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Table 9: Details on Transfer Payment Programs


 

Human Resources and Social Development Canada has a number of transfer payment programs. These programs support individuals, communities, labour, other governments and Aboriginal organizations. Human Resources and Social Development is subject to the revised policy on transfer payments, which was introduced on June 1, 2000. That policy requires departments to report on those payment programs that are worth at least $5 million. In so doing, the Department helps to demonstrate sound management of, control over, and accountability for our transfer payments.

Consistent with this policy, the Department has developed descriptive material on each program including stated objectives, expected results and outcomes, and milestones for achievement. The following is a list of the active transfer payment programs over $5 million. A fact sheet for each of these can be found at the corresponding URL below.

Note: Actual figures reflect program costs and exclude operating resources necessary to deliver the programs.

  1. Youth Employment Strategy
  2. Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
  3. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships
  4. Aboriginal Human Resources Development Program - the Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority
  5. Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
  6. Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities
  7. Sector Council Program
  8. Foreign Credential Recognition Program
  9. Apprenticeship Incentive Grant
  10. Training Centre Infrastructure Fund
  11. Workplace Skills Initiative
  12. Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program
  13. Canada Study Grant / Canada Access Grant
  14. Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement
  15. Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities
  16. Canada Student Loans Program - Liabilities
  17. Canada Education Savings Program -Canada Education Savings Grant
  18. Canada Education Savings Program, Canada Learning Bond
  19. Social Development Partnerships Program
  20. Guaranteed Income Supplement
  21. Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities
  22. New Horizons for Seniors Program
  23. Old Age Security
  24. Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities
  25. Allowance
  26. EarlyLearning and Child Care
  27. Universal Child Care Benefit
  28. National Homelessness Initiative

Further information on these Transfer Payments can be found at:  http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp


 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Youth Employment Strategy
Start Date:
2003
End Date:
Ongoing

Description: 
Transfer payments made under the Youth Employment Strategy 1are predominantly in the form of contributions from participating departments for wage subsidies for participant youth or for the development and delivery of youth support services. Such support services include client assessment and case management services and employability tools so as to help participants acquire needed skills. Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by encouraging organizations to create meaningful skills-enhancement opportunities for youth, providing supporting services or providing all youth with employment and career related tools and information.

Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: 
In 2006-2007 Youth Employment Strategy programs assisted 16,363 youth clients of whom 6,979 became employed or self-employed and approximately 1,560 returned to school. This includes the Youth Employment Strategy Summer Work Experience Program, and the principal component of this program, Summer Career Placements, which assisted approximately 44,777 youth clients.

Human Resources and Social Development Canada Sectoral Council Programs assisted 755 Youth clients in the Career Focus Program of whom 214 became employed or self-employed and 72 returned to school since the beginning of this series of agreements.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
(B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
Total Contributions 187.6 210.9 255.0 233.3 225.3 29.7
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 187.7 210.9 255.1 233.4 225.3 29.8
Comments on Variances: 
The variance is due to unspent funds and transfers to different areas such as projects aimed at Aboriginal Youth.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
A Formative Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy (YES) was completed in 2005 and the management response was subsequently approved in 2006. Evaluation key findings were:
  • While key elements of the horizontal governance structure were found to be in place, others had yet to be implemented, including the need to develop a horizontal approach to overall performance measurement and the tracking of youth outcomes;
  • Program guidelines documentation was not always consistent across departments;
    Overlap and duplication with other programs was identified as an issue; and,
  • Shortcomings in data collection were identified which had implications for monitoring program performance on an ongoing basis and for evaluation at both the program and horizontal levels. This limited the extent that short-term client results could be examined.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable
Note:
1 Youth Awareness is not part of the Strategy

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Start Date:
1999
End Date:
Ongoing
Description: 
Transfer payments made under the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy are provided as contributions to Aboriginal organizations. The Terms and Conditions are to expire March 31, 2009.The Aboriginal Human Resources Development provides support to Aboriginal organizations to design and deliver: 
  • Labour market development programs to assist Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal persons with disabilities, prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment;
  • Special programs to assist Aboriginal youth to make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school, and;
  • Child care programs.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
Assisted approximately 54,797 Aboriginal clients, of whom 16,540 became employed or self-employed (including 6,363 youth) and approximately 5,785 returned to school. Approximately, 7,500 child care spaces were supported and occupied.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 257.3 263.6 257.0 266.8 266.5 (9.5)
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 257.3 263.6 257.0 266.8 266.5 (9.5)

Comments on Variances: 
The variance is due to increases in the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy budgets that were funded internally by the department. This increase is a result of funds being carried forward allowable under a provision in the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy terms and conditions

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
A review of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements was approved in 2004. Evidence from the Review highlighted the following positive impacts of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements: 

  • The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreement model of program design and delivery at local levels is strongly supported.
  • Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreement holders are establishing successful partnerships and leveraging resources.
  • Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreement holders are establishing the means to strengthen management of complex social, economic and employment issues; although funding for capacity building remains an important issue.
  • A perception of positive impacts on communities and participant employability.

The evaluation also identified the following issues as requiring follow-up: 

  • Some weaknesses in the administrative data systems; including appropriateness and measurement of program outcome measures.
  • Differing degrees of operational flexibility across Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements.

