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Section I: Overview

Minister’s Message

Photo - Lawrence Cannon
Lawrence Cannon,
P.C., M.P.

As Canada’s Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, I am pleased to submit Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Performance Report for the period ended March 31, 2007.

The Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Portfolio, including Infrastructure Canada, contributes to our economic growth and environmental sustainability and helps to ensure the safety and security of our transportation infrastructure.

This was a busy and dynamic year that saw the Government of Canada deliver two budgets that committed a historic $33 billion over the next seven years towards the new Building Canada infrastructure plan. This long-term, unprecedented level of infrastructure funding recognizes that to remain competitive in today’s economy, we must create world-class infrastructure to ensure the seamless flow of people, goods and services across our roads and bridges and through our ports and gateways. The Building Canada plan will also support the environment through investments in public transit, green energy, water and wastewater treatment and brownfield remediation.

The Building Canada plan reflects input we received during the summer of 2006 from provinces, territories, the municipal sector and stakeholders. It addresses issues that matter to Canadians, such as safe roads and bridges, a clean environment and a strong economy. These areas are important to Canadians from coast to coast and that is where we intend to focus our efforts.

In fact, we have already started to take action. For example, the Government of Canada committed $26.7 million to help clean up Saint John Harbour in New Brunswick and $150 million to the twinning of Highway 63 in Alberta. We have also finalized our commitment of $332.5 million to complete the Manitoba Red River Floodway Expansion project.

In addition, communities are investing Gas Tax funding to improve their infrastructure and the environment and all provinces and territories have received their share of the $1.3 billion committed to transit through the Public Transit Fund and the Public Transit Capital Trust. As well, the Government of Canada announced close to $1 billion to improve transit in the Greater Toronto Area.

As we look to the future and the challenges that lie ahead, Infrastructure Canada is committed to sustaining its efforts as part of the Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Portfolio and building a modern Canada – stronger, safer, better.

The Honourable Lawrence Cannon, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

Lawrence Cannon,
P.C., M.P.


Management Representation Statement

I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2006-2007 Departmental Performance Report for Infrastructure Canada.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide for the Preparation of Part III of the 2006-2007 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

  • It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat guidance;
  • It is based on the Department’s approved Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Activity Architecture that were approved by the Treasury Board;
  • It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
  • It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities entrusted to it; and
  • It reports finances based on approved numbers from the Estimates and the Public Accounts of Canada.

The paper version was signed by

Louis Ranger
Deputy Head
Infrastructure and Communities


1.1 Summary Information

Infrastructure Canada’s mission is to build world class public infrastructure that contributes to Canada’s economic growth, a clean environment and strong communities for Canadians. This Departmental Performance Report (DPR) presents information on the activities and achievement of Infrastructure Canada in fiscal year 2006-2007 against the expected results described in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2006-2007. During this year, the federal government made significant additional commitments to build and modernize Canada’s infrastructure – with a focus on supporting Canada’s economy, environment and quality of life.

Department’s Reason for Existence — Infrastructure Canada seeks to help build sustainable cities and communities where Canadians benefit from world-class public infrastructure1.

Canada needs to remain competitive and productive while sustaining the quality of life of Canadians. The Government of Canada realizes that world-class public infrastructure, such as an efficient transportation network and safe and reliable water systems, is key to meeting these objectives. Budget 2007, tabled in March, recognizes that modern, accessible infrastructure matters to Canadians. It helps move people and goods to markets, allowing our economy to grow and prosper. Through public transit and water treatment systems, infrastructure investments will mean a cleaner, greener Canada. Investing in infrastructure:

  • Helps ensure goods get to market quickly and seamlessly;
  • Reduces the time people spend in traffic, getting to work and home to their families more quickly;
  • Provides Canadians with clean water; and
  • Results in stronger communities.

