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Table 6 Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:
National Anti-drug Strategy
2. Name of Lead Department(s):
Department of Justice
3. Lead department Program Activity:
Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy;Youth Justice Fund – Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component; and Drug Treatment Courts
4. Start date of the horizontal initiative:
2007-08
5. End date of the horizontal initiative:
2011-12 and ongoing
6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): : $598 million[1]
7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy is built on the former Canada’s Drug Strategy, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

8) Shared Outcome(s):
  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.
9) Governance Structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Strategic Initiative Unit of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources.  The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the development and articulation of policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

10) Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007–08 15. Actual Spending for 2008–09 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17.

Results Achieved in 2007-2008

1. Department of Justice A1 a. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy
$3.3M
$660,207
$568,388 
Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

•  Assuming overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;

•  Establishing and maintaining a NADS Governance Structure;

•  Assuming the lead for and coordination of all NADS communications activities;

• Taking lead responsibility for accountability – evaluation and performance reporting.
•  Coordinated and contributed to 4 Memoranda to Cabinet which received policy approval in February- March 2007;

•  Established the Governance Structure for the NADS;

•  Coordinated the 3 NADS TB Submissions that were approved by the Board in September 2007;

•  Developed and negotiated all partner participation in and agreement to a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) that was submitted to Treasury Board at the end of March 2008;

•  Played a leadership role in the policy and performance of the Strategy through the ADM-level Steering Committee and the Policy and Performance Working Group of the Governance Structure;

•  Provided leadership and overall coordination of all communications activities, including the development and maintenance of the NADS website.
b. Drug Treatment Courts
(Treatment Action Plan)
$16.2M
$3.9M
$1.9M
New Drug Treatment Courts operational and reporting as required as per funding agreements Annual workplans and progress reports that are consistent with the DTC Funding Program objectives were received.
c. Youth Justice Fund - Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component (Treatment Action Plan)
$6.9M
$500,000
$259,708
To fund projects on Treatment Services and Program Enhancements

To enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

A total of 9 proposals were received in 2007-2008.

3 projects funded by the end of the fiscal year (2 completed and 1 on-going as at March 31-08) 4 will be funded in 2008-2009

Of the 3 funded projects, all targeted youth in conflict with the law dealing with illicit drug use issues; all 3 projects enhanced capacity through training and/or research and 1 project provided treatment through a pilot program.
2. Health Canada N/A a. Mass Media Campaign

(Prevention Action Plan)

$29.8 M
4.0M
$4.8M
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences Radio, print and web advertisements were developed and disseminated to parents.  Tips and tools for parents were also made available at www.drugprevention.gc.ca and in the Talking with Your Teen about Drugs booklet.
3.4 b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)
(Prevention Action Plan)
$78.0M
$11.97M[2]
$10.2M
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences

Enhanced uptake of knowledge in communities to address illicit drug sue and its negative consequences

In 2007/08, Health Canada provided $2.920M in funding for national projects and $3.705M in funding for regional projects. A new DSCIF call for proposals addressing NADS objectives, closed in February 2008. A total of 299 proposals were received for consideration.
c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$124.7M
$18.0M
$14.1M
Improved collaboration on responses and knowledge of treatment issues

Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations

Enhanced F/P/T commitments to improve treatment systems in targeted areas of need

In 2007/08, consultations were held with provinces and territories to finalize the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) design. Developmental funding in the amount of $85,000 was provided to 2 provinces to undertake a situational analysis describing the current “state of affairs” in relation to the implementation of evidence-informed practices and performance measurement and evaluation activities. As well, discussions were held with the BC Ministry of Health and Vancouver Coastal Health Authority regarding options for new treatment interventions for drug addicted people living in the Downtown Eastside, in particular women engaged in the sex trade.
4.1.1.2 d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$36.0M
$2.4M[3]
$2.2M[4]
Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations In 2007/08, FNIHB initiated a number of activities to prepare the groundwork for additional NADS investments in 2008/09.  These investments included: establishing a national certification process; enhancing and expanding opportunities for certified, evidence-based training; initiating work on an addictions information data system; producing a detailed report on workforce issues that will help shape future investments.
3.4 e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.8 M
$1.6M
$1.6M
Increased capacity to control and monitor controlled substances and precursor chemicals The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) continued to expand and develop the inspection program for precursor chemicals. Two new inspectors were hired in Alberta and four in Ontario.  Seventy-five inspections were conducted; these comprised of inspections of dealers licensed under the Precursor Control Regulations as well as some pre-license inspections and a small number of targeted inspections under the Narcotic Control Regulations.  Development of tools and processes continues in order to create the appropriate structure for a further expanded inspection program
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$ 49.2 M[5] $ 3.4 M[6]
$8.0M
$9.0M
Increased capacity to gather, analyze/share intelligence and analyze data