URL: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships
Start Date:
2003
End Date:
2012
Description: 
The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership initiative is a targeted Aboriginal skills development program designed to promote maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments through a collaborative partnership approach. It is designed to address a broad spectrum of skills and learning needs and provide access to jobs.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved 2006/2007 are as follows: 

  • 1306 Aboriginal clients served
  • 1363 interventions completed
  • 399 clients employed following an Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership intervention
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 10.0 24.7 23.5 18.2 14.4 9.1
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 10.0 24.7 23.5 18.2 14.4 9.1
Comments on Variances: 
Re-profile of $3.7 M from year 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 and the re-profile of $5.3 M from year 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 included in the planned spending 2006-2007 has been re-profiled to 2008-2009.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Program - the Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority
Start Date:
2003
End Date:
2008
Description: 
The purpose of the Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority is to promote maximum employment opportunities for Aboriginal people at the Voisey's Bay mine/concentrator site as well as in related spin-off activities.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
The contribution agreement with Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority ended March 31, 2006, as the Voisey's Bay Nickel/Mine site was in Operation. The jobs now available at the Voisey's Bay site will be through attrition, and as such longer term planning and more effective programming is required to ensure that Aboriginal people have the appropriate skill sets for areas of demand with Voisey's Bay Nickel Company as well as other employers, as appropriate. The extension of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Program - Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority funding into 2007/2008 will provide the necessary timeline to enter into a new agreement(s) with the Aboriginal groups in Labrador for the effective utilization of the remaining funds, leading to lasting benefits for the Aboriginal people of Labrador. Service Canada has worked with the Aboriginal groups to develop plans for the remaining funds and the associated result targets.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 8.3 4.0 4.7 4.7 0.0 (4.7)
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 8.3 4.0 4.7 4.7 0.0 (4.7)
Comments on Variances: 
The contribution agreement ended March 31, 2006
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
Start Date:
October 2006
End Date:
March 31, 2009
Description: 
The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures, or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment.

Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects.
To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64.

Projects must include employment assistance activities such as rsum writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, or assistance to start a small business. As well, they must offer income support to participants in the form of allowances, wages or wage subsidies, and involve at least 25 hours per week of activity for participants.

Where possible and appropriate, activities will support community economic development strategies and activities. As an example, skills development activities may prepare participants for emerging employment opportunities. Census Metropolitan Areas with a population greater than 250,000 are not eligible for Initiative programming.

Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a two-year interim program that has been put in place while a feasibility study is undertaken to evaluate current and potential measures to address the challenges faced by displaced older workers.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
All provinces and territories that have indicated they will participate in the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers have now signed agreements with the Government of Canada.

Throughout the 2006-2007 timeframe, agreements were signed with Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Yukon.

Participant results will be measured in 2008-2009.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 8.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 0.0 0.0 0.0 8.0 0.0 0.0
Comments on Variances: 
Not Applicable
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities
Start Date:
2005
End Date:
2008
Description: 
The Enabling Fund provides funding to Official Language Minority Communities designated organizations, the Rseaux de dveloppement conomique et d'employabilit and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees through contribution agreements.
Contributions can be made under the Enabling Fund for the Official Language Minority Communities  to support activities such as:
  • Human resources planning, research, preparing and adopting community development plans;
  • Creating, implementing and consolidating partnerships;
  • Mobilizing community stakeholders;
  • Developing and coordinating projects that foster the development and enhance the vitality and economic growth of those communities;
  • Developing human resources and strengthening local and national structures to improve their capabilities in terms of governance, policy and support program development, the expansion of services to the community for community capacity building, and organizational administration and management.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
The Rseaux de dveloppement conomique et d'employabilit and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees are proactively working with Official Language Minority Communities,  Each community has its community plan and partnerships for community economic development and human resources development. Two joint national committees with Federal and Community representatives provide strategic direction and relevant information to the Rseaux de dveloppement conomique et d'employabilit and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees, supporting them in accessing relevant programs and services from the Government of Canada. Evidence to date clearly shows that, through the Rseaux de dveloppement conomique et d'employabilit and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees, the Enabling Fund allows Official Language Minority Communities to leverage significant amounts of funding for partnerships dedicated to community economic development and human resources development. An analysis conducted in the Fall of 2006 showed a one to one return on investment with $4.47 million invested through the Enabling Fund that helped communities leverage $4.75 million in financial contributions, and another estimated $2.31 million as in-kind contributions. Preliminary results for 2006-2007 show an even greater return on investment with $17 million in financial contributions and $3 million as in-kind contributions leveraged from partnerships compared to the annual budget of $12 million from the Enabling Fund
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 7.0 11.9 12.0 12.0 11.9 .1
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 7.0 11.9 12.0 12.0 11.9 .1
Comments on Variances: 
Not Applicable
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Sector Council Program
Start Date:
2002-2003
End Date:
Ongoing
Description: 
Sector Councils are formal, national partnerships of businesses and workers that address human resources and workplace skills development on a sectoral basis ("Sectoral" refers to a defined area of economic activity, as in a sector of the Canadian economy. Since there are sectors of the economy that are not defined in pure industrial terms, the term "sectoral" is the encompassing term used to represent those economic sectors of the Canadian economy in which sector councils work). Contribution payments under the Sector Council Program support research and project based activities proposed by Sector Councils and other national organizations (sector-like) working on skills and learning issues.

