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Table 12 Major Crown Projects

a. Long-Term Vision and Plan for the Parliamentary Precinct

Project Phase: Project Definition

  1. Overview

    The Long-Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct was originally approved in 2001.  In May 2005, Cabinet instructed the Minister of PWGS to return by December 2006 with options to reorganize the LTVP and its associated costs.  The revised LTVP was completed by PWGSC in a consultation process with the Parliamentary Partners: the Senate, the House of Commons and the Library of Parliament.  The LTVP was completed and approved in June 2007.   The plan is a framework that provides direction for the renewal of Canada's seat of government - the Parliamentary Precinct.  The revised LTVP builds on the strengths of the original LTVP and reconfirms the original vision of balancing the evolving functional needs of parliamentarians and other users with the overriding commitment to preserve the historic, environmental and symbolic primacy of the site.

    The new implementation framework is focused on achieving the long-term vision through five-year programs of work that have three components:

    • The major capital component of the first five-year program of work that will focus on advancing the critical West Block Program. The West Block Program includes the renovations of the La Promenade, Wellington building and the Bank of Montreal building;
    • The recapitalization component that is targeted on rehabilitating the Centre Block roof and towers and refurbishing the exterior masonry of the East Block (1867 wing) and the Confederation building to address the most serious deterioration, extend the life cycle of the buildings and make future restoration projects less complicated, faster and less expensive, and:
    • The planning element that will focus on developing more refined plans and cost estimates for projects in later phases, including the restoration of the East and Centre Block buildings, a new committee/office building - West Terrace Pavilion and a new Security and Visitor Services facility. In addition a feasibility study for reuse options for 100 Wellington Street will be completed. This planning approach will ensure that we are prepared to continue advancing the LTVP and taking meaningful steps towards achieving the vision.

    See separate notes for the status of current active projects. (West Block Program, Wellington Building, Library of Parliament)

    In addition to a new implementation framework that enables us to set both long-term direction and achieve immediate priorities, the revised LTVP has strong new oversight and accountability measures that will ensure more effective management of the costing, planning and scheduling of the LTVP through new government approvals every five years, annual reports to Treasury Board Secretariat and quarterly report cards to the minister of PWGSC and his Parliamentary Precinct Oversight Advisory Committee.

  2. Lead and Participating Departments
    1. Lead Department or Agency: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Participating Departments and Agencies: Senate of Canada, House of Commons, Library of Parliament

  3. Prime Contractor and Major Sub-Contractors

    See separate notes for current projects.

  4. Major Milestones

    See separate notes for current projects.

  5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    See separate notes for current projects.

  6. Industrial Benefits

    See separate notes for current projects.


b. Conservation, Rehabilitation and Upgrade of the Library of Parliament

Project Phase: Project Implementation

  1. Overview

    The scope includes the rehabilitation of the Main Library Building on Parliament Hill, fit-up of swing space locations, and Building Components and Connectivity for all locations. The project is the first in the 2001 Long-Term Vision and Plan for the Parliamentary Precinct, although the project has been under way since 1995. The objective is to renew the Main Library Building for at least another 50 years so that it may continue as a functioning library and significant tourist destination. The work involves full rehabilitation from the weathervane to the foundation, including the excavation for three new basement levels. The total approved budget is $127.9 million.

  2. Lead and Participating Departments
    1. Sponsoring Department: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Participating Departments: Library of Parliament, House of Commons

  3. Prime Contractor and Major Sub-Contractors

    Prime Contractor (Main Library):

    • Thomas Fuller Construction Co. (1958) Limited, Ottawa, Ontario

    Major Sub-Contractors (Main Library):

    1. Colonial Building Restoration, Scarborough, Ontario
    2. Heather & Little Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario
    3. Soheil Mosun Limited, Toronto, Ontario
    4. Comstock, Burlington, Ontario
    5. Kroon Electric, Ottawa, Ontario
    6. Asbex, Ottawa, Ontario

    Prime Contractor (125 Sparks Street, Ottawa – completed):

    • Ed Brunet et Associs, Gatineau, Qubec

    Prime Contractor (45 Sacr–Cœur, Gatineau – completed):

