Erratum

Subsequent to tabling in Parliament and online publication of the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities, a typographical error in "Section I: Planning Summary" was corrected in both the English and French html versions. Specifically, the order of magnitude identified as "($ millions)" for the Internal Services Planning Summary Table was deleted as "($ thousands)" is the correct order of magnitude as identified under the "Financial Resources" heading.

Minister's Message

The Honourable [Type Minister's name]

It is my pleasure to present to Parliament and Canadians the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces (DND/CF)1.

Canadians are justifiably proud of the tremendous contributions made by the Defence team to protect Canadians and support our interests and values around the world, including contributing to peace and security operations. In 2012-13, National Defence will continue to ensure operational excellence by fulfilling the roles and missions identified in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) - defending Canada and Canadians, remaining a strong and reliable partner in defence of North America, and contributing to international peace and security. This year we will continue to modernize the CF in a fiscally sustainable manner.

Our nation is vast and the CF stand ready to help first responders protect Canada and Canadian citizens by responding to natural disasters, such as the recent floods in Manitoba and Quebec, and fires in Saskatchewan and Northern Ontario in 2011. The CF plays a critical role in exercising Canada's sovereignty in the Arctic by conducting a number of routine missions and exercises in the region, such as Operation NANOOK. National Defence also works closely with the United States in the defence of North America through activities such as collaboration within the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) and bilateral discussions on a wide variety of issues. We will continue to bolster the partnership with our closest ally through bilateral training and exercises to enhance the ongoing interoperability of our armed forces and the defence of our shared continent in light of evolving security challenges.

Canadians recognize and deeply appreciate the CF's sacrifices and achievements in Afghanistan over the last decade. The Defence team will maintain operational excellence abroad as we continue the important training role in Afghanistan to which we transitioned in 2011. As demonstrated by their rapid and effective response to events as they unfolded in Libya, the CF remains prepared to conduct operations around the world as directed by the Government.

Balancing these roles at home and abroad, while ensuring the CF have the proper leadership, equipment, training and care, is no small feat. Much of our ability to deliver successfully on these objectives depends on our highly skilled civilian and military workforce. Continuing to fulfill our CFDS commitments, while maintaining the ability for rapid deployment and mission success requires significant resources. Following unprecedented recent investments in DND, the Defence team will now do its part to help balance the budget while working hard to remain an agile, flexible, affordable and resilient military, capable of meeting the needs of Canadians. Smart investments will help modernize and rebuild the CF, as well as continue to have a positive impact on Canadian communities by generating economic opportunities nationwide such as those on both coasts due to the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). It is my privilege to lead this great national institution and I am proud of the professionalism and dedication displayed by the CF and by DND civilian personnel. I look forward to working with Parliament and Canadians on strengthening every aspect of the Defence Team.

Original signed by:

The Honourable Peter MacKay, P.C., M.P.
Minister of National Defence

 

 

 

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'ĂȘtre

On behalf of the people of Canada, the Canadian Forces (CF) and the Department of National Defence (DND) stand ready to perform three key roles:

The National Defence Act2 establishes DND and the CF as separate entities, operating within an integrated National Defence Headquarters, as they pursue their primary responsibility of providing defence for Canada and Canadians. Defence continues to adapt to an evolving strategic global security environment and is prepared to meet emerging non-traditional challenges such as piracy attacks, as well as traditional ones, including global terrorism, weapons proliferation and the enduring threat of regional conflicts emerging around the world. In addition to the global financial situation, these factors will continue to occupy the international agenda and challenge Canada's security and prosperity.

Responsibilities

The Defence Team is committed to achieving success in a number of priority areas over the course of 2012-13 and beyond. The Department and the CF will continue to focus on ensuring sustainable operational excellence both at home and abroad, on reconstituting and aligning the CF post-combat operations in Afghanistan, on maintaining defence affordability, and on strengthening the Defence Team. To accomplish this, Defence must be agile, flexible, affordable and resilient, employing and sustaining a world-class force with the ability to protect and excel at home; be a strong and reliable defence partner in North America; and make a meaningful contribution to international security.