Sector Council Program supports sector council activities that include: 
  • Labour market forecasting and analysis;
  • National occupational standards;
  • Curriculum tailored to industry needs;
  • Skills development tools, including e-learning;
  • Literacy and essential skills initiatives; 
  • Integration of foreign trained workers; and
  • Targeted recruitment and retention initiatives.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
The following results were identified in the 2006 Annual Survey of Performance Indicators, completed by Sector Council Program in the Fall of 2006: 

Objective: 
        Increasing consensus and understanding of skills, occupational needs and labour market issues;

Results:
  • Sector Councils produced, and shared, 122 labour market-related research reports, examining labour market trends and issues in order to identify supply/demand issues and needs.
  • Sector Councils developed 85 occupational standards and/or competency profiles

Objective: 
        Increasing availability and use of products and services to help industry  address  their human resources issues;

Results:
  • Sector councils distributed 4,149 copies of best practices
  • Sector councils distributed 353,371 booklets/CD ROMs containing career information
  • Sector councils had 42,958,287 web hits for career information purposes.
  • Sector councils had 1,526,611 downloads of career information, Sector councils distributed 27,248 career counselling guides

Objective: 
        Enhancing labour market transition (facilitating labour market entry and career progression);

Results:
  • Sector councils distributed 353,371 booklets/CD ROMs
  • Sector councils had 42,958,287 web hits for career information purposes
  • Sector councils had 1,526,611 downloads of career information
  • Sector councils distributed 27,248 career counselling guides
  • 16,601 workers took in-house training to meet the occupational standards developed/upgraded by sector councils.
  • 8,963 workers met the occupational standards developed/upgraded by sector councils.

Objective: 

        Increased industry investments in skills development to promote a quality workforce

Results:
  • Sector councils received $70,465,641 in outside support (cash and "in kind") from their sectors, resulting in $1.13 of outside investment for every $1.00 invested by the Program.

Objective: 

        Promoting the workplace as a learning place - by encouraging employers and industry to increase training investment in their employees.
Results:
  • 3,069 employers have established and/or upgraded in-house training programs as a result of council efforts or urging
  • 16,601 workers took in-house training to meet the occupational standards developed/upgraded by sector councils.
  • 8,963 workers met the occupational standards developed/upgraded by sector councils.

Objective: 

        Increasing sectoral capacity - by sharing best practices and innovative ideas between councils and across sectors and industries;

Results:
  • 31,371 attendees at 1,474 events, workshops, seminars, and lectures convened by the sector councils to upgrade workplace skills
  • Sector Councils held 63 sector-wide, open invitation conferences with 8642 attendees designed to upgrade the workplace skills of those attending

Objective: 

        Encourage learning systems to be more responsive to the needs of industry;

Results:
  • Academic and learning institutions developed or upgraded 73 courses or programs of study, using occupational standards developed/upgraded by sector councils
  • 31 courses were accredited under a formal accreditation system that was developed by sector councils to accredit courses that meet the skills content and standards established by that sector
  • 37 sector-specific curricula were developed, or significantly modified, working with an academic or learning institute.
  • 86 sector-specific courses or programs of study were established or significantly modified by sector councils
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 15.4 22.6 26.5 26.5 22.7 3.8
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 15.4 22.6 26.5 26.5 22.7 3.8
Comments on Variances: 
The variance of $3.8 million is a result of delays in implementation of numerous projects.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
A Formative Evaluation of the Sectoral Partnership Initiative (now Sector Council Program) was completed in 2004 in order to lay the groundwork for designing a summative evaluation of the program, which is currently underway.
URL: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Foreign Credential Recognition Program
Start Date:
2003-2004
End Date:
Ongoing
Description of Transfer Payment Program: 
The Foreign Credential Recognition Program provides financial and strategic support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, including Sector Councils, regulatory bodies, immigrant serving organizations and post secondary educational institutions, to develop a pan-Canadian approach to assessing and recognizing foreign credentials within targeted occupations and sectors of the economy to facilitate entry into, and mobility within, the Canadian labour market.

