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Appendix 1: The Agency's regional development intervention tools

As presented in the first section, the Agency uses and places at promoters' disposal a broad range of tools that enable it to support regional development in Quebec.

Guidance and advice

The Agency helps development agents design policy, strategy, business plans, action plans or projects, and helps them plan financial packages, identify funding sources, and so on.

At the Agency, advice and guidance are services delivered to an entrepreneur or a local development agent on an individual basis, geared to his specific situation. Advice is provided on an ad-hoc basis, while guidance constitutes systematic, sustained, prolonged assistance, with the Agency guiding the enterprise or organization at various stages along the path toward design and implementation of its project.

Information and referrals

The Agency produces timely information so entrepreneurs and local and regional development agents may reach informed decisions, ensuring that this information is accessible and usable. It also conveys information to development agents likely to provide a timely, appropriate response to the specific needs of enterprises and organizations.

In this regard, the Agency works with the Canada Business Service Centres operating in Quebec, namely, Info entreprises in Montral and Ressources Entreprises in Qubec, for Eastern Quebec. These organizations deliver information and referral services and reference material to entrepreneurs and local and regional development agents throughout Quebec.

Financial support

Under its programming, the Agency makes both repayable and non-repayable contributions and, in exceptional cases, grants to promoters. Its programs are divided into the categories presented below:

Economic development Agency of Canada for the regions of Quebec—Programs

Regular programming associated with the Agency's core mandate

  • Innovation, development of entrepreneurship and access program for SMEs – terminated March 31, 2007
  • Regional Strategic Initiatives program – terminated March 31, 2007
  • Community Futures Program

Programs under mandates from the Government of Canada and other federal departments

  • Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund
  • Canadian Textiles Program CANtex
  • Infrastructure Canada Program
  • Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund.

The Agency reviewed its programs in 2006-2007. Since April 1, 2007, new programs have been in effect. For further information, see:
www.dec-ced.gc.ca, under Programs.

List of the Seven Regions and 21 Devitalized RCMs Eligible for the Following Measures and Initiatives

CEDI-Vitality, Community Economic Facilities and Venture Capital Fund for Business Startups in the Regions

On the basis of a devitalization index, the Agency has targeted seven regions and 21 RCMs which have an immediate need of support for diversification of their socio-economic structure. Spread over 474 municipalities, the population of these seven regions stands at 1.1 million, or 14.8% of the population of Quebec. The seven Quebec regions posting slow economic growth are:

  • Abitibi-Tmiscamingue
  • Bas-Saint-Laurent
  • Cte-Nord
  • Gaspsie—les-de-la-Madeleine
  • Mauricie
  • Nord-du-Qubec
  • Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean.

There are also some highly devitalized areas (RCMs) outside the seven regions with slow economic growth mentioned above, areas to which special attention should be paid. Spread over 321 municipalities, the population of these 21 RCMs totals almost 500,000, or 6.9% of Quebec's overall population. These areas are the following:

  • La Valle-de-la-Gatineau (Outaouais)
  • Papineau (Outaouais)
  • Pontiac (Outaouais)
  • Charlevoix-Est (Qubec)
  • Charlevoix (Qubec)
  • Les Etchemins (Chaudire-Appalaches)
  • L'Islet (Chaudire-Appalaches)
  • L'Amiante (Chaudire-Appalaches)
  • Montmagny (Chaudire-Appalaches)
  • Nicolet-Yamaska (Centre-du-Qubec)
  • L'rable (Centre-du-Qubec)
  • Asbestos (Estrie)
  • Le Haut-Saint-Franois (Estrie)
  • Le Granit (Estrie)
  • Matawinie (Lanaudire)
  • Montcalm (Lanaudire)
  • D'Autray (Lanaudire)
  • Antoine-Labelle (Laurentides)
  • Argenteuil (Laurentides)
  • Le Haut-Saint-Laurent (Montrgie)
  • Acton (Montrgie).

Appendix 2: Agency performance measurement methodology

Two reference bases17 are used in this report to illustrate Agency achievements and performance (see box in Section 2.1). To present its main outputs, that is, services delivered by the Agency to attain planned results, the reference base used is that of new financial contribution agreements approved between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2007.

