consolidated approach for processing contribution requests is expected to achieve administrative cost savings over the long term. In addition, the new program complies with DFAIT's enhanced management of grants and contribution programs, provides for a consistent risk and results-based management framework, and streamlines administrative processes. Furthermore, it provides flexibility to reallocate a part of the annual allocation from one part of the program to another to meet recipient demands.

In response to the decline in interest among foreign investors in pursuing new projects during the economic downturn, the department has stepped up efforts to build domestic capacity in investment attraction, by offering more courses to domestic partners, expanding the online content available to partners, and disbursing more money through the Community Investment Support Program (supporting 170 projects with a total value of $3.28 million, compared with 151 projects for a total of $2.6 million in 2007-2008).

The department is also undertaking assertive marketing activities related to trade and investment, such as leveraging the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games to advance Canada's commercial outreach in priority markets in Asia, Europe and North America. This included the launch of the 2010 Reasons to Do Business in Canada campaign and development of a suite of 15 marketing tools and products for use by missions in priority markets.


14 This performance summary uses a concise, high-level set of results statements and performance indicators that the department developed in 2008-2009 for the International Commerce program activity. Given the unavailability of quantitative data, the department assessed its performance based on the qualitative evidence provided in summary in the performance highlights. The department judges that it met or exceeded most of the expected results presented in its 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities for this program activity, with the following exceptions:

  • DFAIT only partially met its target for the number of foreign direct investments in Canada that it facilitated. It does not have the systems required to adequately track the value of FDI that it facilitates.
  • To assess results pertaining to client satisfaction, attainment of service standards, and commercial activity undertaken by TCS clients, the department requires information to be obtained from a survey of 2008-2009 TCS clients, which will be conducted in the fall of 2009. Results of the client survey will be published on the TCS website (www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca/clientsurvey2009) and will be used to make further service improvements.

15 This figure comes from the department's Performance Measurement Framework.

16 The reference to a baseline refers to the process of establishing the department's current performance level in an effort to ascertain an appropriate and realistic target for future performance.


2.2.2. Program Activity 4: Consular Affairs

Context: This program activity manages and delivers consular services and advice to Canadians. This work is done through consular agents and officers at missions abroad and in Canada, and through the use of the website www.voyage.gc.ca. The main target groups are Canadians outside Canada and Canadians planning to travel or live abroad. Consular services are delivered through a network of over 260 points of service in approximately 150 countries.

Benefits to Canadians: This program activity prepares Canadians for international travel by informing them about safe travel habits and providing them with credible and timely information and advice to enable them to make responsible decisions about travel to foreign countries.

As well as responding to routine requests for services, this program activity assists Canadians outside Canada (24 hours a day, seven days a week) in handling individual cases of distress and, in cooperation with partners at missions, it also provides a coordinated Government of Canada response to emergencies abroad.

In 2008-2009, the Consular Services and Emergency Management Branch underwent significant changes that resulted in a more comprehensive approach to protecting and assisting Canadians at home and abroad. The creation of the Branch's Emergency Management Bureau in September 2008 strengthened the government's ability to plan, prepare for and respond to emergency crises affecting Canadians. The department provided assistance to some 1,600 Canadians in over 26 separate crisis or emergency situations, including the terrorist attacks in Mumbai, the airport closures in Bangkok and the evacuation of some 80 Canadians from Gaza.