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports the research and project-based activities of partners and stakeholders to develop tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials in targeted occupations and sectors. The goal of the Program is to improve the labour market outcomes of internationally trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
        Short-term
  • To increase the understanding, consensus and commitment on issues and potential solutions related to foreign credential recognition -. As of March 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program staff have met with 60 stakeholders and held 75 meetings to raise awareness and understanding on Foreign Credential Recognition and the mandate of the Foreign Credential Recognition program. In addition, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program continues to participate and/or financially support activities (e.g. dialogues, conferences and symposiums) that complement program delivery and forward the Foreign Credential Recognition Program agenda.
  • To increase the knowledge of what works in developing a pan-Canadian process for foreign credential recognition - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program addresses this through its work to engage stakeholders. To date, engagement work has been most evident with assessment agencies, post secondary education institutions, national associations and in enhancing provincial/territorial relations. Work with all other provincial agencies to standardize their Foreign Credential Recognition Program processes also continues.
  • To identify sectors and occupations facing current and emerging critical shortages that could be addressed by interventions from the Program - An investment Selection Process (Selection Matrix) was developed and implemented. This process evaluates potential projects (occupations and/or sectors) by cross referencing the availability of skilled immigrants with their demand in the labour market; and assessing the readiness of the occupation's institutions to tackle Foreign Credential Recognition.
  • To enhance national coordination of partnership activities with regards to foreign credential recognition - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has engaged all ten provinces in discussions about strengthening their Foreign Credential Recognition capacity. Agreements have been negotiated with 7 provinces, a working group has been established with Alberta and discussions continue with Quebec and Ontario.
        Medium and long term
  • To improve the ability of sectors, employers and regulators to assess and recognize the credentials of internationally trained workers - The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has made substantial investments with partners. By March 31, 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had invested in 79 projects, committing approximately 66% of the total program Grants and Contributions budget. Out of the 79 projects, 37 have been completed and 42 are still in progress.
  • To increase the awareness, availability and use of tools and processes for employers and regulators to assess and recognize foreign credentials - By March 31, 2006, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had made investments that account for approximately 47% of the immigrant labour market1. By March 31, 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program support had increased to approximately 50%.
  • To standardize pan-Canadian Foreign Credential Recognition processes in targeted occupations and sectors - The program's approach of engagement, diagnostic, tool development, implementation, and follow-up enables the involvement and buy-in of all stakeholders to help address emerging priorities and pressures. By March 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had increased its investments at the diagnostic stage from 46.5% to 48.2%, and from 27% to 28.7% at the tool development stage. Foreign Credential Recognition Program investments remained steady at 30% at the implementation stage.
    Investments have been with various organizations including the National Alliance of Respiratory Therapists, the Construction Sector Council, the Bio-talent sector council, the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science, the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers and the Medical Council of Canada.
  • To reduce the barriers to entering the labour market for internationally trained workers - the program has invested in pilot projects to examine overseas interventions to help address issues associated with Foreign Credential Recognition processes prior to immigrants arriving in Canada. The program has received initial positive results from the three operational offices in Philippines, India and China. In addition, the Working In Canada tool was developed to provide a single point of reference to enable users to make informed labour market choices. This is the first time a tool provides Pan-Canadian labour market information on all of the 520 occupations in the National Occupation Classification.
The Program continues to work with partners and stakeholders to achieve these short, medium and long-term outcomes in order to meet its ultimate objective of improving labour market outcomes in targeted occupations and sectors of internationally trained workers.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 1.4 6.8 15.7 14.7 12.6 3.1
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 1.4 6.8 15.7 14.7 12.6 3.1
Comments on Variances: 
The variance is due to project de-commitments particularly from agreements with provinces
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
  • A formative evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program that was completed in 2006-2007 made six recommendations for the Foreign Credential Recognition Program.
  • All six recommendations have either been addressed or are currently being addressed.
  • The Evaluation report concluded that the Foreign Credential Recognition Program is progressing well towards accomplishing its objectives and outcomes.
  • The Management Response to the Evaluation report was approved by the Management Audit and Evaluation Committee on February 28, 2007.
URL: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/2007/sp_ah_687_02_07/sp_ah_687_02_07e.pdf
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable
Note: 1Citizenship and immigration Canada statistics show that the top 45 occupations (immigrant labour market) represent approximately 90% of the economic class immigrants

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Apprenticeship Incentive Grant
Start Date:
January 1, 2007
End Date:
Ongoing
Description: 
  • The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant aims to promote access to apprenticeships and improve labour mobility by providing a taxable $1,000 grant to registered first- and second-year apprentices in one of the Red Seal trades.
  • The grant has been designed to reward advancement in the first two years of an apprenticeship program.
  • Registered apprentices who have completed their first- or second-year of an apprenticeship program in a Red Seal trade designated in the province/territory where they are registered as apprentices on or after January 1, 2007 are eligible to apply.
  • The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant provides an incentive for more Canadians to pursue apprenticeships and hence is intended to help meet the future need for skilled trades people that is crucial to the sustained growth of the economy.
  • By focusing on the Red Seal trades, for which there are national occupational and training standards, the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant will also support inter-provincial mobility.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
As of March 31, 2007 Service Canada had received approximately 1,800 applications for the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant and issued 704 grants. It is too early to report on outcomes against the program's objectives
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants N/A N/A 25.0 32.0 0.7 24.3
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity N/A N/A 25.0 32.0 0.7 24.3
Comments on Variances: 
Funding approval for the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant was confirmed at the end of March 2007. The launch and promotional activities required to create awareness of the new Apprenticeship Incentive Grant program were delayed to fiscal year 2007-2008.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Training Centre Infrastructure Fund
Start Date:
2005-2006
End Date:
2007-2008*
* funding was actually only provided for 05-06 and 06-07
Description: 
Initially the Training Centre Infrastructure Funding was a 3-year pilot program aimed to improve workplace skilled trades training and worker productivity by enabling tradespersons to train on equipment they will likely use on the job. Federal funding matched investments made by union-employer training centres, focused on skilled trades, to purchase new and update equipment and machinery used for trades training that meet industry standards and reflect the requirements of today's workplace.

The program was cancelled further to the announcement of September 25, 2006 on Effective Spending. Thus, funding was limited to the Year 1 applicants.

Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
Forty-six contribution agreements based on Year 1 applications were negotiated. Most of these agreements ended by March 31, 2006, with some extending into Fiscal 06-07.