Our core responsibility is to succeed in operations within an affordable program, while preparing for future operational challenges and caring for our military members and their families.

The focus of Defence activities over the 2012-13 reporting period, as highlighted in this report, are as follows:

With the volatile world economy as a backdrop, the evolving security environment continues to occupy the international agenda; security challenges include terrorism, the enduring threat of regional conflicts, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and conventional weapons, insurgencies and cyber attacks, piracy, and popular uprisings for democratic reform. The Defence Team will continue to adapt to meet these evolving challenges.

The Defence mandate is carried out with the support of a group of related organizations and agencies within the portfolio of the Minister of National Defence. For further details on selected Defence Portfolio organizations, please refer to Section IV: Other Items of Interest – Selected Defence Portfolio HR and Financial Resources. For further information on the legislative framework within which Defence operates, please see Section IV: Other Items of Interest – Legislative Environment.

Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Activity Architecture

Within Treasury Board’s Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures3 (MRRS) for planning, management and reporting, the Program Activity Architecture4 establishes Defence’s four Strategic Outcomes.

Each Strategic Outcome is supported by a group of program activities, which, in turn, are aligned to relevant Defence Priorities, Corporate Risks, and a Government of Canada Outcome Area. For further information, please refer to Section IV: Other Items of Interest – Departmental Link to Government of Canada Outcome Areas.

Department of National Defence Program Activity Architecture
Strategic Outcomes   Program Activities
Defence Operations improve Peace, Stability and Security wherever deployed   Situational Awareness

Canadian Peace, Stability and Security

Continental Peace, Stability and Security

International Peace, Stability and Security
National Defence is ready to meet Government Defence Expectations   Maritime Readiness

Land Readiness

Aerospace Readiness

Joint and Common Readiness
Resources are Acquired to meet Government Defence Expectations   Defence Science and Technology

Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training

Equipment Acquisition and Disposal

Real Property and Informatics Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal
Care and support to the Canadian Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society   Defence Team Personnel Support

Canadian Identity

Environment Protection and Stewardship

Non-Security Support
    Internal Services

For a full illustration of the Defence PAA, please refer to Section IV: Other Items of Interest - Defence Program Activity Architecture. For descriptions of Defence Strategic Outcomes and associated Program Activities, please refer to Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome.

The Canada First Defence Strategy

To help Defence carry out our roles and responsibilities, the Canada First Defence Strategy5 (CFDS), released in May 2008, seeks to ensure a first-class, modern military that is well-trained, well-equipped and ready to take on the challenges of the 21st century.

To accomplish this, the CFDS provided a 20-year roadmap to modernize the CF in our environment of stable and predictable funding that permitted long-term planning and investment in four Defence capability areas or pillars:

3 Roles: Canada, North America, Abroad
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The CFDS articulates the broad strategic vision for Defence aligned with the level of ambition identified by the Government of Canada and outlines six core CF missions in domestic, continental and international contexts:

This year will mark the opportunity for a cyclical review of the CFDS itself in order to continue the modernization of the CF in a fiscally sustainable manner.

Risk Analysis

Security is influenced by a wide range of factors, domestic and international, that impact on how Defence carries out its mandate. These factors present us with both risks and opportunities, which are taken into account as we deliver on our roles and responsibilities. By continuously monitoring emerging issues, developments and trends we can anticipate and respond to challenges and the risks associated with them.

The DND/CF Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) documents the risks facing Defence, and is an important influence on planning and resource allocation decisions. It is a tool through which the executive leadership can provide guidance and direction in responding to the Corporate Risks assessed as vital to the achievement of the Defence mission.

The CRP is derived from the review of external and internal risks. For FY 2012-13, three key Corporate Risks having a Defence-wide impact are highlighted. These are Defence Team Capacity Issues, Canadian Forces Reconstitution, and Investment Plan (IP) Flexibility. The key Corporate Risks, as well as their attendant mitigation actions, are presented below. To fulfill the Government of Canada's expectations, Defence will continue to manage these Corporate Risks in an effective manner.

