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Table 15: Horizontal Initiatives


 

During fiscal year 2006-2007 Human Resources and Social Development Canada was involved in the following horizontal initiatives. Unless otherwise mentioned in the list, Human Resources and Social Development Canada acts as the lead department for these initiatives.

  • Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
  • Labour Market Development Agreements
  • Youth Employment Strategy
  • Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
  • Foreign Credential Recognition Program
  • Sector Council Program
  • Canada Student Loans Program
  • National Homelessness Initiative
  • National Child Benefit
  • Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care
  • Early Childhood Development Agreement

For further information on the above-mentioned horizontal initiatives, see: 
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/profil_e.asp


 


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Name of Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
1999
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
Ongoing
Description of the Horizontal Initiative: 
The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy was originally approved in 1999 for a five-year period with $1.6B committed for labour market and skills development. In the Fall of 2003, Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy was approved for another five years (2004-09). The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy is a pan-Aboriginal human resources and skills development strategy that provides support to Aboriginal organizations (79 Human Resources Development Agreement holders to date), to design and deliver:
  • labour market development programs to assist Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal persons with disabilities, prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment;
  • special programs to assist Aboriginal youth make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school; and
  • child care programs.
As part of a broader Aboriginal agenda, the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy seeks to improve Aboriginal people's skills, facilitate their participation in the labour market, and contribute to closing the gap in employment outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.
Shared Outcome(s): 
  • Assist Aboriginal clients to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment, thereby resulting in Employment Insurance and Social Assistance unpaid benefits.
  • Assist Aboriginal youth to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and to make a successful transition into the labour market, thereby resulting in increased employment.
  • Assist Aboriginal persons with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.
  • Increase the supply of quality child care services in First Nations and Inuit communities, thereby raising the availability of distinct and diverse services in these communities to a level comparable to that of the general population.
Governance Structure(s): 
  • Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy agreements are managed by Service Canada.
  • Another component of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy is the Aboriginal Human Resource Council, launched in January 1998, to enable Aboriginal organizations to build a broad network with leaders of the federal and provincial government and the private sector. Private-sector leadership is at the core of the Council and leaders from key economic sectors work in partnership as champions of the Council and its issues.
Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
 

a) Labour Market Programming

b) Persons with Disabilities

c)Youth Strategy

d)Urban

f) Capacity Building

  $361.3 M $371.3 M Number of Aboriginal Clients Served: 
50,000
54,797
        Number of Aboriginal clients employed following an intervention: 
20,000
16,540
        Number of total interventions: 
60,000
70,373
        Employment Insurance Unpaid Benefits: 
$17M
$15,044,276
        Social Assistance Unpaid Benefits: 
$8M
$5,074,682
        Number of Aboriginal Clients with Disabilities served: 
1,400
1,326
        Number of disabled Aboriginal clients employed following intervention: 
350
334
        Number of Aboriginal Youth employed following intervention: 
6,000
6,363
        Number of Aboriginal Youth who returned to school: 
2,000
4,201
        Number of child care spaces supported and occupied: 
7,500
7,500
        Urban Aboriginal clients served: 
7,500
7,075
        Number of Urban Aboriginal clients who returned to work following an intervention: 
2,500
2,517
        Number of Urban Aboriginal clients who returned to school following an intervention: 
1,000
920
  Total Total
$361.3 M
Total
$371.3 M
   
Comments on Variances: 
The variance is due to increases in the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy budgets that were funded internally by the department. The increase is a result of funds being carried forward allowable under a provision in the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy terms and conditions.
Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
Non Applicable
Contact Information: 
Keith Conn
Director General, Aboriginal Affairs Directorate
Phone: 819-997-8551
Email: keith.conn@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Approved by:  Date Approved: 

 


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
Name of Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
2012
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$190 Million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:  
The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program was originally approved as a five year initiative with a total funding allocation of $85 million. Recently, the program was expanded with an additional $105M over five years (2007-2012). It is targeted at developing the skills of Canada's Aboriginal workforce, promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments across Canada and providing lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals. The entire initiative is geared to providing Aboriginal people with the skills needed to participate in economic opportunities such as northern mining, oil and gas, and hydro development projects across Canada.

A key feature of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program is that a partnership must be established that includes significant funding contribution from the private sector, the provincial or territorial government as well as a commitment from all of the local Aboriginal communities. The partnership must also develop a comprehensive Aboriginal human resources training and employment plan for the major economic development project that will cover a broad continuum ranging from basic skills, literacy and academic upgrading, through job-specific training and apprenticeships to retention counselling and other on-the-job supports. The plan must have a commitment from the major employer to provide at least 50 long-term, sustainable jobs for Aboriginal people.

There will be a number of major projects under development over the next decade as oil and gas, mining, forestry and hydro-electric projects are launched or expanded across Canada. There will be a wide range of employment opportunities, including the skilled trades and opportunities in secondary and service industries which offer good potential for sustainable employment. Training needs will be high, as many jobs now require higher education and computer skills. Within the original $85M, Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is supporting nine such projects.

Shared Outcome(s): 
Long term sustainable employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments, thereby resulting in increased employment and savings to income support programs.
Governance Structure(s): 
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is a national, centrally managed project with support from Service Canada. It promotes the maximum employment of Aboriginal people through a collaborative approach.
  • The implementation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership projects involve close collaboration with regional Service Canada officials and requires involvement of other federal departments, provincial governments, Aboriginal groups and the private sector.
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents receive direct support through a contribution agreement and Human Resources and Social Development Canada negotiates a multi-year contribution agreement based on a human resources development plan. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents are responsible for interim and final financial and performance reports.
Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
Human Resources and Social Development Canada Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program

$85 Million

(program and operating)

$25.3 Million

(program and operating)

$14.9 Million

(program and operating)

1750 Aboriginal clients served

1000 interventions completed

340 clients employed following an ASEP intervention

  • $5,000,000 in savings to Social Assistance

1306 Aboriginal clients served

1363 interventions completed

399 clients employed following an ASEP intervention

  Total
$85M
Total
$25.3 M
Total
$14.9 M
   
Comments on Variances: 
Re-profile of $3.7 M from year 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 and the re-profile of $5.3 M from year 2005-2006 to 2006-2007, included in the planned spending 2006-2007, has been re-profiled to 2008-2009.
Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
Not Applicable
Contact Information: 
Keith Conn
Director General, Aboriginal Affairs Directorate
Phone: 819-997-8551
Email: keith.conn@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Approved by:  Date Approved: 

 


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 
Labour Market Development Agreements
Name of Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
December 1996
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$1.95 billion per year

Description: 
Labour Market Development Agreements are designed to assist unemployed Canadians prepare for, find and maintain employment. These agreements seek to achieve labour market program objectives such as improving client labour market outcomes, ensuring better coordination of federal/provincial programs to reduce duplication, and to more effectively meet the needs of regional and local labour markets.

