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Section III — Supplementary Information

Organizational Information


Minister
Indian Affairs and Northern Development
Deputy Minister
Associate Deputy Ministers
Strategic Outcomes Program Activities

The Government
Lead Assistant Deputy Ministers:
Claims and Indian Government (South)
Northern Affairs (North)

Governance and Institutions of Government
Co-Lead Director General: Lands and Trust Services and Claims and Indian Government

Co-operative Relationships
Lead Director General: Claims and Indian Government

Northern Governance
Lead Director General: Northern Affairs

The People
Lead Assistant Deputy Ministers:
Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations (South)
Northern Affairs (North)

Managing Individual Affairs
Lead Director General: Lands and Trust Services

Education
Lead Director General: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations

Social Development
Lead Director General: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations

Healthy Northern Communities
Lead Director General: Northern Affairs

The Land
Lead Assistant Deputy Ministers:
Lands and Trust Services (South)
Northern Affairs (North)

Certainty of Title and Access to Land and Resources
Lead Director General: Claims and Indian Government

Responsible Federal Stewardship
Lead Director General: Lands and Trust Services

First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Lead Director General: Lands and Trust Services

Northern Land and Resources
Lead Director General: Northern Affairs

The Economy
Lead Assistant Deputy Ministers:
Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations (South)
Northern Affairs (North)

Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People
Lead Director General: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations

Access to Capital and Economic Development
Lead Director General: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations

Community Infrastructure
Lead Director General: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations

Northern Economy
Lad Director General: Northern Affairs

The Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Lead Assistant Deputy Minister: Office of the Federal Interlocutor

Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Lead Director General: Office of the Federal Interlocutor

Departmental Management and Administration

Program Operations
Policy and Strategic Direction Senior Assistant Deputy Minister
Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations Senior/Associate Assistant Deputy Ministers
Claims and Indian Government Assistant Deputy Minister
Lands and Trust Services Assistant Deputy Minister
Corporate Services Assistant Deputy Minister
Northern Affairs Assistant Deputy Minister

Regional Operations
Lead Senior Assistant Deputy Minister: Socio-economic Policy and Regional Operations
Regional Directors General (South)
British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Atlantic

Lead Assistant Deputy Minister: Northern Affairs
Regional Directors General (North)
Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut


 

Financial Tables

Table 1: Comparison of Planned to Actual Spending (including FTEs)


($ millions) Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Governance and Institutions of Government 530.7 558.6 613.6 641.8 667.0 645.1
Co-operative Relationships 132.1 128.5 159.1 169.2 151.4 139.5
Northern Governance 10.6 8.7 11.3 11.3 13.2 8.1
Managing Individual Affairs 18.0 20.0 15.8 15.8 17.1 17.1
Education 1,580.2 1,619.2 1,608.4 1,656.5 1,686.4 1,679.8
Social Development 1,300.4 1,352.5 1,341.9 1,354.7 1,432.2 1,425.7
Healthy Northern Communities 91.8 97.3 86.7 106.4 96.5 96.4
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources 16.2 27.1 11.2 11.3 13.1 10.9
Responsible Federal Stewardship 17.8 22.9 48.7 57.3 120.4 120.4
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment 59.4 87.9 46.0 46.0 24.1 15.4
Northern Land and Resources 149.8 164.8 174.1 174.0 188.5 182.7
Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People 71.0 67.9 1.1 1.1 2.5 2.5
Access to Capital and Economic Development 465.1 501.9 693.2 683.6 672.5 418.7
Community Infrastructure 1,098.8 1,114.3 1,305.6 1,370.8 1,290.5 1,261.3
Northern Economy 32.7 15.6 32.1 32.1 28.6 23.1
Co-operative Relations 27.4 37.0 40.8 40.8 41.1 39.6
 
Sub-Total Budgetary 5,602.2 5,824.2 6,189.7 6,372.6 6,445.0 6,086.2
Access to Capital and Economic Development 48.5
Northern Economy 11.9
Co-operative Relationships 51.9 50.7 80.8 80.8 89.3 44.8
 
Sub-Total Non-Budgetary 51.8 50.7 80.8 80.8 149.7 44.8
 
Total Budgetary + Non-Budgetary 5,654.1 5,874.9 6,270.5 6,453.4 6,594.7 6,131.1
 
Less: Non-Respendable Revenue 338.2 299.7 187.3 187.3 248.3 248.3
Plus: Cost of services received without charge 63.5 68.7 68.3 68.3 72.4 72.4
 