Approximately 56 proposals for Year 2 were reviewed for funding, but due to program cancellation, no agreements were awarded.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions N/A 4.3 11.0 3.0 1.5 9.5
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity N/A 4.3 11.0 3.0 1.5 9.5
Comments on Variances: 
The $9.5 M surplus is mainly due to the cancellation of Training Centre Infrastructure Fund as a result of the announcement of September 25, 2006 on Effective Spending.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Workplace Skills Initiative
Start Date:
2005-2006
End Date:
2009-2010
Description: 
The Workplace Skills Initiative funds projects that test and evaluate promising, partnership-based, outcomes-focused approaches to skills development for employers and employed Canadians:
  • Central to these projects is the development of human capital in and for the workplace.
  • Projects will vary in scope and scale (e.g. firm vs. sector).
  • Small and medium-sized enterprises will be a key audience.
  • Projects will generate cumulative knowledge around skills development and best HR models and practices.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
  • All 15 projects submitted from the first Workplace Skills Initiative Call for Proposals have been approved. Agreements have been finalized and project management has now begun for all 15 projects.
  • On January 30th the second Workplace Skills Initiative Call for Proposals obtained approval. The Call focused on three critical but underutilized groups - older workers, low-skilled workers and newcomers to Canada. This Call will allow the project to fund additional projects which test and evaluate promising, outcomes-focused approaches to skills development for employers and employed Canadians.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions N/A 0.0 34.7 3.1 1.1 33.6
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity N/A 0.0 34.7 3.1 1.1 33.6
Comments on Variances: 
The variance of $33.6 M between Planned Spending for 2006-2007 (A) and Actual Spending 2006-2007 (B) is due to a reprofile and to a deferral of projects to the next fiscal year.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program
Start Date: 
April 1, 2006 1
End Date: 
March 31, 2011
Description: 
The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program works through non-statutory grants and contributions. The key objectives of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program are:
  • to promote lifelong learning by reducing non-financial barriers to adult learning;
  • to facilitate the creation of opportunities for Canadians to acquire the learning, literacy and essential skills they need to participate in a knowledge-based economy and society.
Additional information can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/hip/lld/olt/ADULTLLESP.shtml
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
  • A total amount of 155 new projects were signed in 2006-2007.
  • A total amount of 266 projects were active in 2006-2007.
  • Of the total amount of active projects 96 projects were for organizations to support adult literacy capacity-building initiatives.
  • Of the total amount of active projects, 14 projects were funded for organizations to support access to family literacy in official language minority communities.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants 26.5 22.8 28.4 16.2 13.6 14.8
Total Contributions 3.7 6.1 13.3 22.0 11.5 1.8
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 30.2 28.9 41.7 38.2 25.1 16.6
Comments on Variances: 
Variance is due to a reprofile amount of 12.3M and an Expenditure Restraint of 4.8M. Other variances include unspent funds from PAYE roll-overs.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
An audit of the Office of Learning Technologies was reported in 2006-2007. The Office of Learning Technologies program was streamlined in the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program in 2006. The Audit of the Office of Learning Technologies confirmed that the Office of Learning Technologies was well managed and that adequate controls and practices were in place to ensure sound financial management. The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program is acting on all audit recommendations in the Office of Learning Technologies audit report. Audit report can be found at: www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/audit/index.shtml
Note: 1 The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP) came into effect April 1, 2006 and integrates three former programs, the National Literacy Program, the Office of Learning Technologies, and the Learning Initiatives Program.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program
Canada Study Grant / Canada Access Grant
Start Date:
1995
End Date:
Ongoing
Description
Since 1995, the Government of Canada has offered the Canada Study Grant to encourage participation in post-secondary education by providing additional non-repayable assistance or reducing debt.

In August 2005, the Government of Canada introduced two Canada Access Grants, which provides up?front non-repayable assistance intended to improve access to post-secondary education and reduce financial barriers for students from low-income families and students with permanent disabilities.
Strategic Outcome
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
The value of Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants disbursed in 2006-2007 was $146.4 M. In the 2006-2007 approximately 49,600 Canada Study Grants and approximately 39,000 Canada Access Grants were awarded.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending 2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants 64.5 129.7 119.9 146.4 146.4 (26.5)
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 64.5 129.7 119.9 146.4 146.4 (26.5)
Comments on Variances
The increase is mainly due to higher than expected up-take of the Canada Access Grant program proposed in the Budget 2004 - (Low Income Families and Permanent Disabilities), effective August 2005.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement
Start Date:
2000
End Date:
Ongoing
Description: 
This transfer payment provides alternative payments to non-participating jurisdictions, interest relief and debt reduction in repayment benefits to borrowers, and the value of loans forgiven according to prescribed criteria. Provinces and territories may choose not to participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These provinces and territories receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
As a result of these alternative payments, post-secondary education students in the province of Qubec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 206.1 211.2 223.7 165.2 165.2 58.5
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 206.1 211.2 223.7 165.2 165.2 58.5
Comments on Variances: 
The Alternative Payments are much lower than expected because defaulted loans, a component in the calculation of the Alternative Payments to non-participating provinces, has significantly decreased in fiscal year 2006-2007
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable since this transfer payment is for accounting purposes (see Description)
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities
Start Date:
1995
End Date:
Ongoing
Description
Consolidated Cost of the Risk Shared Loans.
This transfer payment represents interest subsidy, Interest Relief benefits, Debt Reduction in Repayment benefits, the amount of loans forgiven, risk premium and put-backs and administrative costs related to students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime which existed from August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000. At that time the Canada Student Loans Program operated on a shared risk model with Canadian banks.
Strategic Outcome
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
As a result of this transfer payment, students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continue to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment. Canada also meets its obligations as set out under theCanada Student Financial AssistanceActand in agreements with financial institutions.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 86.0 70.1 46.4 53.8 53.8 (7.4)
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 86.0 70.1 46.4 53.8 53.8 (7.4)
Comments on Variances: 
The variance is mainly due to the continuous impact of debt management measures announced in Budgets 2004 and 2005 as well as the outstanding balance of the in-study portfolio being higher and expiring slower than previously forecasted.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable since this transfer payment is for accounting purposes (see Description)
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program
Canada Student Loans Program - Liabilities
Start Date:
1964
End Date:
Ongoing
Description
From 1964 to 1995, the Canada Student Loans Program operated a Guaranteed Loan regime with Canadian banks.
This transfer payment tracks claims submitted by financial institutions related to the remaining Guaranteed Loan Portfolio.
Strategic Outcome
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
These amounts equal claims for payment on Guaranteed loans held by Financial Institutions for Interest Relief, Debt Reduction in Repayment, In-Study Subsidy and Permanent Disabilities benefits minus the recoveries made by Canada Revenue Agency Collections against returned loan amounts.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions (24.1) (27.7) 9.5 (17.8) (17.8) 27.3
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity (24.1) (27.7) 9.5 (17.8) (17.8) 27.3
Comments on Variances: 
The variance between planned spending and actual spending is due to the fact that the actual spending is presented net of recoveries on claims while the planned spending represents the forecasted expenditure of claim payments.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable since this transfer payment is for accounting purposes (see Description)
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Canada Education Savings Program - Canada Education Savings Grant
Start Date:
1998
End Date:
Ongoing
Description: 
The Canada Education Savings Grant encourages Canadians to save for a child's post-secondary education (through Registered Education Savings Plans).
Further information regarding the Canada Education Savings Grant can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/hip/lld/cesg/publicsection/canada_education_savings_grant_general.shtml
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
In 2006-2007, 35.2% of children under 18 years of age had received a Canada Education Savings Grant (which exceeded our target of 34%) with the highest participation rate (39.8%) found in Alberta. As well, families are saving for their children's post secondary education at a younger age - since 1998, the average age at which children receive their first Canada Education Savings Grant has dropped from 8 years of age to 4.7.