The Government is committed to working in partnership with provinces, territories, municipalities and private and non-profit sectors to build a stronger Canada for the benefit of all Canadians. Infrastructure Canada was established in 2002 to lead the Government of Canada’s effort to address the infrastructure challenges of Canadian cities, communities and regions.

In carrying out this Government priority, Infrastructure Canada delivers or coordinates several funding programs and works to build the policies, knowledge and partnerships necessary to support them.

In February 2006, Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada became part of a new portfolio, Transport, Infrastructure and Communities (TIC), which includes sixteen Crown corporations. In August 2006, the management of Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada became the responsibility of a single deputy minister. The TIC portfolio addresses several of the challenges facing Canada, particularly the modernization of public infrastructure and the sustainability of both the environment and economic growth. Transport Canada and the other portfolio organizations, each report on their annual plans and performance separately.

Table 1.1: Financial Resources (in $ thousands), 2006-2007


Planned Spending

Total Authorities

Actual Spending

2,468,311

2,127,643

1,471,134


The variance between total authorities and actual spending is explained in the narrative for Table 3.1 of Section III.

Table 1.2: Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents), 2006-2007


Planned

Actual

Difference

220

184

36


1.2 Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Crosswalk

Building on the experience gained in implementing infrastructure programs and given the scope of changes to its responsibilities, Infrastructure Canada sought and received approval from the Treasury Board in the spring of 2006 to amend its Program Activity Architecture (PAA).


Previous Strategic Outcome:

Revised Strategic Outcome:

To meet the priorities of Canadians for infrastructure in order to contribute to quality of life, healthy environment, economic growth, rural and urban development, innovation and international trade.

Improving the sustainability of our cities and communities and Canada’s local, regional and national public infrastructure to enhance the economic, social, cultural and environmental quality of life of Canadians.


The amended Strategic Outcome was more directly linked to the Government’s priorities during 2006-2007 and better reflected the broader mandate of the organization including its role with respect to contributing to the sustainability of cities and communities. The revised PAA better reflects how Infrastructure Canada allocated and managed the resources under its control to achieve its expected results.

Table 1.3 compares the revised PAA with the previous one, in terms of Program Activities and funding levels. The changes in Program Activities reflect the experience gained in implementing infrastructure programs, recent reorganizations of functions and developing departmental management accountability and reporting structures. The reorganization reflected in the revised Strategic Outcome and PAA includes the transfer out of the Crown Corporations Portfolio.2

Under the revised PAA, Infrastructure Canada has three Program Activities: Infrastructure Investments; Policy, Knowledge and Partnership Development; and Departmental Administration. The three Program Activities are briefly described below:

  1. Infrastructure Investments: This Program Activity consists of all infrastructure programming delivered through transfer payments, as well as the related program management and monitoring functions. The Activity contributes to the construction, renewal and enhancement of public infrastructure in Canada and, in partnership with others, builds capacity for addressing infrastructure and communities issues. More detailed information about this Activity is provided in Section II.
  2. Policy, Knowledge and Partnership Development: This Program Activity consists of activities undertaken in policy, knowledge, research and analysis and partnership development. The Activity develops policies based on research and strong partnerships to address existing and emerging challenges and opportunities. More detailed information about this Activity is provided in Section II.
  3. Departmental Administration: This Program Activity encompasses the Office of the Deputy Head, Corporate Services, Communications and Legal Services. The Activity promotes excellence in program and corporate management in support of Infrastructure Canada’s priorities. Section IV provides additional information about this Activity.

Table 1.3: Infrastructure Canada: Revised Program Activity Architecture – Main Estimates 2006-2007 ($ thousands)


Previous Strategic Outcome

Revised Strategic Outcome

Reason for Change

To meet the priorities of Canadians for infrastructure in order to contribute to quality of life, healthy environment, economic growth, rural and urban development, innovation and international trade.

Improving the sustainability of our cities and communities and Canada’s local, regional and national public infrastructure to enhance the economic, social, cultural and environmental quality of life of Canadians.