Total Departmental Spending 5,379.3 5,643.9 6,151.5 6,334.4 6,418.8 5,955.2
Full-Time Equivalents 3,940 3,967 4,269 4,276 4,063 4,063
Canadian Polar Commission
Research Facilitation and Communication 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
 
Total 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
 
Less: Non-Respendable Revenue
Plus: Cost of services received without charge
 
Total Spending 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
Full-Time Equivalents 5 5 5 5 5 5
Indian Specific Claims Commission
Indian Specific Claims Commission n/a 6.9 5.6 5.6 6.8 6.5
 
Total n/a 6.9 5.6 5.6 6.8 6.5
 
Less: Non-Respendable Revenue n/a n/a n/a
Plus: Cost of services received without charge n/a 0.7 n/a 0.6 n/a 0.7
 
Total Spending n/a 7.6 n/a 6.2 n/a 7.2
Full-Time Equivalents 45 46 49 49 45 45
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 2: Resources by Program Activity


2006–2007 ($ millions)
Program Activity Budgetary Non-Budgetary Total
Operating Capital Grants Contributions
and Other
Transfer Payments
Gross/Net Loans,
Investments
and
Advances
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Governance and Institutions of Government
Main Estimates 43.1 3.8 354.6 212.1 613.6 613.6
Planned Spending 41.5 3.8 355.5 241.1 641.8 641.8
Total Authorities 65.9 0.4 270.5 330.1 667.0 667.0
Actual Spending 44.5 270.5 330.1 645.1 645.1
Co-operative Relationships
Main Estimates 72.3 12.2 5.6 69.0 159.1 80.8 239.9
Planned Spending 72.1 12.2 5.6 79.2 169.2 80.8 250.0
Total Authorities 67.7 12.1 5.6 66.0 151.4 89.3 240.8
Actual Spending 67.0 0.8 5.6 66.0 139.5 44.8 184.3
Northern Governance
Main Estimates 11.1 0.2 11.3 11.3
Planned Spending 11.1 0.2 11.3 11.3
Total Authorities 11.1 2.0 13.2 13.2
Actual Spending 6.0 2.0 8.1 8.1
Managing Individual Affairs
Main Estimates 8.1 1.7 6.0 15.8 15.8
Planned Spending 8.1 1.7 6.0 15.8 15.8
Total Authorities 9.6 1.8 5.7 17.1 17.1
Actual Spending 9.6 1.8 5.7 17.1 17.1
Education
Main Estimates 94.3 34.1 1,480.1 1,608.4 1,608.4
Planned Spending 93.0 34.1 1,529.4 1,656.5 1,656.5
Total Authorities 119.6 0.1 34.1 1,532.6 1,686.4 1,686.4
Actual Spending 115.1 32.1 1,532.6 1,679.8 1,679.8
Social Development
Main Estimates 70.8 10.0 1,261.1 1,341.9 1,341.9
Planned Spending 69.8 10.0 1,274.8 1,354.7 1,354.7
Total Authorities 91.3 10.0 1,330.8 1,432.2 1,432.2
Actual Spending 86.2 8.8 1,330.8 1,425.7 1,425.7
Healthy Northern Communities
Main Estimates 33.5 44.6 8.6 86.7 86.7
Planned Spending 55.2 44.6 6.6 106.4 106.4
Total Authorities 47.7 44.6 4.2 96.5 96.5
Actual Spending 47.6 44.6 4.2 96.4 96.4
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources
Main Estimates 6.0 1.7 3.0 0.5 11.2 11.2
Planned Spending 6.0 1.7 3.0 0.6 11.3 11.3
Total Authorities 7.4 1.7 3.0 1.0 13.1 13.1
Actual Spending 7.4 1.2 1.3 1.0 10.9 10.9
Responsible Federal Stewardship
Main Estimates 18.5 30.2 48.7 48.7
Planned Spending 20.6 36.7 57.3 57.3
Total Authorities 33.5 86.8 120.4 120.4
Actual Spending 33.5 86.8 120.4 120.4
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Main Estimates 20.3 25.7 46.0 46.0
Planned Spending 20.2 25.7 46.0 46.0
Total Authorities 14.6 9.5 24.1 24.1
Actual Spending 5.9 9.5 15.4 15.4
Northern Land and Resources
Main Estimates 158.6 1.1 14.5 174.1 174.1
Planned Spending 158.5 1.1 14.5 174.0 174.0
Total Authorities 159.5 1.1 27.9 188.5 188.5
Actual Spending 153.7 1.1 27.9 182.7 182.7
Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People
Main Estimates 1.1 1.1 1.1
Planned Spending 1.1 1.1 1.1
Total Authorities 1.6 0.9 2.5 2.5
Actual Spending 1.6 0.9 2.5 2.5
Access to Capital and Economic Development
Main Estimates 47.5 512.8 132.9 693.2 693.2
Planned Spending 53.2 512.8 117.6 683.6 683.6
Total Authorities 61.1 479.1 132.3 672.5 48.5 721.0
Actual Spending 53.0 242.1 123.6 418.7 418.7
Community Infrastructure
Main Estimates 98.2 11.0 80.2 1,116.2 1,305.6 1,305.6
Planned Spending 97.3 11.0 80.2 1,182.4 1,370.8 1,370.8
Total Authorities 127.9 11.0 81.4 1,070.3 1,290.5 1,290.5
Actual Spending 104.9 5.6 80.6 1,070.3 1,261.3 1,261.3
Northern Economy
Main Estimates 8.9 23.2 32.1 32.1
Planned Spending 8.9 23.2 32.1 32.1
Total Authorities 8.9 19.7 28.6 11.9 40.5
Actual Spending 3.5 19.7 23.1 23.1
Co-operative Relations
Main Estimates 9.8 31.0 40.8 40.8
Planned Spending 9.8 31.0 40.8 40.8
Total Authorities 10.5 30.7 41.1 41.1
Actual Spending 10.5 29.2 39.6 39.6
Total (INAC)
Main Estimates 702.2 28.7 1,047.6 4,411.2 6,189.7 80.8 6,270.5
Planned Spending 726.5 28.7 1,048.5 4,568.9 6,372.6 80.8 6,453.4
Total Authorities 838.0 25.3 931.2 4,650.5 6,445.0 149.7 6,594.7
Actual Spending 749.9 7.6 688.5 4,640.2 6,086.2 44.8 6,131.1
Canadian Polar Commission
Research Facilitation and Communication
Main Estimates 1.0 1.0 1.0
Planned Spending 1.0 1.0 1.0
Total Authorities 1.0 1.0 1.0
Actual Spending 1.0 1.0 1.0
Indian Specific Claims Commission
Conduct inquiries and provide mediation services
Main Estimates 5.6 5.6 5.6
Planned Spending 5.6 5.6 5.6
Total Authorities 6.8 6.8 6.8
Actual Spending 6.5 6.5 6.5
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items


