Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Canadian Polar Commission and Indian Specific Claims Commission


Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.

Horizontal Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water Management Strategy
Name of Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: May 2003 (official announcement)
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 2008 (end of funding)
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1.6 billion over 5 years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
INAC and Health Canada (HC) have developed a seven-part First Nations Water Management Strategy (FNWMS) to be implemented over a five-year period, beginning in 2003–04. The strategy allows for the development and implementation of: (1) a plan to upgrade and build water and waste-water facilities to meet established design, construction and water quality standards with a priority on identified facilities; (2) an effective water quality monitoring program combined with a comprehensive and coordinated compliance and reporting regime that will improve the detection of drinking water problems in a timely manner, thereby reducing the possibility of risk to health; (3) an effective and sustainable operation and maintenance (O&M) program designed to ensure the safety of the residents and the protection of the assets with a priority on identified high-risk facilities; (4) a plan for the continued expansion and enhancement of training programs, to ensure that all operators have the skills, knowledge and experience required to fulfill their responsibilities, supported by the introduction of mandatory certification requirements for all operators; (5) a set of integrated water quality management protocols with clearly defined roles and responsibilities consistent with national performance standards along with improvements in emergency response procedures; (6) a public awareness campaign aimed at informing both First Nation decision-makers of their roles and responsibilities in ensuring the safety of water supplies within their communities and First Nation households of measures they can take to protect the quality of water within their home and community; and (7) a comprehensive set of clearly defined standards, protocols and policies, using a multi-barrier approach.

The strategy will also require the establishment of closer partnerships amongst key federal, provincial/territorial, industry and other public sector partners. These partnerships will assist in areas such as watershed management and source water protection as well as advances in science and technology. Most importantly, the implementation of the strategy and the development of a detailed plan will require close collaboration with First Nations. The strategy is consistent with the broader national approach and is modelled on the enhanced management regimes in place or being implemented in most provinces and territories. The FNWMS includes an additional $600 million in funding over five years (from 2003–04 to 2007–08). Of that $600 million, $115.9 million goes to HC for their part in the strategy, while the remaining $484.1 million funds INAC's participation in the strategy. This $600 million in funding is in addition to INAC's normal annual funding to water initiatives in First Nations and HC's Drinking Water Safety Program (DWSP) funds that go to First Nations, which are also included in this template. Combining the FNWMS funds and the normal annual funding by both departments into First Nation water issues, the total federal funding allocated over 5 years will be $1.6 billion.

For more information, see http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/h2o/
http://hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/promotion/water-eau/index_e.html

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Reduction in the health risk level of drinking water in First Nations.
  • Increased awareness of the importance of clean drinking water and the responsibilities involved in keeping it clean.
  • Water standards will be met by all facilities.

Governance Structure(s):

  • Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee
  • Interdepartmental Waters ADM Committee.
  • Federal Advisory Committee on municipal wastewater effluent.
  • Interdepartmental Working Group on Drinking Water.
  • Regional Water Teams.
  • DG Steering Committee on Public Health.

Federal Partners Names of Programs for the Federal Partner Total Allocation from Start to End Date Planned Spending for
2006–07
Actual Spending in 2006–07 Planned Results for 2006–07 Results Achieved in 2006–07
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada First Nations Water Management Strategy $1.471 billion $306.2 million $306.2 million Number of trained or certified operators greater than or equal to that in the previous year At the end of 2005–06, there were 828 trained or certified operators out of 1,019 operators (81%). At the end of 2006–07, there were 875 trained or certified operators out of 1,117 operators (78%).
Number of high-risk facilities less than or equal to that in the previous year. At the end of 2005–06, there were 131 high-risk drinking water systems out of 755 systems (17%). At the end of 2006–07, there were 97 high-risk drinking water systems out of 755 systems (13%).
Health Canada Drinking Water Safety Program including the First Nations Water Management Strategy $140.9M ($115.9M for the First Nations Water Management Strategy and $25M a-based) $31.7M ($5M A-based and $26.7M for the FNWMS) $11.7M*
*Actual spending is under estimated because resources from some regions were not all properly coded.
Increased capacity of First Nations to monitor drinking water quality. The building of capacity in First Nations communities to monitor their drinking water quality and detect potential problems was facilitated through the community based water monitor program. In 2006–07, 592 out of 682 communities had access to a trained community based water monitor.
Purchase of lab kits. A total of 546 out of 682 communities had access to portable laboratory kits for testing during 2006–07.
Increase EHOs to support drinking water quality monitoring. In order to be fully staffed, a total of 28 EHOs need to be hired under the FNWMS. In 2006–07, 3 additional positions were staffed and now 26 positions in total are staffed.