    • Les Constructions Ferclau Inc., Le Gardeur, Qubec

  4. Major Milestones

    Pre-Planning Start – June 1995
    Preliminary Project Approval – June 1998
    Effective Project Approval – December 1999
    Swing Space Construction Completed – December 2001
    Revised Effective Project Approval – January 2002
    Main Library Construction Start – March 2002
    Revised Effective Project Approval – December 2004
    Main Library Construction Completion – May 2006
    Library Moves Back – June to August 2006 and June to August 2007

  5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    The swing space locations were completed on budget and are operational. The Main Library construction started March 2002 and was completed May 2006. The Library moved back staff and most of collections during June to August 2006. The rare books are being moved back during summer 2007. The project budget, approved in December 2004, is $127.9M and is being respected. Expenditures for fiscal year 2006-2007 were $4.9 million less than forecast. The reduction reflects the decision to hold off the move of rare books until summer 2007 to verify the mechanical systems through four seasons, and the unsettled claims, which were not received until late in fiscal year. The forecast for future years has been increased to reflect reduced expenditures in 2006-2007. Expenditures for claims will occur in the year that claims are settled.

  6. Risk Analysis

    The project is in the close out phase. The remaining key risk associated with the project is claims. The project has detailed risk management plans for the consultant contract and for the main construction contract. These risks are continually monitored, and are reassessed in detail on a regular basis. The project budget contingencies are managed on the basis of these plans. A team resource is responsible for monitoring the risks.
    The communications plans adopted for the project are based on open and transparent communication. Information about work that was done on the Library is available through the Web site "A Treasure to Explore" tours, lectures and articles in various media publications.

  7. Environmental Assessment

    An Environmental Assessment Screening (EAS) was conducted in September 1999. The project was deemed acceptable from an environmental point of view. Any negative impacts were assessed to be minor or avoidable through simple mitigation measures. The recommendations of the report were incorporated into the project.
    Public consultation was determined to be unnecessary due to the justification for the project and because the EAS predicted insignificant impacts. A priority for the project was to mitigate, as much as possible, any inconveniences associated with the project that may have affected the essential operations of Parliament. Communication about the project to the public is an important aspect of the mitigation measures, including compensating for the temporary loss of access to the building by tourists.

  8. Industrial Benefits

    Multi-million dollar contracts were awarded for architectural design and conservation expertise, and for all aspects of construction in heritage buildings. Canadian expertise in conservation and adaptation of heritage structures to modern use has been furthered.

  9. Summary of Non-recurring Expenditures

    ($ millions) Current Estimated Total Expenditure Forecast Expenditures to March 31, 2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Future Years' Requirements
    Main Library Rehabilitation including all swing spaces $127.9M $123.0M $4.9M  


c. Bank Street Building (New Parliamentary Precinct Building)

Project Phase: Project Definition

  1. Overview

    The purpose of this project was to construct a new Parliamentary Precinct building of about 20,500 square metres, to include 39 offices for Senators, 12 modern committee rooms for the House of Commons, and support spaces, plus an additional 10,000 square metres for a 300-car underground parking garage. This building was identified as a priority in the Long Term Vision and Plan for the Parliamentary Precinct. It would allow parliamentary functions to be located within the Parliamentary Precinct while other parliamentary buildings badly in need of renovations are vacated.

    This project was put on hold in December 2003 while the government conducted an expenditure review. In May 2005, the West Block Renovation Program, which was originally scheduled within Phase 2 of the LTVP, was advanced to Phase 1 due to accelerated deterioration of the masonry plus health and safety concerns related to asbestos. As a result of that emergency rescheduling of the West Block project, the architectural design competition for the Bank Street Building was cancelled in June 2005, and the Bank Street Building and Site Infrastructure projects were suspended pending a review of the overall LTVP. The cost estimate at the time the project was put on hold was $325.1 million.

  2. Lead and Participating Departments
    1. Sponsoring Department: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Participating Departments: Senate of Canada, House of Commons

  3. Prime Contractor and Major Sub-Contractors

    No prime contractor or major sub-contractors are under contract at this time.

  4. Major Milestones

    Preliminary Project Approval (PPA) - June 7, 2001.
    Project put on hold and design competition cancelled - June 14, 2005

  5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    The project has been on hold since December 2003, first due to the Government expenditure review on Major Capital Projects. On June 14, 2005 the architectural design competition was cancelled following a decision to advance the West Block building renovation from Phase 2 to Phase 1 of the LTVP. As a result the Bank Street Building and Site Infrastructure projects were suspended pending a review of the overall LTVP. The program requirements and the Bank Street Building project will now be reviewed as part of the review and update of the Long Term Vision and Plan for the Parliamentary Precinct.