Increased awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemical issues for enforcement

Drug Analysis Services (DAS) Laboratories received more than 107,000 exhibits and issued more than 124,000 certificates of analysis.  Although the average time to analyze exhibits exceeded the performance target (60 days), all received exhibits that indicated a court date were analyzed and reported before that date.  The Destruction Unit processed more than 113,000 requests for authorization to destroy seized controlled substances.  In the administration of Part III Sections 24 (4) to 29 of the CDSA, Health Canada reimburses police services destruction costs. New procedures have been put in place for the reimbursement of these costs. At this time, it is difficult to project the long term impact of these procedures but an increase in claims for reimbursements has been seen.
3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research 1.2.6 Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)

$4.0 M
$100,000
$34,446
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences On November 8 and 9, 2007, the CIHR Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction held a Consultation Workshop to identify research priorities related to addiction treatment for illicit drug use.  Addiction experts, health professionals and potential partners were invited to the consultation funded by NADS. The priorities established during the consultation constituted the base of two Requests for applications (RFAs).  RFAs were posted on the CIHR web site in April 2008.
4. Department of Public Safety Canada 5 a. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming

(Prevention Action Plan)

$20.0M
$2.0M
$830,013
Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations.

Enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences.

Funded projects are only in the early implementation stage and it is premature to outline firm results or outcomes. The six projects which have been approved for funding thus far implicate individuals and communities in British Columbia, Ontario and Atlantic Canada.  They aim to engage youth-at-risk of becoming involved in substance abuse-related crime in programs which help them acquire employment, interpersonal and other pro-social skills which contribute to reduction in risks factors.  These projects respond to priorities of the National Crime Prevention Centre by addressing substance use among youth and/or Aboriginal people. An additional 21 projects have been developed and are being reviewed. 
3 b. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.0M
$800,000
$586,000
Safer Communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies Led, coordinated and drafted NADS TB Submission with enforcement action plan partners.  Coordinated the 2007 Canada-U.S. Border Drug Threats Assessment and drafted the Canada Drug Policy Section.  Extensive participation in developing the NADS RMAF.  Coordinating sections of the annual report on national drug trends for submission to the UN. Participation in FPT policy forums (CCSO impaired driving and drug issues groups), and international policy forums including the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission.

Funded 8 projects for research, knowledge and information exchange.

5. Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1.1.2.7 a. Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$15.1 M
$3.0 M
$1.8M
Increased awareness of the nature, extent and consequences of substance use/abuse within the school, and Aboriginal communities and among youth, professionals and the general public. Improved skills / competencies in the delivery of programs The RCMP continued to engage youth and communities with prevention programming aimed at providing information on the negative consequences of drug use and risky behaviours. Also, DOCAS aims to provide awareness services for other agencies who may deal with issues related to illicit drug use or abuse. For 2007/2008, this included the following programs: D.A.R.E., Drugs and Kids, Drug Awareness Officer Training (DOAT). Efforts are also underway to improve the programming material for Aboriginal Shield.
3.5.2 b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

$3.6M
$410,276
$208,681
To establish a team and a workplan for the program Hired 3 full-time employees to start up the program

Developed a comprehensive draft five-year work plan

Organized and/or participated in 30 consultations

1.1.2.7 c. The RCMP Drug Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan

$91.4M
$12.6M[7]
$10.9M
Improved understanding and knowledge of drugs, related trends, and production and diversion methods

Enhanced ability to detect and respond to the supply of illicit drugs and harmful substances

Undertook an initiative to train the Marihuana Grow Operation teams to respond in an ancillary role of Clandestine Drug Laboratory responders.