Program Activity 4: Consular Affairs
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
42.9 53.5 49.9 496 540 44

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Canadians are better informed and well prepared to travel safely and responsibly abroad. Canadians use the up-to-date country-specific travel reports published on the consular website to their benefit

Number of people reached by consular outreach events

Number of publications distributed

Status: Met all
The consular website logged more than 4.5 million visits.
Due to international crises and events, the travel reports were updated 2,325 times.
4 million publications were distributed.
The department reached over 125,700 people at outreach events.
Canadians and Canadian interests are protected during times of crisis. Number of Canadians assisted during emergencies abroad

Number of calls to the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

Percentage of contingency plans reviewed and updated

Status: Met all
Provided assistance to some 1,600 Canadians in more than 26 separate crises or emergencies.
Planned for three regional support offices for large-scale crises.
Fielded 185,000 calls at the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.
Reviewed and updated 48% of contingency plans, including for avian flu.
Canadians in Canada have improved access to consular services. Sufficient staff for the provision of services at headquarters

Number of services accessed annually

Status: Results to be assessed in autumn 2009 through TCS client survey
Created 49 new positions to support the increased scope of consular services and emergency management, a 50% increase in headquarters staff.
Over 8.5 million services were accessed (phone calls, visits to website, correspondence and publications).
Canadians abroad received increased access to consular services abroad. Percentage of cases for which service standards were met for passports, citizenship applications and prisoner visit services performed by consular officers

Adequate points of service

Status: Results to be assessed in autumn 2009 through TCS client survey
Added three new points of service in high-demand areas and upgraded Mexican points of service.
Service standards were met 94% of the time for passports, 91% for citizenship services and 87% for prisoner visits.
93% of Canadians who received a service were satisfied or very satisfied according to surveys.
Improved management and coordination of consular services with Mexico. Number of distress-related cases in Mexico closed

Adequate consular initiatives focused on Mexico

Status: Results to be assessed in autumn 2009 through TCS client survey
Of the distress-related cases opened in Mexico, 80% were closed.
Established rapid response mechanism to manage complex cases.
One headquarters officer was assigned specifically to Mexico.

Developed a publication explaining Mexican criminal law (www.voyage.gc.ca:80/documents/mexico-law_mexique-loi-eng.asp).

Performance Highlights: Consular Affairs aligns itself with the departmental priority strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Several complex cases were successfully resolved, including the return to Canada of five abandoned minors and of a woman forced into a marriage overseas. A number of high-profile and sensitive kidnapping cases were successfully resolved. The department also developed a post-release assistance plan to ensure that Canadian kidnapping victims receive appropriate consular services and follow-up care. With the growing number of cases involving Canadians abroad affected by illness, the department spearheaded an initiative for improved coordination with provincial authorities to ensure that Canadians receive appropriate hospitalization and support upon their repatriation to Canada.

The department opened more than 250,000 new consular cases in 2009-2009. The number of routine and distress-related cases increased 12 percent from the previous year. The consular website introduced a new feature this year, enabling clients to complete the feedback form online. A total of 4,672 feedback forms were received, up from 2,708 the previous year. Of the Canadians who responded, 93 percent said they were satisfied or very satisfied with the services they received.

Given the complexity of consular cases, the department strengthened its policy capacity and increased its consultations on key consular issues, both at home and abroad. A number of consultations took place to exchange best practices and ideas with like-minded countries (United States, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand).

Lessons Learned

What worked well: Through capacity building, DFAIT further improved aspects of emergency management, particularly those involving sustained and complex situations. There was also a coordinated effort to synchronize the resources of partner departments to enable a quicker and more efficient response overall.

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: Effective public communications is key during a large-scale crisis. Planning, policy development and programming are under way to improve this aspect of consular work. For instance, the online Crisis Portal will consolidate information and lessen redundancy while improving efficiency. To increase public awareness of consular services and the safe-travel program, the department will explore the possibility of implementing a public awareness campaign to reach different target audiences.

2.2.3. Program Activity 5: Passport Canada

Context: This program activity manages and delivers passport services through use of the Passport Canada Revolving Fund. Operations are financed primarily through user fees. This program activity enables the issuance of secure travel documents to Canadians, facilitating travel outside Canada and contributing to international and domestic security. The work is done through authentication of the identity and entitlement of applicants. The main target group is Canadian citizens travelling abroad.