    The cost estimate at the time the project was put on hold was $325.1 million (current dollars). This represented an increase of $127.2 million from the original estimate of $197.9 million (constant 2001 dollars). The increase breaks down as follows:

    • $44.1 million for escalation and conversion from constant to current dollars.
    • $83.1 million for improved estimates, program changes and inclusion of additional risk factors.

  6. Industrial Benefits

    A number of multi-million dollar contracts would be awarded for building construction, information technology systems, multimedia systems, furniture and other equipment. The number of available jobs would be determined after the award of the general construction contract.


d. Wellington Building Renovation Project

Project Phase: Project Definition

  1. Overview

    The Wellington building is a classified heritage building that is located at 180 Wellington Street, across from Parliament Hill. It is a six-storey structure built in 1925. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company completed the last major renovation in 1959. The House of Commons has been the major tenant since the Crown expropriated the building in 1973.

    Renovations are required for health and safety reasons, to replace obsolete building systems and to meet current building code requirements. The planned start of construction is in December 2009, with completion of the committee rooms in July 2013. The building will be completely vacated during the renovations. The current cost estimate is $279.1 million.
    The work will be completed in two phases to expedite project delivery.

    This project is a key enabler of the West Block Building Program, as the Wellington building will provide interim accommodations for the West Block committee rooms during its renovation.

  2. Lead and Participating Departments
    1. Sponsoring Departments: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Participating Departments: House of Commons and Senate of Canada

  3. Prime Contractor and Major Sub-Contractors

    No prime contractor is under contract at this time.

  4. Major Milestones

    LTVP MC Approval June 2007
    Revised PPA and Spending Authority – November 2007
    Consultant Contract Award: March 2008

    Phase I – Construction Start: December 2009
    Phase 2 – EPA: June 2009
    Phase 2 – Construction Start: September 2010
    Construction Completion: July 2013

  5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    Health and safety requirements necessitate the relocation of tenants and the client’s programs to other locations during the renovation. Interim space projects noted below have received separate approvals to enable the renovation of the building.

    Wellington Building Renovation – Updating of the Investment Analysis Report and the TB Submission are underway to support the Revised PPA for the Phase 1 demolition and asbestos abatement and special spending authority to complete design and tender documents for the entire renovation, anticipated to be submitted for Treasury Board approval in the fall 2007.

    Other related projects:

    181 Queen Street – Completed


    • Approved funding $59.9 M

    131 Queen Street – Project Implementation


    • Occupancy scheduled for summer thru fall 2007
    • Approved funding $166.3M

    Security Operation Centre – Project Definition


    • Relocation of House of Commons Security Operations Centre
    • Seeking EPA under departmental authorities in Summer 2007

    Trade Shops Relocation – Project Definition


    • Strategy for permanent relocation of House of Commons trade shops being finalized
    • LPA will be sought under departmental authorities in fall 2007

    The current estimate of $279.1 (Same issue as noted above) million for the Wellington Building Renovation project is exclusive of the 10 committee rooms, for which the West Block Program received TB approval for $70.6 million of fit-up, fees and Building Components and Connectivity (BCC). These 10 committee rooms are to be relocated from the West Block building to the Wellington Building consistent with the approved LTVP.

  6. Industrial Benefits

    A number of multi-million dollar contracts will be awarded for building construction phases, information technology systems, multimedia systems, furniture and miscellaneous equipment. The number of available jobs will be determined upon award of contracts.


e. West Block Renovation Program

  1. Overview

    The West Block is a classified heritage building that is located on Parliament Hill. It is the oldest of the Parliamentary buildings forming a triad with the Centre Block and the East Block. It provides accommodation for Members of Parliament and for parliamentary functions. The building requires major renovations for health and safety and asset integrity reasons.

    The renovation project was initiated in 1992 under the Parliamentary Precinct Long Term Construction Program and received EPA in February 1997. In 1998, the project was put on-hold and was subsequently placed under Phase 2 of the June 2001 Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct. However, due to the accelerated deterioration of the masonry walls and the high risk of friable asbestos in the ceiling plenum, in May 2005, Cabinet approved a recommendation to advance the major renovations to Phase 1 of the LTVP.

