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Section IV: Other items of interest

2006-07 Financial Statements


 

Statement of Management Responsibility (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

 

 

 

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2007 and all information contained in these statements rests with departmental management.  These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.  

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements.  Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management's best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality.  To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the department's financial transactions.  Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the department's Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds.  Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout the department.

The financial statements of the department have not been audited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suzanne Hurtubise
Deputy Minister

 

Elisabeth Nadeau
Assistant Deputy Minister,              
Corporate Management Branch

Senior Financial Officer

 

 

 

Date

 

Date 



 

Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

 

 

 

 

 

As at March 31

2007

2006

 

(in dollars)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

Financial assets                                                   
                Accounts receivable and advances  (Note 5)

 

3,302,783

 

3,741,502

 

 

Non-financial assets                                                           
                Tangible capital assets  (Note 6)

 

15,443,604

 

1,676,811

 

 

Total Assets                                                          

 

18,746,387

 

5,418,313

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities and Equity of Canada    

 

 

Liabilities                                                             
                Disaster financial assistance  (Note 10) 
                Accounts payable and accrued liabilities                Employee severance benefits  (Note 7 (b))           
                Vacation pay and compensatory leave  
                Joint research and development project

 

575,525,839
77,247,783              
11,445,931
4,195,718
2,048,335

 

559,390,034
65,940,428
10,329,989
3,887,138
3,242,931

 

 

Total Liabilities

 

670,463,606

 

642,790,521

 

 

Equity of Canada

 

(651,717,219)

 

(637,372,208)

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

 

18,746,387

 

5,418,313

 

 

 

There are no contingent liabilities or contractual obligations                           

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements   

 

 



 

Statement of Equity (unaudited)                                    

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

 

 

 

 

 

For the Year ended March 31

2007

2006

 

(in dollars)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            Equity of Canada, beginning of year                
                Net cost of operations                                                            Current year appropriations used  (Note 3 (a))                     Revenue not available for spending (Note 3 (b))                    Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund          
                (Note 3 (c))                                                                             Services received without charge from other government  
                departments  (Note 8)                                

(637,372,208)
(306,874,502)
300,452,729
(35,332)

(21,400,929)
13,513,023

(637,504,641)
(409,814,050)
369,723,187
(15,534)

27,368,998

12,869,832

 

               
                Equity of Canada, end of year            

 

(651,717,219)

 

(637,372,208)

 

 

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements   

 

 



 

Statement of Operations (unaudited) 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada         

 

 

 

 

 

For the Year ended March 31 (in dollars)

2007

2006

 

 

Community Safety and Partnerships

Emergency Management and National Security

Policing and Law Enforcement

Total

Total

 

Expenses    

 

 

 

 

See note 11

 

Transfer payments       (Note 4)                                                 
Operating expenses
Salaries and employee benefits  
Professional and special services  
Equipment rentals  
Accommodation     
Travel and relocation Equipment
Information
Communication
Repairs                   
Utilities, material and supplies                 
Amortization

85,112,116

 

25,177,852

34,122,110

399,896
3,693,347
1,704,851
838,564
1,704,126
982,693
379,781
373,219

222,546

56,297,523

 

38,225,865

8,232,740

667,351
5,041,526
3,410,553
4,217,661
2,283,318
1,859,904
1,034,341
1,045,421

450,724

1,834,836

 

14,584,918

(1,118,331)

10,320,928
1,490,688
449,718
318,818
791,686
382,217
150,172
127,892

98,265

143,244,475

 

77,988,635

41,236,519

11,388,175
10,225,561
5,565,122
5,375,042
4,779,130
3,224,814
1,564,294
1,546,532

771,535

263,745,048

 

75,812,987

38,777,964

5,250,561
7,944,026
5,600,013
4,842,920
1,632,214
3,287,904
1,260,258
1,144,117

531,572

 

Total Operating expenses

69,598,985

66,469,404

27,596,971

163,665,359

146,084,536

 

Total Expenses      

154,711,101

122,766,927

29,431,807

306,909,834

409,829,584

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

 

 

Other revenues

11,777

11,777

11,777

35,332

15,534

 

 

 

 

 

Net Cost of Operations

154,699,324

122,755,150

29,420,029

306,874,502

409,814,050

 

 

 

 

 

The expenses related to professional and special services for Policing and Law Enforcement in 2006-07 were $3,807,911; However reductions made to previous years' payables at year-end (PAYE), based on the latest information available, result in the presentation of a negative amount of $1,118,331. The main PAYE reductions are in relation to the 2001-02 Summit of Americas ($3,657,666) and the 2004-05 visit of the President of the United States ($1,024,226).

