ISSN: 2292-6402
Catalogue No. BT1-23/2015E-PDF

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
represented by the President of the Treasury Board, 2015

Table of Contents



President's Message

The Honourable Tony Clement

The Honourable
Tony Clement

President of the Treasury Board

I am pleased to present the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. This report outlines the Secretariat's goals and activities for the upcoming fiscal year.

Modernizing the federal public service is vital to the country's long-term prosperity. The Government of Canada's systems and processes must be periodically reviewed and updated to ensure they provide the programs and services that meet Canadians' changing needs and demonstrate value for money. Our role at the Secretariat is to put in place the management measures to do this.

Three ongoing priorities are modernizing the government's human resources management, reducing red tape and implementing open government. We have made good progress in each of these areas and will continue to advance this work in the year ahead.

Last spring, we reached an agreement on employee and retired employee health-care benefits, and put in place measures to improve the labour relations regime. In addition, all public service employees now have performance management agreements, which promote excellence and continuous improvement, and help build a high-performing workforce. Looking ahead, we are proposing a new sick leave and disability system that is fair to both employees and taxpayers.

Reducing regulatory red tape will continue to be a priority for the Government. In this area, we have implemented a One-For-One Rule that, as of June 2014, had saved Canadian businesses over $22 million in administrative burden and 290,000 hours in time spent dealing with regulatory red tape. To ensure this progress continues, legislation was introduced to give this rule the force of law. Results to date show that our systemic reforms are imposing a new discipline across the federal regulatory system.

We have also made progress in creating a more predictable and transparent regulatory system that is sensitive to the realities of small business. This includes publicly posting new and existing service standards, posting forward regulatory plans on departmental websites, and applying a “small business lens” when considering the impact of new regulations.

In the year ahead, we will maintain this momentum by continuing to refine and further integrate system-wide reforms to monitor, measure and control regulatory red tape.

We will also continue to advance our open government initiative. Building on the success of our first Action Plan on Open Government, we have introduced the Directive on Open Government, which aims to make federal data open “by default.” We also launched our Action Plan on Open Government 2.0, which sets out the actions we will take over the next few years to make our public institutions more transparent and accountable, and help spur innovation and economic benefits.

These are just a few of the priorities we are focusing on in 2015–16. I invite you to read this report to find out more about the work being done at the Secretariat to ensure our government is ready to meet the changing needs of Canadians in the years ahead.

The Honourable Tony Clement
President of the Treasury Board of Canada



Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister:
The Honourable Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board
Institutional Head:
Yaprak Baltacıoğlu, Secretary of the Treasury Board
Ministerial Portfolio:
The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Canada School of Public Service. Operating at arm's length and reporting to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board are the Public Sector Pension Investment Board, the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada and the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada.
Enabling Instrument:
Financial Administration Act, R.S.C., 1985, c.F-11
Year Established:
1966

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

Treasury Board Roles

The Treasury Board is a Cabinet committee of ministers established in 1867. It oversees the government's financial, human resources and administrative responsibilities, and establishes policies that govern each of these areas. In addition, the Prime Minister has designated the Treasury Board to act as the committee of the Queen's Privy Council to consider and approve regulations and most orders-in-council. The Treasury Board, as the management board for the government, has three principal roles:

It acts as the government's Management Office by promoting improved management performance. It also approves policies to support the prudent and effective management of the government's assets and financial, information and technology resources.

It acts as the government's Budget Office by examining and approving the proposed spending plans of government departments and by reviewing the development of approved programs.

It acts as the human resources office and employer or People Management Office by managing compensation and labour relations for the core public administration. It also sets foundational values for the public sector and people management policies for the core public administration (including determining the terms and conditions of employment) to ensure coherence and consistency, where needed.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (“Secretariat”) is the administrative arm of the Treasury Board, and the President of the Treasury Board is the Minister responsible for the Secretariat. The Secretariat supports the Treasury Board by making recommendations and providing advice on program spending, regulations and management policies and directives, while respecting the primary responsibility of deputy heads in managing their organizations, and their roles as accounting officers before Parliament. In this way, the Secretariat strengthens the way government is managed and helps to ensure value for money in government spending and results for Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in each of its roles (see text box “Treasury Board Roles”). Within the Secretariat, the Comptroller General of Canada provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for financial management, internal audit and the management of assets and acquired services. The Chief Human Resources Officer provides government-wide leadership on people management through policies, programs and strategic engagements and by centrally managing labour relations, compensation, pensions and benefits and contributing to the management of executives. The Chief Information Officer provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for information management, information technology, government security (including identity management), access to information, privacy, and internal and external service delivery.

The Treasury Board portfolio consists of the Secretariat and the Canada School of Public Service. The Public Sector Pension Investment Board, the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada and the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada are arm's-length organizations that report to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board.

When working with federal organizations, the Secretariat plays three central agency roles:

  • A challenge and oversight role that includes Cabinet decision-making support, reporting on the government's management and budgetary performance and developing government-wide management policies and standards;
  • A community enabling role to help organizations improve management performance; and
  • A leadership role in driving and modelling excellence in public sector management and launching government-wide horizontal initiatives that target administrative efficiencies.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

In 2015–16, the Secretariat revised its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) to better reflect its core business activities and support the achievement of expected results. The Secretariat's PAA includes five programs that contribute to the achievement of its Strategic Outcome, “Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians.” Detailed information about the Secretariat's Strategic Outcome and each program can be found in Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

Organizational Priorities

For 2015–18, the Secretariat will continue its focus on implementing reforms aimed at increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of government and ensuring value for taxpayer dollars. This includes supporting greater fiscal discipline in managing government expenditures; enhancing public service integrity, performance and productivity; using information technology (IT) to improve service; and continuing to simplify rules and administrative processes.

To improve its internal efficiency and effectiveness, the Secretariat is implementing a set of initiatives under its transformation plan, This is TBS. These include the Workplace Renewal Initiative; the 2014–17 Human Resources Plan; “lean” processes; and the new PAA and its corresponding Performance Measurement Framework (PMF). Together these initiatives will reshape the Secretariat by generating new ideas on how to carry out its business, providing modern and cost efficient tools, and ensuring employees are equipped to fulfill their roles effectively.

Having released its progress report to the Clerk of the Privy Council in January 2015, the Steering Committee for This is TBS will continue to embrace the core principles of BluePrint 2020 by engaging employees in meaningful discussions about the future public service, fostering a better understanding of what they do, how they do it, and how it fits with what others are doing.

In this spirit, the Secretariat will focus on its five priorities in 2015–18, with increased emphasis on consolidating past efforts and advancing new initiatives that together will contribute to the achievement of the Secretariat's Strategic Outcome. These initiatives are highlighted in the tables that follow. Additional information is provided in Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

Priority 1: Strengthen government financial and expenditure management to support value for money, ongoing cost-containment and increased operational efficiency.
TypeFootnote 1 Programs
Ongoing

Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Why is this a priority?

As indicated in the 2014 Federal Budget, achieving leaner and more efficient government is a key part of the government's plan to return to balanced budgets by 2015 and return the debt-to-GDP ratio to pre-recession levels by 2017. To build on recent targeted measures, there is a need to reform how government spending is managed, to make sure that resources are allocated efficiently to key priorities and to optimize results for Canadians.

This reform will involve a more rigorous examination of new spending proposals and a more systematic review of ongoing spending to enable efficient design and delivery of federal government programs. It will also include modernizing the way that government financial and performance data is captured and managed in order to support stronger management oversight and reduce administrative costs.

What are the plans to meet this priority?

  • Implement the Guideline on Chief Financial Officer Attestation for Cabinet Submissions, to provide clarity and ensure a rigourous and consistent approach by all organizations in the costing of funding proposals (ongoing);
  • Use the new Costing Centre of Expertise to strengthen the capacity to challenge costs and improve the quality of financial information for decision making by providing a secondary and independent assessment of high-risk Cabinet documents (new);
  • Support the Treasury Board in its role of reviewing funding proposals, including business transformation initiatives and time-limited programs, to promote effective and efficient spending that aligns with broader government priorities (ongoing); and
  • Advance transformation of the financial and results-based management functions across government by modernizing, standardizing and streamlining business processes that support efficient enterprise-level decisions (ongoing).
Priority 2: Modernize people management to support a productive, high-performing and affordable public service.
Type Programs
Ongoing

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Why is this a priority?

To contribute effectively, employees need to be supported with clear goals and opportunities to learn and innovate while they deliver the quality programs and services expected by Canadians. In this context, there is a need to modernize how the government manages performance, short-term disability and sick leave, and how it supports employee wellness and productivity. At the same time, there is a need to manage compensation in a holistic and sustainable way that aligns with modern employment conditions and current fiscal and economic realities.

What are the plans to meet this priority?

  • Lead collective bargaining negotiations toward fair and reasonable outcomes for employees and taxpayers that align with the government's fiscal objectives (ongoing);
  • Modernize the disability and sick leave regime, in consultation with stakeholders and in negotiations, to better support employee productivity, recovery and wellness through the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy (ongoing);
  • Continue to oversee public service–wide implementation of the new Directive on Performance Management to ensure a consistent and deliberate approach to supporting and managing employee performance, while promoting and recognizing employee excellence (ongoing); and
  • Modernize the public service–wide people management system, to reduce enterprise-wide costs and achieve consistency in service delivery (ongoing).
Priority 3: Provide leadership in information management (IM) and strategic use of information technology (IT) to enable more efficient and effective enterprise delivery of government programs and services.
Type Programs
Ongoing

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Why is this a priority?