The revised Strategic Outcome better reflects Infrastructure Canada’s mandate and vision and is linked to the Government’s priorities.

Previous Program Activity

Revised Program Activity

Reason for Change

1. Infrastructure and Communities $1,824,127 1. Infrastructure Investments $1,808,681

2. Policy, Knowledge and Partnership Development $15,446

Development of better organizational accountability and reporting functions.

2. Crown Corporations Portfolio Management $22,9893
  • Deleted

    $22,989

Responsibility transferred to Transport Canada.

3. Departmental Administration4 3. Departmental Administration4

Moved Communications activities from the Infrastructure and Communities activity (since they support and apply to all departmental activities)


The new organization more accurately reflects Infrastructure Canada’s key areas of achievement and sets the stage to strengthen departmental performance reporting. Section III provides additional organizational information.

1 Public infrastructure is defined as the core physical assets instrumental in supporting the delivery of public services.

2 The four Crown corporations (transferred to Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Portfolio in 2005-2006) are the Canada Lands Company Limited, Old Port of Montral Corporation Inc., Parc Downsview Park Inc. and Queens Quay West Land Corporation.

3 Although the transfer of the Crown Corporations was announced late in fiscal year 2005-2006, the actual transfer of these funds to Transport Canada occurred in 2006-2007.

4 Because the Departmental Administration Activity supports Activities 1 and 2, funding is prorated to those Activities.

1.3 Summary of Departmental Performance

1.3.1 Performance in Relation to Departmental Strategic Outcome, Priorities and Results

Table 1.4 summarizes the performance status on the expected results as they relate to the departmental strategic outcome, priority and program activity.

Table 1.4: Summary of Performance in Relation to Departmental Strategic Outcome, Priorities and Results


Status on Performance

Strategic Outcome: Improving the sustainability of our cities and communities and Canada’s local, regional and national public infrastructure to enhance the economic, social, cultural and environmental quality of life of Canadians.

2006-2007 ($ thousands)

Priority & Type

Program Activity

Expected Results & Achievements

Planned Spending

Actual
Spending

1. Delivering approved program funding (ongoing) 1. Infrastructure Investments

Infrastructure Canada delivers or coordinates a suite of federal public infrastructure funding programs:

  • Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF)
  • Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF)
  • Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP)
  • Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)
  • Gas Tax Fund (GTF)
  • Public Transit Fund (PTF)

Successfully met expectations during the reporting period.

  • 4,923 projects announced or approved and over $7.1 billion allocated by March 31, 2007, for CSIF, BIF, ICP and MRIF, including 2,970 “green” projects.
  • 16 new CSIF projects announced, with total federal funding of $924.1 million.
  • 3 new BIF projects announced, with $72 million in federal funds allocated.
  • 12 new ICP projects approved, with $2.7 million in federal funds allocated (wind-down phase of program).
  • 636 new MRIF projects approved with $444 million in federal funds allocated.
  • Budget 2006 top-up funds of $200 million for MRIF – approval obtained and projects now proceeding.
  • All outstanding provincial and territorial GTF and PTF funding agreements signed.
  • $590.2 million under the GTF and $19.1 million under the PTF transferred by March 31, 2007.

2,448,418

1,455,063

2. Developing Policy, Knowledge and Partnerships (ongoing) 2. Policy, Knowledge and Partnership Development
  • Develop strategic policies that are based on sound knowledge and strong relationships.
  • Build and maintain existing expertise, partnerships and established networks to conduct research, share knowledge and develop policy options.
  • Collaborate with international organizations on policy development and research concerning infrastructure, cities and communities issues.

Successfully met expectations during the reporting period.