To present the main results observed as of March 31, 2007, the reference base used is that of projects in progress, or active projects, that is, projects for which an expenditure was made during FY 2006-2007. In fact, for the Agency to be able to report results for a project, that project has to have been the subject of an expenditure, that is, activities contributing to the attainment of results must have been carried out.

The reference base of projects in progress is particularly representative of Agency intervention, since it measures the results of projects that have been implemented, continued or completed during a fiscal year, and not just of agreements approved during that year. In short, this reference base provides a more accurate picture of the results attained by the Agency in 2006-2007. Some of the projects taken into account in 2006-2007 by this reference base will be completed during subsequent fiscal year, so their results will also be reported in future performance reports.

In addition, information on financial resources used is presented according to three parameters, namely, actual expenditures, planned spending and total expenditures incurred:

  • Actual expenditures are those made by the Agency for projects in progress for a given fiscal year.
  • Planned spending constitutes expenditures presented in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2006-2007.
  • Total expenditures incurred are those made from the start of the projects being implemented up to a given fiscal year. Since projects in progress may have begun during a fiscal year prior to the one being reported on, total expenditures incurred for projects in progress include spending made during previous fiscal years.

Data collection methods

The Agency's performance measurement strategy involves two data collection methods:

  • a yearly telephone survey of promoters and non-recipients is conducted
  • advisors apply the Agency's project tracking mechanism.

Telephone survey

The data presented come from the yearly survey conducted by a poll firm on the Agency's behalf. The survey was conducted between July 4, 2007 and August 7, 2007. A database was set up comprising all projects approved or active during FY 2006-2007. This database included 2,192 projects, but excluded Infrastructure Canada Program projects. From this database, we selected a single project per promoter (either the most recent or the project receiving the most financial assistance from the Agency), so as to reduce the burden of responding for those who received financial assistance for more than one project during the reference period.

The database sent to the firm included contact information for 1,495 distinct promoters, and the final sample comprised 1,351 promoters. The telephone survey response rate was 71.3%. The margin of error was 1.7%, 19 times out of 20.

Project tracking mechanism

The project tracking mechanism applied by advisors in the Agency's different business offices led to gathering of the necessary information on results from projects conducted by organizations offering services to enterprises or supporting development.

This mechanism is in three phases. The first phase involves drawing up a list of indicators to be documented and establishing a database comprising all projects in progress in 2006-2007. The database contained 1,153 projects in 2006-2007.

The second phase comprised the data collection. The data collection period ran July 3 to 30, 2007. A list of projects by advisor was sent to each Agency business office or responsibility centre. Each advisor was given responsibility for compiling information from the activity reports of the different organizations supported by the Agency or contacting the representatives of the business assistance or development support organizations concerned. The data were input into a Web application developed in conjunction with the Technology Directorate. In each business office, an individual was responsible for coordination to ensure that deadlines were met.

The third phase involved validation of the data gathered by the advisors. The Integrated Planning Directorate, which is responsible for drafting the Departmental Performance Report, conducted an initial validation on the basis of certain criteria. It then forwarded a consolidated file to each of the individuals responsible in the business offices or responsibility centres, who verified the data quality. This validation period ran from July 26 to August 3, 2007.

Scope and methodological limitations of the performance measurement strategy

Levels of results observed

The Agency has adopted a results-based management approach. In this regard, as mentioned earlier, its results are of different levels: immediate, intermediate and final.

By their very nature, the results of Agency intervention are achieved over a period of more than one year. The methodology behind the Performance Report—yearly survey and gathering of information—does not allow for measurement of final results, so the report documents only part of the results attained through Agency support. For instance, capital projects or innovation support projects can be spread over more than one year, and anticipated results do not necessarily arise during the year in which the projects were approved and contributions paid.

Moreover, other projects may have ended only shortly before, and their main effects, notably in terms of job maintenance or creation, will appear only later and so cannot be documented in this report.

Therefore this report presents primarily the immediate results attained, along with some intermediate results. For the final results of Agency intervention, the reader must refer to the different summative evaluation reports on that intervention. Several reports have been produced over the past few years to deliver that type of information.

In short, the results presented in this report constitute only part of the results to which the Agency contributes. In fact, its tracking efforts mean the results of most projects are known, but for the reasons mentioned above some results cannot be measured or observed.