Managing information as a strategic asset with a whole-of-government approach supports informed decision making, transparency, access, and program and service delivery. Adopting modern, enterprise-wide practices and solutions based on standardized business processes will reduce administrative or back office costs, improve the security posture of IT systems and data, create greater transparency and accountability, enhance employee productivity, and reduce overall government spending in internal services.

The 2014 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, states that the government needs to protect and properly manage the information it uses in the delivery of programs and services. Furthermore, the Report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates Open Data: The Way of the Future urges the Government of Canada (GC) to continue to pursue its commitment to Open Government, and recognizes the “importance of increased collaboration and harmonization with other levels of government, including international governments and with non-governmental organizations.”

What are the plans to meet this priority?

  • Lead Open Government activities, including implementing Canada's Action Plan on Open Government, by providing an Open Government secretariat, working inter-jurisdictionally with provinces and territories, and identifying new activities to foster greater engagement with Canadians (ongoing);
  • Advance a government-wide service strategy and develop new policy instruments to support enhanced digital self-service delivery; advance work on pilot programs for business (e.g., Business Number Hub) and for Canadians (e.g., Federated Identity Management) to facilitate the “tell us once” approach; and migrate department-specific information to Canada.ca, providing more user-friendly access to services and information through mobile devices and social media (ongoing);
  • Enhance the government's capability for incident coordination by updating the GC Incident Management Plan, including roles and responsibilities (ongoing);
  • Renew the government-wide IM strategy to ensure that information is safeguarded as a public trust and managed as a strategic asset to ensure effective delivery of programs and services (ongoing);
  • Improve the government's ability to manage IT expenditures at the enterprise level by integrating portfolio management of IT applications with investment planning (ongoing); and
  • Transform government-wide applications rationalization, including roadmaps for core back office IT applications and the new business process myGCHR, to modernize internal systems, improve security and privacy, reduce costs, support enhanced business analytics and increase administrative efficiency (ongoing).
Priority 4: Further reduce red tape for business and streamline internal government rules to increase efficiency and reduce costs.
Type Programs
Ongoing

Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Why is this a priority?

Economic Action Plan 2014 reaffirmed the government's commitment to tackle the federal regulatory red tape that can impose administrative burden on Canadian businesses. In October 2012, the government set out to implement a comprehensive package of regulatory reforms through the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan.

The Plan takes a common-sense approach to cutting red tape so that entrepreneurs can focus on growing, innovating and creating jobs. These reforms aim to reduce the regulatory burden on Canadians and business, improve service and predictability in the regulatory system, and make it easier to do business with regulators.

In addition, the government recognizes the value in pursuing efforts to review internal administrative barriers to fostering efficiency and effectiveness and reducing costs.

What are the plans to meet this priority?

  • Provide support to advance Bill C-21, enshrining the One-for-One Rule in law to help permanently control the growth of federal regulatory red tape (ongoing);
  • Implement the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan, establishing service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations to enhance predictability, and implement Forward Regulatory Plans to provide businesses with the opportunity to plan for the future (ongoing);
  • Report on the implementation of the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan through an annual scorecard (ongoing);
  • Identify opportunities to strengthen and streamline the Treasury Board policy suite, to ensure that policy instruments respond to government management priorities, manage significant risks, and enhance management performance (ongoing);
  • Continue implementation of the streamlined and enhanced Management Accountability Framework, to reduce administrative burden and provide more useful information on management practices within federal organizations and across government (ongoing); and
  • Establish the Red Tape Tiger Team to reduce administrative burden and encourage “lean” processes government-wide (new).
Priority 5: Continue to implement the Secretariat's workplace renewal initiative to modernize its office space, technology and internal operations, and improve efficiency.
Type Programs
Ongoing All programs, including Internal Services

Why is this a priority?

In an environment of returning to balanced budgets, the ongoing focus on cost-containment contributes to improving the Secretariat's internal efficiencies and effectiveness as an organization, including its work environment, processes and technologies. By 2017, the four-year workplace renewal initiative will modernize and reduce the Secretariat's office space by 30 per cent; streamline and automate internal operations; use updated technology to enhance employee productivity and collaboration; and increase efficiency in support of the Secretariat's central agency responsibilities.

What are the plans to meet this priority?

  • Implement initiatives to streamline and automate internal processes and significantly reduce paper usage, and use new technologies to improve efficiencies (ongoing);
  • Introduce new technology, tools and practices for managing information to increase productivity and collaboration, and enhance the security of the Secretariat's information (ongoing);
  • Execute the Secretariat's transformation plan, This is TBS, to implement initiatives underway and generate new ideas on how to carry out its business, provide modern and cost-efficient tools, and equip employees to effectively fulfill their roles. Initiatives under This is TBS include Workplace Renewal, the 2014–17 Human Resources Plan, ”lean” processes, the new PAA, and Blueprint 2020 activities (new); and
  • Consolidate and reduce office space and implement enabling technologies to support collaboration and a mobile, connected workforce through the Workplace Renewal Initiative, including the move to new office accommodations (ongoing).

Risk Analysis

The Secretariat actively monitors its operating environment to identify and manage risks that could affect progress toward its strategic outcome, organizational priorities and expected results. Key risks are captured in the Secretariat's Corporate Risk Profile (CRP), which is updated annually. The Secretariat continues to focus on the four key risks described in the table below. For each risk, a response strategy has been developed, including specific mitigation measures.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response StrategyFootnote 2 Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Cyber-Security

Constantly evolving cyber-threats may compromise GC information systems, infrastructure and data with potentially significant disruptions to GC program and service delivery.

The Secretariat will continue to work on numerous fronts to mitigate the risk of rapidly evolving cyber-threats, including:

  • Standardizing incident coordination capability;
  • Developing strategies and initiatives to minimize the risk to GC information holdings;
  • Updating policies and plans;
  • Developing tools for federal organizations to build programs and services that are secure and resilient; and
  • Conducting oversight and monitoring jointly delivered by the Secretariat and lead security agencies (including Communications Security Establishment Canada and Shared Services Canada).

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Back Office Transformation

The complexity and pace of the transformation agenda may exceed federal organizations' and the Secretariat's capacity to drive back office standardization and consolidation.

The Secretariat will continue to provide leadership and oversight for government administrative reforms so that they achieve their intended results, including:

  • Leading the implementation of common business processes for key functions (e.g., human resources and financial management, records management);
  • Developing an integrated plan that addresses impacts on both back office transformation and other government-wide initiatives;
  • Establishing governance arrangements, supported by enterprise program management, to clarify the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders; and
  • Developing a change management plan that addresses required cultural change.

Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Expenditure Management

Gaps in the Secretariat's information and analytic capacity may limit its ability to perform a robust challenge function and to provide sound advice to ministers on costs and expenditure management.

The Secretariat will continue to pursue initiatives to ensure appropriate mechanisms and capacities are in place to support sound decision making on government expenditures, including:

  • Strengthening the capacity for costing and results analysis, both in the Secretariat and in federal organizations;
  • Engaging organizations earlier in developing new project proposals; and
  • Continuing to monitor the implementation of government-wide cost-saving measures.

Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments

High-Performing Public Service

A misalignment may occur between the skills and abilities required for an evolving and high-performing public service and current people management policies and tools.

The Secretariat will continue to advance a number of key reforms to ensure that the government's people management practices are aligned with current and future needs, including:

  • Developing tools that encourage organizational flexibility and adaptability in response to change;
  • Using information management and internal collaborative tools to share knowledge and best practices across the government;
  • Reviewing the Performance Management Program for Executives and using real-time data and information available in the course of implementing the Performance Management Program for Employees; and
  • Rolling out the revised EX Key Leadership Competencies.

Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

The Secretariat continues to operate in a dynamic environment as it advances key reforms to achieve a modern, efficient and high-performing government. This is the strategic and organizational context within which the Secretariat manages identified risks for 2015–18.

The Secretariat's efforts to transform and modernize government are taking place against the backdrop of rapid technological change and greater use of mobile devices and remote access. Despite efforts to date, the increased sophistication of threats continues to pose a risk. In the face of such incidents, citizens and Canada's partners (including industry and other jurisdictions) will demand that the Government of Canada protect their information so that program and service delivery is secure and resilient. As the government-wide lead on IT security policy and standards, the Secretariat has a responsibility to work with other federal organizations to support a coordinated and strategic approach to cyber-security. To address this ongoing risk, the Secretariat has adopted a progressively evolving risk response that includes lessons learned from significant incidents in order to keep up with the pace of technology and counter significant threats.

Reducing the cost of government and ensuring value for taxpayer dollars is a key ongoing priority. The 2014 Federal Budget reaffirmed the commitment to return to a balanced budget by 2015, primarily through spending restraint measures that include improvement to government administration and service delivery. In supporting the Treasury Board, the Secretariat is responsible for providing government with the comprehensive, accurate and reliable information needed to make sound financial decisions. This is even more important at a time when the fiscal environment has become increasingly unpredictable. To fulfill its role and address any possible gaps in information and analytic capacity, the Secretariat will continue to build on past years' risk responses with an increased focus on engagement, outreach and timely communications with other central agencies.

The government will continue to use technology to increase efficiency and reduce the administrative costs associated with its back office functions (e.g., human resources, finance and records management). This ongoing and complex area of work involves standardizing, consolidating and simplifying administrative processes and systems that support the operations of federal organizations. Since last year, numerous risk responses have been successfully implemented, and the Secretariat's response to risk has notably matured.