  • Provided policy support through the development of a long-term infrastructure plan to meet Canada’s infrastructure needs.
  • Maintained and enhanced strong partnerships with regional development agencies, provinces, territories, municipalities, First Nations and stakeholders.
  • Completed a series of Fiscal Balance Consultations during the summer of 2006 with provinces, territories and other stakeholders to help shape the infrastructure programs contained in the Building Canada Infrastructure Plan.
  • Signed agreements to fund 14 new research projects through the Knowledge-building, Outreach and Awareness (KOA) and the Peer Reviewed Research Studies (PRRS) Programs.
  • Completed a number of national and international research initiatives to increase understanding of the challenges and opportunities to be faced in developing public infrastructure.
  • Established a new research web portal to share knowledge among members of the Horizontal Research Roundtable on Infrastructure (HRRI).
  • Played a leading role when Canada hosted the UN-HABITAT’s 3rd World Urban Forum (Vancouver – June 2006).

17,401

13,773


1.3.2 Progress by Organizational Priorities

Priority 1: Delivering Approved Program Funding

Through investments in public infrastructure, Infrastructure Canada seeks to maximize economic and environmental benefits for Canadians and to strengthen communities. It does this in partnership with the provinces and territories, municipalities, First Nations and stakeholders. Infrastructure Canada delivers or coordinates a suite of six infrastructure funding programs, each responding to distinct aspects of Canada’s priority infrastructure needs.

The investment of more than $16 billion in infrastructure announced in Budget 2007 brings federal support under a new Building Canada Infrastructure Plan to a total of $33 billion over the next seven years. This includes funding allocated in Budget 2006 of $16.5 billion over four years for public infrastructure across Canada of which $6.6 billion was new funding to support both small- and large-scale municipal infrastructure in communities. In addition, Budget 2006’s Advantage Canada5 confirmed the Government’s gas tax funding commitment for the remaining four years, through 2009-2010. Budget 2007 delivered on commitment made in Advantage Canada by implementing a comprehensive infrastructure plan based on advice received during consultations in the summer 2006 with provinces, territories, the municipal sector and stakeholders. The new Building Canada Infrastructure Plan will make an important contribution towards the efforts of the Government to drive the economy, support the environment and build a safer, stronger and better Canada and will provide greater predictability, flexibility and accountability.

The CSIF, BIF, ICP and MRIF Programs

These four Programs are delivered or coordinated in partnership with other federal departments and agencies. Projects are managed collaboratively under the terms of specific Memoranda of Understanding. As the coordinator and funding agent, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection and approval, negotiation of the contribution agreement and ongoing monitoring and oversight for the CSIF and BIF. For CSIF- and BIF-related transport projects, Transport Canada takes the lead responsibility for the above listed activities and Infrastructure Canada participates in a supportive role. Project review, selection and approval and ongoing monitoring and oversight for the ICP and MRIF are the responsibility of our federal delivery partners.

The major accomplishments of these four Programs during 2006-2007 are as follows:

  • Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF): The $4-billion CSIF, originally established in Budget 2001, is one of the large-scale strategic programs. During 2006-2007, 16 projects were announced with a total federal allocation of $924.1 million. As of March 31, 2007, a total of 65 projects have been announced, with a value of almost $4.2 billion. Refer to Sections II and IV for additional details.
  • Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF): Announced in Budget 2001, the BIF was established as a $600-million fund, targeting infrastructure primarily at the six largest surface border crossings between Canada and the United States, as well as several other crossings. During 2006-2007, three BIF projects were announced with a federal contribution of $72 million. Since inception, there have been 11 BIF agreements, with a total federal commitment to date of $535.1 million. Refer to Sections II and IV for additional details.
  • Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP): This community-based fund was set up in 2000 and, as of March 31, 2006, all the original ICP funding has been committed to 3,883 projects across Canada, totalling more than $1.9 billion. The Program was extended to March 31, 2009, and to March 31, 2007 for the First Nations component, to provide more time to complete approved projects. Twelve new projects were announced with a federal commitment of $2.7 million to protect the environment and support long-term community and economic needs. There were no new First Nations ICP projects during 2006-2007. Refer to Sections II and IV for additional details.
  • Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF): Budget 2003 established this community-based fund, with an allocation of $1 billion for smaller-scale municipal infrastructure projects designed to improve the quality of life and economic opportunities in smaller centres, including a component addressing the infrastructure needs of First Nations. During 2006-2007, 636 projects were announced, valued at $443.9 million. As of March 31, 2007, a total of 963 projects have been approved, with a total federal investment of $648.2 million. Refer to Sections II and IV for additional details.