Benefits to Canadians: This program activity provides Canadians with secure travel documents through an extensive domestic network of 33 regional offices, 141 Service Canada locations, 56 Canada Post outlets and the central operations. Abroad, passport services are offered through the network of Canada's missions abroad.

Thanks to modernization projects, infrastructure development and contingency planning, passport applicants did not experience long wait times in over-the-counter or mail services in 2008-2009 (www.passport.gc.ca/publications/index.aspx?lang=eng#reports). This was a significant accomplishment given the volume of passport applications, mostly due to the United States' Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative.

Canada's secure travel documents have advanced anti-fraud protection measures embedded in them. Provision of increasingly secure travel documents has facilitated travel and contributed to domestic and international security.


Program Activity 5: Passport Canada
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
0.0 100.8 44.8 2,633 2,832 199

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
The passport application process is simplified without jeopardizing security. Reputation and acceptability of the Canadian passport ensured (for more information, see http://www.icao.int/)

Status: Met all
Successfully launched pilot electronic passport (ePassport) project, issuing over 4,000 diplomatic and special passports.
Developed first phase of facial recognition technology.
Implemented robust outreach strategy, enhancing key partnerships with police agencies and the Canada Border Services Agency.
Passport services are made more convenient for Canadians. Adequate number of offices and receiving agent outlets

Percentage of completed applications processed in compliance with service standards

High level of client satisfaction

Status: Met all
Opened an additional 40 receiving agent outlets.
Held 59 passport clinics in remote or border communities across every province and territory.
Processed 98.7% of completed applications in compliance with service standards.
Degree of client satisfaction with services was up 7 points from the preceding year, to 96%, according to client surveys.
Two-dimensional barcode technology replaced Passport On-Line (POL), accelerating data entry and reducing the chance of errors. The barcode technology is a more popular option with applicants, as illustrated by the number of applications received: 100,000 barcode applications, compared with 9,994 POL applications in the same period.
Improved service to Canadians through infrastructure improvement Greater printing capacity for increased speed of delivery process

Productivity improvements as a result of activity-based costing

Status: Met all
Due to printer replacements, printing capacity increased from 8,000 to 10,000 passports per day using fewer printers.
A 25% increase in productivity was achieved in central operations assisted by the information and measurement provided by activity based costing.

Performance Highlights: The Passport Canada program activity aligns itself with the departmental priority strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

  • Forty new receiving agent locations were opened in Canada in response to client demand.
  • Clients reported a satisfaction rate of 96 percent when rating agency services in surveys. Of these, 44 percent were very satisfied.
  • The first electronic passport was issued on January 12, 2009, and a total of 4,000 diplomatic and special ePassports were issued over the course of the year. The ePassport will be made available to all Canadians in 2011.
  • Despite a high volume of passport applications, mostly due to the WHTI, applicants experienced no long wait times, as demonstrated by internal tracking of achievement of service standards.
  • A total of 40 percent of adult passport applications were renewals. All service standards were met in their processing.
  • The first phase of facial recognition technology was developed, involving manual importation of all photographs saved to the central electronic database.

For more performance information, see www.passport.gc.ca and www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200903_e_32304.html.

Lessons Learned

What worked well: Process improvements and infrastructure modifications facilitated the agency's ability to deal with increased volumes without negatively affecting client service.

What could be improved and what the agency is doing about it: The agency's executive committee focused its work on priority projects to ensure the greatest possible progress. Funding flexibility and capacity remain a challenge due to the governance and funding structure of the agency. However, efforts are being made to find reinvestment opportunities through productivity and technological improvements. Forecasting passport application demand is a challenge in a constantly shifting environment, but the forecast is reviewed and revised when operating conditions change.

Retention and recruitment of staff remains a priority issue for the agency. During this fiscal year, 629 employees were hired.