This initiative was successfully completed with the majority of current members of the MGO Teams being cross-trained in Clan Lab qualifications.  The newly trained members help create a synergistic partnership between the two teams, and target efforts in the prevention of chemical diversion and synthetic drug production. This practice will continue from this point forward, as Divisions have recognized the benefits of having an increased pool of experts in the area of safely investigating and dismantling dangerous labs, in the event of an emergency. Has led to a total 18 officers were trained in 2007/2008.

Funding under the National Anti-Drug Strategy was allocated to Divisions to enhance their Marihuana Grow Operation (MGO) Teams and Clandestine Laboratory Teams. The addition of new members allowed for greater targeting of efforts on larger grow operations, as well as emerging ‘super labs’.

There were 138 MGO seizures, and 22 Clandestine Laboratory seizures made in 2007/2008. For MGOs, this resulted in the seizure of 95,924 plants, and 1,202 kg of marihuana bud seized as part of these disruptions. For Clan labs, over 90 kg of methamphetamine and 95 kg of MDMA were seized as part of these disruptions.  

6. Correctional Service Canada 3.0 Case Preparation and Supervision

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$23.3 M[8]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
7. National Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release and Pardon Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$7.5 M[9]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
8. Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 1.1 a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services
$9.9 M[10]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$33.5 M[11]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
9. Canada Border Services Agency PA 1 Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.7 M
$1.5 M
$888,639
Commence implementation and hiring of staff.  For the CBSA, the reporting period for the NADS is from September 2007, (the commencement of the Strategy), to March 31, 2008. Funding released to the Regional offices, hiring processes commenced and where applicable, fractional resources were combined based on regional needs analysis and to address gaps/pressures.
10. Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 1.2 Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.5 M
$900,000
$900,000
Enhanced capacity of Member States to implement combat crime and drugs through implementation of key international instruments, and delivery of technical assistance. DFAIT successfully managed projects involving training, equipment, technical and legal expertise resulting in increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and combat international crime and drugs.  Capacity building activities addressed both the supply of, and demand for, illicit drugs and also responded to Canadian policy priorities.
11. Canada Revenue Agency 42400 Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.2 M
$825,019
$290,000
Increased capacity to audit MGOs and clandestine laboratories With the additional funding from the Strategy, 44 audits were started in 2007/08. Of these, 25 were completed, resulting in $1.2 M in taxes.
12. Public Works and Government Services Canada 01 Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$1.6 M
$200,000
$200,000
Increased capacity to provide forensic accounting services One full-time employee was hired.  FAMG provided forensic accounting analysis for 3 RCMP projects related to the Strategy.
13. Financial Transactions and analysis Centre of Canada 4881 Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$2.5 M
$268,000
$78,250
Enhanced support to Law enforcement

Development of financial intelligence

Ensuring compliance in high-risk reporting sectors

FINTRAC's involvement in the NADS for 2007-2008 has allowed the Centre to augment its capacity to communicate with its law enforcement and intelligence partners through its Liaison Officers' work. FINTRAC also augmented its capacity to analyze the information it receives and to create financial intelligence that is potentially relevant to drug-related cases, with the addition of one FTE dedicated specifically to NADS in the last quarter of 2007-2008. This increase in capacity is the foundation for the work that will support additional case disclosures and intelligence products by FINTRAC
   
Total $598M
Total $73.6M
Total $61.3M
18. Comments on Variances

1.a Justice - Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy
The funding was not fully utilized due to the late arrival of the funds, and also the complexity of the transition of the leadership role from Health Canada to Justice and the need to develop capacity within Justice to support the leadership role.

1.b Justice - Drug Treatment Courts of Justice:
There are still claims outstanding for this time frame.