Figure 1A illustrates the funding breakdown by project categories for these four programs (CSIF, BIF, ICP and MRIF).

Figure 1A: Summary of Total Funding For Approved or Announced Projects (CSIF, BIF, ICP and MRIF) by Project Categories as of March 31, 2007 ($M)

Figure 1A

Total Funding for CSIF, BIF, ICP and MRIF Approved or Announced Projects: $7,111.8M

New CSIF/MRIF Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreements

Entering into formal agreements with federal, provincial and territorial partners sets the foundation for successful delivery of planned programming and the achievement of the Government’s infrastructure priorities.

In addition to existing Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with other government departments, in 2006-2007, Infrastructure Canada completed a total of seven MOUs with Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (for Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon) and with the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (for New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador) to deliver CSIF funds.

Infrastructure Canada concluded the final federal-provincial agreement for the delivery of MRIF with the signing of the agreement with the Province of British Columbia in June 2006. In addition, arrangements with federal delivery partners were finalized with the signing of three MOUs: Industry Canada (for Ontario), Western Economic Diversification Canada (for British Columbia and for Alberta) and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions.

The Gas Tax Fund (GTF) and the Public Transit Fund (PTF)

In Budget 2005, the Government announced that $5 billion would be provided for the benefit of municipalities over five years by sharing a portion of the federal gas tax revenues. Budget 2007 commits to extending the federal GTF an additional four years until 2013-2014, delivering $8 billion in new predictable funding for sustainable infrastructure in our cities and communities. This funding enables municipalities to make investments in infrastructure projects that address local needs and help to produce the shared national outcomes of cleaner water, cleaner air and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Through the Public Transit Fund, the Government of Canada provided $400 million, allocated over two years, to support investments in public transit infrastructure in cities and communities. These funds support environmental outcomes of cleaner air and lowered greenhouse gas emissions.

The two programs involve agreements with all provincial and territorial governments, two municipal associations and the City of Toronto. In 2006-2007, provincial and territorial GTF signatories received $590.2 million and provincial and territorial PTF signatories received $19.1 million.

In 2006-2007, all outstanding provincial/territorial GTF and PTF funding agreements were signed and Oversight Committees established. These included the GTF agreement with Newfoundland and Labrador and PTF agreements with Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. Infrastructure Canada continued negotiations with the Province of Ontario for the distribution of $5.8 million in gas tax funds set aside for the benefit of Ontario’s unincorporated areas. Funding is expected to flow in 2007-2008.

GTF and PTF agreements describe the expected final outcomes of cleaner air, cleaner water and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. In 2006-2007, work began to identify appropriate outcome indicators that will meet the reporting requirements for these agreements. Both internal and contracted research, supplemented with advice from Fund signatories and other federal government departments, were used to develop a proposed performance measurement approach and specific municipal project environmental indicators. In 2007-2008, final indicators will be agreed upon through the individual Oversight Committees for use in the 2009 outcome reports.

Annual GTF expenditure reports for 2005-2006 were received from most signatories in the fall of 2006. These reports included the amounts paid to eligible recipients and demonstrated their ongoing eligibility under the GTF. The Department is working with the twooutstanding jurisdictions to address their capacity to deliver their reports so that transfers can resume.

The first PTF reports are not expected until the fall 2007.

GTF and MRIF Programming for First Nations

In 2006-2007, Infrastructure Canada continued working with Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the Assembly of First Nations to develop a program for the delivery of the First Nation components of the GTF and MRIF that are adapted to the particular infrastructure needs of First Nations communities.