Finally, as the government adapts to the realities of our times, there is continued risk of a misalignment between the skills and abilities required for an evolving public service and current people management policies and tools. In supporting the employer of the core public administration, the Secretariat is responsible for providing leadership to modernize people management practices, including reviewing and updating current policies and tools to support a high-performing workforce. To that end, the Secretariat is implementing a performance management program that will lead to improved performance and higher productivity within the public service.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$6,892,444,333 $6,892,444,333 $6,565,417,791 $6,562,257,199
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1844 1769 1760
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13
Expenditures
2013–14
Expenditures
2014–15
Forecast Spending
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending

Notes:

Any minor numerical differences are due to rounding errors.

In 2015–16, the Secretariat revised its PAA to better reflect the Secretariat's core business activities and support the achievement of expected results.

Strategic Outcome: Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians
Decision-Making Support and Oversight N/A N/A N/A 47,506,141 47,506,141 47,927,651 47,846,414
Management Policies Development and Monitoring N/A N/A N/A 73,826,361 73,826,361 71,875,824 71,941,055
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery N/A N/A N/A 50,671,220 50,671,220 48,051,421 44,338,351
Strategic Outcome: Government is well managed and accountable, and resources are allocated to achieve results
Management Frameworks 58,544,372 57,875,343 58,194,955 N/A N/A N/A N/A
People Management 60,974,838 57,834,089 140,043,098 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Expenditure Management 31,046,559 35,573,464 32,180,870 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Financial Management 30,866,718 31,291,934 34,452,056 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments 2,500,372,808 2,629,221,633 6,039,468,675 6,645,161,074 6,645,161,074 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397
Subtotal 2,681,805,295 2,811,796,463 6,304,339,654 6,817,164,796 6,817,164,796 6,501,109,293 6,497,380,217
Internal Services Subtotal 80,220,719 80,724,486 71,296,333 75,279,537 75,279,537 64,308,499 64,876,983
Total 2,762,026,013 2,892,520,949 6,375,635,987 6,892,444,333 6,892,444,333 6,565,417,791 6,562,257,199

In 2015–16, the Secretariat revised its PAA to better reflect core business activities and support the achievement of expected results. Due to the significant differences between the Secretariat's previous and current PAA structures, expenditures for 2012–13 and 2013–14, as well as forecast spending for 2014–15, have not been restated.

The table above outlines:

  • Actual spending for 2012–13 and 2013–14, as reported in the Public Accounts;
  • Forecast spending for 2014–15, which reflects the authorized levels to the end of the fiscal year and is assumed to equal forecast expenditures; and
  • Planned spending for 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 as presented in the department's Annual Reference Level Update.

Additional details regarding planned spending are provided in Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments represents the largest portion of the Secretariat's planned spending. Approximately 57 per cent of this program's spending is transferred to, and spent by, other federal organizations for items such as operating and capital budget carry forward, severance, parental benefits and compensation requirements (Central Votes 5, 10, 15, 25, 30 and 33). The Secretariat's total available spending authorities are reduced accordingly.

The significant difference between planned and actual spending (on average $4 billion per year) is related to the distribution of funds from the Central Votes to other organizations. These expenditures are detailed in the operating votes for these organizations. The balance of this program's funding is for public service employer payments, which include revenues and expenses for the Public Service Health Care Plan, the Public Service Dental Care Plan, Disability Insurance, provincial payroll taxes (Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario and Quebec) and other programs.

The increase in disability and health care expenditures and the decrease in revenues from revolving funds and special accounts related to public service employer payments resulted in an increase of actual spending by $130.5 million from 2012–13 to 2013–14.

Looking ahead at forecast spending for the Secretariat's operations, there is a planned increase of $3.5 billion from 2013–14 actual spending. The planned increase is predominantly a result of Central Votes funding not yet allocated to other organizations.

The Secretariat's future spending is expected to decrease by $330 million from 2015–16 to 2017–18. The decrease can be largely attributed to a reduction in Central Vote 30, Paylist Requirements. Payments for the elimination of accumulated severance are nearing completion and are expected to return to historical reference levels by 2016–17.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015–16 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015–16 Planned Spending
Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians Decision-Making Support and Oversight Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 47,506,141
Management Policies Development and Monitoring Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 73,826,361
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 50,671,220
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 6,645,161,074
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic affairs N/A
Social affairs N/A
International affairs N/A
Government affairs 6,817,164,796

Departmental Spending Trend

2015–16 Planned Spending
Figure 1 - Text version

This graphic is a pie chart that illustrates the planned spending breakdown for the Secretariat in 2015–16. The pie chart is broken down into six spending areas as follows: 0.70 per cent for Decision Making Support and Oversight; 1.07 per cent for Management Policies Development and Monitoring; 0.74 per cent for Government-Wide Programs Design and Delivery; 1.09 per cent for Internal Services; 39.07 per cent for Public Service Employer Payments and Statutory Votes; and 57.34 per cent for Central Votes that are used to supplement the appropriations of other departments.

Looking at fiscal year 2015–16, the Secretariat's total planned spending is $6.9 billion. This includes $4.0 billion, or 57 per cent, in Central Votes used to supplement the appropriations of departments and agencies.

Most of the remaining balance, $2.7 billion, is related to the Secretariat's role in supporting the Treasury Board as employer of the core public administration. These funds are used for:

  • The public service pension, benefits, and insurance plans, including payment of the employer's share of health, income maintenance, and life insurance premiums;
  • Payments in respect of provincial health insurance;
  • Payments of provincial payroll taxes and Quebec sales tax on insurance premiums; and
  • Funding to address actuarial deficits in the Public Service Pension Fund.

The remaining amount, $0.3 billion, is directly related to the operations of the Secretariat and its four other program activities: Decision-Making Support and Oversight, Management Policies Development and Monitoring, Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery, and Internal Services.

Departmental Spending Trend for Program Expenditures
Figure 2 - Text version

This bar graph illustrates the spending trend for Secretariat program expenditures (Vote 1) related to actual spending for fiscal years 2012–13 and 2013–14, forecast spending for fiscal year 2014–15 and planned spending for fiscal years 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y axis, increasing by $50 million up to $400 million. These are graphed against fiscal years 2012–13 to 2017–18 on the x axis.

There are two items identified for each fiscal year, the first one being statutory items, largely comprised of contributions to employee benefit plans, and the other, the Secretariat's program expenditures (Vote 1).

In 2012–13, actual spending was $29,775,712 for statutory items and $231,877,492 for program expenditures.

In 2013–14, actual spending was $29,075,263 for statutory items and $234,224,053 for program expenditures.

In 2014–15, forecast spending are $27,514,473 for statutory items and $308,652,838 for program expenditures.

Planned spending for statutory items goes from $27,681,925 in 2015–16, to $26,794,261 in 2016–17, and to $26,569,830 in 2017–18.

Planned spending for program expenditures goes from $219,601,334 in 2015–16, to $205,369,133 in 2016–17, and to $202,432,972 in 2017–18.

The profile of the Secretariat's operating expenditures includes salaries, non-salary costs that support its operations, statutory items comprised of contributions to employee benefit plans, and other statutory items for its own employees.

Out-of-court settlements led to an increase between 2013–14 actual spending and 2014–15 forecast spending. The decrease between 2014–15 and 2015–16 planned spending is mostly related to an out-of-court settlement, Web Renewal, the National Managers' Community, Paylist Requirements and Operating Budget Carry Forward.

Decreases in program expenditures are expected to continue until 2017–18 due to the sunset of initiatives such as the Workspace Renewal, the Joint Learning Program, Web Renewal, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, and the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy.

Public Service Employer Payments
Figure 3 - Text version

This bar graph illustrates the spending trend for the public service employer payments (Vote 20) and various statutory items related to actual spending for fiscal years 2012–13 and 2013–14, forecast spending for fiscal year 2014–15 and planned spending for fiscal years 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y axis, increasing by $500 million up to $3.5 billion. These are graphed against fiscal years 2012–13 to 2017–18 on the x axis.

There are two items identified for each fiscal year, the first one being statutory items, largely comprised of payments under the Public Service Pension Adjustment Act, and the other, the spending for public service insurance.

In 2012–13, actual spending was $443,023,226 for statutory items and $2,057,349,583 for public service insurance.

In 2013–14, actual spending was $443,088,925 for statutory items and $2,186,132,708 for public service insurance.

In 2014–15, forecast spending is $443,000,000 for statutory items and $2,506,134,407 for public service insurance.

Planned spending for statutory items will remain the same for fiscal years 2015–16 to 2017–18 in the amount of $443,000,000.

Planned spending for public service insurance goes from $2,250,070,604 in fiscal year 2015–16, to $2,337,061,397 for fiscal years 2016–17 to 2017–18.

Expenditures for public service employer payments and statutory items represent the employer's share of contributions required by the insurance plans sponsored by the Government of Canada. These amounts also include statutory items for payments under the Public Service Pension Adjustment Act and employer contributions made under the Public Service Superannuation Act, the Employment Insurance Act, and related Acts.

Expenditures for public service insurance increased by $129 million from 2012–13 to 2013–14 following a premium rate increase for the Disability Insurance Plan; the cessation of a premium holiday for the long-term disability insurance line under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Life and Disability Insurance Plan; higher usage of the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) by members; and a decrease in recoveries of the employer's share of insurance plans from other government departments related to Special Accounts and Revolving Funds.

Public service employer payments increased by $320 million from 2013–14 to 2014–15 and decreased by $256 million from 2014–15 to 2015–16 mostly due to a one-time top-up payment for the Service Income Security Insurance Plan (SISIP) and the implementation of benefit changes made to the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP).

Planned spending between 2015–16 and 2017–18 is expected to increase by $87 million largely as a result of an expected rise in PSHCP usage per member, increased unit costs under the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan and the Public Service Dental Care Plan, and higher employer contributions directly related to increases in payroll.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's organizational appropriations, consult the 2015–16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.



Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section describes each of the Secretariat's programs and sub-programs and identifies their expected results, performance indicators and targets, in line with the Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures. It presents the financial and human resources planned for each program and sub-program and highlights a number of key planned initiatives for 2015–16.

The Secretariat's new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), as well as the revised performance indicators and the targets and dates to achieve them, provide the basis for the Report on Plans and Priorities. Performance of the expected results will be captured in the Secretariat's 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report.

Strategic Outcome: Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians

Performance Measurement
Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada's ranking in the World Bank's Worldwide Governance Indicators for the third indicator, Governance Effectiveness. Top ten among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries. Annually

Results achieved in support of the Secretariat's strategic outcome strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the federal government; support decision making by Parliament, the Treasury Board and Cabinet; and ensure that Canadians are well served by a government that is accountable and transparent. Effective government contributes to Canada's competitive advantage, providing a strong foundation for security, stability and prosperity. The strategic outcome is supported by five programs:

Program 1.1: Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Description

Through the Decision-Making Support and Oversight program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its roles as management board of the Government of Canada and as budget office in the government-wide expenditure cycle. The program objective is to support the government in promoting value for money and results for Canadians in programs and operations.

This program achieves its results by providing independent strategic advice, analysis, guidance and oversight of programs, operations, and expenditures. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat reviews departmental submissions, provides recommendations to the Treasury Board, and coordinates and reports on the allocation of expenditures across government organizations and programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$47,506,141 $47,506,141 $47,927,651 $47,846,414
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
377 378 377
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Government is supported to promote value for money in programs and operations. Federal organizations either agree or strongly agree that Secretariat program sector officials provide constructive advice and guidance during the Treasury Board submission process. 70% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Enhance monitoring and reporting of government expenditures and support federal organizations through the Treasury Board submission process with collaborative engagement and advice (ongoing).
  • Support the Treasury Board in reviewing funding proposals, including business transformation initiatives and time-limited programs to promote effective and efficient spending that aligns with and supports broader government priorities (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Cabinet Decision Support

Description

Through the Cabinet Decision Support sub-program, the Secretariat supports decision making by providing advice regarding resource allocation, risks, compliance with rules and policies, and alignment with the Government of Canada's objectives and priorities. The sub-program objective is to provide the Treasury Board and other Cabinet committees with the best possible advice and analysis pertaining to departmental submissions to achieve results for Canadians.

This sub-program achieves its results by reviewing and providing advice and guidance on Treasury Board submissions and Memoranda to Cabinet. The Secretariat plays a challenge function role in reviewing any Cabinet proposal. It also supports the Treasury Board as a committee of ministers in considering Governor in Council regulations and Orders in Council.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$30,537,739 $30,510,574 $30,307,190 242 241 240
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Cabinet makes informed and timely decisions regarding Treasury Board and Governor in Council submissions and Memoranda to Cabinet. Federal organizations either agree or strongly agree that Secretariat officials provide an effective challenge function. 70% March 2016
Per cent of comments on Treasury Board submissions and Governor in Council regulatory proposals returned to client organizations within the established service standard. 90% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Review Cabinet documents, including transfer payment proposals, to ensure compliance with Government of Canada policies related to financial management (ongoing).
  • Strengthen the challenge function, undertake due diligence, and improve the rigour of financial information on Treasury Board submissions and other Cabinet proposals (ongoing).
  • Support the expenditure management system using the Costing Centre of Expertise to strengthen capacity, challenge costs and improve information available for decision making through enhanced due-diligence reviews of cost estimates in Cabinet documents (new).

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management

Description

Through the Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management sub-program, the Secretariat provides advice and analysis related to government expenditures, including compensation. It also supports decision making by providing reliable, detailed and timely information to Parliament and to the public, and by reporting on spending and resource allocation. The objective of this sub-program is to promote accountability and transparency in the management of government expenditures.

This program achieves its results by working with federal departments and agencies—as well as most Crown corporations—and by conducting research and analysis on expenditure trends to support expenditure planning, resource allocation and results-based decision making.

This sub-program also includes expenditures on whole-of-government reporting to Parliament and to Canadians.

The primary legislation underpinning this sub-program's activities is the Financial Administration Act, as well as the appropriation Acts associated with the Estimates.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$16,968,402 $17,417,077 $17,539,224 135 137 137
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Government expenditures are managed in an effective manner. The Consolidated Financial Statements of the Government of Canada receive an unmodified opinion from the Auditor General of Canada. Yes March 2016
Organizations receive necessary resources in a timely manner. Per cent of adjustments to organizations' votes and allotments made in a timely and appropriate manner, following parliamentary approval of supply. 100% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Take a government-wide perspective on cost savings, maximize the potential for operational efficiencies, and improve service to Canadians by providing advice and guidance on financial reporting, policy and Treasury Board accounting standards (new).
  • Direct the form and content of the 2015–16 Public Accounts of Canada, including the consolidated financial statements (ongoing).
  • Monitor federal organizations' financial performance reporting to the Receiver General (ongoing).
  • Contribute to the development of public sector accounting standards, domestically and internationally (ongoing).

Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Description

Through the Management Policies Development and Monitoring Program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its role of establishing principles for sound governance and management by setting government-wide policy direction in targeted areas. The program objective is to have a sound management policy framework for the Government of Canada.

This program achieves its results by communicating clear management expectations for deputy heads and by adopting principles-based approaches and risk-informed monitoring of policy compliance. The Secretariat develops, reviews, leads implementation, supports, and monitors policies and departmental performance under a variety of Areas of Management. The Secretariat also engages with functional communities and undertakes outreach and monitoring to promote policy compliance and capacity building.

This program is underpinned by legislation such as the Financial Administration Act, the Public Service Employment Act and the Federal Accountability Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$73,826,361 $73,826,361 $71,875,824 $71,941,055
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
552 545 539
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Federal organizations manage public resources and assets in key policy areas effectively. Per cent of organizations that comply with key policy requirements. 95% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Build on financial management expertise and knowledge in federal organizations to support compliance and effective resource management. Planned talent management activities for senior management will be rolled out 2015–18 (ongoing).
  • Use MAF results and the organizational perspective these results provide to evaluate compliance with key Treasury Board policy requirements (ongoing).
  • Develop and provide interpretation, advice, guidance and support to federal organizations to advance the implementation of regulations, frameworks and policies in such areas as financial and people management, information management and technology, and external-facing and organizational management (ongoing).
  • Conduct performance monitoring to ensure that government is well managed and accountable (e.g., Public Service Employee Survey, MAF) (ongoing).
  • Identify opportunities to strengthen and streamline the Treasury Board policy suite to ensure that policy instruments respond to government management priorities, help manage significant risks, enhance management performance and support deputy heads in providing advice regarding their direct authorities (ongoing).
  • Continue to report on and monitor federal institutions' implementation of people management–related regulations and policy instruments, and their development of IM/IT solutions (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Financial Management Policy

Description

Through the Financial Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides direction to federal organizations on proper stewardship of taxpayers' dollars and government assets. The sub-program works to strengthen financial management, management of real property and materiel, investment planning and project management, and procurement across the federal public service. The sub-program objective is to promote sound stewardship and value for money and provide direction on standardizing the management of public resources including in the areas of financial management and assets and acquired services across the Government of Canada.

This sub-program provides policy direction and leadership to departments by developing and maintaining policies, guidance and practices; nurturing sustainable and professional communities (e.g., finance, procurement, materiel management, real property); monitoring departmental performance and compliance; and helping improve the overall efficiency of government operations. This includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

The primary legislation issuing program authority is the Financial Administration Act.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$12,034,021 $12,314,414 $12,166,757 79 79 80
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Financial management policies are effective in promoting sound stewardship and value for money across the Government of Canada. Per cent of organizations that have implemented a risk-based ongoing monitoring program for all three control areas to support the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting. 80% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that have a chief financial officer–approved Financial Management System Plan in accordance with the Policy on the Stewardship of Financial Management Systems and its related directive. 80% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that met key policy requirements for management of acquired services and assets. 80% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy

Description

Through the People Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat supports activities of the Treasury Board in its role as the employer of the core public administration. This sub-program provides government-wide leadership through enabling policy frameworks, strategic engagements and human resources services delivery infrastructure for high performance and leadership excellence in people management. It enables prudent fiscal management of resources in the areas of classification, total compensation (collective bargaining, wages and salaries, terms and conditions of employment, pensions and benefits) and labour relations.

In support of deputy heads and to provide Parliament and Canadians with a view of people management, this sub-program develops and monitors the implementation of policy frameworks, including for executive management; classification; values and ethics and for official languages. It establishes people management performance indicators; assesses and reports on organizations' performance in people management; and collects and provides data on the public service. This includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

This sub-program is underpinned by legislation such as the Financial Administration Act, the Federal Accountability Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act, the Public Service Employment Act and the Official Languages Act.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$27,789,543 $27,445,128 $27,905,963 231 229 229
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
People management policies and infrastructure contribute to achieving effective people management in the Government of Canada. Per cent of employees who have had a performance appraisal at the end of the performance management cycle. 95% March 2016
Average employment equity representation of each of the four designated groups in organizations across the public sector compared with workforce availability, as a percentage of workforce adjustment. 100% March 2016
Per cent of employees who indicate that overall their organization treats them with respect. Improvement over 2011 PSES resultsFootnote 3 March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Oversee modernization of the job classification program and review the occupational group structure in line with the government's priority to advance a productive, high-performing and affordable public service (new).
  • Implement the key leadership competencies to meet the evolving needs of the public service (new).
  • Work to advance the broader human resources agenda, including strategic management of compensation (ongoing).
  • Work with stakeholders (e.g., organizations, bargaining agents, and the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board) to help prepare for the implementation of changes to the recourse provisions of the Public Service Labour Relations Act and other related Acts (ongoing).
  • Provide evidence-based analysis and recommendations to modernize the classification and compensation structure for senior leaders in order to attract and retain future leaders (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Information Management and Information Technology Policy

Description

Through the Information Management and Information Technology Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides strategic direction and leadership to federal institutions on record keeping, business intelligence, data management, web content management, access to information, and privacy protection and management of cyber-security and information technology. This sub-program enables information to be safeguarded as a public trust and managed as a strategic asset.