1.c Justice - Youth Justice Fund - Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component:
The short time frame (October-March, 2007) impacted the number of proposals received and projects approved.  Funding criteria was established and a call for proposals sent to Provincial/Territorial representatives, but there was slow uptake on the funding.  The short time frame also impacted the number of proposal reviews and agreement negotiations which could take place within the time frame.  The G's and C's allocation was $375 K and projects of a value of $166.7 K were funded over the time frame.

 2.a Health Canada - mass media campaign
Television campaign for parents was added to parent component.  Funding came from Branch surplus.

2.c Health Canada - Drug Treatment Funding Program
Delay in the announcement of DTFP resulted in lapsed funds in 2007/08.

2.f Health Canada - Drug Analysis Services
DAS has been in a chronic deficit since before 2000.  This is funded through internal reallocation.

3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Research on Drug Treatment Model
Actual spending was less than the allocation due to the timing of the NADS announcement and the amount of time it requires to prepare and issue RFAs.

4.a Department of Public Safety Canada- Crime Prevention Funding and Programming
The timing of NADS did not coincide well with our call for “Letters of Interest/proposals”, and so most projects were already in development, leaving little opportunity to turn these into NADS projects.  We did identify a certain number of proposals as NADS projects which in fact began their application process prior to 07/08, but most of these projects were for relatively small amounts of funding, meaning we fell short of our financial commitment, notwithstanding that we actually funded more projects than anticipated.

4.b Department of Public Safety Canada - National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation
As NADS funding was received late in fiscal year 2007-2008, there was insufficient time to complete staffing actions, resulting in lapsed funds equivalent to 1 FTE.

5.a RCMP - Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service
Actual spending was less than the allocation as a result of the re-orientation of the DOCAS program, and postponement of the Aboriginal Shield Initiative, which updated its programming material to reflect a broader range of Aboriginal cultures (i.e., Mtis, Inuit).  Remaining funds that were allocated were returned to Treasury Board for the 2007/2008 fiscal year.     

5.b RCMP - National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program (NYIDP)
Overall, the NYIDP’s actual spending for FY 2007-08 was approximately fifty percent (50%) of the planned spending, which is largely due to the fact that this was the start-up year for the program.   The Director and Manager were hired in the 3rd quarter of the fiscal year; therefore, their salaries do not cover the entire fiscal year as originally calculated in the planned spending. The delays in having employees physically on-site delayed the overall development/implementation schedule for the NYIDP and, therefore, also impacted the operating expenditures.

5.c RCMP - The RCMP Drug Enforcement Program
Actual spending was less than the allocation as a result of funding for the Strategy rolling out in November 2007, and the amount of time required to fulfill human resource plans for additional trained officers.  Funding for 2007/2008 has been allocated to the requisite Divisions, and processes are underway to staff these positions.

9. Canada Border Services Agency - Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services
The September 2007 implementation had a significant impact on the CBSA expenditures for the first year of the National Anti-Drug Strategy. Consequently, in 2007/2008 the CBSA was not able to utilize resources to their full extent (for example, procurement delays).

11. Special Enforcement Program of Canada Revenue Agency
The funding was received by the CRA in November 2007. It was not fully utilized because there was only five months to expend it and the majority of the funds are being spent on personnel costs.

13. Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
The funding was not fully utilized as it was received by the FINTRAC only in March of 2008.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): n/a:
20. Contact Information

Catherine Latimer 
General Counsel and Director General
Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives & Law Reform
(613) 957-9623

clatimer@justice.gc.ca


[1] It includes funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences, which is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[2] Original allocation as per RMAF is $15.7M. Variance due to reallocation of $1.79M in contribution dollars to 2008/09, the $1billion reduction exercise conducted in 2005/06 and lapsed funds.

[3] The original allocation of $3.2M for 2007/08 was re-profiled to future program years.

[4] This figure does not include accommodation, EBP and Branch fees.

[5] Original allocation as per RMAF is $62.4M. Variance is a result of internal reallocation to support DAS activities (research, policy, regulatory development).
[6] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[7] This figure does not include accommodation amounts that are transferred to PWGSC.

[8] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

[9] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

[10] No funding was allocated for fiscal year 2007/08.

[11] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.