Pursuant to sections 57 and 63 of the Employment Insurance Act, Labour Market Development Agreements have been signed with all of the provinces/territories, in the form of either a co-managed or transfer agreement. A transfer agreement was signed with Ontario in November 2005. It came into effect on January 1st, 2007. Labour Market Development Agreements are indeterminate agreements and are not subject to renewal; however, each agreement contains certain provisions for either party to give notice of termination. Part II of the Employment Insurance Act requires the federal government to "work in concert" with provinces and territories in designing, implementing and evaluating Employment Benefits and Support Measures. Employment Benefits and Support Measures reduce dependency on insurance benefits and social assistance by helping individuals obtain and maintain employment. For further information on Employment Benefits and Support Measures spending, please refer to the Monitoring and Assessment Report at the following URL: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/ei/reports/eimar_2006.shtml

The Employment Insurance Commission is mandated in section 3(1) of the Employment Insurance Act to provide the Minister responsible for the Employment Insurance program with an annual report on the usage, impact and effectiveness of the program. The 2006 Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report continues an annual examination of Employment Insurance from the perspective of the economy, communities and individual workers. The report examines the use of the program, the program's impacts and effectiveness, the use of active re-employment measures, and the interaction between Employment Insurance and the workplace for the fiscal year April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006.

The Employment Benefits and similar provincial-territorial programs delivered under the Labour Market Development Agreements help unemployed Employment Insurance insured Canadians gain work experience, improve job skills or start new businesses, as well as encourage employers to provide opportunities for work experience. The first of four employment benefits is the Skills Development benefit which provides financial assistance to help eligible individuals pay for the cost of skills training and related expenses, while they are enrolled in a training program. The second is the Self-Employment benefit which provides eligible individuals with financial support and assistance in business planning while they begin to establish and operate their businesses. Thirdly, the Job Creation Partnerships benefit provides eligible individuals with opportunities to gain valuable work experience on projects developed in conjunction with industry, other levels of government, and/or community groups. Finally, Targeted Wage Subsidies helps eligible individuals who are experiencing difficulty accessing employment. Employers receive a temporary wage subsidy as an incentive to hire individuals they would not normally hire in the absence of a subsidy.

The Support Measures and similar provincial-territorial programs delivered under the Labour Market Development Agreements, provide funding to organizations, businesses and communities for three types of activities: The first measure, Employment Assistance Services helps unemployed individuals prepare for, obtain and maintain employment by providing them with services such as counselling, job search techniques, action planning, job placement, and labour market information. The second support measure is Labour Market Partnerships which provides funding. to encourage and support employers, employee and/or employer associations and communities in developing and implementing strategies for dealing with labour force adjustments and meeting human resource requirement Finally, Research and Innovation helps support experimental activities which identify improved methods of helping Canadians prepare for and maintain employment, as well as be productive participants in the labour force.

Summative evaluations of Employment Benefits and Support Measures, which are aimed at providing information on the impact of active measures in helping participants prepare for, obtain and maintain employment, are currently underway in several jurisdictions. Key findings from the British Columbia, Quebec, Alberta, Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador summative evaluations are discussed in the 2006 Monitoring and Assessment Report. This report has been tabled in Parliament and is available from the above link to the Monitoring and Assessment Report website. Other summative evaluations are currently underway and where available, findings will be presented in the 2007 Monitoring and Assessment Report.

Shared Outcome(s): 
The shared outcomes of partners are to help unemployed Employment Insurance insured Canadians gain work experience, improve job skills or start new businesses, and to provide funding to organizations, businesses and communities that provide employment services to unemployed Canadians.

Three measurement indicators will be used to assess the performance of these programs: 

  1. Employment Insurance Clients Served: Represents active claimants and former Quebec claimants.
  2. Returns to Work: Represents those insured participants (active and former Part I claimants) who have been referred to and participated in an Employment Insurance Act Part II activity and who have subsequently returned to employment.
  3. Unpaid Benefits: Measures the difference between the individual's entitlement to regular Employment Insurance Act Part I benefits and the actual benefits paid out as the result of Employment Insurance active claimants who have been referred and participated in an Employment Insurance Act Part II activity and who have returned to employment before exhausting their employment insurance entitlement.

Governance Structure(s): 

  • Under the co-managed arrangement, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and the respective province/territory share responsibility for the design of labour market development programs and services, while Human Resources and Social Development Canada (through Service Canada) continues to be responsible for the management and delivery of the Employment Benefits and Support Measures through its network of local offices. Each provincial/territorial government of co-managed agreements has assumed joint responsibility for the planning and evaluation of active employment measures through a Joint Management Committee, and Joint Evaluation Committee.
  • Under transfer agreements, the delivery of similar benefits and measures is the responsibility of the respective province/territory.
  • A formula based on socio-economic indicators allocates Employment Insurance funds to co-managed regions and Ontario for Employment Benefits and Support Measures, and to transfer provinces/territories for similar benefits and measures.
  • Under the agreements with transfer provinces/territories, the Government of Canada also provides an annual contribution towards the administration costs incurred by the province or territory.
  • Joint Management Committees, and/or Joint Implementation Committees are used by various regions and provinces, while all save Quebec have Joint Evaluation Committees. In Quebec, the province conducts the evaluations.
  • Provinces/Territories and the Government of Canada agree on the importance of ensuring that the public be notified of their respective roles, and particularly the financial contribution of the Government of Canada and the responsibility of the provinces/territories with regard to active employment measures under these Agreements.
  • Human Resources and Social Development Canada remains responsible for the implementation of activities under its employment benefits and support measures that are pan-Canadian in scope and not covered by Labour Market Development Agreements, such as activities in support of inter-provincial labour mobility and national sectoral partnerships, but will consult with provinces/territories regarding the implementation of these activities that impact the citizens of the provinces/territory.
  • Human Resources and Social Development Canada may also intervene in response to economic crises using funding that is incremental to funding commitments that have been made within the context of the Labour Market Development Agreement.
  • Human Resources and Social Development Canada retains responsibility for Employment Insurance benefits under Employment Insurance Act Part I (passive support).
Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
 Allocation 
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007

Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Co-Managed Prov/Ter.

Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, British Columbia, and Yukon

Employment Benefits and Support Measures

  • Skills Development
  • Self-Employment
  • Job Creation Partnerships
  • Targeted Wage Subsidies
  • Employment Assistance Services
  • Labour Market Partnerships
  • Research and Innovation
$1,060.8 M $1,060.8 M $872.1 M

EI Clients
Served:
65,031 active claimants and former Quebec claimants

Returns to Work: 43,079 EI clients (active and former)

Unpaid EI Part I benefits: $159.4 M

EI Clients
Served:
66,808

Returns to Work: 49,411

Unpaid EI Part I benefits: $175.79

 

Total
 $1,060.8  M

Total
$1,060.8 M

Total
$872.1 M

   
Non-federal Partners Names of Programs Total Allocation Forecasted Spending 2006-2007 Actual Spending 2006-2007 Planned
Results
2006-2007
Achieved
Results
2006-2007

Transfer to Prov/Ter. Government

New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut

Similar Employment Benefits and Support Measures programs $889.2 M $889.2 M $1,056.0 M

Employment Insurance Clients
Served:
288,949 active claimants and former Quebec claimants

Returns to Work: 150,475 Employment Insurance clients (active and former)

Unpaid Employment Insurance Part I benefits: $606.2 M

Employment Insurance Clients
Served: 298,732

Returns to Work: 154,281

Unpaid Employment Insurance Part I benefits: $680.5 M

 

Total
$889.2 M

Total
$889.2 M

Total
$1,056.0 M

   
Comments on Variances: 
The Ontario transfer Labour Market Development Agreements came into effect on January 1, 2007, with the result that less money was spent in co-managed provinces/territories and more in transfer provinces/territories.
Contact Information: 
John Atherton
Director General
Active Employment Measures Directorate
Employment Programs Policy and Design Branch
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
819-994-6919
Approved by: 
Karen Jackson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Employment Programs Policy and Design Branch
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
819-997-9236
Date Approved: 

 


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 
Youth Employment Strategy (YES)
Name of Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
Ongoing

The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. Youth Employment Strategy  has played an instrumental role in developing Canada's workforce of the future by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and in making a successful transition into the labour market.

Youth Employment Strategy has been streamlined based on information and knowledge gained through research and program evaluations which indicated the need to keep pace with the changing labour market and needs of youth, especially youth facing barriers to employment. The realigned Youth Employment Strategy features three key programs for youth aged 15-30 years: Career Focus, Skills Link and Summer Work Experience. For the period 2006-2007, the estimated Youth Employment Strategy investment was planned to be $400.1 million ($334.1 million Consolidated Revenue Funds program funds and $66 M in operating resources).

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Through the Youth Employment Strategy, Human Resources and Social Development along with 13 other federal government departments work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sectors to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

Shared Outcome(s): 
The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:
  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed/self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school
Governance Structure(s): 
The Youth Employment Strategy has in place an umbrella Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) that represents a commitment among the twelve participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

As lead department, Human Resources and Social Development Canada with Service Canada chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of an Interdepartmental Operations Committee that is responsible for reporting on the implementation of the Youth Employment Strategy. The Evaluation Steering Committee is another Youth Employment Strategy interdepartmental committee. There is also a Communications Sub-Committee reporting to the Operations Committee.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs.

Youth Protocols for joint planning mechanisms have been signed with Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Manitoba.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007

1. Human Resources and Social Development Canada with Service Canada (HRSDC)

Career Focus

  $6.2 M
$4.2 M
$6.1 M
$3.4 M

Clients Served: 417 

Employed or Self-Employed: 374

Return to School: 54

Contribution Agreements: 50

Funds Leveraged: $8 M

HRSDC with HRP

Clients Served: 657

Employed or Self- Employed: 591

Return to School: 66

Funds: $19,968,130 total cost projected for agreements.

Total cost will
likely be lower

Clients Served: 400

Employed or Self-Employed: 293

Return to School: 32

Contribution Agreements: 28

Funds Leveraged: $4.3 M

HRSDC with HRP

Clients Served: 755

Employed or Self-Employed: 214

Return to School: 72

Funds Leveraged: $8.6 leveraged to date towards total cost.

Agreements run from mid 05-06 to March 08.

2. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

$1.1 M $0.9 M

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: 109

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 109

Employed or Self-Employed: 56+

Return to School: 3

3. Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

$0.1 M $0.1 M

Clients Served: 5

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 6

Employed or Self-Employed: 4

Return to School: N/A

4. Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

$6.4 M $6.2 M

Clients Served: 396

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 444

Employed or Self-Employed: 166

Return to School: 47

5. Canadian Heritage (PCH)

$0.9 M $0.7 M

Clients Served: 81

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 87

Employed or Self-Employed: 44

Return to School: 4

6. Environment Canada (EC)

$3.3 M $2.0 M

Clients Served: 130

Employed or Self-Employed: 130

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 156

Employed or Self-Employed: 107

Return to School: N/A

7. Foreign Affairs / International Trade Canada (FAC/ITCan)

$6.4 M $0.0 M

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

8. Industry Canada (IC)

$9.8 M $7.9 M

Clients Served: 1,268

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 1,256

Employed or Self-Employed: 111

Return to School: 137

9. National Research Council (NRC)

$5.4 M $4.4 M

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 431

Employed or Self-Employed: 127

Return to School: 2

10 Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

$0.6 M $0.6 M

Clients Served: 50

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 76

Employed or Self-Employed: 43

Return to School: 13

TOTAL Career Focus

  $44.4 M $32.3 M

Clients Served: 3,004

Employed or Self-Employed: 1204

Return to School: 120

Clients Served: 3,720

Employed or Self-Employed: 1,165

Return to School: 310

1. Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)

Skills Link

  $146.6 M $122.1 M

HRSDC Targets: Revised August 2006

Clients Served: 16,002

Employed or self-employed: 5,631

Return to school: 1,317

Contribution Agreements: 800

Funds Leveraged: $60 M

Clients Served: 15,963

Employed or Self-Employed: 6,686

Return to School: 1,528

Contribution Agreements: 758

Funds Leveraged: $72 M

2. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

$1.0 M $1.0 M

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 120

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

3. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

$14.0 M $12.7 M

Clients Served: N/A

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 14,957

Employed or Self-Employed: N/A

Return to School: N/A

TOTAL

Skills Link

  $161.6 M $135.8 M

Clients Served: 16,002

Employed or Self-Employed: 5,631

Return to School: 1,317

Clients Served: 31,040

Employed or Self-Employed: 6,686

Return to School: 1,528

1. Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Summer Work Experience 4

  $98.1 M $93.5 M

HRSDC Targets only: 

