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Table 8: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

The following is a summary of the transfer payment programs for the Public Health Agency of Canada that are in excess of $5 million. All the transfer payments shown below are voted programs.

  1. Population Health Fund
  2. Community Action Program for Children
  3. Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program
  4. Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada
  5. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities/Early Childhood Development
  6. The Canadian Health Network
  7. Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal)
  8. National Collaborating Centres Contribution Program

1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Population Health Fund (PHF)

2) Start Date:
1999-2000

3) End Date:
Ongoing

4) Description: Contributions to persons and agencies to support health promotion projects in the areas of community health, resource development, training /skill development and research.

Objective(s), Expected Result(s) and Outcomes for the Population Health Fund:

To expand the knowledge base for program and policy development, to build more partnerships and develop inter-sectoral collaboration. Evidence-based policies and programs that promote healthy activities and create a larger cadre of trained community members. Increased number of community-based initiatives that foster evidence-based healthy living practices, healthy environments, safe products and strong support systems. Greater number of organizations and networks acting collaboratively to help Canadians make physical activity a part of their daily lives.

5) Strategic Outcomes: Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved: The Population Health Fund continued to be active with 35 national projects completed following the 2002 solicitation. The Fund also supported the establishment of the National Collaborating Centres for Public Health and the development of the 2007 International Conference on Health Promotion and Public Health Education in Vancouver. The 2004 solicitation for national projects resulted in 27 projects being recommended to the Minister for approval. Funding of regional projects that reflect regional priorities has continued. The Dissemination and Evaluation component of various approved projects was also increased.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

4.5

4.3

9.5

3.4

3.4

6.1

14) Total Contributions

3.4

6.5

0.0

7.3

7.0

(7.0)

15) Total PA

7.9

10.8

9.5

10.7

10.4

(0.9)

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Funds planned for grants has been reallocated to contributions; the net difference between the total planned for both and the actual spending for both was 0.1 million.

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

The first evaluation of the PHF was completed in 2003. It was based on 420 funded projects that had been completed in 2002. There was strong evidence of participant involvement in the projects and intersectoral partnership at the community level. The 2006 evaluation, which followed a similar methodology and was based on 213 PHF projects that were completed between 2002 and 2005, validated the findings of the previous evaluation. Based on the findings from the two evaluations, there is evidence that the PHF is making significant strides to accomplishing its intended outcomes identified in the Results Based Management and Accountability Framework.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
The Community Action Program for Children (CAPC)

2) Start Date:
CAPC launched in 1993

3) End Date: Ongoing

4) Description:
CAPC provides funding to community-based groups and coalitions to develop and deliver comprehensive, culturally appropriate prevention and early intervention programs to promote the health and social development of children (0-6 years) and their families facing conditions of risk.

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved:
There are approximately 450 CAPC projects across Canada. Based on results from CAPC's national process evaluation for the 2005-06 reporting period, it is estimated that CAPC projects serve over 65,000 children and parents/ caregivers in a typical month in more than 3,000 communities across the country.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14) Total Contributions

56.5

55.8

56.4

56.4

55.7

0.7

15) Total PA

56.5

55.8

56.4

56.4

55.7

0.7

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
CAPC's national process evaluations have consistently shown that CAPC projects have developed successful partnerships with many sectors and are supported by communities and other funders including Provincial and Territorial governments. Data from 2005-06 illustrated that CAPC projects received more than $21.7 million in additional funding including more than $11.6 million from provincial and territorial governments; more than $6.7 million in in-kind community donations; and more than 68,000 hours of donated time from participant volunteers and community members.

A CAPC Snapshot Census in May 2006 illustrated that CAPC is successfully reaching at-risk children and their families. The census found that 50% of participating parents and caregivers had household incomes of less than $25,000; 27% had not completed high school; and 26% were lone parents. The census also found that 15% of participating parents and caregivers self-identified as Aboriginal and 22% were newcomers to Canada.

CAPC was audited as part of the 2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada. CAPC was found to have satisfactory controls over the management of the program, having:

  • adopted a risk-based approach to monitoring funded activities of G&C recipients;
  • prepared clear documentation on the assessment of applications;
  • developed grant and contribution management systems and;
  • established training for officials of G&C programs.

The report also highlighted good practices such as the use of multi-year agreements and constructive steps to reduce the monitoring and reporting requirements for recipients.

The Blue Ribbon Panel on Grants & Contributions recognized the Atlantic Region for its management of CAPC and CPNP. The Region successfully applied the Panel's principles by employing innovative reporting and accountability practices, ensuring the programs were accessible and had high utility, and by collecting information that was relevant for both recipients and program managers.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
The Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP)

2) Start Date: 1994-1995

3) End Date: Ongoing

4) Description:
The CPNP funds community-based groups and coalitions to promote public health and address health disparities affecting pregnant women and their infants. The program increases access to health and social supports for women who face challenging circumstances that put their health and the health of their infants at risk.

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved:
There are approximately 330 CPNP projects reaching close to 2,000 communities across Canada. The program serves about 50,000 prenatal and recently postnatal women annually. Each year, an estimated 28,000 pregnant women and 1,800 postnatal women enter the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program. Between 1998 and 2003, CPNP served an estimated 60% of all low income pregnant women and 40% of all teens delivering live births. For the same period, the program reached an estimated 37% of all pregnant Aboriginal women living off reserve in Canada.

Breastfeeding initiation rates amongst CPNP participants have been found to be consistently higher than those of women of similar socio-economic risk in the general population. A Baseline Comparison Study found the odds that mothers in the CPNP would initiate breastfeeding were nearly double those of the comparison group.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14) Total Contributions

27.8

26.8

27.9

27.9

26.7

1.2

15) Total PA

27.8

26.8

27.9

27.9

26.7

1.2

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s)

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
There is on-going evaluation and performance monitoring of the CPNP. Key results are reported above.

In December 2006, the Blue Ribbon Panel on Grants & Contributions recognized the Atlantic Region for its management of CAPC and CPNP and application of the Panel's principles focussing on accessibility, clarity, innovation and utility.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada. (voted program)

2) Start Date: January 2005

3) End Date: Ongoing

4) Description: Contributions towards the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada

Purpose:
To support prevention of HIV/AIDS, to promote access to diagnosis, care, treatment and support for people affected. Projects funded at the national and regional levels that will result in improved knowledge and awareness of the epidemic and a strengthened community and public health capacity to respond to the epidemic.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased and improved collaboration and networking;
  • Increased availability and use of evidence;
  • Increased awareness of HIV/AIDS;
  • Improved attitudes and behaviours towards people living with HIV/AIDS;
  • Increased coherence of federal response; and
  • Increased capacity (knowledge and skills) of individuals and organizations.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Increased practice of healthy behaviours;
  • Improved access to quality prevention, diagnosis, care, treatment and support; and
  • Strengthened Canadian response to HIV/AIDS.

Long Term Outcomes:

  • Improved health status of people living with or vulnerable to HIV/AIDS;
  • Reduced social and economic impact of HIV to Canadians; and
  • Contribution to the global effort to reduce the spread of HIV and mitigate its impact.

5) Strategic Outcome: Healthier Population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury

6) Results Achieved: National Program: 29 New Projects Funded , 23 ongoing for 2006-07: specifically, 22 New Projects under the Non- Reserve, First Nations, Inuit & Mtis Communities HIV/AIDS Project Fund; 7 New projects under the National Voluntary Sector Response Fund; 3 Ongoing projects under the Non-Reserve, First Nations, Inuit and Mtis Communities HIV/AIDS Project Fund, 10 Projects ongoing for under the Legal, Ethical and Human Rights Fund; 6 Projects ongoing under the Capacity Building Fund; and 2 projects ongoing under the Information Services/Program & Policy Interventions; 2 projects ongoing under the National HIV/AIDS Community Based Social Marketing Fund. Regional Program (AIDS Community Action Program [ACAP]): 148 Projects in total; 16 New Projects and 132 projects ongoing. A number of volunteers contributed time and effort towards addressing HIV/AIDS through ACAP funded organizations; and thousands of partnerships are maintained through ACAP funded projects.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.3

0.1

8.0

1.0

0.8

7.2

14) Total Contributions

19.6

19.9

13.4

20.4

20.4

(7.0)

15) Total PA

19.9

20.0

21.4

21.4

21.2

0.2

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funds planned for grants were reallocated to contributions.

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation: n/a.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities

2) Start Date: 1995-1996

3) End Date: Ongoing

4) Description:
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) is an Agency funded early intervention and health promotion program serving about 4,500 Inuit, Mtis and First Nations children and their families. It is a comprehensive program designed to meet the spiritual, emotional, intellectual and physical needs of participating children. Each participating project focuses on preschool children and includes the following six program components: Culture and Language, Education and School Readiness, Health Promotion, Nutrition, Social Support and Parental Involvement. The AHSUNC mandate includes involving the local Aboriginal community in the planning, development, operation and evaluation of the program, as well as guidance provided by a National Aboriginal Head Start Council and the Agency’s regional offices. The goal of AHSUNC is to contribute to the health and social development of Aboriginal children and their families in urban and northern communities.
Contributions went to incorporated, local or regional non-profit Aboriginal organizations and institutions. In 2006-07 AHSUNC received $37.5 million annually, including operations funding. Until 2006-07, funding was $35 million, but was increased with a Maternal/Child Health contribution of $2.5 million. The Agency is the major contributor for all sites except those in Nunavik, Quebec, where the major contributor is the Provincial Government.

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved:
In 2006 -2007 approximately 4500 children were enrolled in 131 AHSUNC sites. This number represents more than 10% of the eligible 4-5 year old Aboriginal children in Canada. Almost every site is full to capacity and most have waiting lists. The program continued its efforts to increase the number of: involved parents, project staff in areas such as special needs, parental involvement, and culturally competent early childhood development services. Additionally, training was undertaken by program staff.
 

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14) Total Contributions

28.6

28.3

28.9

28.9

28.7

0.2

15) Total PA

28.6

28.3

28.9

28.9

28.7

0.2

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s)

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
The program undertakes annual program and administrative evaluations to monitor effectiveness, efficiency, and participation. A three year impact evaluation was completed in March 2006 found that the program contributes to the health and social development of Aboriginal children and their families. The Work Sampling System data demonstrated significant gains for children are in the Physical Development and Health, and in Personal and Social Development domains. Parents reported positive changes in family nutrition and health practices, in particular: serving more nutritious foods in the home, and children improving dental and other hygiene practices. Kindergarten teachers, parents and community members indicated that AHSUNC graduates show increasing school readiness skills which they attribute to AHSUNC participation. Parents, AHSUNC staff and community members reported gains by AHSUNC children in the practice of Aboriginal culture and traditions, and in Aboriginal language acquisition. Parents reported positive changes for themselves through AHSUNC participation as well as increased involvement in cultural activities for themselves.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
The Canadian Health Network (CHN)

2) Start Date:
2002-2003

3) End Date:
Ongoing

4) Description:
As a health information service, the Canadian Health Network (CHN) and its network of networks supports the Agency’s work in helping to build healthy communities. It is a health promotion program with the mandate to promote healthy choices by communicating information on health promotion and disease and injury prevention through a network of expert organizations.

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved: There is an increasing and continued need for the Canadian Health Network; the CHN aligns well with the Agency’s objectives; the CHN continues to grow in usage, with over 2 million unique visitors for 2006 (an increase of 133% from 2003); and the CHN has been successful in meeting its immediate outcomes.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14) Total Contributions

5.1

5.5

5.6

5.6

5.4

0.2

15) Total PA

5.1

5.5

5.6

5.6

5.4

0.2

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
The CHN has completed a comprehensive evaluation as required by Treasury Board to evaluate its relevance, progress/success and cost-effectiveness. Findings from this evaluation indicated: 1) that there is an increasing and continued need for the CHN; 2) that the CHN aligns well with the Agency’s objectives; 3) that the CHN continues to grow in usage, with over 2 million unique visitors for 2006 (an increase of 133% from 2003); and 4) that the CHN has been successful in meeting its immediate outcomes.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal)

2) Start Date:
2005-2006

3) End Date:
Ongoing

4) Description:
The Agency provides leadership on the non-Aboriginal elements of the Canadian Diabetes Strategy, which has been in effect since 1999. Under the Agency’s Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Initiative, the Canadian Diabetes Strategy will undergo a change of directions, targeting information to Canadians who are at higher risk, especially those who are overweight, obese or pre-diabetic (i.e. family history, high blood pressure, high cholesterol in blood).