In 2002, Monitoring for bacteriological contaminants in distribution systems only met, on an average, 29% of the frequency recommended in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (GCDWQ). In March 2007, 44% of piped drinking water distribution systems with five or more connections are now monitored weekly, as per the GCDWQ recommendation for bacteriological parameters.

It is anticipated that the remaining 56% piped community water systems will be monitored as per the GCDWQ by the end of 2008.

A total of 153,604 water samples were taken and analyzed in First Nations communities, which represent an increase of 29% from last fiscal year. If all systems were sampled as per recommended frequency the total number of samples collected would be approximately 135,000. That this target was exceeded is misleading given that not all systems are meeting required frequency. This may be the result of including samples collected at the water source, additional testing in the community (e.g. tap samples, wells) beyond the minimum recommended, and repetitive testing for quality control or to confirm positive results. In all:

— 35,477 bacteriological samples were analysed in an accredited lab which represents an increase of 23% from last fiscal year,

— 115,483 bacteriological samples were analyzed using a portable lab kit (Colilert) which represents an increase of 30% from last fiscal year,

— 2,420 were analyzed for chemical parameters which represents an increase of 68% from last fiscal year, and

— 224 were analyzed for radiological parameters which represents an increase of 22% from last fiscal year.
Implementation of early warning database. Six out of the seven regions have a water database in place to monitor sample results.
Investigate waterborne diseases and waterborne outbreaks. There were no instances where gastrointestinal illness was identified as a possible waterborne disease outbreak.
    Total $1.6 billion Total $X million Total $    

Contact information:
Michael Roy
Senior Operations Manager
INAC, SEPRO-CD, Water Management
Les Terrasses de la Chaudire
10 Wellington, Room 2008
Gatineau, Qubec K1A 0H4
Telephone: 819-997-8241
Fax: 819-934-1034
Roymjp@ainc-inac.gc.ca

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy
Name of Lead Department(s): INAC — Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Mtis and Non-Status Indians
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1998
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2007
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $50,025 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) is a $50 million, four-year initiative developed by the Government of Canada to help respond to the needs facing Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared Outcome(s):
Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support projects that respond to local priorities.

Governance Structure(s):
The core governance structure for the Urban Aboriginal Strategy is a community committee that includes a multi-partnership model in each of the twelve designated communities under the UAS. Each community committee (either via a shared delivery model or a community entity model, the latter being an incorporated organization having been delegated authority for delivering pilot projects on behalf of the various partners) is responsible for identifying local priorities and recommending pilot projects for support. Local UAS committees are supported by formal or informal working groups of federal regional officials representing interested federal departments that are meant to coordinate federal efforts to respond to community interests.


Federal Partners Names of Programs for the Federal Partner(s) Total Allocation from Start to End Date Planned Spending for
2006–07
Actual Spending in 2006–07 Planned Results for 2006–07 Results Achieved in 2006–07
Canadian Heritage
[Aboriginal Women’s Professional Association (AWPA): Business Planning Edmonton] Aboriginal Women’s Program $15,488 $500 $500 Development of a business and strategic development plans for an Aboriginal Women’s Professional Association. A consultant was retained to work with the proponent’s board to complete the business and strategic plan.
[Native Friendship Centre (CNFC) – National Aboriginal Awareness Week Activities – Edmonton] Celebrate Canada $35,000 $10,000 $10,000 Supporting the Edmonton Aboriginal community together to share, network and celebrate Aboriginal contributions as part of the National and Provincial festivities. 34 Aboriginal organizations hosted a number of events within Edmonton resulting in a greater awareness of Aboriginal people’s contribution nationally and provincially.
[Blackfoot Canadian Cultural Society – Lethbridge] Arts Presentation Canada $200,152 $10,000 $10,000 In support of the International Peace Powwow in Lethbridge. Cultural awareness campaign in City of Lethbridge.
[Blackfoot Canadian Cultural Society – Lethbridge] Canada Council for the Arts $200,152 $12,000 $12,000 In support of the International Peace Powwow in Lethbridge. Cultural awareness campaign in City of Lethbridge.
[Ndinawemaaganag Endaawaad Inc. – Youth Resource Centre – Winnipeg] Urban Multi-purpose Aboriginal Youth Centre $947,234 $241,837 $241,837 Assistance to a multi-service youth resource centre for at-risk youth in the Winnipeg community. Assistance provided to over 11,000 youth at the resource centre in Winnipeg.
Human Resources and Social Development
[Shkoday Abinojiwak Obimiwedoon – Neighbourhood Capacity Building Project – Thunder Bay] Urban Aboriginal Homelessness $1,026,746 $366,607 $364,107 Initiative aimed at alleviating child poverty within five Thunder Bay neighbourhoods. Over 2,200 individuals registered with the project and over 500 people a month were served by the various NCBP activities.