Clients Served: 52,000

Contribution Agreements: 32,000

Funds Leveraged: $65 M

HRSDC Results only: 

Clients Served: 44,777

Contribution Agreements: 27,135

Funds Leveraged: $54 M

2. Canadian Heritage

$8.0 M $7.3 M

Clients Served: 2023

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 1,954

Return to School: 666

3. Industry Canada

$10.0 M $8.6 M

Clients Served: 1,130

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 1,424

Return to School: 790

4. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

$10.0 M $13.7 M

Clients Served: 25,477

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 24,988

Return to School: N/A

5. Parks Canada

$2.0 M $2.0 M

Clients Served: N/A

Return to School: N/A

Clients Served: 324

Return to School: 324

TOTAL

Summer Work Experience

  $128.1 M $125.1 M

Clients Served: 80,630

Return to School: n/a

Clients Served: 73,467

Return to School: 1,780

TOTAL

Ongoing

$334.1 M

$293.2 M

Clients Served: 99,636

Employed or Self-Employed: 6,835

Return to School: 1,437

Clients Served: 108,227

Employed or Self-Employed: 7,851

Return to School: 3,618

Comments on Variances: 
Targets were submitted to the Report on Plans and Priorities before the former year Period 14 results were known or new budgets were established. Targets were revised once this information became available.

Contact Information: 
John Atherton
Director General
Active Employment Measures Directorate
Employment Programs Policy and Design Branch, HRSDC
Phone: 819-994-6916

Approved by: 
Karen Jackson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Employment Policy and Program Design
Phone: 819-934-1088

Date Approved: 
Notes: 1Human Resources and Social Development Canada Career Focus includes resources spent outside of the Employment Program Business Line. Forecasted spending includes departmental contributions and operating and maintenance. However, some departments were not able to provide this combined figure.
2Not all departments set targets, and therefore the totals represent partial targets.
3Some departments were not able to provide complete results for a number of reasons: not all the data for the year are yet available or results were not captured in electronic systems. Therefore, the totals represent partial results.
4Summer Work Experience results are estimates. To be eligible for this program, participants are normally in secondary or post-secondary education programs and intend to return to school after the intervention.

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
October 2006
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
March 31, 2009

Total Federal Funding Allocation: 

$65.86 M total
$8 M in 06-07
$44.95 M in 07-08
$12.91 M in 08-09

Description:
The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures, or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment.

Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects.

To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64.

Projects must include employment assistance activities such as rsum writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, or assistance to start a small business. As well, they must offer income support to participants in the form of allowances, wages or wage subsidies, and involve at least 25 hours per week of activity for participants.

Where possible and appropriate, activities will support community economic development strategies and activities. As an example, skills development activities may prepare participants for emerging employment opportunities. Census Metropolitan Areas with a population greater than 250,000 are not eligible for Initiative programming.

Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a two-year interim program that has been put in place while a feasibility study is undertaken to evaluate current and potential measures to address the challenges faced by displaced older workers.

Shared Outcome(s): 
The shared outcomes of partners are to help unemployed older workers reintegrate into employment. Where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, outcomes would be to increase their employability, and assist them to remain active and productive in their labour market while their communities undergo adjustment.

Three measurement indicators will be used to assess the performance of this initiative. Participant results will be measured in 2008-09.

  1. Participants obtain employment - Represents unemployed older workers who participated in the initiative and found employment during or shortly after their intervention.
  2. Participant employability improved - Represents individuals who have become more employable by improving their skills to help them find work.
  3. Participation extended in labour market - Represents individuals who, as a result of the project, have remained in the labour force longer.

Governance Structure(s): 
Under this federal-provincial/territorial initiative, one agreement (signed by representatives of both governments) will be signed with each participating province or territory.

The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a 70% federal, 30% provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative.

Provinces and territories are responsible for designing and delivering projects.

All project proposals are approved by the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development.

Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for the evaluation of the initiative.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
  Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW) $8.0 M $0.0 M $0.0 M Begin agreement discussions with provinces/ territories

All provinces and territories that have indicated they will participate in the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers have now signed agreements with the Government of Canada.

Throughout the 2006-2007 timeframe, agreements were signed with Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Yukon.

    Total
$8.0 M
Total
$0.0 M
Total
$0.0 M
   
Comments on Variances: 
Not Applicable
Contact Information: 
John Atherton
Director General
Active Employment Measures Directorate
Employment Programs Policy and Design Branch
HRSDC
819-994-6919
Approved by: 
Karen Jackson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Employment Programs Policy and Design Branch
HRSDC
Date Approved: 

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
2003-2004
End Date: 
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$64.1 million over 6 years and $6.9 million ongoing
Description: 
The Foreign Credential Recognition Program provides financial and strategic support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, including Sector Councils, regulatory bodies, immigrant serving organizations and post secondary educational institutions, to develop a pan-Canadian approach to assessing and recognizing foreign credentials within targeted occupations and sectors of the economy to facilitate entry into, and mobility within, the Canadian labour market.

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports the research and project-based activities of partners and stakeholders to develop tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials in targeted occupations and sectors. The goal of the Program is to deliver on its mandate of improving the labour market outcomes of internationally trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Shared Outcome(s): 
As the actual implementation of Foreign Credential Recognition rests with partners and stakeholders, the program primarily plays a support role in the development of tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials. Efforts focus on achieving the following short-, medium- and long-term outcomes in support of the program's overarching ultimate objective.