Strategic Outcome 3: Canada's International Platform

2.3.1. Program Activity 6: Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters

Context: This program activity manages and delivers services and infrastructure at headquarters to enable Canada's representation abroad. The work is done by coordinating with various departmental units and 30 federal and other partners who have operations at Canada's missions abroad. 17

Benefits to Canadians: Using a single-window approach, this program activity provides infrastructure and related services to 173 missions in 110 countries. As a result of the department's 2007 strategic review, various functions related to the delivery of common services were consolidated under a single assistant deputy minister. To build an effective and equitable network, the international platform's governance structure has brought DFAIT's partners to the decision-making table, resulting in a more agile system for providing services and infrastructure abroad.


Program Activity 6: Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
265.8 328.6 317.6 914 989 75

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Federal departments and other partners are satisfied with the department's common services delivery. Positive feedback from the annual client survey

Number of client complaints

Clients' full engagement and active participation in their partnership with DFAIT

Implementation and refinement of an automated costing framework for common services abroad

Status: Met all
Assessed satisfaction with the overall quality of service delivery in a pilot client survey: 69% of Canada-based staff (CBS) and 72% of locally engaged staff (LES) were satisfied. 18
The number of complaints decreased 50% from the previous year (all complaints were successfully resolved to clients' satisfaction), as a result of better communications with clients on service standards.
Completed renegotiation of the Memorandum of Understanding on Common Services ahead of schedule, due to active engagement of partners.
Completed Phase I of costing automation, and implemented the refined system.
Human resources at HQ and abroad support Canada's representation abroad. Implementation of human resources (HR) planning tools for missions completed on schedule

First phase of the global review of LES terms and conditions of employment completed on schedule

Completion of an integrated HR plan for the International Platform Branch

Status: Met all
HR planning tools: 89% completed as planned for the year and distributed them to all missions on time.
Eight missions finished reviewing the terms and conditions of employment for their locally engaged staff, and another 34 missions started reviews.
Developed integrated HR plan for the International Platform Branch.
Financial activities at missions abroad are monitored, and controls are strengthened. Separation of mission budgets into common services and program activities

Status: Met all
Divided mission budgets into common services and program budgets, improving monitoring and reallocations.
Operations and services of the department and its partners at Canada's missions abroad are supported by appropriate infrastructure. Maintenance or improvement of the department's Management Accountability Framework (MAF) ratings

Governance structure representing business lines and partner departments in place to provide strategic direction, endorse priorities and oversee investments

Status: Met all
Maintained "strong" MAF VI ratings for effectiveness of information technology management, asset management and project management; improved ratings for effectiveness of information management, from "opportunity for improvement" to "acceptable" and for effective management of security and business continuity, from "acceptable" to "strong."
Provided strategic direction, oversaw investment decisions and endorsed priorities for information management and technology (IM/IT) Governance.
The accommodation infrastructure at missions is managed to meet government and departmental priorities. Cost and schedule objectives of the effective project approval standard met

Achievement of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) certification standards

Effective and efficient management of the refurbishment, leasing or construction of office and residential accommodation at missions

Alignment of accommodation infrastructure and major project management with government priorities achieved

Status: Met all
All 12 completed projects met the cost objective for effective project approval, while 83% met the schedule objective within three months; maintained "strong" MAF VI rating for effectiveness of asset management and project management.
85% of projects met ISO certification standards.
Successfully used departmental project priority list to plan property expenditures; managed accommodations against priorities; acquired a new site for the Moscow embassy; completed a new building in Dhaka; and substantially advanced long-term arrangements in London, Paris, Mexico City and New York.
Missions are secure, personnel are safe, and assets and information are protected at missions abroad. Performance of regular on-site security inspections (physical and personal safety, information technology and technical) to adequately protect Government of Canada personnel and assets abroad

Provision of upgraded security services and training to missions

Status: Somewhat met19
Visited 105 posts for formal inspections, specific problem examinations, physical security upgrades, or work related to major renovations and relocations; conducted seven technical inspections and 20 other mission visits for installation of shielded facilities.
Linked all briefings on security at missions to accurate and up-to-date threat and risk assessments; maintained new online security training.
Reviewed and updated policies and procedures to better protect personnel, information and assets. Security inspections (physical and personal safety, information technology and technical) of missions are performed regularly, with priority given to high-risk missions.