Vote or
Statutory
Item
  2006–2007 ($ millions)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
1 Operating expenditures 609.4 620.3 702.8 649.9
5 Capital expenditures 28.7 28.7 25.3 7.6
10 Grants and contributions 5,252.8 5,411.3 5,375.7 5,124.1
15 Payments to Canada Post Corporation 27.6 40.9 40.9 39.3
20 Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Mtis and non-Status Indians — Operating expenditures 7.2 7.2 7.8 7.4
25 Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Mtis and non-Status Indians — Contributions 31.0 31.0 30.7 29.2
(S) Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development — Salary and motor car allowance 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
(S) Grassy Narrows and Islington Bands Mercury Disability Board
(S) Liabilities in respect of loan guarantees made to Indians for Housing and Economic Development 2.0 2.0 0.2 0.2
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 1.4 1.4 1.8 1.8
(S) Grants to Aboriginal organizations designated to receive claim settlement payments pursuant to Comprehensive Land Claim Settlement Acts 137.6 137.6 137.6 137.6
(S) Grant to the Nunatsiavut Government for the implementation of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement pursuant to the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act 36.0 36.0 35.9 35.9
(S) Payments to comprehensive claim beneficiaries in compensation for resource royalties 1.5 1.5 1.9 1.9
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 54.4 54.5 48.9 48.9
(S) Payment from the Consolidated Revenue Fund of guaranteed loans issued out of the Indian economic development account 31.8 0.1
(S) Court awards 1.6 1.6
(S) Refunds of amounts credited to revenues in previous years 0.5 0.5
(S) Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 1.4
 