    Construction will be undertaken in phases. Emergency Stabilization - will involve the erection of scaffolding around towers to eliminate the risk of collapse. Engineered stabilization work as well as repairs and conservation of the masonry will follow this.

    Implementation of the subsequent Program will be carried out in two phases. Stage 1 of the implementation will focus primarily on the provision of interim space that will allow the progressive vacating of the West Block Building, as well as a limited amount of exterior masonry repairs. The building will be vacated during phase 2. Occupants will be relocated to swing space during Stage 1 and for the duration of Stage 2 work.

    In June 2005, Treasury Board granted Revised PPA in the amount $769.2 million (indicative estimate, current dollars, excluding GST) including swing space. In December 2006 and February 2007, an EPA of $235 million (excluding GST) for the Stage 1 projects as well as $17.2 million Spending Authority to advance the planning and design of the Stage 2 projects.


    Project Phase: Stage 1 - Project Implementation
      Stage 2 - Project Definition

  2. Lead and Participating Departments
    1. Lead Department or Agency: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Participating Departments and Agencies: Senate, House of Commons, Library of Parliament

  3. Prime Contractor and Major Sub-Contractors

    West Block Building: Prime Contractor (design consultant); ARCOP/Gersowitz Moss, architects in joint venture 1244 Ste-Catherine Ouest, 3rd floor, Montreal PQ, H3G 1P1

    La Promenade Building: Prime Contractor (design consultant); KWC Architects Inc.; 110 Argyle Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1B4

    South East Tower Masonry Restoration: General Contractor; Ellis-Don Corporation, 150, Isabella Street, Suite 300, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 1V7

  4. Major Milestones

    Effective Project Approval – February 1997
    Preliminary Project Approval (for Building Components and Connectivity (BCC)) – February 1997
    Revised PPA – June 2005
    Partial EPA, and revised SA – December 2006 & February 2007

    MPs move into La Promenade Building – 2009/10
    Start renovations of West Block South Wing – 2009/10
    Committee Rooms to be vacated, start of North Wing renovations – 2012/13
    Renovations are scheduled for completion in Summer 2017

  5. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    In comparison with the 1997 project that was to address the renovation of the West Block building only, the current program has been expanded to include interim space for committee rooms, Members of Parliament and administration staff. The program of work consists of sub-projects involving emergency stabilization of towers and masonry, several interim space projects, major renovations of the building and construction of a Courtyard infill. The renovations of the West Block building are scheduled to start in late 2009, with completion in the summer 2017.

    Stabilization:

    • Authorities granted by TB in June 2005 included the emergency stabilization of the West Block's four towers. Temporary stabilization of both the South East and Mackenzie Towers has been completed; stabilization of the remaining two towers will be undertaken when the building is vacated.
    • Various investigations of the masonry walls and foundations have been completed. This work provides a better understanding of the structural deficiencies and methods of correcting them.

    Swing space:

    • Acquisition and fit-up of interim space for administration staff has been completed and the staff was relocated in May 2006.
    • A strategy to maintain ten committee rooms functioning for the duration of the West Block renovation was tabled and accepted in principle in April 2006.

    The current estimate of the total program of works is $1.11 billion (current dollars, excluding GST). This current estimate is $349.3 million greater than the June 2005 TB approval of $769.2 million. Following is a summary of the variance with explanations (constant dollars, excluding GST):


    COST ITEM VARIANCE COMMENTS
    Construction $45.7 M More extensive deterioration of masonry and foundations than previously expected.
    Professional Fees $42.7M Inclusion of $23M for PM/CM Services plus increase to prime consultant and PWGSC fees as a percentage of increased construction cost.
    Swing Space $114.9M Additional swing space projects include Room 200, Production Kitchen and Classrooms.
    Contingency $95.7M In 2005, total contingency allowances were based on the industry standard of 10 % of the construction cost estimate. To better reflect reality, the rates have been varied from 15% to 27% on specific projects to reflect new knowledge gained from investigations of the West Block.
    Risk Allowance $76.5M A risk factor of 10% was used in 2005; however, due to experience with renovations to the Library of Parliament, a comparable heritage asset, the risk allowance was increased to 25%.
    BCC ($ 26.3 M) The 2005 cost was based on updating the 1997 requirements.  The 2006 cost has been reduced due to a better understanding of the requirements.
    TOTAL $349.2 M  

    Currently, the overall Program baseline is being reviewed in light of the completion of a number of sub-projects. The results of this analysis will be presented to management in the fall 2007.