Performance Highlights: This program activity and with Program Activity 7 make possible the international operations of the entire Government of Canada and of its partners who also have operations at Canada's missions abroad. The 2008-2009 achievements of this program activity correspond to the following priorities identified in the year's Report on Plans and Priorities: strengthened stewardship of the department's resources (human, financial, physical and technological) and of Canada's international representation generally, reflecting alignment with Government of Canada priorities; and launching of DFAIT's transformation process, including meeting the challenge of strengthening Canada's global mission network. Governance, service standards, planning and performance measurement were further integrated, and resources were strategically deployed to improve efficiency.

The mandate of common services delivery was consolidated under one assistant deputy minister to efficiently manage human and financial resources, services and infrastructure. A global review of the management of LES was initiated. An integrated human resources plan for the International Platform Branch was developed, and HR planning tools were provided to missions, in support of Canada's representation abroad. Monitoring of mission budgets was improved by separating common services from program funding. Security and infrastructure management was improved, in accordance with national and international standards and government priorities.

The department achieved its objective of measuring client satisfaction with the delivery of common services. Results of a pilot client survey were used to develop a baseline measure and to set targets for future performance. The number of client complaints was cut in half in 2008-2009. All clients participated in renegotiating the service agreement (part of the Memorandum of Understanding on Common Services). As a result of organizational alignment, integrated planning and client engagement, all client demands as well as common services and infrastructure objectives were met, and services were delivered on time.

Lessons Learned

What worked well: Establishment of the International Platform Branch improved service efficiency through realignment and integration of resources as well as improved monitoring and governance. Mission budgets were divided into common services and program budgets to ensure better monitoring. Development of a departmental project priority list ensured alignment of departmental objectives with those of the government as a whole. Objectives of the department's transformation process were met through organizational realignment, and growing service demands were successfully handled in a timely manner.

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: Performance measurement needed to be strengthened by setting a target for client satisfaction. Service standards needed to be better defined and communicated. The department has set a target of 75 percent for client satisfaction, and is establishing, communicating and monitoring service standards identified in the Memorandum of Understanding on Common Services.


17 These include Crown corporations, such as Export Development Canada, as well as provincial governments.

18 Based on a 2008-2009 client survey distributed to 160 employees (88 CBS and 72 LES) at 29 missions. There were 68 respondents (30 CBS and 38 LES)-a 42% participation rate.

19 As the Government of Canada continues to expand its presence abroad, particularly to increasingly complex, higher-threat environments, the department is assessing systems to address evolving security risks.


2.3.2. Program Activity 7: Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad

Context: This program activity manages and delivers services and infrastructure at Canada's 173 missions in 110 countries, enabling the international operations of the entire Government of Canada and its partners at missions abroad. This work is done by coordinating with various departmental units and 30 federal government and other partners working out of Canada's missions. This program activity ensures that services such as human resources, financial management, asset and materiel management, comptrollership, mail and diplomatic courier services, and bandwidth acquisition are in place at missions to support Canada's international policy objectives and program delivery.

Benefits to Canadians: This program activity provides support to key Government of Canada programs delivered through Canadian missions, such as consular and commercial services, the Political/Economic Reporting and Public Affairs (PERPA) program, immigration services, international aid and development assistance, border security and national defence. According to the Annual Report on Representation Abroad, there were over 260 points of service as of June 30, 2009. To better support these programs, five new missions were opened in 2008: at Hyderabad and Kolkata in India; Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia; Karachi in Pakistan; and Astana in Kazakhstan. No mission closures were carried out this year.