  Total budgetary 6,189.7 6,372.6 6,445.0 6,086.2
L20 Loans and guarantees of loans through the Indian economic development account 48.5
L30 Loans to native claimants 31.1 31.1 39.6 16.5
L35 Loans to First Nations in British Columbia for the purpose of supporting their participation in the British Columbia Treaty Commission Process 49.7 49.7 49.7 28.3
L40 Loans to the Government of the Yukon Territory for making second mortgage loans to territory residents 0.3
L55 Provision of Inuit loan fund for loans to Inuit to promote commercial activities 6.6
L81 Loans for the establishment or expansion of small businesses in the Yukon Territory 5.0
 
  Total non-budgetary 80.8 80.8 149.7 44.8
 
  Total Department 6,270.5 6,453.4 6,594.7 6,131.1
Canadian Polar Commission
40 Program expenditures 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
 
  Total Commission 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
Indian Specific Claims Commission
45 Program expenditures 5.0 5.0 6.2 5.9
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
 
  Total Commission 5.5 5.5 6.8 6.5
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 4: Services Received Without Charge


($ millions) Indian and
Northern
Affairs
Canada
Canadian
Polar
Commission
Indian
Specific
Claims
Commission
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 26.8 0.4
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by TBS (excluding revolving funds) 24.2 0.2
Workman's compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada 0.6
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 20.7
 
Total 2006–2007 Services Received Without Charge 72.4 0.6
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 5: Loans, Investments and Advances (Non-Budgetary)


($ millions) Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Co-operative Relationships
Loans to native claimants 23.1 22.0 31.1 31.1 39.6 16.5
Loans to First Nations in British Columbia for the purpose of supporting First Nations' participation in the British Columbia Treaty Commission process 28.8 28.7 49.7 49.7 49.7 28.3
Access to Capital and Economic Development
Loans and guarantees of loans through the Indian Economic Development Account 48.5
Northern Economy
Loans to the Government of the Yukon Territory for making second mortgage loans to territory residents 0.3
Provision of Inuit Loan Fund for loans to Inuit to promote commercial activities (net) 6.6
Loans for the establishment or expansion of small businesses in the Yukon Territory through the Yukon Territory Small Business Loans Account (net) 5.0
 
Total 51.8 50.7 80.8 80.8 149.7 44.8
Canadian Polar Commission
N/A
Indian Specific Claims Commission
N/A
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 6: Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue


($ millions) Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
Revenue
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Governance and Institutions of Government
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   2.3 0.7 0.7 6.8 6.8
Miscellaneous revenues   0.1 0.1
Co-operative Relationships
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   1.0 0.3 0.3 0.9 0.9
Return on investments   9.4 7.1 7.1 10.3 10.3
Miscellaneous revenues   0.1 0.1
Education
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   3.0 2.5 2.5 5.9 5.9
Miscellaneous revenues   0.2 0.2
Social Development
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   6.1 5.0 5.0 9.2 9.2
Miscellaneous revenues   0.1 0.1
Healthy Northern Communities
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.1 0.2 0.2
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.2
Responsible Federal Stewardship
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.2 0.5 0.5
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   2.2 0.1 0.1
Other non-tax revenues   0.1
Northern Land and Resources
Return on investments:
— Norman Wells Project profits   131.9 98.0 98.0 123.3 123.3
— Other   0.7 0.7
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.2 1.2 1.2 0.5 0.5
Adjustments of Prior Year's Payables at Year End   0.3 1.0 1.0 0.2 0.2
Canada mining   77.9 39.5 39.5 18.7 18.7
Quarrying royalties   0.1 0.1 0.1
Oil and gas royalties   14.5 16.0 16.0 15.4 15.4
Land, building and machinery rentals   0.2 0.1 0.1
Rights and Privileges   3.9 3.9
Other non-tax revenues   29.5 2.7 2.7 32.0 32.0
Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.1 0.1 0.1
Access to Capital and Economic Development
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.8 0.3 0.3 2.6 2.6
Return on investments   0.4 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.3
Miscellaneous revenues   6.6 6.3 6.3 6.7 6.7
Community Infrastructure
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   4.7 0.5 0.5 11.5 11.5
Return on investments   1.2 1.0 1.0 1.4 1.4
Miscellaneous revenues   0.1 0.1
Northern Economy
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.4 0.3 0.3
Co-operative Relations
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   0.4 0.2 0.2
Departmental Management and Administration
Refunds of previous years' expenditures   5.3
Miscellaneous revenues   0.7
 