Results Achieved: 
Short-term: 
  • To increase the understanding, consensus and commitment on issues and potential solutions related to foreign credential recognition - As of March 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program staff have met with 60 stakeholders and held 75 meetings to raise awareness and understanding on Foreign Credential Recognition and the mandate of the Foreign Credential Recognition program. In addition, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program continues to participate and/or financially support activities (e.g. dialogues, conferences and symposiums) that complement program delivery and forward the Foreign Credential Recognition Program agenda.
  • To increase the knowledge of what works in developing a pan-Canadian process for foreign credential recognition - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program addresses this outcome through its work to engage stakeholders. To date, engagement work has been most evident with assessment agencies, post secondary education institutions, national associations and in enhancing provincial/territorial relations. Work with all other provincial agencies to standardize their Foreign Credential Recognition processes also continues.
  • To identify sectors and occupations facing current and emerging critical shortages that could be addressed by interventions from the Program - An investment Selection Process (Selection Matrix) was developed and implemented. This process helps evaluate potential projects (occupations and/or sectors) by cross referencing the availability of skilled immigrants with their demand in the labour market; and assessing the readinessof the occupation's institutions to tackle Foreign Credential Recognition.
  • To enhance national coordination of partnership activities with regards to foreign credential recognition - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has engaged all ten provinces in discussions about strengthening their Foreign Credential Recognition capacity. Agreements have been negotiated with 7 provinces, a working group has been established with Alberta and discussions continue with Quebec and Ontario.
Medium and long term: 
  • To improve the ability of sectors, employers and regulators to assess and recognize the credentials of internationally trained workers - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has made substantial investments with partners. By March 31, 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had invested in 79 projects, committing approximately 66% of the total program Grants and Contributions budget. Out of the 79 projects, 37 have been completed and 42 are still in progress.
  • To increase the awareness, availability and use of tools and processes for employers and regulators to assess and recognize foreign credentials - By March 31, 2006, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had made investments that account for approximately 47% of the immigrant labour market 1 By March 31, 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program support had increased to approximately 50%.
  • To standardize pan-Canadian Foreign Credential Recognition processes in targeted occupations and sectors - The program's approach of engagement, diagnostic, tool development, implementation, and follow-up enables the involvement and buy-in of all stakeholders to help address emerging priorities and pressures. By March 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had increased its investments at the diagnostic stage from 46.5% to 48.2%, and from 27% to 28.7% at the tool development stage. Foreign Credential Recognition investments remained steady at 30% at the implementation stage.
    Investments have been with various organizations including the National Alliance of Respiratory Therapists, the Construction Sector Council, the Bio-talent sector council, the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science, the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers and the Medical Council of Canada.
  • To reduce the barriers to entering the labour market for internationally trained workers - the program has invested in pilot projects to examine overseas interventions to help address issues associated with Foreign Credential Recognition processes prior to immigrants arriving in Canada. The program has received initial positive results from the three operational offices in Philippines, India and China. In addition, the Working In Canada tool was developed to provide a single point of reference to enable users to make informed labour market choices. This is the first time a tool provides Pan-Canadian labour market information on all of the 520 occupations in the National Occupation Classification.

The Program continues to work with partners and stakeholders to achieve these short, medium and long-term outcomes to meet its ultimate objective of improving labour market outcomes in targeted occupations and sectors of internationally trained workers.

Governance Structure(s): 
The Foreign Credential Recognition Program is managed and delivered by the Department of Human Resources and Social Development, however, foreign credential recognition is an area of shared jurisdiction with provinces and territories. In turn, provinces and territories have delegated this responsibility to over 400 regulatory bodies. This means some Foreign Credential Recognition Program outcomes are linked directly to the operations of its partners and explains why the accountability for achieving these outcomes is a shared responsibility.

Since 2003, Human Resources and Social Development and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have been co-chairing an interdepartmental Director General Forum which was formed to focus on immigrant labour market integration. A new governance structure of the Director General Forum was recently approved to improve the coordination between Human Resources and Social Development, Health Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
  Foreign Credential Recognition $64.1 M

(Over six years)

$15.7 M $12.6 M Further developing and strengthening the Foreign Credential Recognition program
  • The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has made investments towards addressing Foreign Credential Recognition issues and expanded its scope to additional occupations and sectors such as Respiratory Therapists and the Biotechnology sector.
  • An Investment Selection Process that takes a strategic approach for selecting occupations for Foreign Credential Recognition program future investments has been implemented.
  • The Working in Canada tool that provides seamless integrated Labour Market Information from several departmental databases (and the backbone to the Foreign Credential Recognition Office website) was developed
  • The Foreign Credential Recognition Office task force received approval for the initial design of Foreign Credential Recognition Office and undertook research, analysis and consultations in support of policy and program development for the Foreign Credential Recognition OfficeOffice.
  • Additional results are listed above in the Shared Outcome(s) box of this template.
           
           
  Total
$64.1 M
Total
$15.7 M
Total
$12.6 M
   

Comments on Variances: 
The variance is due to project de-commitments particularly from agreements with provinces

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
Not Applicable

Contact Information: 

Corinne Prince-St-Amand
Director General -
Foreign Workers and Immigrants
819-997-9217
Approved by:  Date Approved: 
Note: 1Citizenship and immigration Canada statistics show that the top 45 occupations (immigrant labour market) represent approximately 90% of the economic class immigrants

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Sector Council Program

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
2002-2003
End Date: 
Ongoing
Federal Funding Allocation: 
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 

$84 M (2002-2003 - 2006-2007); $136.7 M (2007-2008-2011/12), including 26.5 M currently allocated.
Description: 
Sector Councils are formal, national partnerships of businesses and workers that address human resource and workplace skill development on a sectoral basis. Contribution payments under the Sector Council Program support research and project based activities proposed by sector councils and other national organizations (sector-like) working on skills and learning issues.

Sector Council Program supports sector council activities that include: 

  • Labour market forecasting and analysis;
  • National occupational standards;
  • Curriculum tailored to industry needs;
  • Skills development tools, including e-learning;
  • Literacy and essential skills initiatives;
  • Integration of foreign trained workers; and
  • Targeted recruitment and retention initiatives

Shared Outcome(s): 
While the specific goals of each industry-driven sector council may vary, depending on the particular needs of the sector, some interests and objectives are common.

In the short-term, the Program and sector councils will continue to work in partnership to: 

  • develop new and innovative solutions to human resources and skills issues; by
    • increasing consensus and understanding of skills, occupational and competency standards and labour market issues;
    • increasing availability and use of Labour Market Information , products and services to help industry address their human resources issues;
    • enhancing labour market transition (facilitating labour market entry and career progression); and
    • enhancing collaboration, action, and investment by industry.
  • address current and emerging skills and human resources issues by: 
    • increasing sectoral capacity - by sharing best practices and innovative ideas between councils, provinces and territories, and across sectors and industries;
    • encouraging learning systems to be more responsive to the labour market - by developing educational curricula that develops and refine skills needed by industries and employers in Canada's labour market ; and,
    • promoting the workplace as a learning place - by supporting the development of certification and training programs and encouraging employers and industry to increase training investment in their employees.