Factors related to the performance measurement methodology used also prevent the Agency from evaluating the overall results of its actions. One of the methodological limitations of the yearly survey conducted by the Agency lies in the fact that it is difficult to reach enterprises during the summer. While the response rate obtained by the Agency is highly satisfactory at more than 70%, it does mean that the projects of many enterprises are not taken into account when the results are analysed. Moreover, an enterprise may have received financial assistance for more than one project, but in order to avoid increasing the burden on its promoters, the Agency gathers information on only one project per enterprise. Some of the enterprises not reached might also not be in a position to provide results owing to the status of certain projects at the time of the data collection (some projects being still in the planning or implementation stage).

These factors have an impact, one way or another, on the Agency's ability to evaluate project results. Through the implementation of results-based management practices and an enhanced strategy for measuring its performance, the Agency intends in future to increase its ability to document more effectively the overall results attained through its intervention.

As to the scope of performance measurement, 859 active projects were implemented by promoter enterprises benefiting from Agency financial support (n = 859), and respondents represented some 60% (498/859) of the enterprises supported financially by the Agency during FY 2006-2007.

As to the gathering of information for projects whose promoters are organizations, almost all the 1,114 projects were documented. On the other hand, the nature of the information gathered varies from project to project, depending on the status of the projects and the scope of the performance agreements with the organizations.

Results with respect to employment

In the context of this report, the Agency counts jobs created or maintained directly or indirectly through its intervention. In the first case, this involves a statement from respondents to the telephone survey as to the number of jobs created or maintained. In the other case, it involves jobs that are created or maintained in enterprises receiving assistance from business service organizations and are documented under their contribution agreements. The quality of tracking systems can vary from one organization to another. This information is conveyed to the advisor in the business office responsible for their project.

Finally, the definition used by CFDCs and BDCs for measuring job creation and maintenance differs from the Agency's. Whereas the Agency measures job created and maintained through its financial contributions, the CFDCs and BDCs count jobs maintained or created as a result of financial support and following technical assistance. For that reason, the employment results are presented distinctly.

Attribution of results

Moreover, since it works closely with several departments and agencies of the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec as well as with many local and regional agents in providing funds for projects, the Agency cannot alone claim merit or responsibility for all the results attained. So it is fair to say that the financial assistance provided by the Agency for project implementation contributes to the attainment of the results observed.

Enhancement of the performance measurement strategy

In addition to implementing its performance management framework and linking it closely to its new Program Activity Architecture, the Agency will in future be applying enhanced information management mechanisms, and over the next few fiscal years this should improve its ability to document the overall results attained through its support.

Appendix 3: Technical notes on result tables

Agency's overall performance

Data sources:

  • information on results gathered by advisors from business service or development organizations
  • yearly survey of enterprises.

(1) Commercialization and exports

Information on the 307 new exporting enterprises, i.e. those exporting to foreign markets for the first time: for 81 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 226 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 28).

Information on the 715 enterprises which made sales on new markets, for 81 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey, while for 634 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 38).

(2) Innovation and productivity

Information on the 1,095 enterprises which developed an innovation action plan comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 50).

Information on the 901 enterprises which designed a new product or improved an existing product comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 73).

Information on the 149 enterprises which developed new products or services ready to be commercialized comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 401 enterprises which developed higher-performance processes: for 93 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 308 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 44).

Information on the 14 enterprises which obtained a patent comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(3) Business growth

Information on the 2,777 enterprises in pre-startup, startup or expansion, for 30 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 2,747 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 89).

Information on the 94 enterprises which modernized or expanded their facilities or equipment comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 169 enterprises which increased their sales comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 219 enterprises which increased their profitability comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 248 enterprises which improved their competitive position comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(4) Employment

Information on the 18,169 jobs created or maintained: for 6,686 jobs it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises (n = 386), while for 11,483 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 111).

(5) Regions' and communities' dynamism

Information on the 775 local or regional development strategies or projects comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 116).

(6) Incentive nature of Agency financial assistance

Proportion of respondent recipients stating that they could not have carried out their project without Agency financial assistance or that they could not have carried out their project on the same scale or within the same timeframe (712 respondents out of 730; 97.5%).

(7) Leverage effect

The leverage effect is calculated from the following financial data:

  • number of projects in progress as at March 31, 2007 = 2,261
  • total value of projects supported = $4,173,922
  • financial commitment with respect to these projects: $1,314,412.