Total 338.2 299.8 187.3 187.3 248.3 248.3
Canadian Polar Commission
N/A
Indian Specific Claims Commission
N/A
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

Table 7A: User Fees


User Fees Act 2006–07 Planning Years
User Fee Fee Type Fee-setting Authority Date Last Modified Forecast Revenue ($000) Actual Revenue ($000) Full Cost ($000) Performance Standard Performance Results Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue ($000) Estimated Full Cost ($000)
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA) Other products and services (O) Access to Information Act 1992       Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request.

The Access to Information Act provides fuller details.
On-time responses provided in 95 percent of requests completed during fiscal year 2006–07. 2007–08
2007–08
1,500
3,000

1,500
s.11(1)(a) 1,340 1,340   2008–09
2008–09
1,500
2,700

2,000
s. 11(1)(b) 3,353 3,353 1,052.1 2009–10
2009–10
1,500
2,500

2,500
Canada Mining Regulatory Territorial Lands Act See Section B: Proposed amendments 5,500 6,572 Note 1 Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation: CMR CMR - amendments All applications processed within set time lines. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
6,600
6,600
6,600
Note 1
Territorial Land Use Regulatory Territorial Lands Act
Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act
1996 230 139 Note 1 Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation All permits were issued within the regulated time frame. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
139
139
139
Note 1
Territorial Lands Regulatory Territorial Lands Act 1996 930 2,305 Note 1 Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. All lease and letter patent were issued once all pre-conditions were met (e.g. environmental assessment decisions, lease negotiations). 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2,300
2,300
2,300
Note 1
Frontier Lands Registration Regulatory Territorial Lands Act
Canada Petroleum Resource Act
1988 88 78 Note 1 Standard requests to be processed within 10 working days. Requests that require additional research take additional time to process (requestor is advised of the delay at the time the request is made). All standard requests were processed within the established timeline. A number of request necessitated further research which resulted in additional processing time. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
88
88
88
Note 1
Territorial Quarrying Regulatory Territorial Lands Act
Mackenzie Valley Land Use Regulations
2003 0 0 Note 1 The issuance of a quarrying permit leads to the granting of a Land Use Permit. As such, there is no time line set in regulations to process/issue/reject a quarrying permit application. Permits are issued once pre-conditions are met. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
0
0
0
Note 1
Territorial Water Regulatory Northwest Territories Waters Act 1992 10 16 Note 1 Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. All permits and letter patent were issued once all pre-conditions were met. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
16
16
16
Note 1
Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act 2002 (Note 2)
Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act 2003
Territorial Coal Regulatory Territorial Lands Act 2003 0 0 Note 1 Exploration permits are issued once consultations are complete. Permits are issued upon completion of consultations. 2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
0
0
0
Note 1
Date Last Modified
The Canada Mining Regulations (CMR) are currently in the process of modernization. The royalty sections of the CMR were amended in 1999, but the remainder of the regulations were left as they were written in 1977. The metric system is being introduced in this round of amendments, thereby changing the fee schedule to reflect the amounts required by hectares instead of acres. The mining industry and other stakeholders were consulted by various methods of consultation and no complaints about the changes were submitted. One new fee is being added to discourage nuisance protests against a claim.
Note 1: The fee or service triggers a series of activities related to land and resource management and the protection of the environment, all of which are controlled by the nature and scope of the resource development projects, e.g. mine development.
Note 2: The Water Regulations under the Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act are currently in the process of being written. Industry and other stakeholders have not yet been extensively consulted. Changes to the fee structure are still under consideration.

 

Table 7B: Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

Supplementary information on Service Standards for External Fees can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp

 

Table 8: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

INAC has five transfer payments programs:
Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Government
Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The People
Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Land
Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Economy
Payments for Mtis, non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people — The Office of the Federal Interlocutor

Further information on these projects can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp

 

Table 9: Response to Parliamentary Committees, and Audits and Evaluations

Response to Parliamentary Committees

House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Accounts

Standing Order 108(3) (g) — On June 1, 2006, the Standing Committee on Public Accounts commenced consideration of Chapter 5, May 2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Management of Programs for First Nations, which was referred to the House of Commons, Standing Committee on Public Accounts on May 16, 2006. The committee report was adopted on June 20, 2006, and presented to the House on June 21, 2006.

Standing Order 109 — Indian and Northern Affairs Canada officials appeared before the Standing Committee of Public Accounts on June 1 and June 13, 2006. The Government Response to the Sixth Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts review of the Auditor General’s 11 recommendations was presented to the House by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada on October 19, 2006. The response was jointly prepared by Health Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. It addressed the following issues: patient safety and prevention of abuse of prescription drugs; addressing mould in on-reserve housing; reducing the First Nations’ reporting burden; finalizing an evaluation of the comprehensive land claims implementation process including establishing performance indicators, and objectives; development of a plan to end third-party management; and longer appointment periods for deputy heads.

Prescription Drugs — The government response stated that it is committed to expanding program options, and to exploring the development of specific legislative authorities in order to ensure patient safety and prevent prescription drug misuse. Government would also initiate discussions with provincial and territorial organizations to collect vital statistics related to death and injury due to inappropriate use of prescription drugs, and report the costs of each initiative annually to Parliament.

Mould in On-Reserve Housing — The Government response indicated that discussions on a framework for a national strategy between federal departments (INAC, CMHC, HC), and the Assembly of First Nations had been completed and implementation plans were being developed to address mould prevention and remediation plans. Where remediation was not possible, alternate approaches to acquiring additional housing were being examined.

First Nation Reporting — The government response outlined a three-pronged approach to reducing the amount of data collected, increasing the efficiency of the procedures to submit and process reports, and working with TBS to eliminate duplication where possible in order to achieve a whole-of-government reduction.

Comprehensive Land Claims Implementation — The government response provided an overview of the INAC Multi-Year Evaluation Plan and information on the development of shared objectives, mutually shared results and performance indicators that will be utilized for reporting on departmental activities.

Third-Party Management — The government will work with the appropriate boards to develop guidelines to clarify key terms and develop water standards in accordance to the needs of the communities. It has already met with a number of boards to discuss best practices and board member training needs, and has developed a process for ongoing dialogue to resolve issues. It currently requires that boards to provide information on financial performance in annual reports, including how the boards manage their responsibilities. This information will be linked to the development of strategic plans with the intent of strengthening the annual reporting process.

Longer Appointment Periods for Deputy Heads — The appointment system is an executive function exercised by the Prime Minister and the Clerk of the Privy Council. Deputy Heads work within this system and must be prepared to move to other assignments when requested to do so.

Response to the Auditor General of Canada, including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD)

Auditor General

Chapter 5 — The May 2006 fourth status report of the Auditor General on the Management of Programs for First Nations was presented to the House of Commons, Standing Committee on Public Accounts on May 16, 2006. The report made 11 recommendations in total with eight recommendations being directed at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and three recommendations at Health Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada presented a response to the House responding to the need to address mould in on-reserve housing; to reduce the First Nations reporting burden; to establish performance indicators and objectives and to finalize an evaluation of the comprehensive land claims implementation process; to develop a plan to end third-party management; and to create longer appointment periods for deputy heads.

The department response, prepared on behalf of the Government of Canada, stated that it is important to put in place a strategy to develop a common Aboriginal agenda for the future in important areas such as housing, health, education, and economic opportunities. Canada will continue to take the critical factors into account when developing approaches aimed at securing a better future for Aboriginal peoples.

Chapter 6 — The May 2006 Report of the Auditor General on the Management of Voted Grants and Contributions was presented to the House of Commons with one recommendation directed at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. The report stated that the department should strengthen its grant and contribution management controls by preparing a risk-assessment of recipients to determine the frequency and depth of monitoring and reporting, complete development and implementation of the automated management system for grants and contributions, and provide training to program officers.

The department responded by indicating that the new First Nations and Inuit Transfer Payment System being implemented would improve and strengthen management practices. By adopting a risk-based approach to manage all grants and contributions, managers will be able to determine the eligibility and the appropriate level of monitoring and reporting required. Ongoing training of staff will take place while the department replaces the current system with this new one during the planned 2006–2008 roll-out period.