Thus the Canada Education Savings Grant has encouraged Canadians to increase the financial capacity of their children to save for post secondary education. As of March 31, 2007, Registered Education Savings Plans assets totalled over $22 billion, an increase of nearly $3 billion from the previous year. Since its inception in 1998, $3.4 billion in Canada Education Savings Grant has been paid to more than 2.4 million children under the age of 18.

By increasing families' financial capacity to attend post secondary education, the Canada Education Savings Grant contributes to having more skilled and knowledgeable Canadians who are able to fully participate in the workplace and society. This in turn is expected to result in enhanced Canadian productivity and participation in the economy and society.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Learning
           
Total Grants 426.0 462.5 575.0 505.0 505.0 70.0
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 426.0 462.5 575.0 505.0 505.0 70.0
Comments on Variances: 
Downward estimate adjustment mainly due to sluggish payments of the Additional Canada Education Savings Grant (A- Canada Education Savings Grant). Lower than expected A- Canada Education Savings Grant payments are attributable to several factors including low awareness and more gradual implementation from Registered Education Savings Plan promoters.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
A Formative Evaluation of the Canada Education Saving Grant Program was completed in 2003. http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/hrsdc/edd/reports/2003-002509/SP-AH-200-04-03E.pdf
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Canada Education Savings Program - Canada Learning Bond
Start Date: 
2005
End Date: 
Ongoing
Description: 
The Canada Learning Bond was introduced to encourage low-income families to open Registered Education Savings Plans and provide savings for their children's post-secondary education.

Further information regarding the Canada Learning Bond can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/hip/lld/cesg/publicsection/CESP/Canada_Learning_Bond_General.shtml
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.
Results Achieved: 
In 2006-2007 $21.8 million in Canada Learning Bond payments were made to over 34,000 children and provided an incentive for low-income Canadians to increase their Registered Education Savings Plan contributions and enable their children to attend post-secondary education. As of March 31, 2007, Registered Education Savings Plan assets totalled over $22 billion, an increase of nearly $3 billion from the previous year.

By increasing families' financial capacity to attend post secondary education, the Canada Education Savings Grant contributes to having more skilled and knowledgeable Canadians who are able to fully participate in the workplace and society. This in turn is expected to result in enhanced Canadian productivity and participation in the economy and society.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity            
Total Grants N/A 2.2 45.0 21.8 21.8 23.2
Total Contributions            
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity N/A 2.2 45.0 21.8 21.8 23.2
Comments on Variances: 
Downward estimate adjustment due to limited uptake as a result of the recent introduction of the Canada Learning Bond, delayed readiness of the delivery systems of Registered Education Savings Plan promoters, and limited marketing of the Canada Learning Bond from communications and outreach activities
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Social Development Partnerships Program1
Start Date: 
April 1, 2003
End Date: 
On-going (Terms & Conditions expire March 31, 2008)
Description: 
The Social Development Partnerships Program is a broad-based and flexible grant and contribution instrument that makes investments to improve life outcomes for children, families, and people with disabilities and other vulnerable populations.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
  • Invested $14.1 million in 99 different projects supporting families and their children, official language minority communities, community development and voluntary sector initiatives in 2006-2007 through the Community Development and Partnerships Directorate.
  • Invested $11.7 million in 71 different projects to support disability organizations in Canada operating at local or national levels to support innovations in service delivery and knowledge generation and dissemination to promote the full participation of Canadians with disabilities in learning, work, and community life.
  • Participants from the Vibrant Communities project shared their knowledge and experience via the Government Learning Circle teleconferencing series which connects a virtual 'community of practitioners' who seek to understand how government can best play enabling roles in local, collaborative, well-being efforts.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           

Total Grants

9.7 9.9 14.3 10.8 9.5 4.8

Total Contributions

19.5 19.4 15.0 18.5 16.3 (1.3)

Total other Transfer Payments

           