Improvement of the economic environment of regions

Data sources:

  • information on results gathered by advisors from business service or development organizations
  • yearly survey of enterprises.

(1) Regions' and communities' dynamism

Information on the 193 regional development strategies comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 108). Cumulative result since start of project.

Information on the 582 development projects comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 116). Cumulative result since start of project.

(2) Local and regional entrepreneurship

Information on the 2,077 enterprises in pre-startup, startup or expansion comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 63).

Information on the 306 enterprises which developed an innovation action plan comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 21).

Information on the 327 enterprises which developed a new product or improved an existing product comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 34).

Information on the 166 enterprises which commercialized a new product comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 29).

Information on the 33 enterprises which exported for the first time comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 10).

(3) Employment

Information on the 9,032 jobs created or maintained: for 702 jobs it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises (n = 52), while for 8,330 it comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 86).

(4) Quebec regions' capability to attract foreign tourists

The information gathered comes from organizations which conduct international promotion of the regions of Quebec. These are not distinct travellers. A tourist may have been counted more than once if he visited more than one region or attended more than one festival or event.

(5) Incentive nature of Agency financial assistance

Proportion of respondent recipients stating that they could not have carried out their project without Agency financial assistance or that they could not have carried out their project on the same scale or within the same timeframe (294 respondents out of 297; 98.9%).

(6) Leverage effect

The leverage effect is calculated from the following financial data:

  • number of projects in progress as at March 31, 2007 = 1,026
  • total value of projects supported = $1,632,470
  • financial commitment with respect to these projects: $595,085.

Provision of special adjustment measures

Data sources:

  • information on results gathered by advisors from business service or development organizations
  • yearly survey of enterprises.

(1) Innovation and productivity

Information on the 28 enterprises which developed higher-performance processes comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 16 enterprises which developed new products or services ready to be commercialized comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(2) Business growth

Information on the 21 enterprises which increased their sales comes from the telephone survey of enterprises. The average sales increase was calculated using a 5% trimmed mean, eliminating extreme values. The average sales increase concerns only the findings of the telephone survey.

Information on the 31 enterprises which increased their profitability comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 31 enterprises which improved their competitive position comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(7) Employment

Information on the 1,398 jobs created or maintained comes from the telephone survey of enterprises (n = 31).

Enterprise development

Data sources:

  • information on results gathered by advisors from business service or development organizations
  • yearly survey of enterprises.

(1) Commercialization and exports

Information on the 274 new enterprises exporting to foreign markets for the first time: for 81 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 193 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 18).

Information on the 590 enterprises which made sales on new markets, for 79 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey, while for 511 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 19). The average sales increase on new markets was calculated using a 5% trimmed mean, eliminating extreme values. The average sales increase concerns only the findings of the telephone survey.

(2) Innovation and productivity

Information on the 854 enterprises which adopted or integrated a new business practice comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 41).

Information on the 789 enterprises which developed an innovation action plan comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 29).

Information on the 574 enterprises which designed a new product or improved an existing product comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 73).

Information on the 119 enterprises which developed higher-performance processes comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 216 enterprises which developed new products or services ready to be commercialized: for 74 enterprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 142 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 15).

Information on the 12 enterprises which obtained a patent comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(3) Business growth

Information on the 700 enterprises which are in pre-startup, startup or expansion: for 14 entreprises it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises, while for 686 it comes from information gathered by advisors from business service organizations (n = 40).

Information on the 46 enterprises which modernized or expanded their facilities or equipment comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 164 enterprises which increased their sales comes from the telephone survey of enterprises. The average sales increase was calculated using a 5% trimmed mean, eliminating extreme values. The average sales increase concerns only the findings of the telephone survey.

Information on the 148 enterprises which increased their profitability comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

Information on the 169 enterprises which improved their competitive position comes from the telephone survey of enterprises.

(4) Employment

Information on the 7,739 jobs created or maintained: for 4,586 jobs it comes from the telephone survey of enterprises (n = 303), while for 3,153 it comes from information gathered by advisors from development organizations (n = 40).

(8) Incentive nature of Agency financial assistance

Proportion of respondent recipients stating that they could not have carried out their project without Agency financial assistance or that they could not have carried out their project on the same scale or within the same timeframe (418 respondents out of 433; 96.5%).