Chapter 7 — The November 2006 Report of the Auditor General on Federal Participation in the British Columbia Treaty Process was presented to the House of Commons on November 28, 2006. The report presented a total of four recommendations: the need for greater collaboration between Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and other federal organizations participating in the British Columbia treaty negotiations process; fulfill the federal government’s duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate First Nations; improve the timing and resource management of the treaty negotiations process; and provide more accessible and comprehensive reporting to Parliament.

The department responded by indicating that it will work with federal partners to improve existing internal federal processes with respect to policy development in order to respond more effectively to policy-related challenges and opportunities at treaty negotiations tables. INAC will also continue working with other federal departments to develop a federal approach to consultation and accommodation. The department will place greater emphasis on results-based negotiations focusing on areas where progress is demonstrably possible and will explore ways to improve the current process of providing information to Parliament by making reports more comprehensive.

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

Chapter 2 — The 2006 Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change, was presented to the House of Commons on September 28, 2006. The audit of six federal departments, including Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, assessed broadly if departments developed strategies on a regional or sectoral basis for activities under their responsibility and for INAC, in particular, how it was addressing the impacts of climate change in the North. There were no specific recommendations directed to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and it was not asked to prepare a response to the audit report.

Chapter 4 — The 2006 Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Sustainable Development Strategies, was presented to the House of Commons on September 28, 2006. The audit examined the progress made by federal departments and agencies toward meeting the commitments made in their sustainable development strategies. The audit stated that Indian and Northern Affairs Canada had made good progress implementing a management framework to promote and track initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities. This is seen to be an important step toward environmental protection and sustainable development. INAC was also making good progress in developing a long-term strategy to assist Aboriginal and northern communities to adapt to the impacts of climate change. There were no specific recommendations directed to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and it was not asked to prepare a response to the audit report.

Chapter 5Environmental PetitionsCESD examined the environmental petition process that allows Canadians to formally present their concerns about environmental issues to federal ministers and obtain a response. The audit examined the timeliness and adequacy of the departmental response to petitions.

Of the five petitions received between July 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006, the Commissioner noted that INAC’s on-time response rate was 60 percent. The department has put in place an internal protocol for ensuring timely response to petitions. INAC was not required to prepare a response to the CESD Environmental Petitions report.

External Audits (Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)

The Public Service Commission of Canada’s October 2006 Audit of Readiness for the New Public Service Employment Act (PSEA) examined whether selected departments, including Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, had met essential elements designed to support the new PSEA prior to its implementation. This audit focused on delegation agreements, mandatory policies, training of sub-delegated managers and human resources advisors, communication and monitoring processes. One recommendation was provided calling for Deputy Heads of all departments to provide ongoing leadership to support the full implementation of the PSEA in accordance with the Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instruments.

Internal Audits or Evaluations

Internal Audits

Audit of Aboriginal Business Canada’s Aboriginal Financial Institutions and Access to Capital Program — March 2007

Audit of Departmental Travel — March 2007

Audit of the First Nations Child and Family Services Program — March 2007

Audit of the Compliance with the First Nation Land Management Initiative — October 2006

Audit of Funding of School Facilities — October 2006

Audit of Contracting and Purchasing — June 2006

Evaluations

Evaluation of Aboriginal Business Canada’s Aboriginal Financial Institutions and Access to Capital Program — March 2007

Evaluation of the First Nations Child and Family Services Program — March 2007

 

Table 10: Sustainable Development Strategy

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada implementation of its third Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS), On the Right Path: A Sustainable Future for First Nations, Inuit and Northern Communities, was completed in December 2006. The SDS supports INAC sectors and regions to further integrate sustainable development into programs, policies and decision-making. In 2006, the department focused on developing the final report on implementation of the third SDS, and developed its fourth Strategy, which was tabled in the House of Commons in December 2006.

The final report on the third SDS highlights accomplishments and discusses lessons learned. The report was the culmination of regional and sectoral efforts in implementing each commitment. The Strategy enhances linkages with the department’s strategic outcomes, and broadly addresses the need to integrate sustainable development in departmental planning and policy development.

Each target in SDS 2004–2006 supported positive results in one or more of the four strategic outcome areas of Government, People, Land, and Economy, as well as in Departmental Management and Administration. Reporting on the Strategy was reflected in but not fully aligned with departmental reporting processes; while each target was clearly supporting one or more strategic outcomes, the language was not completely consistent between the SDS and the strategic outcome. A sustainable development table including an overview of progress was included in the Report on Plans and Priorities and in Departmental Performance Reports, with detailed progress presented in a separate SDS reports.