Total Program Activity

29.2 29.3 29.3 29.3 25.8 3.5
Comments on Variances: 
Variance of $3.5 million due to $2.2 million reduction in the Understanding the Early Years initiative under the Effective Spending Measures and $1.3 million reduction due to delays in posting new Calls for Proposals under the Social Development Partnerships Program.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

Note: 1The funds for the Voluntary Sector Strategy (ending March 2009), Understanding the Early Years (ending March 2011) and Early Childhood Development for Official Language Minority Communities (on-going) are administered through the Social Development Partnership Program Terms and Conditions. Operating costs are not included.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Guaranteed Income Supplement
Start Date: 
1967
End Date: 
Ongoing
Description: 
The Guaranteed Income Supplement is a monthly benefit paid to residents of Canada who receive a basic, full or partial Old Age Security pension and who have little or no other income. The Guaranteed Income Supplement is a non-taxable benefit.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved: 

The Guaranteed Income Supplement continued to keep pace with inflation. The implementation of the second instalment of the increase in January 2007 increased benefits for single Guaranteed Income Supplement recipients by $18 per month and $29 for couples.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007(A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants 6,038.2 6,476.5 6,820.0 6,901.1 6,901.1 (81.1)
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 6,038.2 6,476.5 6,820.0 6,901.1 6,901.1 (81.1)
Comments on Variances: 
The variance between the planned and actual Guaranteed Income Supplement benefit expenditures can be attributed to an increase in the average monthly rate. In 2006-2007, the average monthly Guaranteed Income Supplement rate was $372, which was 3.0% higher than the estimated $361. This increase was partially offset by a decrease in the average number of monthly recipients. In 2006-2007, the average number of monthly recipients decreased from 1,573,000 to 1,547,000 (1.7% less than the planned estimate). The cumulative effect is an increase of Guaranteed Income Supplement expenditures by approximately $81 million above the planned estimates.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities
Start Date: 
April 1, 2004
End Date: 
March 31, 2008
Description: 
The goal of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is to improve the employment situation of Canadians with disabilities, by enhancing their employability, increasing the employment opportunities available to them, and building on their existing knowledge base.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
The Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities continued to provide a broad range of programs and services in the priority areas of education and training; employment participation; employment opportunities; connecting employers and persons with disabilities and building knowledge.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments 211.8 219.8 222.0 222.0 218.2 3.8
Total - Program Activity 211.8 219.8 222.0 222.0 218.2 3.8
Comments on Variances: 
The $3.8 million is reserved for Territorial funding. Although the Multilateral Framework for the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities reflects Federal/Provincial/Territorial consensus, it was not formally endorsed by Qubec and the territories. The territories have confirmed their support for the principles and direction of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities. They will continue to provide labour market programs for people with disabilities, and will participate in the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities in the future if outstanding fiscal arrangement issues are resolved. This situation does not represent a change for the territories, which did not participate in Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities initiative, the predecessor to Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
New Horizons for Seniors Program1
Start Date: 
October 1, 2004
End Date: 
On-going (Terms & Conditions expire September 30, 2009)
Description: 
This program supports local projects across Canada that encourages seniors to contribute to their communities through social participation and active livingand to lessen social isolation.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
  • 775 projects were approved for $13.9 M in 2006-2007
  • Estimated reach: 75,000 participants
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants 5.0 10.8 15.6 15.6 13.9 1.7
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 5.0 10.8 15.6 15.6 13.9 1.7
Comments on Variances: 
Though the demand for New Horizons for Seniors Program funding remained relatively constant; the number of proposals received that were ineligible for funding was greater than expected.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable
Note: 1The total budget for this program was $15 million in 2005-06 comprised of 11.7million in grants and 3.3 million in operating costs, 20 million in 2006-2007 comprised of 15.6 million in grants and 4.4 million in operating costs and 25 million in 2007-08 and on-going comprised of $19.5 million in grants and $5.5 million in operating costs.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Old Age Security
Start Date: 
1952
End Date: 
Ongoing
Description: 
The Old Age Security pension is a monthly benefit available, if applied for, to most Canadians 65 years of age or over. Old Age Security residence and legal status requirements must also be met. An applicant's employment history is not a factor in determining eligibility, nor does the applicant need to be retired. Old Age Security pensioners pay federal and provincial income tax. (Higher income pensioners also repay part or all of their benefit through the tax system).
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
Old Age Security continued to provide the first level of income support for seniors. Work will continue to ensure that the benefit addresses the evolving nature of Canadian society and the needs of Canada's seniors.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between (A)
and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants 21,364.0 22,043.7 23,255.0 22,878.8 22,878.8 376.2
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 21,364.0 22,043.7 23,255.0 22,878.8 22,878.8 376.2
Comments on Variances: 
The variance between the planned and actual Old Age Security pension spending can be attributed to several factors. The average monthly rate of the Old Age Security pension for 2006-2007 was $466 ($2 less than expected) due to a greater proportion of partial pensions. There was also an increase in the average number of monthly Old Age Security recipients (0.1% above the planned estimates). Lastly there was over $1,087 million in benefit repayment from higher-income Old Age Security recipients through the Old Age Security Recovery Tax ($265 million higher than the planned estimates) These factors resulted in an overall decrease of $376 million over the planned estimates.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities 1
Start Date: 
1997
End Date: 
March 31, 2009
Description: 
The Opportunities Fund Program is designed to assist persons with disabilities to return to work. Persons with disabilities who are unemployed and not normally eligible for Employment Insurance Part II Employment Programs can apply for assistance under the Opportunities Fund.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
  • Number of Clients Served - 4,923
  • Number of Clients Employed - 1,757
  • Number of Clients Who Returned to School - 223
  • Number of Clients with Enhanced Employability - 1,849
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 24.1 23.6 26.7 26.7 24.7 2.0
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 24.1 23.6 26.7 26.7 24.7 2.0
Comments on Variances: 
The uncertainty of the renewal of the Terms and Conditions past March 31, 2007 impacted on program expenditures.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable
Note: 1The total cost for this program is $30 million, comprised of $26.7 million in contributions and $3.3 million in operating costs.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Allowance
Start Date: 
1975
End Date: 
Ongoing
Description: 
The Allowance (ALW) is a monthly benefit paid to a 60-64 year old spouse or common-law partner of an Old Age Security pensioner. The Allowance for the Survivor (ALWS) is available to low-income persons aged 60-64, and whose spouse or common-law partner is deceased. To be eligible, the Allowance or the Allowance for the Survivor recipients must reside in Canada and have low income.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
In 2006-2007, Allowance benefits were provided to an average of 94,000 pensioners each month. Payments totalled 504.1 M.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: Social Investment            
Total Grants 468.8 472.1 500.0 504.1 504.1 (4.1)
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 468.8 472.1 500.0 504.1 504.1 (4.1)
Comments on Variances: 
The variance between the planned Allowance spending and the actual expenditures can be attributed to an increase in the average monthly rate of the benefit. The average monthly rate of the Allowance for 2006-2007 was $445 (27$ higher than the planned estimate). This was partially offset by a reduction in the average number of monthly recipients from 99,000 to 94,000 (5.1% below the planned estimate). The combined effect is an increase of Allowance expenditures by approximately $4 million above the planned estimates.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Available
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Early Learning and Child Care
Start Date: 
April 1, 2006
End Date: 
March 31, 2007
Description: 
Transfer of funds for one year (2006-2007) to all provincial and territorial governments as a transition period to enable them to adjust the new approach of the Government of Canada's Universal Child Care Plan
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: Information on the results achieved may be available in provincial/territorial reports, which are available on their respective websites.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Social Investment
           