Governance Structure(s): 
In order to deliver on its mandate, Sector Council Program works in partnership with national partnerships of businesses and workers that address human resource and workplace skill development on a sectoral basis. As such, the Program is in a 'shared accountability regime'. Some of the mandated program outcomes are directly linked to the performance of its partners and therefore, the accountability for achieving these outcomes should be shared.

Note:  There are also national organizations with the mandate to address skills issues. While they do not form sector councils, they often work with industrial/occupational sector councils to address issues related to one or more councils.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
  Sector Council Program

$84 M (2002-2003-2006-2007)

Note: SCP's Terms and Conditions were renewed May 31, 2007 for 5-years (through 2011/2012), and provided the allocation of $136.73 M in funding. The provided funding includes an additional $4.3 M in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 for the establishment of a forestry sector council.

$26.5 M $22.7 M

Refining and broadening the impact of the Sector Council Program, testing new and innovative approaches to sectoral skills development

  • 93% of Sector Councils met or exceeded expected levels of performance.
  • The Sector Council Program withdrew funding from two councils and re-directed investments towards key strategic sectors to broaden impact, namely Agriculture and Supply Chain Logistics. The Forestry sector has been engaged as a potential sector council investment.
  • Labour Market Transition Initiative was initiated as a new instrument. 5 pilot projects were launched with the: Electricity, Mining, Trucking, Environment, and Petroleum sector councils
    Total: $84 M (2002-2003 - 2006-2007); $136.7 M (2007-2008-2011/12)

Total: 
$26.5 M

Total: 
$22.7 M

   
Comments on Variances: 
The variance of $3.8 M is a result of delays in the implementation of numerous projects

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
The 2006 Annual Survey of Performance Indicators shows that sector councils: 

  • Leveraged industry investment and support: sector councils received $70,465,641 in outside support (cash and in-kind) from their sectors resulting in $1.13 of outside investment for every $1.00 invested by the Program
  • Leveraged employer commitment and investment in skills: 3069 employers offered in-house training as a result of efforts by sector councils, 1474 workshops on promoting workplace skills were convened
  • Have facilitated labour mobility: through development of 85 national occupational or competency standards
  • Increased opportunities for skills development for workers: 16,601 workers took in house training to meet the occupational/competency standards developed or upgraded by sector councils

Contact Information:
Eric Parisien
Director Sector Council Program
(819)994-4360

Approved by:  Date Approved: 

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Canada Student Loans Program

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
1964
End Date: 
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
Ongoing
Description: 
The purpose of the Canada Student Loans Program is to promote accessibility to post-secondary education for individuals with demonstrated financial need by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants and to ensure Canadians have an opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to participate in the workplace and community.

Information for the public on saving, planning and paying for post-secondary studies and specific information for Canada Student Loans Program clients (including information on learning opportunity selection, financial planning, and how to apply for, maintain and repay student loans) can be accessed at: www.canlearn.ca.

Shared Outcome(s): 
Maintain the Government's commitment to accessible post-secondary education by: 

  • lowering financial barriers to post-secondary education through the provision of financial assistance to eligible Canadians; and
  • ensuring a more manageable debt burden for borrowers.

Governance Structure(s): 
The Government of Canada has entered into Integration Agreements with four provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador) in order to create a "one-student-one-loan" service approach. These four integrated provinces accounted for over 60% of the Canada Student Loans Program borrowers.

The administration of the current Program is the product of a co-operative effort between Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, Canada Revenue Agency, participating provinces and the Yukon Territory, two Service Providers, Financial Institutions and Public Works and Government Services Canada. These agents are responsible for conducting one or more activities during the loan lifecycle. Program documents and communications tools are typically prepared with the input and approval of both federal and participating provincial and territorial governments. Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These jurisdictions receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

Effective management of the Program and of relations with third-party agents is the primary responsibility of the Canada Student Loans Program. Program activities include, for example, defining the operational and financial processes for the delivery of the Program by the Service Providers and client relations for escalated cases and comptrollership.

The application and needs assessment for the Program is delivered by provincial student assistance offices, which also administer provincial aid. The participating provinces and the Yukon Territory: 

  • determine individual eligibility for loans and Canada Access Grants based on federal criteria;
  • assess students' financial needs based on federal criteria;
  • issue loan certificates;
  • administer and deliver Canada Study Grants; and
  • designate educational institutions that students may attend with Canada Student Loans Program assistance.

While the Canada Student Loans Program provides the guidance and direction on how the Program is to be delivered, the Service Providers assume responsibility for managing the loans once the loan agreement is signed and submitted for processing. Service Providers' responsibilities include: 

  • verifying loan agreements;
  • managing the in-study interest-free period;
  • negotiating and handling loan repayment; and
  • managing debt management activities and advising borrowers on their debt management options

Public Works and Government Services Canada is responsible for disbursing loans to the borrowers and to Educational Institutions, for any funds directed to pay for tuition.

Canada Revenue Agency Non-Tax Collection Directorate is the agent responsible for debt collection. Delinquent guaranteed and risk-shared loans become debts to the Crown when the Government of Canada buys back the debt from financial institutions. Delinquent direct financed loans are returned to the Crown, after the Service Provider has attempted collection of a set period of time and the borrower has either not made payments on their loan or is unwilling to repay. These activities may also be conducted by private collection agencies under contract to Canada Revenue Agency. These private collection agencies must abide by Canada Revenue Agency collection guidelines when carrying out the recovery of Crown debts.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007

Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Public Works and Government Services Canada

Canada Revenue Agency

N/A

Ongoing

(Statutory funding)

$648.7 M $554.5 M

Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Loans Program (includes loans, grants and non-repayable in-study interest subsidies: 455,000

Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants: 80,000

Approximately 461,500 borrowers benefited from the Canada Student Loans Program.

There were approximately 49,600 Canada Study Grants awarded and approximately 39,000 Canada Access Grants awarded for the 2006-2007 fiscal year.