Program Activity 7: Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad
2008-2009 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2008-2009 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Planned Actual Difference
532.9 582.5 580.2 4,251 4,052 (199)

In the interests of concise reporting, the expected results for each program activity have not been taken directly from the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities. Instead, they have been consolidated into higher-level results that more accurately relate to the program activity level of the department's Program Activity Architecture. Performance indicators have been derived from three sources: the 2008-2009 RPP, information provided by DFAIT branches, and the department's draft Performance Measurement Framework.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Management and administrative services at missions are improved and cost-effective. Improved and rationalized management and administrative processes as well as practices related to mission operations, financial management and control, and administration of human resources and property resources

Status: Met all
Designed a new Regional Service Centre (RSC) business model to consolidate resources, delegate authorities and functions to the regions, and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of services (four regional workshops introducing the RSC were held at missions in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Americas).

The first RSC is set to open in the fall of 2009.

Service standards for the RSC are under development.
Departmental and partner programs and activities are successfully supported at missions abroad. Successful completion of annual consultation on changes to positions abroad, within prescribed timelines

Client satisfaction with respect to common service delivery at missions

Timely review of Foreign Service Directives (FSDs) in order to take into account local conditions of host countries and the exigencies of foreign service

Provision of timely and efficient relocation services to ensure personnel are located where they need to be in order to advance government priorities

Status: Exceeded
The 850 requests for position changes that were received from 31 partner departments and agencies in the first annual interdepartmental consultation were all processed on time despite a 25% increase in requests from 2007-2008.
A client survey 20 yielded positive results: 88% of Canada-based staff (CBS) and 89% of locally engaged staff (LES) were satisfied with IM/IT services, and 86% of CBS and 82% of LES satisfied with infrastructure provided.
Successfully completed the cyclical review of FSDs after one year of negotiations with the National Joint Council and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (several changes recommended by the department were adopted to modernize and simplify the directives and to reallocate funding toward families, in line with current demographics and priorities).
Handled 20% more relocations this year than last year (relocated 1,000 staff and their families this year, compared with 830 in 2007-2008). According to results of a client survey 21 of 823 employees relocated in 2008-2009, 74% expressed a high level of satisfaction with services received.
Operations and services at missions abroad are supported by information management and technology infrastructure. Reliable, cost-effective and agile connectivity and IM/IT infrastructure at missions

Engagement of program managers and partners in IM/IT investment decisions related to the international platform

Deployment of secure global communications and other mechanisms at missions to enable rapid recovery from disasters and emergencies and to ensure Government of Canada security

Status: Met all
According to an internal IM/IT client survey, 92% were satisfied with the ease of use, productivity and processing of the department's upgraded classified network.
According to an evaluation survey, 97% of Information Management Improvement Program clients agreed that it increased IM awareness and provided tools for compliance.
An emergency IT services kit was maintained for departmental response to crises at home and abroad.
Government resources support Canada's objectives in Afghanistan. Support for coordination of Canada's mission in Afghanistan, through the embassy in Kabul

Establishment of a civilian representative of Canada in the Kandahar office, with sufficient staff to ensure coordination between Kabul- and Kandahar-based activities

Status: Exceeded
Security of existing facilities in Kabul was improved, and a new site for the embassy was identified (letter of intent signed by Canada and Afghanistan, engaging both sides to finalize lease negotiations for a permanent embassy by the end of 2009).
Civilian representative in the Kandahar office was established to ensure coordination between Kabul- and Kandahar-based activities; the number of employees posted in Afghanistan doubled in 2008-2009; a database of Afghan detainees created for the department's Afghanistan Task Force. The website Canada's Engagement in Afghanistan (www.afghanistan.gc.ca/canada-afghanistan/index.aspx?lang=en) integrates information from DFAIT, the Department of National Defence and the Canadian International Development Agency to ensure coherent government messaging.