The Secretariat creates an environment that promotes open information and allows Canadians to exercise their right to access and use information, where personal information is protected against unauthorized collection, use and disclosure. The sub-program encourages the continual improvement of Information Management and Information Technology across the Government of Canada by promoting principles and standards that support the achievements of the Government of Canada's enterprise transformation objectives, and enable department priorities.

The sub-program develops and maintains policy instruments, encourages collaboration between government institutions, monitors and oversees departmental policy performances and provides leadership. This includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$18,560,668 $17,456,959 $17,275,819 122 120 116
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Federal institutions manage information and technology effectively. Per cent of organizations that demonstrate leadership engagement in information technology management. 70% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that have implemented strategies and plans to effectively manage information and technology. 70% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that are aligned with, and actively engaged in, the implementation of Government of Canada enterprise initiatives. Target to be established once final MAF data for 2014–15 are available March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Engage Government of Canada information and technology leaders to ensure strategic use of information management (IM) and information technology (IT) in enabling more secure, efficient, and effective enterprise-wide transformation and delivery of government programs and services (ongoing).
  • Increase the Government of Canada's capacity to respond to cyber-threats, recover from cyber-incidents, and address the outcomes of lessons learned exercises by establishing tools, templates and best practices as part of enterprise-wide IT infrastructure renewal and knowledge development and sharing activities (ongoing).
  • Working with lead security agencies to assist in coordinating activities during an incident, which includes identifying the incident's impact on business (ongoing).
  • Modernize the IM and IT portfolio and lead effective execution of strategies to enable efficient, interoperable, accountable, transparent and secure government operations and services in support of the transformation agenda (ongoing).
  • Modernize the administration of the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) program by developing a government-wide approach to increase efficiency and accessibility by implementing a request and pay online system available through Open.Canada.ca with searchable ATIP summaries (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Externally-Facing Policy

Description

Through the Externally Facing Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides strategic direction and guidance to departments and agencies to effectively manage Government of Canada communications and services to Canadians. In addition, it provides management and oversight of the government's regulatory function to the benefit of citizens and stakeholders. The sub-program's objectives are to promote high-quality, beneficial, consistent and open relationships and interactions between the Government of Canada and citizens and other stakeholders, and to reduce regulatory compliance burdens on business that may inhibit growth, productivity and innovation.

The Secretariat provides strategic direction and guidance in the areas of Government of Canada services, communications and regulations, and monitors the policy compliance of departments. This includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$7,883,810 $7,251,526 $7,107,926 57 56 52
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Communications, corporate identity and service policy instruments are implemented in organizations effectively. Per cent of key service organizations that are implementing the Government of Canada service direction. 70% March 2016
Per cent of organizations in compliance with select requirements of the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, the Federal Identity Program Policy and their related instruments. 80% March 2016
Regulatory administrative burden on business is controlled. Per cent of organizations in compliance with the reconciliation requirements of the One-for-One Rule. 90% Annually
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Evaluate organizational compliance with the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada and the Federal Identity Program Policy through the Communications Policy and Federal Identity Program policy centre in the Secretariat (ongoing).
  • Take a “bottom-up” and user-centric approach to identify key areas where red tape problems are found and where some concrete action can be taken (ongoing).
  • Work with federal organizations to implement the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management (ongoing).
  • Monitor and report on regulatory organizations' level of compliance with the One-for-One Rule (ongoing).
  • Monitor implementation of the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan by federal organizations by continuing to establish service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations to enhance predictability and to post Forward Regulatory Plans on the website to provide businesses with the opportunity to engage and plan for the future (ongoing).
  • Have the Communications Policy and Federal Identity Program policy centre conduct a review of Treasury Board policy instruments to identify opportunities to streamline requirements and ensure sound management of communications and corporate identity activities (ongoing).
  • Oversee implementation of the Policy on Service, and develop a government-wide service strategy and new policy instruments to support enhanced digital self-service delivery (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.2.5: Organizational Management Policy

Description

Through the Organizational Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides leadership and direction in the areas of results-based management, risk management, internal audit, evaluation and non–information technology security. These policies support the ongoing improvement of the relevance, effectiveness and value for money of programs and operations across the Government of Canada. It also includes the strategic direction and coordination of the Management Accountability Framework to support and improve the practices and accountability of deputy heads across departments and agencies. The objective of this sub-program is to promote effective and standard corporate management practices across the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat develops and maintains policy instruments, and engages with functional communities, to build capacity and promote management excellence, and monitors policy compliance in the area of corporate management. This includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$7,558,319 $7,404,797 $7,484,590 62 60 62
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Organizational management policies promote effective and standard corporate management practices across the Government of Canada.

Composite of new proposed Public Service Management Advisory Committee indicator:

  1. Organizations either agree or strongly agree that the Secretariat's policy centres for organizational management provide useful tools to facilitate their implementation of policy requirements.
  2. Organizations either agree or strongly agree that the Secretariat's policy centres for organizational management provide useful guidance to facilitate their implementation of policy requirements.
70% March 2016
Per cent of federal organizations that have effectively established practices to mitigate identified security risks. 60% March 2016
Per cent of federal organizations that have received a “generally conforms” on a Practice Inspection of their internal audit function. 95% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Conclude the first annual assessment under the renewed MAF (new).
  • Review the Policy on Government Security and develop a phased implementation plan in collaboration with stakeholders to improve consistency of application and relevance, and support the effective delivery of programs by protecting information, assets, individuals, and services through measures commensurate with the security risk (ongoing).
  • Lead an integrated approach, in partnership with lead security agencies, to strengthen the government's security posture by supporting enterprise-wide security management that protects information, assets, individuals and services against internal and external threats (ongoing).
  • Provide leadership, actively engage partners, share best practices and encourage collaboration through multiple forums, to enable the security community to effectively manage departmental security and contribute to improving the overall management of enterprise security (ongoing).
  • Strengthen results-based management through improved performance metrics and analytics to support effectiveness and efficiency in program delivery (ongoing).
  • Build on the results of the evaluation of the Policy on Evaluation to continue to enhance the usefulness of evaluations for policy and program improvement and expenditure management, as well as to consult with organizations to support their needs for capacity building initiatives (ongoing).
  • Provide guidance, direction and functional leadership to strengthen internal audit, including developing tools and activities to support organizations in enhancing their professional practices to meet the standards of the internal audit community (e.g., planning, conducting and reporting on engagements) (ongoing).
  • Lead the Blueprint 2020 horizontal initiative to reduce internal red tape, engaging public service employees through social media and in-person workshops (new).

Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Description

Through the Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery program, the Secretariat designs and delivers activities, systems, services and operations with, for, or on behalf of other organizations in the Government of Canada. This program also establishes a platform for transformational initiatives. The program objective is to provide consistent and cost-controlled operations across the Government of Canada.

This program achieves its results by developing and delivering solutions where whole-of-government leadership is required or where standardization and cost-savings can be achieved.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$50,671,220 $50,671,220 $48,051,421 $44,338,351
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
333 279 280
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The Government of Canada has the capacity to manage operations in an innovative and cost-effective manner. Employees agree that they have the necessary tools to do their jobs. Improvement over 2011 PSES results. March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Support Government of Canada awards and recognition as part of an approach to comprehensive performance management and employee engagement (ongoing).
  • Continue to manage, improve and modernize various HR programs in the areas of workplace well-being, performance management, informal conflict management, employee assistance, diversity and employment equity (ongoing).
  • Transform the government-wide applications rationalization program, focusing on standardizing and consolidating back office functions (including myGCHR), in order to streamline and modernize internal systems, reduce costs, support enhanced business analytics and increase administrative efficiency (ongoing).
  • Improve the government's ability to manage IT investments at the enterprise level by introducing an integrated IT planning and prioritization process that uses departmental IT plans, application portfolio management data (e.g., mission critical data and aging IT), and annual expenditure reporting (new).
  • Renew the government-wide IM strategy to ensure that information is safeguarded as a public trust and managed as a strategic asset (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Pensions and Benefits

Description

Through the Pensions and Benefits sub-program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board as manager of the federal Public Service Pension Plan and as the pension plan and group benefit plan sponsor. The objective of this sub-program is to provide consistent pensions and benefits to employees across the core public service.

The Secretariat oversees administration of the Public Service Pension Plan, providing direction to Public Works and Government Services Canada, and undertakes management and oversight responsibilities for other federal pension and benefit programs. This includes program development and management of pensions, benefits, disability and sick leave management. The Secretariat also manages stakeholder relations and provides information to pension and benefit plan members on entitlements, and communicates changes to the Public Service Pension Plan. The Secretariat supports the Secretary and the Treasury Board in setting the terms and conditions relating to eligibility, premiums, contributions, and other arrangements.