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.



Statement of Cash Flow (unaudited)                                        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Year ended March 31                      

2006

2007

 

(in dollars)

 

Operating activities                                  

 

Net Cost of Operations       

Non-cash items:
Services received without charge from other government departments (Note 11)
Amortization of tangible capital assets (Note 6)

Variations in Statement of Financial Position:
Increase (decrease) in accounts receivable and advances       
Decrease (increase) in liabilities                         

306,874,502

 

(13,513,023)

(771,535)

 

(438,719)
(27,673,086)

409,814,051

 

(12,869,833)

(531,572)

 

1,377,359
(931,319)

 

Cash used by operating activities

264,478,139

396,858,686

 

 

Capital investment activities

 

 

Acquisitions of tangible capital assets  (Note 6)
Asset transferred in without charge (Note 6)
Adjustments                                          

14,519,307
19,021
-

205,514
-
12,451

 

Cash used by capital investment activities

14,538,328

217,965

 

 

Financing activities

 

 

 

Net cash provided by Government of Canada                  

(279,016,467)

(397,076,651)

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements   

 



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

1. Authority and objectives

 

The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) was created in 2003 to ensure coordination across all federal departments and agencies responsible for national security and the safety of Canadians. The department operates under the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act (2005, c.10) that received Royal assent on March 23, 2005. 

PSEPC contributes to the public safety of Canadians through the promotion and maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society; it has three main core activities:

 

  1. Community Safety and Partnerships: providing national public safety leadership, protecting the security of Canadians, enhancing the role of Canadians in community safety and security;                                                
  2. Emergency Management and National Security: delivering a broad range of national emergency preparedness, and critical infrastructure protection; and                                                                                            
  3. Policing and Law Enforcement: providing leadership and strategic policy advice with respect to policing policy and public safety interoperability.        

 

 

 

2. Significant accounting policies           

 

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a) Parliamentary appropriations
PSEPC is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to the department do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

(b) Net Cash Provided by Government
PSEPC operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada.  All cash received by the department is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the department are paid from the CRF.  The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

2. Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

(c) Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund
The change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non respendable revenue recorded by the department.  It results from timing differences between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.

(d) Revenues
Revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues. Revenues include access to information program (ATIP) fees, employees' parking fees etc.

(e) Expenses
Expenses are recorded on the accrual basis:

 

  1. Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met. In the case of grants which do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements;
  2. Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement;                                                                                                                                               
  3. Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.                                                                                                                                                                                             
  4. Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

 

(f) Employee future benefits

 

Pension benefits:  Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer plan administered by the Government of Canada.  The department's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan.  Current legislation does not require the department to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.    

 

Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment.  These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them.  The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.                                                    



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

2. Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

(g)  Receivables
Accounts receivables are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

 

(h) Tangible capital assets
All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost.  The department does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian Reserves and museum collections.

Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

 

Asset Class

Amortization Period

 

Informatics hardware                          
Informatics software                           
Motor Vehicles                    
Leasehold improvements                   

4 years                                  
3 years                                  
3 years                                  
remaining term of the lease or           
useful life of the improvement                                          

 

(i) Measurement uncertainty
The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets.  Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated.  Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

3. Parliamentary appropriations

 

PSEPC receives its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations.  Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years.  Accordingly, PSEPC has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis.  The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

 

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used:

 

(in dollars)              

2007

2006

 

Net cost of operations                                                                                                                                                                           
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting appropriations:                      
Add (Less):                                                                                             Accruals for disaster financial assistance                                Services received without charge from other      
                government departments                                                        Employee Severance Benefits                                                 Refunds/adjustments to previous years expenses 
                Vacation pay and compensatory leave  
                Reduction for amounts paid to Justice Canada not affecting 
                appropriation         
                Amortization of tangible capital assets                 
                Revenue not available for spending                                        Other                                                                  

306,874,502

 

 