Performance Highlights: This program activity and Program Activity 6 make possible the international operations of the entire Government of Canada and its partners who also have operations at Canada's missions abroad. The 2008-2009 achievements of this program activity correspond to the following priorities identified in the year's Report on Plans and Priorities: strengthened stewardship of the department's resources (human, financial, physical and technological) and of Canada's international representation generally, reflecting alignment with Government of Canada priorities; and launching of DFAIT's transformation process, including meeting the challenge of strengthening Canada's global mission network.

The department met its objective to improve the management and cost-effectiveness of administrative services at missions. This work will be advanced further by implementation of the new Regional Service Centre model in the fall of 2009, which will guide efforts to rationalize the management of resources, functions and authorities at missions.

The department maintained a secure and reliable IM/IT infrastructure as well as an IT service kit for crisis response. The updated classified network was acclaimed by clients as fast, useful and productive.

The department's timely and successful completion of annual consultations on changes to positions abroad and related reallocation services exceeded expectations. The department handled approximately 20 percent more requests for changes and relocations in 2008-2009 and was able to complete them on schedule. Clients expressed a high level of satisfaction with these and other services and infrastructure.

The aim of the department to support Canada's objectives in Afghanistan was also exceeded. The department's most significant achievements in this regard were to support the coordination of Canada's mission in Afghanistan through the embassy in Kabul and to advance negotiations for a permanent site for the embassy in Kabul.

Lessons Learned

What worked well: The department's aim was to enable program managers to focus on their core mandates. Through consultations with missions and partners, the international platform that DFAIT provides is evolving to become more responsive to the needs of heads of missions, program staff and partners.

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: More can be accomplished in establishing and explaining measurable and verifiable performance indicators, such as those related to requests for mission openings/closings and for position changes. Targets of 95 percent have been set for timely completion of approved requests for mission openings/closings and position changes. Evaluation of common service delivery is expected to take place every five years.


20 Service Delivery Standards: Client Satisfaction Survey 2008-2009. The results will be published in the annual report on Canada's representation abroad.

21 FSD Service and Policy Bureau, client service questionnaire, 2008.


2.4. Internal Services

Context: Internal Services are activities that make possible all of the department's operations. Without Internal Services, the department could not carry out its mandated functions or advance its strategic outcomes.

Benefits to Canadians: Internal Services enable the delivery of program activities 1 through 7, described earlier in this report. The department has reviewed its processes and activities in order to improve their quality as well as alignment of resources (human, financial, physical and technological) with international policy objectives and program delivery. Departmental performance for Internal Services includes lessons learned from internal and external reports as well as from the department's Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessments.


Expected Results Performance Indicators Performance Summary
Governance and Management Support: Management and Oversight
Full alignment is achieved with TBS and departmental policies on audit, evaluation, inspections, and values and ethics. Adequate corporate governance structure, based on TBS policies, including MAF

Level of alignment of departmental policies with the most recent federal policies on internal audit, evaluation, inspections, and values and ethics

Maintenance or improvement of the department's most recent MAF scores pertaining to Areas of Management (AoMs) 1, 3, 6 and 18

Status: Mostly met
  • Established corporate governance structure, consisting of seven boards and committees, which resulted in an improved score related to MAF AoM 3 (Effectiveness of Corporate Management Structure) from "opportunity for improvement" to "acceptable."
  • Developed a five-year risk-based evaluation plan.
  • Completed 17 mission inspections, 15 special investigations, 75 recipient audits and 16 evaluations.
  • Pursuant to the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act, developed Code of Conduct for all employees.
  • In accordance with Treasury Board policy, a Departmental Audit Committee was established. It held six meetings during which it reviewed departmental documents and provided advice to the Deputy Ministers upon its review of the documents. This should improve the MAF score related to AoM 18 (Effectiveness of the Internal Audit Function) in future, but the score was maintained as "opportunity for improvement."
  • Maintained the MAF score for AoM 1 (Values-based Leadership and Organizational Culture) as "strong."
  • Gave values and ethics presentations at headquarters, 20 missions and one regional office.
  • The Departmental Evaluation Committee approves reports related to program evaluation and mission inspections. These functions, fully aligned with relevant TBS and departmental policies, ensure value for money and generate advice on how to improve DFAIT programs. The score related to MAF AoM 6 (Quality and Use of Evaluation) improved from "acceptable" to "strong."
Resource Management Services: Human Resources (HR)
High-quality HR services are consistently delivered in support of core services. Level of satisfaction and fulfillment of employees and their families posted abroad