 

Total
Ongoing (Statutory Funding)

Total
$648.7 M

Total
$554.5 M

   
Comments on Variances: 
The ($94.2)M variance is mainly due to a significant adjustment recorded in the Bad Debt Expense ($65.8)M due to a change in the methodology of calculating the expense by the Office of the Chief Actuary as well as a major decrease in the alternative payments (59.7)M resulting from a decrease in defaulted loans. Moreover, other variances, for a total of $31.3 M, were recorded as a result of the 2004 and 2005 Budget enhancements still impacting the current years.
Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
See the Canada Student Loans Programs' Annual Reports at: 
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/asp/gateway.asp?hr=en/hip/cslp/Publications/01_pu_publications.shtml&hs=cxp

Contact Information: 
Pauline Damphousse
Program Analyst
Portfolio Management and Accountability
Canada Student Loans Program
(819)956-6679

Approved by: 
Rosaline Frith
Director General
Canada Student Loans Program

Date Approved: 

 


Name of Horizontal Initiative
National Homelessness Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s):  
Human Resources and Social Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
1999
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 
March 31, 2007
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$716 million (Grants and Contributions)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): 

In December 1999, the Government of Canada launched the National Homelessness Initiative, a three-year initiative with a budget allocation of $753 million (Human Resources and Social Development and other departments) to develop new programs and to enhance existing programs to address the homelessness crisis in Canada. In February 2003, the Government extended the National Homelessness Initiative for an additional three years with a budget allocation of $405 million. In November 2005, the Government announced a one-year extension (2006-2007) of the National Homelessness Initiative. The total budget for 2006-2007 was $175.5 million and included: 

  • $106.3 million in initial program funding;
  • $3.0 million in Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative funding;
  • $29.0 million in reprofiled funds from 2004-2005; and
  • $37.2 million in reprofiled funds from 2005-2006.

The Government of Canada launched the National Homelessness Initiative to assist communities in responding to the needs of the homeless population and those at risk of homelessness in Canada. The National Homelessness Initiative made strategic investments in community priorities and a planning process that encouraged cooperation between governments, agencies and community-based organizations to find local solutions for homeless people and those at-risk. The National Homelessness Initiative helped to provide supports to 61 designated communities and some small, rural and Aboriginal communities to develop community-based measures that assist homeless individuals and families move toward self-sufficiency. Although the responsibility for homelessness programs falls under Human Resources and Social Development, most National Homelessness Initiative program components are delivered by regional staff, now part of Service Canada.

The National Homelessness Initiative continued to: 

  • help communities build on their successes and focus on interventions to help prevent and break the cycle of homelessness;
  • enhance the partnership approach with all levels of government and the private and voluntary sectors to strengthen capacity and build sustainability; and
  • carry out research to foster a better understanding of homelessness as well as collect and disseminate best practices to assist in designing the most effective responses.

For more information, please visit the National Homelessness Initiative website: http://www.homelessness.gc.ca

Shared Outcome: 
Enhanced community capacity to contribute to the reduction of homelessness in Canada.

Governance Structure(s): 
The National Homelessness Initiative 's community-based program was delivered via two models: 

  1. A Community Entity model where the community, in consultation with Service Canada, designated a local incorporated organization to act as the Community Entity. Service Canada held a broad contribution agreement with the Entity, which administered federal funds according to the community plan. A Community Advisory Board recommended projects to the Entity, whose responsibilities included approving project proposals and managing contribution agreements with local service providers.
  2. 2) A Shared Delivery model where both Service Canada and the community (through a Community Advisory Board) worked in partnership to support funding priorities, resulting in a joint selection and decision-making process. Service Canada managed the funds, held contribution agreements with project proponents and oversaw all related activities. The Minister approved project proposals.

The Community Entity model and the Shared Delivery model were used to deliver the Supporting Communities Partnership Initiative, the Regional Homelessness Fund and Urban Aboriginal Homelessness (UAH). In addition, regions were actively involved in setting the agenda of the National Research Program (NRP) for Phase II but not the extension year and the delivery of Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI).

In Quebec, unlike other provinces and territories, two National Homelessness Initiative components - the Supporting Communities Partnership Initiative (SCPI) and the Regional Homelessness Fund (RHF) - were delivered under a formal Canada-Quebec agreement, in collaboration with the Province of Quebec.

Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative was a National Homelessness Initiative program co-managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) and Human Resources and Social Development/Housing and Homelessness Branch (HRSD/HHB), with advice and support from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). Together, Housing and Homelessness Branch and Public Works and Government Services Canada submitted a Treasury Board submission to transform surplus federal property into facilities that serve homeless people or those at risk of homelessness and contribute to building a coordinated response to homelessness and housing challenges.

Starting in 2003, delivery of the Urban Aboriginal Homelessness program was linked with the Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS), led by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada in eight pilot communities (Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Saskatoon, Regina, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay and Toronto). The goal of this collaboration was to jointly support Aboriginal community-planning and decision-making processes and culturally-appropriate programming in the pilot communities.

The Housing and Homelessness Branch also led Action for Neighbourhood Change, a two-year action research initiative involving five federal initiatives across three federal departments (Human Resources Social Development, Health Canada and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada)  to examine how to further horizontal collaboration across government departments in support of neighbourhood revitalization.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
HRSD - Housing and Homelessness Branch (HHB)

Supporting Communities Partnership Initiative (SCPI)

National Research Program (NRP)

Action for Neighbourhood Change (ANC)

Urban Aboriginal Strategy/Urban Aboriginal Homelessness (UAS/UAH)

601.0

6.0

0

109.0

113.0

1.5

2.1

15.0

121.8

1.2

2.3

18.0

  • SCPI communities will be required to demonstrate cost-matching with other partners.

Increased availability and access, for homeless people, to a range of services and facilities along the continuum (i.e. emergency, transitional and supportive housing).

  • The program indicator which measures the ratio of total NHI funding investments versus funding by types of partners for each province and territory demonstrates that the cost matching with partners increased for the 2006-2007 fiscal year.

Under the NHI in 2006-2007, the ratio of project activities for transitional housing facilities and supportive housing facilities increased, thereby increasing access to services that help prevent and reduce homelessness.

  Total HRSDC Housing and Homelessness $716.0 M $131.6 M $143.3 M    
Comments on Variances: 
The variance between the planned spending and the actual spending is the result of variation between reprofile fund received from 2005-2006.
Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
Contact Information: 
Jim Young
A/Director
Corporate Affairs and Accountability
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development Branch
165 Hotel de Ville, Phase II
Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0J2
Telephone: 819-956-6857
E-mail: james.young@hrsdc-rhsdc.gc.ca

 


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 
National Child Benefit

Name of Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
1998
End Date: 
Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
Statutory

Description: 
The National Child Benefit 1contributes to a larger federal, provincial and territorial strategy, the National Children's Agenda, designed to help Canadian children.