The third Strategy included 41 commitments under five themes: consultation and joint decision-making, long-term planning, water management, climate change and energy management, and integrating sustainable development into departmental policies and processes. For each theme, INAC committed to meeting related objectives and accompanying targets. The objectives defined the intended outcomes for each theme, and the targets represented short-term commitments, which were more specific, measurable, time driven and output oriented. The strategy led the department to develop sustainable development frameworks and policies to guide national and regional programs and activities. Progress on the Strategy also improved collaboration with other governmental departments and First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.

Over the course of the three years, four targets were withdrawn because of changing priorities or lack of resources. Seven targets were considered incomplete at the conclusion of the Strategy, and the remaining were completed. Implementation will continue under SDS 2007–2010 for some of the targets to achieve long-term outcomes. The department made progress in several areas under each of the five themes.

Consultation and Joint Decision-Making — There are now more regional co-operative processes among federal departments and Aboriginal communities and organizations in establishing priority-setting processes, addressing Aboriginal issues and improving collaboration in decision-making processes.

Long-term Planning — All regions in the south, and one in the North are engaged in comprehensive community planning (CCP), with some regions implementing CCP on a wide-scale. Many regions have benefited from capacity-building initiatives in terms of human resource capacity, professional development, and increasing land management expertise.

Water Management — Implementation of the First Nations Water Management Strategy has decreased the number of high-risk water systems and increased the number of certified water operators.

Climate Change and Energy Management — The Aboriginal and Northern Community Action Program assisted Aboriginal and northern communities in undertaking 200 energy-related projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions over a four-year period. It also provided funding for more than 50 impacts and adaptation projects over the three years of the Strategy, as well as supported development of a Northern Impacts and Adaptation Strategy.

Integrating Sustainable Development into Departmental Policies and Processes — The department actively integrated sustainable development into departmental processes through the implementation of the Environmental Stewardship Strategy, the development of sustainable development guidelines for economic development, and the identification of sustainable development co-ordinators in the department.

A number of limitations in the third SDS influenced the development of the fourth one, primarily in the area of reporting and monitoring. There was a lack of clear performance measurements or short-term and long-term outcomes identified in the third SDS. Evaluating implementation of the SDS, therefore, was very difficult. This was addressed in the fourth SDS through the development of very clear, detailed logic models that identify outcomes, outputs, activities and performance indicators for each commitment.

The lead for each target was also more clearly identified at the sectoral level. The volume of commitments in the third SDS has also been scaled down and refined in the fourth SDS. The department is focusing on a select group of commitments with the objectives of supporting sustainable communities and building a culture of sustainability within the department.

The linkage between SDS reporting and departmental planning and reporting processes was also addressed in the fourth SDS. Almost all of the new targets are directly integrated into strategic outcome plans and have been reflected in the Report on Plans and Priorities. Reporting on SDS implementation will take place through departmental reporting processes.

The fourth SDS was developed in collaboration with all regions and sectors of the department, as well as with some representatives from Aboriginal communities and organizations. The department also responded to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development’s recommendations and the Federal Guidance on developing the fourth round of SDS. As well, all targets support one or more of the federal sustainable development goals. The Strategy is a result-oriented document relying on commitments that will have a long-term, concrete impact at the community level as well as on departmental policy, operations and decision-making.

 

Table 11: Procurement and Contracting

Supplementary information on Procurement and Contracting can be found at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

 

Table 12: Horizontal Initiatives

INAC is the lead department for the following four horizontal initiatives:

First Nations Water Management Strategy
Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy
Urban Aboriginal Strategy
Mackenzie Gas Project and induced oil and gas exploration and development activities in the Northwest Territories

Supplementary information on Horizontal Initiatives can be found at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/profil_e.asp.

 

Table 13: Travel Policies

Supplementary information on Travel Policies can be found at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

 

Table 14: Storage Tanks

Supplementary information on Storage Tanks can be found at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr3/06-07/index_e.asp.

 

Table 15: Financial Statements of Departments and Agencies

Financial Statements for Indian and Northern Affairs Canada for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2007 are available at http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/pr/fnst/07/index-eng.asp.