Horizontal Approach for Reporting

In establishing a common, horizontal approach for reporting all federal infrastructure programs, Infrastructure Canada’s objective is to measure and report on progress and results as consistently as possible. The Department has developed preliminary performance measurement framework for the Gas Tax and Public Transit Funds which can be used as a basis for further discussion of common issues and data gaps.

Priority 2: Developing Policy, Knowledge and Partnerships

Policy Development

Infrastructure Canada works to support public infrastructure needs through the development of strategic policies that are based on sound knowledge and strong partnerships and address existing and emerging challenges and opportunities. In 2006-2007, Infrastructure Canada continued to deliver high quality and timely policy support and advice to the Minister and to develop strategic policies based on sound knowledge and strong partnerships. Some results achieved include:

  • Leading the development of the Building Canada Infrastructure Plan announced in Budget 2007, tabled in the House of Commons in March 2007;
  • Completing a series of fiscal balance consultations during the summer of 2006 with provinces, territories and other stakeholders to help shape the infrastructure programs contained in the Building Canada Infrastructure Plan;
  • Conducting interim due diligence studies and providing project selection advice to the Minister; and
  • Providing parliamentary and cabinet support to the Minister to ensure that Infrastructure Canada perspectives are incorporated in relevant Parliamentary, Cabinet, interdepartmental and portfolio briefing and policy documents.

Knowledge and Partnerships Development

Infrastructure Canada undertook research activities in all major program activity areas, in consideration of its research priorities. Multiple research studies were completed and disseminated on these issues. Details can be found in Section II and at: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/research-recherche/result/studies-rapports/index_e.shtml.

In June 2004, Infrastructure Canada received Treasury Board approval for two multidisciplinary policy research funding programs that support the organization’s Research Strategy goals. These programs are complementary tools to encourage and support the development of evidence-based policy and informed decision-making on public infrastructure and communities issues:

To date, these two research programs have funded more than 50 research projects and partnerships. During 2006-2007, competitive calls for proposals were conducted under both programs and agreements were signed to fund 14 new research projects, representing an investment of $1.3 million in research over the next two fiscal years.

Building Relationships and Sharing Knowledge

On behalf of the Government of Canada, Infrastructure Canada works with its partners to identify and assess public infrastructure needs, to evaluate priorities and to develop policy options to improve Government of Canada’s policies and programs in support of building modern public infrastructure and stronger cities and communities. Infrastructure Canada also seeks to build capacity and to develop and share knowledge about infrastructure with its partners through research, communications and other partnership initiatives. For example, Infrastructure Canada engages in ongoing liaison and information-sharing with provincial and territorial officials responsible for local government and for infrastructure through the Intergovernmental Consultation Network.

The Horizontal Research Roundtable on Infrastructure (HRRI) brings together about 25 federal government departments and organizations to facilitate and foster collaborative research on infrastructure. An intra-web portal for the HRRI was created in April 2006, for the use of HRRI members and federal government employees, to facilitate the activities of the HRRI and related research collaboration among its members.

1.3.3 Operating Environment and Challenges

Evolution of the Organization

Since it was established in 2002, Infrastructure Canada has overseen the relatively rapid development and implementation of three generations of infrastructure and communities programming. In 2004, Infrastructure Canada became a federal focal point for infrastructure and cities and communities issues. In February 2006, Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada became part of a new portfolio: Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

The evolution of Infrastructure Canada’s responsibilities over the past several years has resulted in a period of continuous change in its organizational structure and scope, creating demands for resources not anticipated at the time the organization was originally established. As a result, Infrastructure Canada has had to develop the capacity and operational structure to support new and expanded programs and provide an increasingly higher level of discipline and rigour to the policy development, project selection, program management and implementation processes, as well as audit and program/project evaluation.