(16,135,805)
(13,513,023)

(1,115,942)
11,433,518
(308,580)
(565,045)

(771,535)
35,332
-

409,814,051

 

 

(30,280,864)
(12,869,833)

(1,588,850)
8,159,705
(2,400,661)
(737,996)

(531,572)
15,534
(61,841)

 

 

(20,941,080)

(40,296,378)

 

Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting appropriation:                                                                                       
Add (Less):                                                                            
                Acquisitions of tangible capital assets                          

 

 

14,519,307

 

 

205,514

 

 

 

 

 

14,519,307

205,514

 

Current year appropriations used                                     

300,452,729

369,723,187

 

 

 



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

3. Parliamentary appropriations (continued)

 

(b) Appropriations provided and used:

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Operating expenditures - Vote 1                                            
Grants & Contributions - Vote 5                                           
Supplementary Vote a                                                           
Supplementary Vote b                                                           
Transfer from TB - Vote 10                                                  
Transfer from TB - Vote 15                                                  
Frozen Allotment                                                  
Governor General's special warrants                                     

147,890,000
298,673,000
317,757
5,738,573
-
1,007,000
3,600,000
-

85,968,000
335,437,000
-
-
252,000
-
-
43,983,063

 

 

457,226,330

465,640,063

 

Less:                       
Lapsed appropriations                          

 

(167,077,826)

 

(106,686,090)

 

 

290,148,504

358,953,973

 

Add statutory amounts:                                        
Salary and motor car allowance                                             
Contributions to employee benefits plan                              

 

75,709
10,228,516

 

68,735
10,700,479

 

Current year appropriations used

300,452,729

369,723,187

 

(c) Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used:

 

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Net cash provided by Government                                       
Revenue not available for spending                                       

279,016,467
35,332

397,076,651
15,534

 

 

279,051,799

397,092,185

 

 

Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund                                                                                                                                   
Refunds/adjustments to previous years expenses 
Increase (decrease) in Joint research and development project               
Reduction for amounts paid to Justice Canada not affecting appropriation                                                         
(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable                             
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable
Other                                                                                                      
Motor vehicle transferred from Industry Canada without charge               

 

 

11,433,518
(1,194,596)
(565,045)

438,719
11,307,355
-
(19,021)

 

 

8,159,705
1,278,309
(737,996)

(1,377,359)
(34,617,363)
(74,294)
-

 

 

21,400,930

(27,368,998)

 

Current year appropriations used

300,452,729

369,723,187



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

4.  Transfer payments

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Grants                                                                                   
Emergency management and national security      
Community safety and partnership                                                                                      
Contributions                                                                                      
Emergency management and national security      
Policing and law enforcement                                
Community safety and partnership                  

 

590,466
5,988,450

 

55,707,056
1,834,836
79,123,667

 

644,375
20,621,375

 

164,135,664
2,043,111
76,300,523

 

Total

143,244,475

263,745,048

 

 

 

 

5.  Accounts receivable and advances

 

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Receivables from other Federal Government departments and agencies
Employee advances                                                                               

3,278,031
24,752

3,722,652
18,850

 

Total

3,302,783

3,741,502

 

 

 



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada         

 

6. Tangible capital assets

 

(in dollars)

Cost

2007
Opening
balance

 

Acquisitions

Asset
transferred in

2007
Closing
balance

 

Informatics hardware                             
Informatics software                              
Motor vehicles                       
Leasehold improvements       
Post capitalization of lease hold improvement                                          

3,280,643
101,670
62,537
1,242,526
-

125,959
46,300
29,378
6,766,670
7,551,000

-
-
30,033
-
-

3,406,602
147,970
121,948
8,009,196
7,551,000

 

Total cost

4,687,376

14,519,307

30,033

19,236,716

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated amortization

2007
Opening
balance

 

Amortization

 

Asset
transferred in

2007
Closing
balance

 

Informatics hardware                             
Informatics software                              
Motor vehicles                       
Leasehold improvements       

1,644,521
67,780
55,738
1,242,526

368,491
44,055
29,225
329,764

-
-
11,012
-

2,013,012
111,835
95,975
1,572,290

 

Total accumulated amortization

3,010,565

771,535

11,012

3,793,112

 

 

 

 

 