(9) Leverage effect

The leverage effect is calculated from the following financial data:

  • number of projects in progress as at March 31, 2007 = 974
  • total value of projects supported = $1,639,146
  • financial commitment with respect to these projects: $441,192.

Appendix 4: List of acronyms


BDC

Business Development Centre

CANtex

Canadian Textiles Program

CEDI-Vitality

Community Economic Diversification Initiative – Vitality

CFDC

Community Futures Development Corporation

CFP

Community Futures Program

CMA

Census Metropolitan Area

CSIF

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

CSPGIME

 

Canadian Support Program for the Gaspsie—les-de-la-Madeleine Economy

FTE

Full-time equivalent employee

ICP

Infrastructure Canada Program

IDEA-SME

 

Innovation, development of entrepreneurship and access program for SMEs

MAF

Management Accountability Framework

MRIF

Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

NPO

Non-profit organization

OAG

Office of the Auditor General

OCOL

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

PA

Program Activity

PAA

Program Activity Architecture

RCM

Regional County Municipality

R&D

Research and development

RSI

Regional Strategic Initiative

SDS

Sustainable Development Strategy

SICEAI

Softwood Industry and Community Economic Adjustment Initiative

SME

Small- and medium-sized enterprise


Appendix 5: Agency Business Offices

Abitibi-Tmiscamingue
906 5th Avenue
Val-d' Or, Quebec J9P 1B9
Tel.: 819-825-5260 • 1-800-567-6451
Fax: 819-825-3245

Bas-Saint-Laurent
2 Saint-Germain Street East, Suite 310
Rimouski, Quebec G5L 8T7
Tel.: 418-722-3282 • 1-800-463-9073
Fax: 418-722-3285

Centre-du-Qubec
Place du Centre
150 Marchand Street, Suite 502
Drummondville, Quebec J2C 4N1
Tel.: 819-478-4664 • 1-800-567-1418
Fax: 819-478-4666

Cte-Nord
701 Laure Blvd., Suite 202B, P.O. Box 698
Sept-les, Quebec G4R 4K9
Tel.: 418-968-3426 • 1-800-463-1707
Fax: 418-968-0806

Estrie
Place Andrew Paton
65 Belvdre Street North, Suite 240
Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 4A7
Tel.: 819-564-5904 • 1-800-567-6084
Fax: 819-564-5912

Gaspsie—les-de-la-Madeleine
120 de la Reine Street, 3rd Floor
Gasp, Quebec G4X 2S1
Tel.: 418-368-5870 • 1-866-368-0044
Fax: 418-368-6256

le-de-Montral
3340 de l'Assomption Blvd.
Montral, Quebec H1N 3S4
Tel.: 514-283-2500 • 1-800-322-4636
Fax: 514-496-8310

Laval—Laurentides—Lanaudire
Tour Triomphe II
2540 Daniel-Johnson Blvd., Suite 204
Laval, Quebec H7T 2S3
Tel.: 450-973-6844 • 1-800-430-6844
Fax: 450-973-6851

Mauricie
Immeuble Bourg du Fleuve
25 des Forges Street, Suite 413
Trois-Rivires, Quebec G9A 2G4
Tel.: 819-371-5182 • 1-800-567-8637
Fax: 819-371-5186

Montrgie
Place Agropur
101 Roland-Therrien Blvd., Suite 400
Longueuil, Quebec J4H 4B9
Tel.: 450-928-4088 • 1-800-284-0335
Fax: 450-928-4097

Nord-du-Qubec
Tour de la Bourse
800 square Victoria
Suite 3800, P.O. Box 247
Montral, Quebec H4Z 1E8
Tel.: 514-283-8131 • 1-800-561-0633

Service point Chibougamau:
Tel.: 418-748-2175 • 1-877-748-2175
Fax: 514-283-3637

Outaouais
259 Saint-Joseph Blvd., Suite 202
Gatineau, Quebec J8Y 6T1
Tel.: 819-994-7442 • 1-800-561-4353
Fax: 819-994-7846

Qubec—Chaudire-Appalaches
Place Iberville IV
2954 Laurier Blvd., Suite 030
Qubec, Quebec G1V 4T2
Tel.: 418-648-4826 • 1-800-463-5204
Fax: 418-648-7291

Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean
170 Saint-Joseph Street South, Suite 203
Alma, Quebec G8B 3E8
Tel: 418-668-3084 • 1-800-463-9808
Fax: 418-668-7584

Corporate Services
Tour de la Bourse
800 Square Victoria
Suite 3800, P.O. Box 247
Montral, Quebec H4Z 1E8
Tel: 514-283-6412 • 1-866-385-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302

Place du Portage, phase II
165 Htel-de-Ville Street
P.O. Box 1110, Station B
Gatineau, Quebec J8X 3X5
Tel.: 819-997-3474
Fax: 819-997-3340

Appendix 6: Resource-person and statute administered

Resource-person for further information

Andr Cliche
Director General
Departmental Performance Branch

Economic Development Agency of Canada
for the Regions of Quebec
Tour de la Bourse, 800 Victoria Square
Suite 3800, P.O. Box 247
Montral, Quebec H4Z 1E8
Tel.: 514-283-7982 • Fax: 514-283-0041
E-mail: andre.cliche@dec-ced.gc.ca

Statute administered (Fiscal Year 2006-2007)


The Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec has sole responsibility to Parliament for administering the following statute:

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act

(S.C. 2005, c. 26 )


Endnotes

1 Certain programs represent mandates entrusted to the Agency by the Government of Canada or other federal departments. See Appendix 1 for further information.

2 These two venture capital funds were set up in collaboration with the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDC) and Business Development Centres (BDC), with support from venture capital corporations active in Quebec.

3 Calculation of leverage effect:

  • number of projects in progress as at March 31, 2007 = 2,261
  • total value of projects supported = $4,173,922
  • financial commitment with respect to these projects: $1,314,412

4 This number does not include jobs created, maintained or transformed through CFDC and BDC intervention.

5 In 2006-2007, the Mauricie region and 21 devitalized RCMs were added to the list of six resource regions to which the Agency was already devoting attention (see Appendix 1).

6 Initially scheduled for April 1, 2007, implementation was postponed to 2008-2009.

7 The Agency has also continued to improve the tools that enable it to produce opinions and recommendations on the timeliness of its programs and initiatives, the quality of their design, their effectiveness, implementation and management, and the miscellaneous risks associated with their application.

8 In July 2005, the Canada-Quebec Agreement was amended to postpone to March 31, 2009 the deadline for disbursements under the ICP. Since December 2005, no more new projects may be approved under this program.

9 This heading includes business service or local development support organizations, public agencies, communities, Aboriginal communities, and educational and research institutions.

10 The Agency's performance measurement strategy uses two data collection methods:

  • yearly telephone survey conducted on promoter enterprises
  • project tracking mechanism in relation to organizations.

11 The four million visitors are not unique travellers. See the methodological note number 4 of table Improvement of the economic environment of regions (Appendix 3).

12 Source: Statistics Canada, data compiled in www.bonjourquebec.com/mto/publications/
pdf/etudes/Tourisme_chiffres2006.pdf
.

13 The Agency implements the MRIF jointly with the ministre des Affaires municipales et des rgions du Qubec, the program's prime contractor. The MRIF came into effect on July 18, 2005, and the deadline for project approval is December 31, 2008. While program delivery is carried out by the Agency, it is Infrastructure Canada which reports on the MRIF in its departmental performance report. For further information concerning the MRIF, see: www.infrastructure.gc.ca/index_e.shtml.

14 The Agency is fully responsible for management of the ICP. As to the MRIF and the CSIF projects, the Agency acts as the agent for Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Canada, the department responsible for the funds.

15 The benefits are described by the promoters of the infrastructure projects in their applications for funding under the ICP and validated by the advisors responsible for the program with the Government of Quebec and the Government of Canada. The results presented concern projects approved from the date on which the program came into effect until March 31, 2006. Since December 2005, no more new projects may be approved under the program.

16 See the box on the Impact of the Government's spending review on the Agency's level of activity and performance in 2006-2007 (Section 1.4.1).

17 The two reference bases are not mutually exclusive. New contribution agreements approved during FY 2006-2007 may also have been the subject of an expenditure, and thus of activities leading to results. They are therefore included in the reference base of projects in progress when this report states results observed as of March 31, 2007.