Through the National Child Benefit, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared Outcome(s): 
The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals: 

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute in order to present comparable information on National Child Benefit initiatives. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the federal, provincial and territorial National Child Benefit website: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Federal Spending: 

The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement. The federal government provided $3.5 billion through the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Provincial and territorial and First Nations Spending: 

Under the National Child Benefit, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2005, reports that in 2004-2005, provinces, territories and First Nations reinvested about $743.8 million in available social assistance savings plus another $155.4 million in additional funds into benefits and services for low-income families with children. This includes First Nations reinvestments in programs and services which are estimated to be $55.1 million in 2004-2005.

Indicators and Impacts: 

The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2005 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment and do not infer that any changes are the result of the initiative, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit.

With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income increased slightly from 11.4 percent in 2002 to 11.7 percent in 2003. However, the incidence of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1900s, decreasing from the peak of 17.6 percent in 1996 (using Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cut-offs). Between 1996 and 2003, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 850,500 in 2002, a decrease of approximately 453,500 children.

Further, the report estimates that in 2003, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit: 

  • 159,000 children in 60,500 families were prevented from living in low income, a reduction of 12.4 percent. This means that in 2003, there were 12.7 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit.
    - These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,600, or 9.7 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low-income situations, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,200 (7.1 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 16.1 percent.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2005. For a discussion of evaluation results published in 2005, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Governance Structure(s): 
The National Child Benefit Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on performance of the initiative. To date, six annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role: 

Under the National Child Benefit, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development represents the Government of Canada in this federal/provincial/territorial initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The Provincial and Territorial Role: 

Under the National Child Benefit, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefiting low-income families with children.

It is important to note that, as the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in five key areas: 

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child/Day Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits;
  • Youth Initiatives, and
  • Other Benefits and Services.

First Nations Role: 

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nations participate in the National Child Benefit and implement their own programs.

$ Million [Note: for National Child Benefit Program Year July 2006- June 2007]
Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
1. Canada Revenue Agency* National Child Benefit Supplement

Ongoing

$3.7 billion

$3.5 billion

Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in "Shared Outcomes", above. Not available.
Comments on Variances: 
* While Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. Variances reflect the difference between projections and actual benefits paid to eligible recipients.
Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
N/A

Contact Information: 
Lenore Duff, Director
Economic Security
Strategic Policy and Research
Phone (613) 957-7277

Approved by: 
Virginia Poter, Director General
Economic Security
Strategic Policy and Research
Phone (613) 957-4433

Date Approved: 

Note: 1The Government of Quebec has stated that it agrees with the basic principles of the National Child Benefit. Quebec chose not to participate in the initiative because it wanted to assume control over income support for children in Quebec; however, it has adopted a similar approach to the National Child Benefit. Throughout this text, references to joint federal, provincial and territorial positions do not include Quebec.
2While Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
March 2003
End Date: 
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$300 million in 2006-2007 transferred to provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer

Description of the Horizontal Initiative: 
In March 2003, Federal/ Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services, reached agreement on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. This initiative complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement.

The objective of this initiative is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Types of investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003.

Information about the initiative, including the text of the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared Outcome(s): 
The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care are: 

  • to promote early childhood development; and
  • to support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governance Structure(s): 
The Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Child Care recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Implementation of the commitments outlined in the Multilateral Framework has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Qubec, which participates as an observer). This Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services, and is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Saskatchewan.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
Not applicable. The Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care is a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.

In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada transferred $300 M via the Canada Social Transfer to provinces and territories for investment in programs and services related to early learning and child care.

All governments agreed that investments in early learning and child care should be incremental, predictable and sustainable over the long term. All governments committed to make incremental investments in regulated early learning and child care.

The Canada Social Transfer is a block transfer to provinces and territories, which does not require them to report to the Government of Canada on the results achieved.

Total

$300 M via the Canada Social Transfer

Comments on Variances: 
N/A

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 
Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003 and annual reporting in November 2004. Federal, Provincial, and Territorial reports on results achieved may be available on their respective web sites and on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative because it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children

Contact Information: 
Glennie Graham,
Director, Child and Youth Policy Division
Approved by:  Date Approved: 

 


Horizontal Initiative: 
Early Childhood Development Agreement

Lead Department(s): 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Start Date: 
September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001
End Date: 
ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation: 
$
500 million/year transferred to provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer

Description: 

In September 2000, First Ministers reached agreement, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Early Childhood Development Agreement, to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age 6) and for their parents. The specific objectives are: 

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Childhood Development Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative as it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Information about the Agreement, including the text of the First Ministers' communiqu on Early Childhood Development, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared Outcome(s): 

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement are: 

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn, and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.
Governance Structure(s): 

In the Early Childhood Development Agreement, First Ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services.

Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services and Ministers of Health are responsible for implementation of the commitments in the Agreement. Implementation has been tasked to an Early Childhood Development Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Quebec, which participates as an observer). The Working Group includes representation from both the Health and Social Services sectors, and reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services and Deputy Ministers of Health (represented by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the lead province on early childhood development). The Working Group is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Service Canada.

Federal
Partners
Involved in
Each
Program
Names of
Programs
Total
Allocation
Forecasted
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Results for
2006-2007
Achieved Results
in
2006-2007
Not applicable. The Early Childhood Development Agreement is a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.

In 2006-2007 the Government of Canada transferred $500 M via the Canada Social Transfer, to provinces and territories for investment in programs and services related to early childhood development.

The Canada Social Transfer is a block transfer to provinces and territories, which does not require them to report to the Government of Canada on the results achieved.

Total

$500 M via the Canada Social Transfer

Comments on Variances: 
N/A

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: 

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement: 

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care, and;
  • strengthening community supports.

All participating Federal, Provincial, Territorial governments have committed to three reporting requirements: 

  • Each government released a first report on Early Childhood Development programs and expenditures for the 2000-2001 fiscal year, providing a baseline against which new investments can be tracked.
  • In fall 2002, governments began annual reporting, using a shared framework with comparable program indicators, to track progress in improving and expanding early childhood development programs and services within the four areas for action.
  • In fall 2002, governments began biennial reporting on children's well-being, using a common set of outcome indicators.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial reports on results achieved may be available on their respective web sites and on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Contact Information: 
Glennie Graham
Director
Child and Youth Policy Division
Approved by: 
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Planning
Date Approved: