Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - Infrastructure Canada


Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2013
Total CSIF Allocation:
$5.2 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) is a ten-year program that received Treasury Board approval in 2003 with total funds of $4 billion. It is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects. The original $4 billion allocation has been supplemented by additional funding from various sources resulting in total funds of $5.2 billion by end of 2006-2007.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance, and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians. CSIF is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations. Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public. The categories eligible under CSIF are:

  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

More information on CSIF can be found at: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/index_e.shtml

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results INFC expects to achieve through CSIF are to invest in projects which:

  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean, and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canadas National Highway System (NHS) for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canadas surface transportation system;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world; and
  • expand broadband networks in Canada.

Governance Structure(s):

All CSIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, Treasury Board (TB) approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the TB submission.

CSIF is delivered in partnerships, involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, INFC is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. INFC leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to TB for the approval of funds. For transport related projects, Transport Canada leads the negotiation of contribution agreements. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an INFC representative will sit on the projects Agreement Steering Committee (ASC).
  2. An implementing department/agency: INFCs relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and TB submission. The implementing department/agency will support implementation of the CSIF projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of the projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the projects ASC. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure (SIMSI), which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support. Implementing agencies and departments include: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED-Q), Western Economic Diversification (WED), Industry Canada (IC) for Ontario and broadband projects, Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) for northern and First Nations projects, Transport Canada (TC) for all transportation-related projects, and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) for housing projects.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, INFC leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

The CSIF is delivered in partnerships with the three federal regional economic agencies Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Canada Economic Development Quebec (CED-Q), and Western Economic Diversification (WED). In addition, Infrastructure Canada works with Industry Canada for Ontario and broadband projects, Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) for northern and First Nations projects, Transport Canada for all transportation-related projects, and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) for housing projects.

Roles and responsibilities of partners are outlined in Memoranda of Understanding between Infrastructure Canada (INFC) and the implementing agencies or departments.

Names of Programs

CSIF

Total Allocation

$5.2 B

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$1,206.7M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$681.2M

Planned Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for CSIF that proposes a suite of indicators for projects and data source or methods for collecting the data.

The overall expected results for CSIF include:

  • Safer and faster movement of people and goods on Canadas major land transportation routes
  • Less production of greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants
  • More effective urban development
  • Increased economic activity, including tourism

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

Given their large-scale nature, most of the approved projects that the government will be contributing to will be under development for many years. Therefore, the achievement of ultimate outcomes will be fairly limited in the early years of the program.

As of March 31, 2007, 65 projects were announced with total CSIF contributions of up to $4.2 billion.

Over the last fiscal year, 16 new projects were announced, representing CSIF contributions of up to $924.1 million.

In addition to Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) previously established, in 2006-2007, seven additional MOUs were completed with INAC and ACOA.

Comments on Variances:

The variance is due to contribution agreements being signed later than anticipated and decreased cash flow requirements for existing agreements.

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A

Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2013
Total BIF Allocation:
$600 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF) is a ten-year, $600 million cost-shared contribution which received Treasury Board approval in 2003. It complements some of the Government of Canadas other infrastructure programs, such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF), and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program (SHIP), a Transport Canada program (see http://www.tc.gc.ca/SHIP/faq.htm for more information).

As part of Canadas commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada United States border, BIF contributions are directed at, or on routes leading to Canadas border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and,
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

BIF also directs some funding towards smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under BIF will help to alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration. (A Canada US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

More information on BIF can be found at: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/ip-pi/bif-fsif/index_e.shtml

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results that INFC expects to achieve through the BIF are to invest in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity, increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

Governance Structure(s):

All BIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

BIF is delivered in partnerships, involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, INFC is responsible for project review and selection. INFC leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and is responsible of the evaluation of the program. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an INFC representative will sit on the projects Agreement Steering Committee (ASC).
  2. Transport Canada: This department has the project specific technical knowledge with regard to each project. Transport Canada provides analysis and advice for the review and approval of projects. Transport Canada is responsible for implementing the BIF projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: environmental assessment, the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, the provision of information pertaining to cash flow and budget, the approval of invoices, making payments, and the conducting of audits and evaluation of the projects. Transport Canada reviews the business case for the project, determining the costs and benefits to be realized. Transport Canada works with INFC to jointly negotiate the project agreement and prepares the TB submission; the Minister Transport, Infrastructure and Communities signs both documents. Transport Canada is the federal co-chair of the projects ASC. Transport Canada also ensures adherence to information management requirements to capture, monitor and report on project information.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial or local government, private partner or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, the funding recipient enters into negotiations with INFC to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

BIF is delivered in partnership with Transport Canada. The roles and responsibilities of Infrastructure Canada (INFC) and Transport Canada are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding.

Names of Programs

BIF

Total Allocation

$600 M

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$168.9 M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$53.1 M

Expected Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for BIF, which details the expected results and proposes a suite of performance indicators for projects. The results of ongoing performance measurement will be used to make the necessary adjustments to the initiative and the performance measurement strategy will be reviewed on an annual basis.

The overall expected results for BIF include:

  • More efficient facilities capable of handling greater capacity at major border crossing, helping trucks travel across the busiest Canada-US border points more quickly.
  • Improved Canada-US relations and better movement of goods, contributing to increased trade and production.
  • Improved border crossing, contributing to federal security and increased safety for all Canadians.

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

Given the large-scale nature of the projects, most of the projects will be under development for many years. Therefore, the achievement of ultimate outcomes will be fairly limited in the early years of the program.

As of March 31, 2007, 11 agreements were announced with total BIF contributions of up to $535.1 million.

Over the fiscal year, 3 new projects were announced, representing BIF contributions of up to $72 million.

Comments on Variances:

The variance is due to contribution agreements being signed later than anticipated and decreased cash flow requirements for existing agreements.

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A


Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2011
Total MRIF Allocation:
$1.2 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

MRIF was originally allocated $1 billion and, in Budget 2006, an additional $200 million in funding was added in 2006-2007 for a total of $1.2 billion. The fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada, and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities, will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments. It builds on past successes in partnership infrastructure funding where over 3,000 projects have directly benefited Canadians.

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live and work and raise families. MRIF targets communities of less than 250,000 residents and First Nation communities. Like other infrastructure programs, the MRIF seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the federal government, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on green projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gasses. At least 50% of federal funds will be directed to green projects.

Through the MRIF, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The MRIF is cost-shared, with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute more than one-third.

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural and recreation.
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

Governance Structure(s):

MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between INFC and five federal departments: Western Economic Diversification, Industry Canada (for Ontario projects), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Fourteen sub-programs are negotiated under MRIF, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations. Each of the 14 MRIF sub-programs follow the same general conditions, priorities and approaches, but, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the agreements encompass the nuances pertaining to the partnering order of government.

To stimulate expected outcomes, MRIF eligible projects will have to conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships, are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of MRIF projects. The program will rely on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives will be involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between INFC and five federal departments:

  • Western Economic Diversification,
  • Industry Canada (for Ontario projects),
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions,
  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

Names of Programs

MRIF

Total Allocation

$1.2 B

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$398.7 M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$81.6 M

Expected Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for MRIF that details expected results and proposes a suite of indicators for projects and data source or methods for collecting the data.

The overall expected results of MRIF include:

  • Improved and increased stock and better management of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural and recreation, which make our communities vibrant and productive places to live and work and raise families
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

Actual outcomes will depend on the types of projects approved, and will be reported in future INFC departmental performance reports.

As of March 31, 2007, 963 projects were approved with total MRIF contributions of up to $648.2 million.

Over the fiscal year, 636 MRIF projects were approved, representing MRIF contributions of up to $443.8 million.

Comments on Variances:

The variance is due to decreased cash flow requirements for existing agreements.

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A


Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, and Western Economic Diversification Canada as coordinated by Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2009 (2007 for First Nations component)
Total ICP Allocation: $2.05 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP) is a contribution program introduced in 2000 for local municipal infrastructure projects. The Government of Canada matches the provincial/territorial governments’ contribution, providing up to one-third of the cost of each municipal infrastructure project. The ICP is a $2.05 billion program in effect over seven fiscal years with an additional two-year extension. The ICP is well underway and projects are ongoing across the country. Most of the funding has been committed to approved projects. In 2002, Infrastructure Canada was created and was transferred the coordination role played, up to then, by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

The ICP’s first priority for funding is “green municipal projects”, i.e. projects with environmental benefits that enhance the quality of the environment or health benefits that enhance the quality of human life. Other priorities include affordable housing, culture, tourism and recreation, rural and remote telecommunication, high-speed access for local public institutions and local transportation. Recognizing that individual communities know their needs best, the program operates in a "bottom-up" fashion, with the flexibility for municipalities and First Nations to identify their own infrastructure priorities. It also includes provisions to ensure an equitable balance of funding between urban and rural communities.

Further information may be obtained from the following web sites:

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results are that urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada is enhanced and Canadians’ quality of life is improved through investments that protect the environment and support long-term community and economic growth.

Governance Structure(s):

The key roles and responsibilities of partners are as follows:

  • Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities – overall program management and accountability to Parliament, including media relations, appointment of Management Committee members, and project approval, jointly with implementing Minister or Secretary of State, for projects where the federal share is between $1M - $10M;
  • Infrastructure Canada – oversight and monitoring of the program ensuring effective management and a coordinated approach to communications and provision of services including operational services, information management, and communications services;
  • Ministers or Secretaries of State responsible for delivery (Industry Canada; Western Economic Diversification; Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions; Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) – authority to enter into contribution agreements with provinces/territories for project approvals where federal share is less than $1M;
  • Federal-Provincial/Territorial Management Committees (one per jurisdiction) – administration and management of ICP in accordance with terms and conditions of the applicable federal-provincial/territorial agreement;
  • Provinces/Territories – signatories to the negotiated agreements with the federal government;
  • Local governments – main applicants for ICP projects; also responsible for sponsoring projects with NGOs and/or private sector;
  • NGOs and private sector – eligible to propose projects that are sponsored either by a municipality, a province/territory or the federal government; and
  • Other government departments - provide key expertise for all or some types of ICP projects (e.g., Transport Canada, National Research Council, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, Federation of Canadian Municipalities).

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

The following partner federal departments/ agencies are responsible for the delivery of the ICP throughout the country:

  • Industry Canada (for projects in Ontario);
  • Western Economic Diversification (for projects in the western provinces);
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (for projects in Quebec);
  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (for projects in Atlantic Provinces); and
  • Indian & Northern Affairs Canada (for projects in the Territories and with the First Nations).

The following partners also provide key expertise for all or some types of ICP projects:

  • Transport Canada;
  • National Research Council;
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans;
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; and
  • Federation of Canadian Municipalities

Names of Programs

ICP

Total Allocation

$2.05 B

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

Resources are transferred to the federal delivery partners and are reported in their RPPs and DPRs.

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

Resources are transferred to the federal delivery partners and are reported in their RPPs and DPRs.

Expected Results for 2006-2007

Over 3800 projects have been approved and announced under ICP. Together, the expected results over time include:

  • Enhancement of the quality of the environment (water and wastewater management, solid waste management and more efficient energy use)
  • Support for long-term economic growth (increasing economic opportunity in communities, access to the new economy through improved telecommunications and tourism opportunities)
  • Improvement of community infrastructure (increasing community safety and access to local recreational facilities, supporting Canadian heritage and culture and the development of minority English and French linguistic communities)
  • Increased innovation, and use of new approaches and best practices, and the more efficient use of existing infrastructure

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

As of March 31, 2007, 3883 projects were approved with total ICP contributions of nearly $2.0 billion.

Over the fiscal year, 12 new projects were approved, representing ICP contributions of up to $2.7 million.

Comments on variances:

N/A

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A


Peer Reviewed Research Studies Program (a sub-program of the Research, Knowledge and Outreach Program)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation:
PRRS is one of three components of the 5-year, $25-million Research Knowledge and Outreach initiative. The allocation of funds between the three components is notional.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Research, Knowledge and Outreach Program includes two multidisciplinary research funding programs, the Knowledge-building, Outreach and Awareness program and the Peer Reviewed Research Studies program (PRRS). The programs are complementary tools for enhancing implementation of Infrastructure Canada’s Research Strategy and helping to foster evidence-based policy and decision-making on infrastructure and communities issues.

Infrastructure Canada’s PRRS program is a horizontal initiative that provides contributions-based funding for high quality, horizontal, policy relevant research studies on public infrastructure and communities’ issues in Canada. Funding is awarded by Infrastructure Canada on the basis of merit, through a competitive peer review process that is administered on Infrastructure Canada’s behalf by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada with the assistance of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Shared Outcome(s):

The primary goals of the Peer Reviewed Research Studies program are to:

  • Stimulate and support independent, high quality, multidisciplinary and timely policy relevant research on public infrastructure and communities issues in Canada;
  • Encourage the development and maintenance of a strong, multidisciplinary research community on public infrastructure and communities issues; and
  • Strengthen Canada’s existing knowledge base.

Governance Structure(s):

The PRRS program is delivered with the help of various partners. The role of each collaborator is:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: program design and implementation, initial eligibility screening of applications, final funding decisions, communications, negotiation and management of contribution agreements, monitor progress of funded research.
  2. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and Natural Sciences Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC): administering the peer review process and making recommendations to Infrastructure Canada based on recommendations of the peer review committee.
  3. Funding recipient: Eligible recipients include a wide variety of organizations and individuals, including university-based researchers, Canadian not-for-profit organizations, international organizations, and Canadian provincial, territorial and municipal governments. The eligible recipient enters into negotiations with INFC to develop a contribution agreement and is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of that agreement.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

The PRRS program is administered by the Infrastructure Canada in conjunction with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and with assistance from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada.

Names of Programs

PRRS

Total Allocation

$6.25 M

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$ 1.4M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$ 1.0M

Planned Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for PRRS that details expected results

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

The second call for proposals under the PRRS program was conducted during this period and 39 proposals were received. The proposals were all evaluated through a competitive peer review process. As a result of the competitive process five successful proposals were chosen for funding. Agreements were signed with two of the successful recipients during 2006-2007 with the other three expected to follow in early 2007-2008.

Comments on variances:

N/A

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel.: (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A

Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2011
Total MRIF Allocation:
$1.2 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

MRIF was originally allocated $1 billion and, in Budget 2006, an additional $200 million in funding was added in 2006-2007 for a total of $1.2 billion. The fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada, and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities, will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments. It builds on past successes in partnership infrastructure funding where over 3,000 projects have directly benefited Canadians.

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live and work and raise families. MRIF targets communities of less than 250,000 residents and First Nation communities. Like other infrastructure programs, the MRIF seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the federal government, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on ‘green’ projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gasses. At least 50% of federal funds will be directed to “green” projects.

Through the MRIF, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The MRIF is cost-shared, with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute more than one-third.

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural and recreation.
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

Governance Structure(s):

MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between INFC and five federal departments: Western Economic Diversification, Industry Canada (for Ontario projects), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Fourteen sub-programs are negotiated under MRIF, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations. Each of the 14 MRIF sub-programs follow the same general conditions, priorities and approaches, but, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the agreements encompass the nuances pertaining to the partnering order of government.

To stimulate expected outcomes, MRIF eligible projects will have to conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships, are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of MRIF projects. The program will rely on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives will be involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between INFC and five federal departments:

  • Western Economic Diversification,
  • Industry Canada (for Ontario projects),
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions,
  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

Names of Programs

MRIF

Total Allocation

$1.2 B

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$398.7 M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$81.6 M

Expected Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for MRIF that details expected results and proposes a suite of indicators for projects and data source or methods for collecting the data.

The overall expected results of MRIF include:

  • Improved and increased stock and better management of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, cultural and recreation, which make our communities vibrant and productive places to live and work and raise families
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

Actual outcomes will depend on the types of projects approved, and will be reported in future INFC departmental performance reports.

As of March 31, 2007, 963 projects were approved with total MRIF contributions of up to $648.2 million.

Over the fiscal year, 636 MRIF projects were approved, representing MRIF contributions of up to $443.8 million.

Comments on Variances:

The variance is due to decreased cash flow requirements for existing agreements.

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A

Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, and Western Economic Diversification Canada as coordinated by Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2009 (2007 for First Nations component)
Total ICP Allocation: $2.05 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP) is a contribution program introduced in 2000 for local municipal infrastructure projects. The Government of Canada matches the provincial/territorial governments’ contribution, providing up to one-third of the cost of each municipal infrastructure project. The ICP is a $2.05 billion program in effect over seven fiscal years with an additional two-year extension. The ICP is well underway and projects are ongoing across the country. Most of the funding has been committed to approved projects. In 2002, Infrastructure Canada was created and was transferred the coordination role played, up to then, by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

The ICP’s first priority for funding is “green municipal projects”, i.e. projects with environmental benefits that enhance the quality of the environment or health benefits that enhance the quality of human life. Other priorities include affordable housing, culture, tourism and recreation, rural and remote telecommunication, high-speed access for local public institutions and local transportation. Recognizing that individual communities know their needs best, the program operates in a "bottom-up" fashion, with the flexibility for municipalities and First Nations to identify their own infrastructure priorities. It also includes provisions to ensure an equitable balance of funding between urban and rural communities.

Further information may be obtained from the following web sites:

Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results are that urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada is enhanced and Canadians’ quality of life is improved through investments that protect the environment and support long-term community and economic growth.

Governance Structure(s):

The key roles and responsibilities of partners are as follows:

  • Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities – overall program management and accountability to Parliament, including media relations, appointment of Management Committee members, and project approval, jointly with implementing Minister or Secretary of State, for projects where the federal share is between $1M - $10M;
  • Infrastructure Canada – oversight and monitoring of the program ensuring effective management and a coordinated approach to communications and provision of services including operational services, information management, and communications services;
  • Ministers or Secretaries of State responsible for delivery (Industry Canada; Western Economic Diversification; Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions; Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) – authority to enter into contribution agreements with provinces/territories for project approvals where federal share is less than $1M;
  • Federal-Provincial/Territorial Management Committees (one per jurisdiction) – administration and management of ICP in accordance with terms and conditions of the applicable federal-provincial/territorial agreement;
  • Provinces/Territories – signatories to the negotiated agreements with the federal government;
  • Local governments – main applicants for ICP projects; also responsible for sponsoring projects with NGOs and/or private sector;
  • NGOs and private sector – eligible to propose projects that are sponsored either by a municipality, a province/territory or the federal government; and
  • Other government departments - provide key expertise for all or some types of ICP projects (e.g., Transport Canada, National Research Council, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, Federation of Canadian Municipalities).

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

The following partner federal departments/ agencies are responsible for the delivery of the ICP throughout the country:

  • Industry Canada (for projects in Ontario);
  • Western Economic Diversification (for projects in the western provinces);
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (for projects in Quebec);
  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (for projects in Atlantic Provinces); and
  • Indian & Northern Affairs Canada (for projects in the Territories and with the First Nations).

The following partners also provide key expertise for all or some types of ICP projects:

  • Transport Canada;
  • National Research Council;
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans;
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; and
  • Federation of Canadian Municipalities

Names of Programs

ICP

Total Allocation

$2.05 B

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

Resources are transferred to the federal delivery partners and are reported in their RPPs and DPRs.

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

Resources are transferred to the federal delivery partners and are reported in their RPPs and DPRs.

Expected Results for 2006-2007

Over 3800 projects have been approved and announced under ICP. Together, the expected results over time include:

  • Enhancement of the quality of the environment (water and wastewater management, solid waste management and more efficient energy use)
  • Support for long-term economic growth (increasing economic opportunity in communities, access to the new economy through improved telecommunications and tourism opportunities)
  • Improvement of community infrastructure (increasing community safety and access to local recreational facilities, supporting Canadian heritage and culture and the development of minority English and French linguistic communities)
  • Increased innovation, and use of new approaches and best practices, and the more efficient use of existing infrastructure

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

As of March 31, 2007, 3883 projects were approved with total ICP contributions of nearly $2.0 billion.

Over the fiscal year, 12 new projects were approved, representing ICP contributions of up to $2.7 million.

Comments on variances:

N/A

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel. : (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A

Peer Reviewed Research Studies Program (a sub-program of the Research, Knowledge and Outreach Program)

Name of Lead Department(s):

Infrastructure Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation:
PRRS is one of three components of the 5-year, $25-million Research Knowledge and Outreach initiative. The allocation of funds between the three components is notional.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Research, Knowledge and Outreach Program includes two multidisciplinary research funding programs, the Knowledge-building, Outreach and Awareness program and the Peer Reviewed Research Studies program (PRRS). The programs are complementary tools for enhancing implementation of Infrastructure Canada’s Research Strategy and helping to foster evidence-based policy and decision-making on infrastructure and communities issues.

Infrastructure Canada’s PRRS program is a horizontal initiative that provides contributions-based funding for high quality, horizontal, policy relevant research studies on public infrastructure and communities’ issues in Canada. Funding is awarded by Infrastructure Canada on the basis of merit, through a competitive peer review process that is administered on Infrastructure Canada’s behalf by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada with the assistance of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Shared Outcome(s):

The primary goals of the Peer Reviewed Research Studies program are to:

  • Stimulate and support independent, high quality, multidisciplinary and timely policy relevant research on public infrastructure and communities issues in Canada;
  • Encourage the development and maintenance of a strong, multidisciplinary research community on public infrastructure and communities issues; and
  • Strengthen Canada’s existing knowledge base.

Governance Structure(s):

The PRRS program is delivered with the help of various partners. The role of each collaborator is:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: program design and implementation, initial eligibility screening of applications, final funding decisions, communications, negotiation and management of contribution agreements, monitor progress of funded research.
  2. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and Natural Sciences Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC): administering the peer review process and making recommendations to Infrastructure Canada based on recommendations of the peer review committee.
  3. Funding recipient: Eligible recipients include a wide variety of organizations and individuals, including university-based researchers, Canadian not-for-profit organizations, international organizations, and Canadian provincial, territorial and municipal governments. The eligible recipient enters into negotiations with INFC to develop a contribution agreement and is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of that agreement.

Federal Partners Involved in each program:

The PRRS program is administered by the Infrastructure Canada in conjunction with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and with assistance from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada.

Names of Programs

PRRS

Total Allocation

$6.25 M

Planned Spending for 2006-2007

$ 1.4M

Actual Spending in 2006-2007

$ 1.0M

Planned Results for 2006-2007

A results-based management and accountability framework (RMAF) has been developed for PRRS that details expected results

Results Achieved in 2006-2007

The second call for proposals under the PRRS program was conducted during this period and 39 proposals were received. The proposals were all evaluated through a competitive peer review process. As a result of the competitive process five successful proposals were chosen for funding. Agreements were signed with two of the successful recipients during 2006-2007 with the other three expected to follow in early 2007-2008.

Comments on variances:

N/A

Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Manager, Corporate Accountability and Management Initiatives
Tel.: (613) 954-7750
e-mail:

Approved by:

David Cluff,
Assistant Deputy Minister/ Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Branch

Date Approved:

N/A