  6. Industrial Benefits

    A number of multi-million dollar contracts will be awarded for building construction, information technology systems, multimedia systems, furniture and other equipment. The number of available jobs will be determined after the award of the general construction contract.


f. Pension Modernization Project

Project Name:Government of Canada Pension Modernization Project (GCPMP)

  1. Overview

    The GCPMP is a major component of PWGSC's Transformation of Pension Administration agenda. The purpose of this project is to renew PWGSC's pension administration systems and services, and transform its business processes. This will allow PWGSC to provide industry standard pension administration services to employees, employers and pensioners.

    PWGSC's approximately 40-year-old systems and business-process infrastructure for pension administration are in grave need of renewal. The limited capabilities of existing processes and the archaic technology of the legacy systems severely compromise PWGSC's ability to sustain current service levels. As well, they severely limit PWGSC's ability to offer future services that are comparable to the delivery performance and cost-effectiveness industry standards.

    Employers are looking to provide better and broader services to their employees. Demographic trends indicate that by 2016, approximately 40% of the current public service will have become eligible for retirement. As a result, increasingly large numbers of employees are seeking retirement counselling and want access to capabilities that allow them to analyze their pension benefit options. Similarly, demands for enrolment services are increasing as new employees are hired to replace retirees. At the same time, pension administration business units face significant losses of experienced, trained personnel, as approximately 42 percent of the compensation trainers, supervisors, managers, and coaches will be eligible to retire by the fall of 2009.

    The GCPMP has completed its Project Definition Phase. A Requirements Mapping and Gap Analysis for the business and technical requirements and the solution proposed was completed in the spring of 2006; this exercise included the mapping of the proposed future business processes as well as the core processes built into the solution’s commercial products. The project team has also completed the preliminary system design and implementation planning, developed substantive estimates, and submitted a Treasury Board submission, seeking effective project approval (EPA), which was received in June 2007. The project is now beginning its Implementation Phase activities, which are expected to take 4 years to complete.

  2. Project Phase

    The two Transformation of Pension Administration projects, the GCPMP and the Centralization of Pension Services Delivery Project are currently in their Implementation Phases. Implementation activities began in July 2007 and are expected to be completed in January 2012.

  3. Leading and Participating Departments and Agencies
    1. Sponsoring Department: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    2. Contracting Authority: Public Works and Government Services Canada
    3. Stakeholder Departments: Treasury Board Secretariat, Department of National Defence

  4. Prime and Major Sub-Contractor

    Prime Contractor: EDS Canada Inc. (EDS)

    Major Sub-Contractors: James Evans and Associates, Siebel Systems, and Vangent (formerly Pearson Canada Solutions)

  5. Major Milestones

    Milestone Date completed
    Project Definition Phase (from PPA to EPA):
    Preliminary Project Approval (PPA) received from TB May 3, 2004
    Release of draft RFP
    (Completion: May 2004)
    May 25, 2004
    Consultations with vendors
    (Completion: July 2004)
    July 2004
    Release of final RFP
    (Completion: September 2004)
    October 22, 2004
    (Release of RFP was delayed to allow the project to address feedback from consultations)
    Close of bidding period
    (Completion: December 31, 2004)
    January 31, 2005
    (Bidding period was extended at the request of the bidders)
    Evaluation of bids
    (Completion: December 31, 2004)
    May 27, 2005
    (Completion date was deferred to accommodate the extended bidding period and the larger than expected number of bids)
    Preparation of the TB submission for contract authority / Contract award
    (Completion: June 2005)
    November 4, 2005 – Contract signed with EDS November 7, 2005 – Vendor began work
    (contract award was deferred to accommodate the extended bidding and evaluation periods. TB approved the contract award to EDS Canada Inc. on October 31, 2005)
    Requirements Mapping and Gap Analysis
    These activities were rescheduled from original planned date of January 2006 to April 2006 following contract award.
    April 2006
    Architecture and Design
    (Completion: September 2006)
    September 2006
    Effective Project Approval
    (Completion: November 2006)
    June 13, 2007
    (Completion of the Treasury Board Submission was delayed to accommodate Treasury Board’s request to prepare a single submission for both the GCPMP and the Centralization of Pension Services Delivery Project)
    Implementation Phase (EPA to Close-Out):
    Phase 5–EPA Start-Up Activities
    (Completion: January 2008)
     