Total Grants N/A N/A 650.0 650.0 650.0 0.0
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total Program Activity N/A N/A 650.0 650.0 650.0 0.0
Comments on Variances: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and/or Evaluation
Not Available

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
Universal Child Care Benefit
Start Date: 
July 1, 2006
End Date: 
Ongoing
Description: 
Effective July 2006 families receive $100 per month (up to $1,200 per year) for each child under six, taxable in the hands of the lower-income spouse. Payments are made directly to families so that they can choose the child care that best meets the needs of their family. The Universal Child Care Benefit is provided in addition to existing federal programs such as the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which includes the National Child Benefit Supplement, the new Child Tax Credit and the Child Care Expense Deduction. The Universal Child Care Benefit does not affect the benefits families receive under these programs. Further information can be found at www.universalchildcare.ca.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
In March 2007:
  • There were 2,047,500 children under six years of age 1
  • With 1,946,402 children under six years of age having received Universal Child Care Benefit payments
Therefore, 95% of eligible children under six years of age received the Universal Child Care Benefit in March 2007.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity            
Total Grants N/A N/A 1,610.0 1,784.4 1,784.4 (174.4)
Total Contributions            
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity N/A N/A 1,610.0 1,784.4 1,784.4 (174.4)
Comments on Variances: 
The $1,610M in planned spending reflects the amount set out in the 2006 Budget Plan (Table 3.11) as the federal cost of the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) for 2006-2007. It has since been clarified that this amount was after the savings accrued from the elimination of the CCTB supplement for children under age 7, which was rolled into the Universal Child Care Benefit.

The $1,784.4 M in actual spending by the Human Resources and Social Development Canada reflects the gross amount of Universal Child Care Benefit payments issued from July 2006 through March 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation: 
Not Applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit: 
Not Applicable
Note: 1Based on Statistics Canada population forecasts using 2001 Census

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: 
National Homelessness Initiative
Start Date: 
1999
End Date: 
March 31, 2007
Description: 
Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Rgies rgionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues.
Strategic Outcome: 
Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Results Achieved: 
  • Enhanced supports and services such as drug counselling, rent banks, and supportive and longer-term housing were made available to address gaps in the supports at the local level.
  • Increased knowledge and understanding of homelessness issues and trends to develop effective solutions providing funding to support research, knowledge development and dissemination activities such as the Metropolis Conference (annual), the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences (annual), and a special one day conference on immigration and homelessness in March 2007.
  • Fostered collaboration among communities, all orders of government, the private sector, unions and non-governmental organizations in addressing homelessness through the National Homelessness Initiative, community planning and priority setting process, as well as other forms of direct engagement such as stakeholders meetings and, the bilateral agreement between the government of Canada and Quebec.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2004-2005
Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007 (A)
Total
Authorities
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2006-2007 (B)
Variance
between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity: 
Housing and Homelessness
           
Total Grants 0.6 1.0 0.9 2.0 0.9 0
Total Contributions 95.8 139.3 137.4 173.5 149.6 (12.2)
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total - Program Activity 96.4 140.3 138.3 175.5 150.5 (12.2)
Comments on Variances: 
Reprofiled to current fiscal year to ensure no gaps in service while the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (which replaced the National Homelessness Initiative effective April 1, 2007) is implemented.
Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL to last Audit and/or Evaluation: 
A Formative Evaluation of the National Homelessness Initiative was conducted in 2003. http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/hrsdc/edd/reports/2003-002435/page00.shtml