Evaluating Effectiveness

Infrastructure Canada retains responsibility within the federal government for the use of contributions from its infrastructure funds and exercises due diligence and rigorous oversight. However, several factors may preclude the availability of information on program results, in turn affecting Infrastructure Canada’s ability to demonstrate tangible progress and results in the short term. For example, the long-term benefits of many of the infrastructure funding programs, such as economic and environmental benefits, may become apparent only after several years, given the long life cycle of major infrastructure projects. In addition, building sustained relationships with partners based on shared values, open communications and accountability is a long-term commitment. Over the years, there has been continued refinement of infrastructure programs that reflect the experience gained by the Government of Canada in the establishment of infrastructure programs; e.g., ICP in 2000 and CSIF and BIF in 2001. In 2002, the creation of Infrastructure Canada was followed by renewed investments in CSIF, the creation of the MRIF in 2003 and the establishment of the gas tax and public transit programs in 2005. Since then, the government has continued to pursue this evolution of a long-term, strategic commitment to infrastructure.

Ensuring Accountability

While Infrastructure Canada is fully accountable for program expenditures, the projects are managed collaboratively under the terms of specific Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs). As the coordinator and funding agent, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection and approval, negotiation of the contribution agreement, and ongoing monitoring and oversight for the CSIF and BIF. For CSIF- and BIF-related transport projects, Transport Canada takes the lead responsibility for the above listed activities and Infrastructure Canada participates in a supportive role. Project review, selection and approval, and ongoing monitoring and oversight for the ICP and MRIF are the responsibility of the federal delivery partners. For GTF and PTF, expenditure reports are submitted to the department to identify the amounts paid to ultimate recipients and to demonstrate the recipients’ ongoing eligibility.

Coordination, Partnerships and Capacity Building

Coordination, partnerships and capacity building are at the core of Infrastructure Canada’s mandate, operations and organizational culture.

At the operating level, Infrastructure Canada collaborates extensively with other federal departments and agencies to deliver beneficial infrastructure programs for Canadians. Infrastructure Canada takes a leading role in developing and maintaining new partnerships and working relationships with the provinces, territories, municipalities, municipal associations and stakeholder organizations across the country, as well as with First Nations and international organizations. Significant challenges exist in addressing different goals of stakeholders while moving forward federal infrastructure objectives. Coordinating partnerships is also resource intensive.

Partnerships are also an important tool in Infrastructure Canada’s focus on knowledge generation, community building and knowledge transfer. Infrastructure Canada collaborates with other federal departments, other levels of government, universities, research institutes, civil society organizations, the private sector and other experts domestically and internationally to generate and share knowledge about infrastructure and communities in support of sound policy making.

1.3.4 Link to the Government of Canada Outcomes Areas

The whole-of-government framework for reporting Canada’s performance groups all departmental Strategic Outcomes and Program Activities into four broad Spending Areas: Economic Affairs, Social Affairs, International Affairs and Government Affairs.

Infrastructure Canada’s one Strategic Outcome and two corresponding Program Activities6 align with the Government of Canada Outcomes as shown in Figure 1B.

Figure 1B: Infrastructure Canada’s Linkage to the Whole-of-Government Performance Framework


Government of Canada

Infrastructure Canada

Spending Area

Outcome

Program Activity

Strategic Outcome

Economic Affairs

Strong Economic Growth

Infrastructure Investments

Improving the sustainability of our cities and communities and Canada’s local, regional and national public infrastructure to enhance the economic, social, cultural and environmental quality of life of Canadians.

An Innovative and Knowledge-based Economy

Policy, Knowledge and Partnership Development


For more information about the Government of Canada’s four broad Spending Areas and the corresponding 13 Outcomes, visit http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/krc/cp-rc-1-05_e.asp.

5 Advantage Canada is a long-term, national economic plan designed to make Canada a true world economic leader.

6 The resources for Infrastructure Canada’s third Program Activity, Departmental Administration, are prorated to its other two Program Activities.