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved:

Surveillance

  • Coordination of the National Diabetes Surveillance System (NDSS).
  • 3 grants distributed to provinces and territories to support capacity to participate in the NDSS.

Knowledge Development and Exchange

  • 11 grants approved to increase capacity and activities across the country. These projects focus on diabetes risk assessment, the identification and dissemination of effective prevention and control interventions, pilot studies of screening in the general population, and vulnerable populations.

Community-Based Program

  • 41 grants approved for diabetes community-based projects (5 national and 36 regional). These projects focus on preventing diabetes among high risk groups; and supporting approaches for the early detection of type 2 diabetes and the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Public Information

  • Public opinion research was conducted with pharmacists to inform the next social marketing campaign.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population & Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 14) Total Grants

5.9

2.4

0.0

6.9

6.3

(6.3)

 14) Total Contributions

0.0

0.3

0.0

0.1

0.1

(0.1)

15) Total PA

5.9

2.7

0.0

7.0

6.4

(6.4)

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funding for the Canadian Diabetes Strategy program was renewed as part of the Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Disease. The funding received in Supplementary Estimates (A) was not included in the planned spending.

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
The Canadian Diabetes Strategy will be evaluated as part of the overall Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Disease. RMAF has been completed. Refinement and implementation is ongoing. No audit planned.


 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:
National Collaborating Centres Contribution Program.

2) Start Date:
2004-2005

3) End Date:
Ongoing

4) Description:
Contributions to persons and agencies to support health promotion projects in the area of community health, resource development training and skill development and research. The National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) focus to develop, strengthen public health capacity and to transfer health knowledge to effectively prevent, manage and control infectious disease in Canada through joint collaboration at federal, provincial/territorial level but also with local governments, academia, public health practitioners and non-governmental organizations.

5) Strategic Outcomes:
Healthier population by promoting health and preventing disease and injury.

6) Results Achieved: Two new NCCs were established, joining the four NCCs that were already functioning over the year. Three Centres have done environmental scans and all have begun synthesis activities. All NCCs have begun building networks of their target audiences. Two NCCs have identified gaps in knowledge for applied research work in the future. Several NCCs have been involved in international presentations and engagement and all have participated at national public health conferences, such as the CPHA. Stakeholders are beginning to approach the NCCs for information and possible joint ventures.

 

7) Actual Spending 2004–05

8) Actual Spending
2005–06

9) Planned Spending 2006–07

10) Total Authorities
2006–07

11) Actual Spending
2006–07

12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11

13) Program Activity: Population and Public Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

14) Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14) Total Contributions

1.5

1.4

9.2

9.2

6.8

2.4

15) Total PA

1.5

1.4

9.2

9.2

6.8

2.4

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Two of the NCCs were not formally in place as of April 2006. This was due to the protracted negotiations for a potential host organization in the two geographical areas of interest.

One NCC was implemented by end of June 2006 and the last NCC was implemented as of mid-December 2006. Consequently the hiring of staff, finalizing physical location, building bridges to potential partners in the work and determination of projects and their prioritization created a delay in their ability to spend their allocated monies from their contribution agreement funds.
Additional impacts were created as two other NCCs changed their Centre leadership and underwent respective reviews of their anticipated projects. This created an additional delay in engaging in funded projects and engaging their target audiences via environmental scans.

An unanticipated delay has occurred as all NCCs are incurring some difficulties in setting up contracts for meetings, engaging external experts or implementing project work due to the host agencies internal contracting policies – all which may differ from the Agency’s. This is a consequence of the language of the contribution agreement, TB policies and G&C terms and conditions.

17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation:
A Formative evaluation is due 2008-09. Currently we are developing a formal evaluation plan that which we are piloting via site visits.

Each NCC will be submitting an audit of financial spending with their annual reports due May 2007.