The Secretariat is also responsible for insurance benefits plans, which include health care, dental and disability for public service employees, pensioners and their dependants. This includes oversight of the plan contracts, communication, and initiatives to manage costs.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$7,559,708 $6,093,471 $5,497,543 84 42 40

The decreases in planned spending and FTEs from 2015–16 to 2016–17 are largely attributable to the sunsetting of authorities related to chargeable administrative costs for the Public Service Pension Plan. Authorities are approved on a three-year basis and will be sought as of 2016–17.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Centrally managed, modern, cost-effective, efficient and well-governed pension and benefit plans that contribute to the competitiveness of the federal government as an employer. Per cent completion of planned initiatives and activities that contribute to the modernization, cost-effectiveness and efficiency of plans. 80% March 2016
Per cent of key government partners that either agree or strongly agree that the Secretariat provides quality advice and support in the area of pensions. 80% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Advance the development of a modern approach to public sector pensions and benefits, in consultation with stakeholders, to modernize the disability and sick leave management system and better support employee productivity, recovery and wellness (new).
  • Pursue a modern approach to public sector compensation and pensions and benefits, ensuring that they are affordable and sustainable for the long term and work in areas such as governance, reporting, and plan sustainability for employee benefits (ongoing).
  • Implement the action plan developed in response to the 2014 Spring Report of the Auditor General of Canada on public sector pension plans (new).

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Labour Relations

Description

Through the Labour Relations sub-program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its role as employer by overseeing labour management and compensation operations for the core public administration.

The Secretariat negotiates collective agreements with employee bargaining agents and oversees employer representation at recourse for labour relations, classification, pay equity, staffing and terms and conditions of employment. It also provides advice and guidance to departments and agencies on labour relations and compensation issues.

This sub-program is underpinned by legislation, such as the Financial Administration Act, the Federal Accountability Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act, and the Public Service Employment Act.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$21,988,012 $22,683,390 $19,176,880 89 88 87
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Compensation decisions enable the government to achieve its recruitment and retention objectives in a cost-effective manner. Per cent of compensation decisions that are aligned with the principles of the Treasury Board's Policy Framework for the Management of Compensation. 90% March 2016
Federal organizations are enabled to execute their people management authorities and, when required, are effectively represented during litigation, adjudication, recourse, and in other forums. Government organizations either agree or strongly agree that the advice and support provided by the Secretariat's labour relations programs enables them to effectively execute their people management authorities, and ensures effective representation of the employer during litigation and recourse. 70% June 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Implement an integrated compensation strategy for the core public administration, the excluded and unrepresented employees, the separate agencies, the Canadian Forces and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The current round of collective bargaining will advance the government's priority to negotiate a new short-term disability plan and sick leave provisions, as part of the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Initiative (new).
  • Ensure an integrated and coordinated employer's response to grievances and complaints (e.g., staffing, classification, human rights, labour relations) to protect the interests of the employer (ongoing).
  • Provide litigation advice and guidance on court challenges, and support Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms claims and pay equity cases (ongoing).
  • Advance the employer's position collaboratively through the National Joint Council, providing input from the respective policy centres and the Office of the Employer Side Secretary (ongoing).
  • Provide ongoing advice and interpretation to deputy heads and federal organizations on policies for minister's offices and directives on relocation, commuting assistance, isolated posts and government housing, occupational health and safety, first aid to the general public, allowance for employees, uniforms, travel, foreign service and workforce adjustment (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Government-Wide Operations

Description

Through the Government-Wide Operations sub-program, the Secretariat provides other departments and agencies with access to shared operations, services, and information technology systems. The Secretariat also provides support to small departments and agencies where specific expertise is required or capacity limitations exist, in order to generate cost-savings. The Secretariat develops and maintains IT tools that promote a more collaborative and efficient public service. Its objective is to improve the efficiency of government organizations.

Activities under this sub-program are performed with groups of government organizations to facilitate government business. These services and systems are developed and maintained by the Secretariat, sometimes in partnership with other organizations.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$10,919,087 $9,178,540 $9,398,502 101 97 98
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Government-wide operations are managed effectively. Per cent of government operations activities that met 2015–16 targets. 100% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that have implemented services and systems developed or mandated by the Secretariat. 100% March 2016
Per cent of public servants using collaborative tools developed by the Secretariat. 15% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Provide government-wide service leadership and guidance in line with the Policy on Service, and oversee an approach to improving the design and delivery of services (ongoing).
  • Contribute to improved efficiency of policy development and program delivery through enhancements to GCpedia and GCconnex, enabling greater collaboration within and across federal organizations (ongoing).
  • Continue to perform horizontal internal audits in large and small federal organizations and core control audits in small organizations to contribute to improving government-wide public sector management (ongoing).

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership

Description

Through the Transformation Leadership sub-program, the Secretariat reviews existing administrative systems and processes, and provides the platform for transformational initiatives across the Government of Canada to promote improvements primarily, but not exclusively, in back office functions. The objective of this sub-program is to achieve long-term savings by redesigning operations of the Government of Canada where benefits outweigh the costs.

The Secretariat develops and pilots leading-edge enterprise tools, systems, and services to initiate change and help identify lessons learned in support of government-wide implementation.

Human and Financial Resources
Budgetary Financial Resources Planned Spending Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
$10,204,413 $10,096,020 $10,265,426 59 52 54
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Transformational initiatives improve Government of Canada operations. Per cent of initiatives that met 2015–16 commitments. 70% March 2016
Per cent of organizations that have adopted new initiatives as targeted. 77% March 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Design, deliver and facilitate the transformation of people management business processes, systems (including myGCHR) and services (new).
  • Lead Open Government activities by implementing Canada's second Action Plan on Open Government. This includes providing an Open Government secretariat; working inter-jurisdictionally with provinces and territories; and identifying new initiatives to foster openness, innovation and greater citizen engagement (ongoing).
  • Provide increased access to government data, services and citizen engagement online through a single point of entry, Canada.ca. This web portal has been optimized for mobile use and designed to enhance the user experience. It is also supported by more efficient web publishing (ongoing).
  • Continue rollout of the three-year project to implement a performance management regime across the core public administration, as per the Directive on Performance Management. The project includes the design, configuration and maintenance of an online application to automate performance management and reporting (ongoing).
  • Advance transformation of the financial and results-based management functions across government by modernizing, standardizing and streamlining business processes that support efficient enterprise-level decisions (ongoing).
  • Advance work on pilot programs for business (e.g., Business Number Hub) and for Canadians (e.g., Federated Identity Management) to facilitate the “tell us once” approach (ongoing).

Program 1.4: Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments

Description

The Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments program accounts for funds that are held centrally to supplement other appropriations, from which allocations are made to, or payments and receipts are made on behalf of, other federal organizations. These funds supplement the standard appropriations process and meet certain responsibilities of the Treasury Board as the employer of the core public administration, including employer obligations under the public service pension and benefits plans.

The administration of these funds falls under the Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management sub-program and the People Management Policy sub-program, but their financial resources are shown separately in the PAA for visibility and reporting purposes.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$6,645,161,074 $6,645,161,074 $6,333,254,397 $6,333,254,397

This program consists of two components:

1. Government-Wide Funds (Central Votes)
Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$4,395,090,470 $4,395,090,470 $3,996,193,000 $3,996,193,000
2. Public Service Employer Payments
Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$2,250,070,604 $2,250,070,604 $2,337,061,397 $2,337,061,397
Human Resources (FTEs) (for both components)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
N/A N/A N/A
Performance Measurement (for both components)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Allocations and payments managed by the Secretariat are made, as required. Per cent of allocations and payments made as required. 100% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Continue planned spending for this program according to the legislative requirements related to Treasury Board Vote 20 – Public Service Employer Payments. Related information on planned spending is presented in Section III: Supplementary Information. Other contingency funds are available to other government departments, if required, and expenditures are identified under their programs (ongoing).

Program 1.5: Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups include the following services: Management and Oversight; Communications; Legal; Human Resources Management; Financial Management; Information Management; Information Technology; Real Property; Materiel; and Acquisition.

Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and do not include those provided for a specific program.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
$75,279,537 $75,279,537 $64,308,499 $64,876,983
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
582 567 565

Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Secretariat will:

  • Implement initiatives to streamline and automate internal processes, significantly reduce paper usage, and improve efficiencies by using new technologies (ongoing).
  • Introduce new technology, tools and practices for managing information to increase productivity and collaboration and enhance the security of the Secretariat's information (ongoing).
  • Consolidate and reduce office space and implement enabling technologies to support collaboration and a mobile, connected workforce through the Workplace Renewal Initiative, including the move to new office accommodations (ongoing).
  • Maintain employee engagement and idea generation through the This is TBS Steering Committee and Innovation Working Group (ongoing).


Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's (the Secretariat's) operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. As such, the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the report differ, as they are prepared on an expenditure basis.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Secretariat's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31
Financial Information 2014–15
Estimated Results
2015–16
Planned Results
Change
Total expenses $3,302,177,577 $2,962,600,282 ($339,577,295)
Total net revenues $14,152,834 $13,268,175 ($884,659)
Net cost of operations $3,288,024,743 $2,949,332,107 ($338,692,636)

Total expenses are forecasted to decrease by $339.6 million (10.3 per cent). The decrease is mainly due to one-time funding requirements in 2014–15 related to public service employer payments ($246.1 million) and an out of court settlement ($74.9 million). It also has to do with a reduction in 2015–16 expenses due to the implementation of Strategic Review decisions related to public service employer payments ($10.2 million). Total net revenues are forecasted to decrease by $0.9 million (6.3 per cent) in 2015–16 mainly due to a decrease related to the provision of internal support services to other departments. As a result, the net cost of operations is forecasted to decrease by $338.7 million (10.3 per cent) in 2015–16 from 2014–15 net costs.