Key Corporate Risks
Risk Action
Canadian Forces Reconstitution The Canadian Forces (CF), after several years of high tempo operations centred on Afghanistan, will continue to balance the readiness levels necessary to maintain its leadership role and responsiveness in accordance with the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS).

To mitigate this risk, a directive has been issued for future CF Posture and Defence Readiness, which provides a clear and viable plan to develop and maintain the capabilities and readiness levels necessary to meet the requirements of the CFDS.
Defence Team Capacity Defence will continue to place priority on achieving the right balance and composition of the Defence workforce with focused attention on addressing military and civilian occupations of concern, and on leadership and professional development at all levels in the organization.

This will be achieved by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development. Defence will also continue to implement the Public Service Renewal action plan aligned with the Clerk's priorities as well as advance CF Transformation. This has been supplemented with a directive on recruitment and staffing, and succession planning for civilian staff. All Groups and Commands within National Defence have begun using these directives in their annual business plans.
Investment Plan Flexibility Defence will continue to ensure that there is sufficient flexibility in the IP to address both emerging operational requirements and CF capability requirements of the future as outlined in the CFDS.

In support of this, Defence is implementing the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) model and is developing an update to the Investment Plan. These two initiatives will allow Defence to more effectively manage the changes to the Investment Plan (IP) and balance investments across the four pillars of CFDS.

In an effort to increase the visibility of the CRP in this report, Defence has developed a Defence Priorities - CRP - PAA Alignment Matrix6, which illustrates the risks related to each Program Activity. See Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome for discussion of risks and associated mitigation strategies.

Organizational Priorities

The Defence Priorities are informed by Government and senior leadership direction and from the key Corporate Risks. They represent a focused number of areas where efforts and resources will be directed to mitigate the risk areas, and to address gaps in capability or capacity, to enable Defence to act effectively on Government of Canada direction. To respond with essential activities while achieving excellence in our operations and management, the Defence Priorities are:

Priority Type1 Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad Previously committed to Defence operations improve peace, stability and security wherever deployed
Description

Why is this a priority?
By ensuring sustainable operational excellence both at home and abroad, the CF will maintain its ability to deliver the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) by conducting six core CF missions within Canada, in North America and globally, at times simultaneously.

Plans for meeting the priority
- Conduct maritime, land, and air domestic surveillance of Canadian territories;
- Support to domestic security partners in providing security for national and international events in Canada;
- Exercise Arctic sovereignty;
- Provide support to Continental, NATO and UN led-missions;
- Support the Government's reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan;
- Enhance Defence Diplomacy activity; and
- Be prepared to conduct military operations on short notice in support of Government of Canada objectives.

1Type is defined as follows: Previously committed to-committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; Ongoing-committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and New-newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR.

Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Reconstituting and Aligning the CF Post- Afghanistan Previously committed to - Defence operations improve peace, stability and security wherever deployed
- National Defence is ready to meet Government Defence Expectations
- Resources are acquired to meet
Government Defence Expectations
Description

Why is this a priority?
By reconstituting and aligning the CF post-Afghanistan, the CF will demonstrate its ability to deliver the CFDS by conducting six core CF missions within Canada, in North America and globally, at times simultaneously.

Plans for meeting the priority
- Implement the transition plan to perform a training role in Afghanistan;
- Plan and develop post-2011 readiness initiatives;
- Implement post-2011 readiness initiatives; and
- Plan and develop the capability to meet reconstitution and readiness initiatives.



Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Strengthening the Defence Team Previously committed to - Resources are acquired to meet Government Defence Expectations
- Care and Support to the Canadian Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society
Description

Why is this a priority?
By investing in the Personnel pillar of the CFDS - military and civilian - National Defence will align the Defence Team to ensure the successful execution of the other Defence Priorities.

Plans for meeting the priority
- Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CF members;
- Advance a comprehensive plan to align and optimize the military and civilian workforce;
- Recruit, develop, and sustain under-strength military and civilian occupations;
- Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development;
- Implement the Public Service Renewal Action Plan, aligned with the Clerk's priorities; and
- Advance CF Transformation.



Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Maintaining Defence Affordability Previously committed to - Resources are acquired to meet Government Defence Expectations
- Care and Support to the Canadian Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society
- National Defence is ready to meet Government Defence Expectations
- Internal Services
Description

Why is this a priority?
By maintaining Defence affordability, the Defence Team will strengthen key military capabilities through the management of investments in each of the four pillars of the CFDS – Personnel, Equipment, Readiness and Infrastructure.

Plans for meeting the priority
- Improve management of the Investment Plan to balance CFDS requirements;
- Advance ‘Web of Rules' initiative within Defence;
- Advance the Defence Procurement Initiative;
- Enhance the integration of risk and performance into Defence Planning and Management processes;
- Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework internal controls;
- Implement the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) in collaboration with other Government Departments;
- Develop and implement the Defence Environmental Strategy;
- Contribute to Advantage Canada; and
- Transform the CF national command and control structure.

Defence Planning and Performance Reporting Framework

The following diagram illustrates the alignment of Defence's PAA, Key Corporate Risks and Priorities to the CFDS. This framework forms the basis for communicating Defence's planning story throughout this report.

Figure: Defence Planning and Performance Reporting Framework
Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

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Planning Summary

During FY 2012-13, the CF will maintain the capability to conduct a range of missions at home and abroad, in collaboration with our whole-of-government and international partners. The CF will continue to lend a helping hand to Canadians in need, as they did following the First Air crash in the North in 2011, the flooding in Manitoba and Quebec, and the fires in Saskatchewan and Northern Ontario. Defence will also continue to support multinational drug interdiction operations in the Caribbean and East Pacific to help to disrupt the flow of illicit drugs to Canadian communities, and will continue to assist in endeavours such as dealing with illegal immigration.

The CF will continue to make a significant contribution to international security as they have been doing in Afghanistan. For example, through Operation ATTENTION, and in Canada's participation in the NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan (NTM-A), the CF is delivering training and professional development services to the national security forces of Afghanistan, including the Afghan National Army and the Afghan National Police. The Canadian effort is concentrated in Kabul and Mazar-e-Sharif. CF members will fill command and training development positions and deliver training in areas such as leadership, health care, literacy improvement, and the core professional skills of soldiers and police.

The CF is having an impact elsewhere in the region as well. Canada is contributing to the Middle East Peace Process by supporting the US Security Coordinator (USSC) efforts to build Palestinian security capacity with Op PROTEUS. The CF expertise, flexibility and unique access to the West Bank is key to the USSC's mission. Op PROTEUS focuses on security sector reforms of the Palestinian Authority (PA) and among many projects has helped the USSC to create, equip and train 10 Special Battalions of 500 personnel each within the PA's National Security Force that provides the nucleus of security in West Bank Governorates.

As evidenced by our participation in the NATO-led operation in Libya, OP MOBILE, the CF has also demonstrated a high level of readiness to deploy elsewhere around the world if requested to do so by the Government of Canada. Defence will ensure that forces are ready to deploy to similar international operations in the future when requested by the Government of Canada.

Defence will continue the modernization of the CF by advancing numerous key projects while seeking new efficiencies. In FY 2012-13, Defence will:

Through these and other activities, Defence will meet the expectations of the Government of Canada and Canadians.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
20,110,453 20,433,751 21,171,750
Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
95,100 94,100 93,496
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group, Chief Military Personnel Group, Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources - Civilian) Group
For further information on Human Resources and Reserve Force Personnel, please refer to Section IV: Other Items of Interest.