In 2006-07, 189 children participated in the after-school programs taking place at five schools with a high concentration of Aboriginal students and over 400 children participated in structured sponsorship activities since the project began.

To date, approximately 5,200 emergency needs vouchers were distributed to people requiring assistance.

Since October 2006, the Volunteer Services component of the NCBP has trained 206 individuals, providing these individuals with marketable and transferable skills.

Monthly, the Good Food & Good Beef Box programs provides 320 individuals with fresh produce and meats, a service not always available to individuals through other existing programs and services.
[Western Region Mtis Women’s Association – Saskatoon] Skills Link $349,579 $286,363 $286,363 Provide assistance of an Elder within a Job readiness Project. The Elder was an invaluable asset to the youth and the employment and/or return to school results were good considering they were youth with barriers to employment.
[Red Ribbon Place – Regina] National Homelessness Initiative $1,467,400 $665,000 $665,000 Supportive housing project for homeless persons and those at risk of homelessness affected by HIV/AIDS. Policies and procedures for rental of the units was developed and partnerships with other housing groups were formalized as well as additional capital assets were purchased.
[Ogijiita Pimatiswin Kinamatwin Inc – Winnipeg] Youth Employment $439,747 $114,302 $114,302 Employs, trains and educates young Aboriginal ex-offenders in all aspects of housing renovation and offers in-house education at the secondary and post-secondary level. Trained young Aboriginal ex-offenders in all aspects of housing renovation and offers in-house education at the secondary and post-secondary level. Project results included decreased recidivism rate and stable housing situation for individuals involved in the program.
[Manitoba Urban Native Housing Association Inc. Winnipeg] National Homelessness Initiative $146,918 $38,270 $38,270 Develop a housing plan to respond to the housing needs of urban Aboriginal people. Developed a housing plan which responds to the needs of urban Aboriginal people.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
[Saskatoon Tribal Council] Economic Development $64,031 $19,000 $19,000 Implement a strategic plan to revitalize Super Saturday Program. The Super Saturday program was revamped with a good deal of input from community partners and the communications products produced and distributed.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
[Beyond the Walls, building a Safe Community "Restorative Justice Conference" – Prince Albert] Grant $79,984 $10,000 $10,000 Hosting of a restorative justice conference and justice related issues. Successful and well attended conference that was very timely in the community and another UAS project which was training community workers on restorative justice matters to serve clients.
Service Canada
[Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth – E-learning initiative for Aboriginal youth and employers – Calgary] Youth Employment Strategy $225,731 $63,529 $63,529 Enhance the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal youth in Calgary through the development of an Aboriginal Awareness learning tool for employers and;

Enhance the life skills of Aboriginal youth through the development of a personal finance learning tool.
Both e-learning programs have been developed. The programs were launched for public use in 07–08. The Recipient is in the initial stages of tracking the usage and impact of the e-learning programs.
Rainbow Lodge - Calgary National Homelessness Initiative $505,000 $250,000 $250,000 The objective of this project is to provide support to the sustainability of a supportive 32 unit transitional housing facility for homeless Aboriginal families. The project provided 32 units transitional housing facility for homeless Aboriginal families.
Justice Canada
[Ndinawemaaganag Endaawaad Inc. – Youth Resource Centre – Winnipeg] Aboriginal Justice Strategy $947,234 $47,841 $47,841 Assistance to a multi-service youth resource centre for at-risk youth in the Winnipeg community. Assistance provided to over 11,000 youth at the resource centre in Winnipeg.
    Total $ Total $ Total $    

Comments on Variances: Not applicable

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners:
UAS has proven effective in leveraging both monetary and in-kind contributions. There were over 168 projects funded during the 2006–2007 fiscal year with contributions from other federal departments amounting to $3,324,608. In addition to contributions from provincial and municipal government partners, the private sector and Aboriginal organizations contributed $11,281,823 million during the 2006–2007 fiscal year to support the federal contributions under UAS. In some communities, partnerships have formed between the federal government departments, provincial government, municipal government, Aboriginal organizations, non-profit organizations and employer associations to support the UAS project initiatives in twelve cities. Although the data above identify examples of projects that received financial support from other federal departments, a majority of other projects funded through the UAS received non-financial support from a number of federal departments and in some cases projects were approved through the UAS horizontal terms and conditions without direct funding through the UAS pilot project budget.

Contact information
Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Mtis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Telephone: (613) 992-8186