Net book value

2007
Opening
balance

 

Net
Change

 

Asset
transferred in

2007
Closing
balance

 

Informatics hardware             
Informatics software              
Motor vehicles       
Leasehold improvements       

1,636,122
33,890
6,799
0

(242,532)
2,245
153
13,987,906

-
-
19,021
-

1,393,590
36,135
25,973
13,987,906

 

Total net book value

1,676,811

13,747,772

19,021

15,443,604

 

 

 

 

- There was no disposal or write-off of capital assets during the year;
- During the fiscal year, PSEPC received a motor vehicle from Industry Canada without charges. In addition,  leasehold improvement completed in      fiscal year 05-06 was identified and capitalized in 06-07 (Note 9); and
- Amortization expense for current year is $771,535 ($531,572 in 2005-06).



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

7. Employee benefits

 

a) Pension benefits
PSEPC's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada.  Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings.  The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the department contribute to the cost of the Plan.  The 2006-07 expense amounts to $7,538,416 ($7,918,355 in 2005-06), which represents approximately 2.2 times (2.6 in 2005-06) the contributions by employees.

 

PSEPC's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions.  Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

(b) Severance benefits
PSEPC provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary.  The accrued benefit obligation at the end of the year is calculated by multiplying a ratio (23.20% for 2006 and 23.64% for 2007) to the department's annual gross payroll at year end subject to severance pay, which is the payroll related to indeterminate employees.  The ratios are determined by Treasury Board Secretariat.  These severance benefits are not pre-funded.  Benefits will be paid from future appropriations.  Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:

 

 

 

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year        
Expense for the year                                                              
Benefits paid during the year                                                 

10,329,989
1,943,591
(827,649)

8,741,140
3,200,413
(1,611,564)

 

Accrued benefit obligation, end of year

11,445,931

10,329,989

 

 

 



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

8. Related party transactions

 

The department is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations.  The department enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.  Also, during the year, the department received services which were obtained without charge from other Government departments as presented in part (a).

(a) Services received without charge from other government departments
During the year the department received without charge from other departments.  These services have been recognized in the department's Statement of Operations as follows:

 

(in dollars)

 

2007

See note 11
2006

 

Accommodation                                                                     
Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans        
Worker's compensation coverage                                           
Legal services provided by Justice Canada without charges

7,680,133
4,907,479
7,550
917,861

7,023,948
4,780,227
7,517
1,058,140

 

 

13,513,023

12,869,832

 

The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge.  The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada, are not included as an expense in the department's Statement of Operations.

 

(b) Payables and receivables outstanding at year-end with related parties:

 

(in dollars)

2007

2006

 

Accounts receivable with other government departments and agencies
Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies       

3,278,031
11,223,722

3,722,652
4,602,821

 

 

 



 

Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

 

 

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada                                 

 

 

 

9. Capitalization of Assets purchased in Fiscal year 2005-06

 

In fiscal year 2006-07, a leasehold improvement to the PSEPC's Head Office building at 269 Laurier Avenue, Ottawa, that should have been capitalized in fiscal year 2005-06, was identified. A decision has been made to complete a post capitalization of the leasehold improvement during fiscal year 2006-07. The related cost is $7,551,000.

 

 

 

 

10. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements Program (DFAA)

 

In the event of a natural disaster in Canada, the federal government provides financial assistance to provincial and territorial governments through the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements Program to help meet the basic costs of response and recovery when such expenditures exceed what an individual province or territory could reasonably be expected to bear on its own.  The current outstanding liabilities of $575M is the estimated cost of 41 natural disaster events for which the Federal Government has agreed to share the costs and final payments have not yet been made.

 

 

(in dollars)

 

2007

 

2006

 

Opening balance                                                     
Disbursements                                                       
Accrued expenses for the year                               

559,390,034
(31,679,253)
47,815,058

529,109,170
(125,347,879)
155,628,743

 

Closing balance

575,525,839

559,390,034

 

 

 

 

11. Comparative information

 

Comparative figures have been restated to conform to the current year's presentation.
The services provided without charge included in the financial statements of fiscal year 2005-06 have been restated to reflect the actual costs.

The effect is an increase in salaries and employee benefits, professional and special services and accommodation costs on the statement of operations. The restatements are also reflected on the statement of cash flow but do not affect the net cash provided by the government, the appropriation used or the equity of Canada.