    Phase 6–Design, Construction and Implementation:
    • Release 1.0–Client Services Basic Case Management and Interactive Voice Response (IVR)
      (Completion: October 2008)
    • Release 1.5–Enhanced Case Management and Imaging
      (Completion: July 2009)
    • Release 2.0–Contributors
      (Completion: February 2010)
    • Release 2.5–Service Acquisition, Leave Without Pay (LWOP) and Pension Benefits Division Act (PBDA)
      (Completion: July 2010)
    • Software Upgrade(Completion: Spring 2011)
    • Release 3.0–Annuitants and Accounting
      (Completion: October 2011)
    (See note below)
    Phase 7–Final Maintenance Transition
    (Completion: January 2012)
     
    Phase 8–Close-out Phase
    (Completion: January 2012)
     

    Note: The dates for the implementation phase have been updated to reflect the implementation plans completed during the preparation of the TB Submission for EPA.

  6. Progress Report and Explanation of Variances

    The initiation and preliminary planning phases were conducted from September 2000 to January 2004, leading up to the finalization and presentation of the Treasury Board Submission for PPA in April 2004. Approval in principle was received from the Treasury Board in March 2004. Preliminary Project Approval was received in May 2004, and the project proceeded with the Project Definition Phase.

    Following the receipt of PPA, the GCPMP completed and released a draft Request for Proposal (RFP) for the procurement of a contractor for the development and implementation of business transformation and the COTS software-based solution. Industry feedback was analyzed and integrated into the final RFP, which was released in October 2004. The close of the bidding period was extended from December 2004 to January 2005 at the request of bidders. The evaluation of bids was conducted from February to May 2005. Contractor selection was based on the evaluation processes and scoring specified in the RFP. These processes included: the evaluation of hard copy proposals; an evaluation of each bidder’s corporate capabilities, references, presentations and readiness assessment; and the evaluation of financial proposals.

    As the EDS Canada Inc. proposal was fully compliant and obtained the highest proposal score, EDS was the recommended bidder. An independent third party (fairness monitor) was engaged to observe and verify that the evaluation process was conducted with integrity, objectivity and impartiality. The fairness monitor reported that the recommended bidder was selected appropriately

    On November 4, 2005, following approval from Treasury Board, a contract was signed with EDS for the provision of professional services to complete the Project Definition Phase for the new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) based pension administration system. The EDS team, including product specialists from James Evans and Associates Ltd. (Penfax), Siebel Systems, and Pearson Canada Solutions (now named Vangent), joined the GCPMP team on November 7, 2005.

    The Project Definition Phase activities completed in 2006-2007 included:

    • A Requirements Mapping and Gap Analysis between the GCPMP requirements specification and the selected COTS-based solution, including the mapping of the proposed future business processes as well as the product management processes;
    • The Architecture and Design of the new pension administration solution; and
    • The development of detailed implementation plans to support both the preparation of substantive cost estimates for all work to complete the GCPMP delivery and the TB Submission for Effective Project Approval.

    Following the completion of these activities in late 2006, the GCPMP completed its business case and prepared its request for Effective Project Approval from the Treasury Board. The presentation of the TB Submission for EPA was delayed from its original target date of December 2006 to June 2007, to accommodate more pressing Treasury Board priorities.

    The project will now proceed with the actual implementation of the new COTS software pension administration systems and services. The contract with EDS includes options for the completion of the releases of the GCPMP solution. These options include professional services, COTS software, and maintenance and support services as required to implement the new pension system for the Public Service Superannuation Act (PSSA). Although the project is focused on the PSSA administration, the project will implement a multi-plan solution that will provide for other pension plans within the public service.

  7. Industrial Benefits

    A multi-million dollar contract has been awarded for the COTS products, as well as for the implementation of the new systems and business processes, support services and ongoing maintenance. The implementation will be conducted in several phases over a four and a half year period (July 2007 to January 2012). During that time, it is expected that there will be some temporary positions required to support the system implementation and business transformation activities in both the National Capital Area and Shediac, New Brunswick. In the long term, the project will provide the infrastructure and processes essential to the sustainability of current pension administration operations, and positions, in Shediac, New Brunswick.