Strategic Outcome: Defence operations improve peace, stability and security wherever deployed
Performance Indicators Targets
% Effects Achieved (aggregate for all commands) 80-100%

Planning Summary Table
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Situational Awareness 666,181 396,047 395,478 409,843 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Canadian Peace, Stability and Security 293,074 295,703 304,315 315,667 A safe and secure Canada
Continental Peace, Stability and Security 207,845 184,687 189,717 197,576 A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership
International Peace, Stability and Security 2,197,478 1,719,881 1,451,412 1,310,785 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Total Planned Spending 2,596,318 2,340,922 2,233,873  
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Strategic Outcome: National Defence is ready to meet Government Defence Expectations
Performance Indicators Targets
% Readiness level for Maritime, Land and Aerospace combined 98-100%

Planning Summary Table
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Maritime Readiness 2,254,649 2,290,638 2,197,164 2,228,282 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Land Readiness 3,721,144 3,599,768 3,338,569 3,432,141 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Aerospace Readiness 1,940,724 1,911,012 1,826,385 1,885,289 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Joint and Common Readiness 2,293,342 2,339,309 2,281,953 2,307,837 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Total Planned Spending 10,140,727 9,644,071 9,853,548  
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Strategic Outcome: Resources are acquired to meet Government Defence Expectations
Performance Indicators Targets
Performance against CFDS as measured by Investment Plan and Business Plans 95-100%

Planning Summary Table
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Defence Science and Technology 323,282 296,821 288,459 308,948 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training 1,430,929 1,184,910 1,155,219 1,187,077 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Equipment Acquisition and Disposal 2,437,931 3,030,240 4,169,829 4,803,448 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Real Property and Informatics Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal 614,058 559,986 565,296 487,268 Strong economic growth
Total Planned Spending 5,071,958 6,178,802 6,786,741  
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Strategic Outcome: Care and Support to the Canadian Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society
Performance Indicators Targets
% Public support for the Canadian Forces 85-100%

Planning Summary Table
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Defence Team Personnel Support 801,961 707,135 697,903 725,357 A safe and secure world through international cooperation
Canadian Identity 363,935 349,478 323,801 333,230 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
Environment Protection and Stewardship 196,785 128,955 120,246 55,212 A clean and healthy environment
Non-Security Support 9,341 5,628 5,622 4,202 A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government
Total Planned Spending 1,191,195 1,147,572 1,118,002  
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Planning Summary Table
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Internal Services 1,091,864 1,110,256 1,122,383 1,179,586

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada's commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. Defence ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. In particular, through the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process, any new policy, plan, or program initiative includes an analysis of its impact on attaining the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced, demonstrating the department's commitment to achieving the FSDS goals and targets.

Defence contributes to Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government, as denoted by the visual identifier below.
 Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government - visual identifier

These contributions are components of the following Program Activities and are further explained in Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome:

A Defence Environmental Strategy (DES) will also be implemented to reflect the breadth of effort that Defence commits to the environment and sustainable development, including Defence's significant contribution to the Government of Canada's Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. Operational themes within the DES will be aligned with the program activities of the Department's Program Activity Architecture to demonstrate their relevance toward achieving the strategic outcomes that support the Canada First Defence Strategy.

For additional details on Defence's activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this RPP and http://www.vcds-vcemd.forces.gc.ca/sites/page-eng.asp?page=5609. For complete details on the FSDS please see http://www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/.

Expenditure Profile

Planned Spending

Expenditure Profile - Planned Spending Chart

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to 100 percent.
Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

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Financial Spending Trend

Expenditure Profile - Financial Spending Trend

Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

[D]

The change in financial spending trend between fiscal years 2011-12 and 2012-13 is mainly attributable to items that are reflected in the spending authorities for fiscal year 2011-12 and not in the spending authorities for fiscal years 2012-13 to 2014-15, such as the ongoing reviews of departmental spending, the establishment of Shared Services Canada and the establishment of Communications Security Establishment as a stand-alone agency.

Estimates by Vote

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2012-13 Main Estimates publication. An electronic version of the Main Estimates is available at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20122013/p2-eng.asp.

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