Grant and Contribution Programs Administered by Public Safety Canada

  1. Under the First Nations Policing Policy (FNPP), Public Safety negotiates, implements, administers and monitors tripartite agreements for First Nations policing services.  The First Nations policing services are culturally appropriate and responsive to the particular needs of First Nations and Inuit communities and are cost-shared 52% by Canada and 48% by the province/territory.
  2. The Joint Emergency Preparedness Program (JEPP) was established to enhance the national capability to manage all types of emergencies and convey a reasonably uniform emergency response and recovery capacity across Canada.  National capabilities are enhanced through training activities, the purchase of emergency response equipment and joint emergency planning.
  3. The National Crime Prevention Centre provides national leadership on effective and cost-effective ways to prevent and reduce crime and victimization by addressing known risk factors in high risk populations and places.  Under the National Crime Prevention Strategy, there are three funds:

    1. The Crime Prevention Action Fund (CPAF) supports the development and implementation of crime prevention initiatives aimed at reducing crime and victimization in communities large and small.  It promotes cross-sector collaboration in crime prevention, engaging sectors such as policing, community health, voluntary and private sectors.  It is a federal program that is delivered regionally in partnerships with provincial and territorial governments, and nationally for those projects involving more than one jurisdiction.  This fund will also support projects that were previously funded under the Policing, Corrections and Communities Fund.
    2. The Research and Knowledge Development Fund (RKDF) supports innovative and promising interventions with at-risk populations and in specific communities to contribute to the development of the knowledge base of effective and successful practices.  It also supports robust evaluations of pilot and demonstration projects and knowledge transfer activities to foster the application of good practices across the country. 
    3. The Youth Gang Prevention Fund (YGPF) provides time-limited funding for anti-gang initiatives in communities where youth gangs are an existing or emerging threat.  It supports the development and implementation of tailored interventions aimed at youth who are in gangs or at risk of joining gangs to improve community safety and prevention of crime and victimization; it will also support the knowledge and evidence-based community interventions that target gun violence and gang-related issues by tackling its root causes.
  4. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) assist provinces and territories to offset the costs of response and of returning infrastructure and personal property to pre-disaster condition.
  5. The Joint Infrastructure Interdependencies Research Program (JIIRP) is jointly funded with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC).  The ultimate outcome of the JIIRP is to produce new science-based knowledge and practices to better assess, manage and mitigate risks to Canadians from critical infrastructure interdependencies by funding innovative research projects with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary research.
  6. The Policy Development Contributions Program (formerly known as the Departmental Contributions Program) supports policy development through allocations to public not-for-profit organizations in support of Public Safety priorities under the following categories:

    1. communication / information exchange projects;
    2. innovation and research projects that support innovative approaches and the acquisition of knowledge and the ability to translate knowledge into action for communities and community-based organizations; and
    3. training and skills development projects.
  7. The Public Safety Canada Research Fellowship Program in Honour of Stuart Nesbitt White seeks to encourage Ph.D. research in two key areas:

    1. cyber security relating to critical infrastructure protection, preferably in disciplines such as computer/software/electrical/mechanical engineering, computer science, and/or areas such as systems science, and risk modeling and management; and
    2. disaster and emergency management, and physical critical infrastructure studies, preferably in disciplines such as urban and regional planning, geography, sociology, economics, engineering, environmental sciences, and/or areas such as risk assessment and modeling.
  8. The Workers Compensation Program provides funding to provinces and territories, based on a 75% federal and 25% provincial/territorial cost sharing ratio, to compensate volunteer emergency service workers injured or killed in the course of emergency service training or work.
  9. The Sustaining Funding Program (SFP) for National Voluntary Organizations (NVOs) provides grants to thirteen NVOs in order to cover core operating expenses and to maintain a national structure.  These organizations provide policy advice to the Department and Portfolio agencies, and also provide public education activities and participate in community public safety initiatives.