Adequate capacity pools of qualified candidates to meet requirements for country- or region-specific language skills

Targets met for employee equity representation

Status: Met all
  • Created a Spousal Employment Support Office to aid families in deployment abroad.
  • Facilitated foreign-language training for 1,001 employees, up 200 from the previous year.
  • Improved targeted employee equity representation in all four areas: women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.
  • Improved the score related to MAF AoM 10 (Workplace) from "opportunity for improvement" to "acceptable."
The department is effectively staffed to deliver on its business priorities. Adequate pool of qualified employees is available to draw from to meet human resource needs

Positions filled abroad by employees with advanced foreign-language skills

Status: Met all
  • 263 employees successfully qualified in an exercise to create a pool of candidates with specific skill sets to fill shortages for political/economic foreign service officers and administrative management-consular officer positions.
  • Launched largest-ever executive recruitment (EX-01) process to replenish the pool of qualified candidates; 250 interviews took place.
  • Filled 90% of designated advanced foreign-language positions abroad, representing a 74% increase in capacity (this responded to a 2007 Auditor General report critical of the department on this issue).
  • Launched a succession planning exercise, identifying 89 critical executive positions to be targeted.
  • Maintained the score for MAF AoM 11 (Workforce) as "acceptable."
Resource Management Services: Financial Management; and Asset Management: Acquisitions
Efficient and effective financial and procurement management service based on a solid organizational foundation consisting of sound business practices, processes, systems and people is delivered. Adherence to TBS policies related to financial and procurement management

Status: Met all
  • Adopted a Chief Financial Officer model, modernizing financial and procurement management and implementing a risk-based model for international financial operations.
  • Developed an awareness training program for procurement and delivered it to many levels within the department, focusing on its relationship to the MAF.
  • Created a new division responsible for financial policies, internal controls and training.
  • Maintained the scores related to MAF AoM 14 (Effectiveness of Asset Management) and AoM 15 (Effective Project Management) as "strong." The score for AoM 16 (Effective Procurement) was maintained as "acceptable" and the score for AoM 17 (Effectiveness of Financial Management and Control) improved from "opportunity for improvement" to "acceptable."
Resource Management Services: Information Management
MAF scores for information management and information technology management services are "acceptable" or higher. MAF scores for AoMs 12 and 13 scored "acceptable" or higher

Status: Met all
  • Improved the MAF score for AoM 12 (Effectiveness of Information Management) from "opportunity for improvement" to "acceptable." The score for AoM 13 (Effectiveness of IT Management) was maintained as "strong."

Lessons Learned

What worked well: The department undertook ambitious work to strengthen its accountability and renew its human resources as part of the departmental transformation process. This work was mostly very successful, as indicated by the MAF scores with respect to 12 Areas of Management related to Internal Services. For five out of the 12, the department improved its scores from the previous assessment. Four AoMs were maintained as "strong," two AoMs were unchanged at "acceptable," and one was unchanged at "opportunity for improvement."

What could be improved and what we are doing about it: The 2009-2010 Report on Plans and Priorities (www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/index-eng.asp?acr=1375) outlined in detail the initiatives and policies that will be assessed to measure progress in strengthening the department's management and oversight. One area in particular need of improvement is AoM 18 (Effectiveness of the Internal Audit Function), where the department's MAF score remained at "opportunity for improvement," the same as in its previous MAF assessment. Change has already taken place. The Departmental Audit Committee, created the previous year, provides much-needed oversight, which should improve the AoM 18 score in the future.