Legislation Administered by the Department and Portfolio Agencies


The Minister of Public Canada has sole responsibility to Parliament for the following Acts:

  • Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
  • Charities Registration (Security Information) Act
  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Records Act
  • Customs Act
  • Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act
  • DNA Identification Act
  • Emergency Preparedness Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
  • Sex Offender Information Registration Act
  • International Transfer of Offenders Act
  • Witness Protection Program Act

 

 

PSEP or its Agencies administer or are impacted by the following Acts in whole or in part.  Some contain specific functions of the Minister that the Minister exercises solely or in conjunction with other Ministers:

Public Safety Canada

  • Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act
  • Emergency Preparedness Act

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

  • Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
  • Charities Registration (Security Information) Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal Act
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Criminal Records Act
  • DNA Identification Act
  • Excise Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Foreign Missions and International  Organizations Act

National Parole Board

  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Criminal Records Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act

Correctional Services of Canada

  • Corrections and Conditional Release Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Extradition Act
  • Old Age Security Act
  • Prisons and Reformatories Act
  • International Transfer of Offenders Act
  • International Transfer of Offenders Act
  • National Defence Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
  • Security Offences Act
  • Sex Offender Information Registration Act
  • Witness Protection Program Act

Canada Border Services Agency

  • Aeronautics Act
  • Anti-Personnel Mines Convention Implementation Act (through EIPA)
  • BlueWaterBridge Authority Act
  • Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act
  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Canada Border Services Agency Act
  • Canada Customs and Revenue Agency Act
  • Canada Grain Act
  • Canada Post Corporation Act
  • Canada Shipping Act
  • Canada-Chili Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Canadian Dairy Commission Act
  • Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
  • Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act
  • Canadian Wheat Board Act
  • Carriage by Air Act
  • Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (though EIPA)
  • Civil International Space Station Agreement Implementation Act
  • Coastal Fisheries Protection Act
  • Coasting Trade Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act
  • Controlled Drug and Substances Act
  • Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
  • Copyright Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Cultural Property Export and Import Act
  • Customs Act
  • Customs and Excise Offshore Application Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Defence Production Act
  • Department of Health Act
  • Department of Industry Act
  • Energy Administration Act
  • Energy Efficiency Act
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Act, 2001
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Explosives Act
  • Export Act
  • Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act
  • Feeds Act

Canada Border Services Agency (continued)

  • Fertilizers Act
  • Firearms Act
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Fisheries Act
  • Foods and Drugs Act
  • Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act
  • Freshwater Fish Marketing Act
  • Hazardous Products Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Importation of Intoxicating Liquors Act
  • Integrated Circuit Topography Act
  • International Boundary Commission Act
  • Manganese-based Fuel Additives Act
  • Meat Inspection Act
  • Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act (not in force)
  • Motor Vehicle Safety Act
  • National Energy Board Act
  • Navigable Waters Protection Act
  • North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
  • Nuclear Energy Act
  • Nuclear Safety and Control Act
  • Pest Control Products Act
  • Pilotage Act
  • Plant Breeders’ Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Precious Metals Marking Act
  • Preclearance Act
  • Privacy Act
  • Privileges and Immunities (North Atlantic Organization) Act
  • Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act
  • Provincial Trade Act
  • Quarantine Act
  • QuebecHarbour, Port Warden Act
  • Radiation Emitting Devices Act
  • Radiocommunication Act
  • Seeds Act
  • Special Economic Measures Act
  • Special Import Measures Act
  • Statistics Act
  • Telecommunications Act
  • Textile Labelling Act
  • Trade-Marks Act
  • Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
  • United Nations Act
  • United States Wreckers Act
  • Visiting Forces Act
  • Wild Animals and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act

 

 

Other

  • Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Act

 


Contacts for Further Information

For further information about this Departmental Performance Report, you may communicate with our departmental contacts as follows:


Name

Title

Telephone

 

 

 

Suzanne Hurtubise

Deputy Minister of Public Safety

(613) 991-2895

Chantal Bernier

Assistant Deputy Minister, Community Safety and Partnerships

(613) 993-4325

J. Scott Broughton

Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Emergency Management and National Security

(613) 991-2820

Richard Wex

Assistant Deputy Minister, Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability

(613) 990-2703

Elisabeth Nadeau

Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management

(613) 990-2615

Kristina Namiesniowski

Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy

(613) 949-6435

Daniel Lavoie

Director General, Communications

(613) 990-2743

Eva Plunkett

Inspector General of CSIS

(613) 949-0675


For more information on Public Safety Canada, please visit our web site at: www.publicsafety.gc.ca