Expenses include approximately $2.9 billion in 2014–15 and $2.7 billion in 2015–16 that are largely related to public service employer payments. These funds are used for government-wide programs such as the employer's share of the Public Service Health Care Plan, the Public Service Dental Care Plan, other insurance and pension programs, as well as contributions to the Public Service Pension Plan and Retirement Compensation Arrangement in respect of actuarial deficits. The balance of the expenses relates to departmental expenses including salary costs and payments for goods and services. Revenues of approximately $13 million to $14 million per year consist of the provision of internal support services to other departments, and the recovery of costs related to pension administration services provided to the Public Service Pension Plan.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's website:

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.



Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
140 O'Connor Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5
Canada


Appendix: Definitions

appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (DPR):
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. DPRs are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending:

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP):
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated organization over a three-year period. RPPs are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
whole-of-government framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.


Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Future-Oriented Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending March 31, 2016

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Future-Oriented Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending March 31, 2016

(in thousands of dollars)
Estimated Results
2014–15
Planned Results
2015–16

Notes:

The accompanying notes form an integral part of this future-oriented statement of operations.

Expenses (Note 7)
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments (Note 6)
2,943,555 2,685,362
Management Frameworks
60,830 0
People Management
154,457 0
Expenditure Management
34,705 0
Financial Management
36,380 0
Decision-Making Support and Oversight
0 51,263
Management Policies Development and Monitoring
0 79,597
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
0 63,510
Internal Services
72,251 82,868
Total expenses 3,302,178 2,962,600
Revenues
Recovery of pension administration costs
8,885 8,744
Internal support services
6,709 5,978
Parking fees – Government-wide
2,604 2,200
Other
87 66
Gross revenues
18,285 16,988
Revenues earned on behalf of government
(4,132) (3,720)
Total net revenues 14,153 13,268
Net cost of operations 3,288,025 2,949,332

1. Departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs

For more information on the Secretariat's strategic outcomes and programs refer to Section II of the Report on Plans and Priorities.

2. Methodology and Significant Assumptions

The future-oriented statement of operations has been prepared on the basis of government priorities and departmental plans as described in the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

The information in the estimated results for fiscal year 2014–15 and the planned results for fiscal year 2015–16 are based on the activities and initiatives included in the forecast spending and planned spending amounts that are presented in the departmental RPP, expressed in terms of accrual accounting.

The main assumptions underlying the forecasts are as follows:

  • The Secretariat's activities will remain substantially the same as for the previous year.
  • Expenses and revenues, including the determination of amounts internal and external to the government, are based on historical experience. The general historical pattern is expected to continue.

These assumptions are adopted as at February 6, 2015.

3. Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

Forecasts have been made for 2014–15 and 2015–16. Actual results achieved for both years are likely to vary from the forecast information presented, and this variation could be material.

In preparing this future-oriented statement of operations, the Secretariat has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future. These estimates and assumptions may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Factors that could lead to material differences between the future-oriented statement of operations and the historical statement of operations include the following:

  • The timing and amount of acquisitions and the disposal of property, plant and equipment, which may affect gains or losses and the amortization expense;
  • Implementation of new collective agreements; and
  • Further changes to the operating budget through additional new initiatives or technical adjustments later in the year.

Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, the Secretariat will not be updating the forecasts for any changes in financial resources made in ensuing supplementary estimates. Variances will be explained in the Secretariat's Departmental Performance Report.

4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The future-oriented statement of operations has been prepared using Government of Canada accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis and are recorded when goods are received or services are rendered. These expenses include:

  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation and legal services at their estimated cost.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave when earned by employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Amortization of tangible capital assets, which are capitalized at their acquisition cost. Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset.

b) Revenues

Revenues are accounted for in the period in which the related transactions or the event that gives rise to the revenues occurred.

Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge the Secretariat's liabilities. While the Secretary is expected to maintain accounting control, she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues. As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government of Canada and are therefore presented as a reduction of the entity's gross revenues.

5. Parliamentary Authorities

The Secretariat receives most of its funding through expenditure authorities provided by Parliament. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the Secretariat do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Items recognized in the Future-Oriented Statement of Operations in one year may be funded through parliamentary authorities in prior, current, or future years. Accordingly, the Secretariat has a different net cost of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables.

a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to requested authorities
(in thousands of dollars)
Estimated
2014–15
Planned
2015–16
Net cost of operations 3,288,025 2,949,332
Adjustment for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Services provided without charge by other government departments
(19,008) (19,868)
Gain on disposal of tangible capital assets
11 29
Change in vacation pay and compensatory leave liabilities
(142) 221
Change in employee future benefits
851 561
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(1,283) (4,706)
Refunds / Adjustment to previous years' expenditures
5,596 7,709
Total items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities
(13,975) (16,054)
Adjustment for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
11,184 7,068
Change in prepaid expenses
11 8
Change in lease obligation for tangible capital assets
73 0
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities
11,268 7,076
Requested authorities 3,285,318 2,940,354
b) Authorities requested
(in thousands of dollars)
Estimated
2014–15
Planned
2015–16
Authorities requested:
Vote 1 – Program expenditures
308,653 219,601
Vote 5 – Government contingencies
750,000 750,000
Vote 10 – Government-wide initiatives
103 2,090
Vote 20 – Public service insurance
2,506,134 2,250,071
Vote 25 – Operating budget carry forward
460,112 1,600,000
Vote 30 – Paylist requirements
1,742,785 1,000,000
Vote 33 – Capital budget carry forward
137,334 600,000
Subtotal 5,905,121 6,421,762
Statutory amounts:
Employer contributions made under the Public Service Superannuation Act, other retirement Acts, and the Employment Insurance Act
443,000 443,000
Contributions to employee benefit plans
27,434 27,600
President of the Treasury Board – Salary and motor car allowance
80 82
Payments for the pay equity settlement pursuant to section 30 of the Crown Liability and Proceedings Act
17 0
Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets
14 41
Subtotal 470,545 470,723
Less:
Authorities to transfer or lapse:
Vote 1 – Program expenditures
0 0
Vote 5 – Government contingencies
(750,000) (750,000)
Vote 10 – Government-wide initiatives
(103) (2,090)
Vote 20 – Public service insurance
0 0
Vote 25 – Operating budget carry forward
(460,112) (1,600,000)
Vote 30 – Paylist requirements
(1,742,785) (1,000,000)
Vote 33 – Capital budget carry forward
(137,334) (600,000)
Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets
(14) (41)
Subtotal (3,090,348) (3,952,131)
Requested authorities 3,285,318 2,940,354

The authorities presented reflect current forecasts of statutory items, approved initiatives included and expected to be included in Estimates documents, and (when reasonable estimates can be made) estimates of amounts to be allocated from Treasury Board Central Votes.

6. Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments

The Government of Canada sponsors defined benefit pension plans covering most of its employees. The Secretariat also funds payments to, or in respect of, the following:

  • Employer's share of contributions to the Public Service Death Benefit Account;
  • Employer's share of Canada/Québec Pension Plan contributions and Employment Insurance premiums;
  • Employer's share of health, disability, and life insurance premiums and related Québec sales tax;
  • Employer's share of the Québec Parental Insurance Plan premiums;
  • Claims and related costs under the Public Service Dental Care Plan and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan;
  • Provincial payroll taxes in respect of employees who work in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Newfoundland and Labrador. The payroll tax is levied on employers in each of the provinces to help fund the respective health plans; and
  • Returns to certain employees of their share of the Employment Insurance premium reduction.

Generally, Public Service Pension Plan contributions, Public Service Death Benefit Account contributions, Canada/Québec Pension Plan contributions, and Employment Insurance premiums are recovered from all departments, agencies and revolving funds, based on salaries and wages incurred. Contributions to health care plans are recovered from certain departments, agencies and all revolving funds, based on a percentage of salaries and wages incurred.

The following table presents a breakdown by major category:
(in thousands of dollars)
Estimated
2014–15
Planned
2015–16
Expenses:
Employer's contributions to government employee benefit plans (statutory)
3,375,968 3,471,035
Public Service Health Care Plan premiums (Vote 20)
1,103,646 1,089,390
Group disability and life insurance premiums (Vote 20)
762,529 530,188
Provincial payroll taxes (Vote 20)
531,406 544,707
Public service and pensioners' dental care plans claims (Vote 20)
455,546 458,704
Public Service Pension Plan and Retirement Compensation Arrangements in respect of actuarial deficits (statutory)
443,000 443,000
Provincial health insurance plan premiums (Vote 20)
37,037 40,211
Québec Parental Insurance Plan premiums (Vote 20)
36,452 36,204
Operating expenses (Vote 20)
7,506 7,882
Pension and similar payments to former government employees (Vote 20)
4,481 5,027
Employment Insurance premiums reduction (Vote 20)
2,182 1,801
Payments for the pay equity settlement (statutory)
17 0
Total expenses 6,759,770 6,628,149
Recoveries:
Employer's contributions to government employee benefit plans recovered from government departments and agencies (statutory)
3,375,968 3,471,035
Employees' and pensioners' contributions to the Public Service Health Care Plan recovered from government departments and agencies (Vote 20)
189,078 221,643
Employer's contributions to government employee insurance plans recovered from government departments and agencies (Vote 20)
169,251 163,391
Pensioners' contributions to the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (Vote 20)
81,918 86,718
Total recoveries 3,816,215 3,942,787
Net expenses 2,943,555 2,685,362

7. Comparative Information by Program

As a result of the Secretariat's new Program Alignment Architecture approved for 2015–16, comparative information for 2014–15 could not be prepared on the same basis due to significant differences in programs between the two years. The 2014–15 estimated expenses are therefore presented according to the Secretariat's Program Alignment Architecture applicable for 2014–15.



Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

Name of transfer payment program International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB)
(Voted)
End date March 31, 2016
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Previous program and sub-program

  • Program 1.4: Financial Management; Sub-Program 1.4.1: Financial Management, Oversight and Reporting

New programs and sub-programs

  • Program 1.1: Decision-Making Support and Oversight; Sub-Program 1.1.2: Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management (76%)
  • Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.1: Financial Management Policy (24%)
Main objective The International Federation of Accountants, through its ongoing policy work undertaken by the IPSASB, will develop high-quality accounting standards for use by public sector entities.
Planned spending for 2015–16 $200,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2010–11
General targeted recipient groups Non-profit organization


Greening Government Operations

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context
This target applies to procurement activities generated to support departmental operations at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat).
Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)
Program 1.5: Internal Services
Financial Performance Expectations
N/A

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of materiel and services

Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

17 specialists

94%

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

6 managers and functional heads

100%

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2017, 100 per cent of vehicles purchased are right-sized for operational needs and are the most fuel-efficient vehicle in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide and/or are an alternative fuel vehicle.

Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number of vehicle purchases that meet the target relative to the total number of all vehicle purchases in the given year.

100%

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2017, monitoring purchases to ensure a higher percentage of recycled content and an increase in green purchases.

Performance Indicator Performance Target
By March 31, 2017, 95 per cent of copy paper will contain a minimum of 30-per-cent recycled content and will be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
By March 31, 2017, 90 per cent of toner cartridges are recycled at end of life. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2016, the initiation of a contract under the Secretariat's authority will not require paper.

Performance Indicator Performance Target
Functional specialists in procurement will receive an electronically approved Contract Initiation Form and will no longer require wet ink signatures. 95% of new contracts initiated at a Protected B level or lower during 2015–16 will not require a paper-based form.
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments, where available and feasible. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
7.2.2. Incorporate environmental considerations into procurement instruments (applies only to Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)). N/A
Best Practice 7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
Best Practice 7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
Additional Activities Performance Target
Ensure green procurement training for employees that manage low-dollar-value acquisitions.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

100% of low-dollar-value authority holders are informed of the Secretariat's green procurement targets and resources, such as PWGSC's Office of Greening Government Operations (OGGO).

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Scope and Context
This target applies to select Internal Services areas that support departmental operations at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.
Link to Department's PAA
Program 1.5: Internal Services
Financial Performance Expectations
N/A

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact

Performance Indicator Performance Target
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices.

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

Continue to engage the administrative services community on challenges and opportunities in greening government.

7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Continue to adhere to asset and materiel life-cycle management guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (e.g., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).

Printer Ratios: The target is an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Green Meetings: By 2015–16, 100% of employees have access to a mobile device (tablet or laptop) to reference meeting material digitally in order to avoid printing.

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

Paper Usage: The Secretariat continues to reduce paper consumption. The new target is a reduction of 25% from the baseline set in 2011–12 (increased from earlier target of 20%).

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

7.3.1.4. Minimize the number of information technology (IT) assets per employee.

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

The Secretariat will ensure a maximum of two network access devices per employee when an employee adopts mobile computing and telephony (laptop or tablet and mobile phone)—excluding employees with elevated security or network access requirements.

7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

100% of multi-functional devices are set to hibernate when not in use.

7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Continue to adhere to e-waste guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Continue to adhere to reuse and recycling guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated, and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste. N/A
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings and improve space utilization in special purpose buildings.

Seeking to obtain "Achieved"

By 2015–16, the Secretariat will have a minimum of 60% of its staff adhering to the Workplace 2.0 office space utilization standard. The Secretariat has no special purpose buildings.

7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Continue to adhere to the Treasury Board Directive on Fleet Management: Executive Vehicles, subsection 5.4, for the purchase and use of vehicle fleets.



Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative:
Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy (WPS)
Name of lead department:
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat)
Lead department Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) program and sub-program:
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery, Pensions and Benefits
Start date of the horizontal initiative:
February 2013
End date of the horizontal initiative:
2017

Total federal funding allocation (from start date to end date)

The amount of $25,010,838 in total funding has been allocated over a four-year period for the Secretariat, Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Health Canada to carry out a range of activities in support of modernizing the current system for disability and sick leave management. The total allocated funding includes an amount of $21,092,649 in funding from the fiscal framework, along with $3,918,189 from existing departmental reference levels.

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding)

The Government of Canada intends to implement the WPS as a means to modernize federal public service disability and sick leave management and to bring itself at par with other jurisdictions and industry standards. It announced its intention in Budget 2013 and earmarked $21.5 million over four years to modernize the disability and sick leave management system in the federal public service. The funding is allocated between the Secretariat (13.9 million), ESDC – Labour ($2.4 million) and PWGSC ($5.2 million). This plan was reinforced in the October 2013 Speech from the Throne.

Under the WPS, the Government of Canada proposes to introduce a new self-insured, short-term disability plan to replace the accumulated sick leave model. A new short-term plan would provide all employees with equitable income security in the event that they become ill or injured and would seamlessly link up with the long-term disability support and benefits. The WPS would also include retendering of the two fully insured long-term disability plans.

The existing plans were put in place some 40 years ago, and they have not kept pace with the changing workplace and related health issues and ensuing interventions. A new long-term plan would incorporate modernized ways to support employees while they are on long-term disability benefits. The WPS would emphasize wellness, prevention and return-to-work support through active case management. These supports would help employees to remain productive at work and would promote workplace physical and mental wellness.

Once adopted, the WPS would balance employee wellness and workplace productivity. The new approach would offer the same coverage to all federal public servants, regardless of tenure or medical history. It would also provide adequate income protection, along with timely access to case management, rehabilitation, and return-to-work services for employees who experience illness or injury.

In 2014, the Government of Canada embarked on collective bargaining to negotiate sick leave provisions and the proposed short-term disability plan. The outcome of the negotiations is expected to inform the design of the short-term disability plan.

Shared outcomes

The targeted result to be achieved by the Secretariat and its partners is the modernization of key elements of the disability and sick leave management regime in the federal public service, with a view to creating a seamless, integrated and sustainable system to support employee wellness and productivity. This initiative aims to improve overall management of employee disability and help a higher percentage of employees back to work, when they are ready to return. 

Governance structures

A Memorandum to Cabinet dated February 2013 mandated the Secretariat to lead the project in collaboration with its federal partners PWGSC, ESDC (then Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)) and Health Canada. A subsequent Treasury Board submission in fall 2013 (signed by the Ministers responsible for the Secretariat, PWGSC and HRSDC) approved the overall funding and the project plan.

A project charter and brief, prepared for the initiative and reviewed by senior officials from each of the partner organizations, provides details on the initiative and spells out the roles, responsibilities and deliverables of each of the partners.

In addition, the WPS initiative has put in place a detailed governance structure to support effective, collaborative and timely decision making regarding the resolution of ongoing and emerging issues. The governance structure includes oversight at the highest levels, through a Deputy Minister Project Governance Committee, an ADM Steering Committee and a working-level group of committees covering each of the initiative's major activities.

The chair of each of the work stream committees is responsible for monitoring work, directing corrective actions to be taken when required, reporting regularly on progress, and submitting deliverables as completed to the project management office. The latter would have core responsibility for monitoring progress, directing any required corrective actions and approving deliverables. As the executive director is responsible for project progress overall, he or she is the chair of the project management office.

Planning highlights for 2015–16

Continuous reporting and monitoring of the initiative (as described above) ensures that progress is closely tracked using evidence-based information.

Federal partners

Sponsored by the Secretariat, the WPS has partners in key departments. 

PWGSC – Acquisitions Branch and Accounting, Banking and Compensation Branch: The Acquisitions Branch is to provide procurement expertise in the procurement of a new short-term disability plan and in the retendering of the long-term disability plan. The Accounting, Banking and Compensation Branch is to support the development of the technological solution required for interoperability with the People Soft–based absence management system and human resources and pay systems in the federal public service.

ESDC – Labour: The Labour Program is to identify options for improving the administration of occupational claims under the Government Employees Compensation Act.

Health Canada: This organization is to provide support for the updated Policy on Employee Assistance Program and related departmental advice. Its activities also support a streamlined application process for medical retirement under the Public Service Superannuation Act.

Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy
Federal partners PAA programs Contributing activities and programs Total allocation (from start date to end date)
($ dollars)
2015–16 planned spending
($ dollars)
2015–16 expected results (including targets)
Secretariat Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Direction setting

Comprehensive management of compensation

$15,623,157 $4,468,999
  • project leadership
  • coordination and oversight
  • input into plan design and policy development
  • support for the collective bargaining process
  • industry engagement process
PWGSC

Acquisitions

Federal Pay and Pension Administration

$5,227,999 $1,984,001
  • support for development of Request for Information (RFI) and Request for Proposals (RFP) for potential procurement of short-term and long-term disability plans, following conclusion of collective bargaining
  • activities in support of implementing pay and pension information systems
EDSC Labour $2,412,000 $810,000
  • activities focused on modernizing systems and arrangements involving occupational injury or illness claims filed under the Government Employees Compensation Act, to reduce reporting times and improve data collection and information available to departments and agencies
Health Canada Specialized Health Services $1,747,682 $588,142
  • activities in support of an updated Policy on Employee Assistance Program and related departmental advice
  • activities in support of a streamlined application process for medical retirement under the Public Service Superannuation Act
Total $25,010,838 $7,851,142

Comments on variances

The WPS project and funding were approved in late fall 2013. The planned activities described in this supplementary information table cover fiscal year 2015–16 (i.e., up to March 31, 2016).

Contact information

Ashique Biswas, A/Executive Director
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
5th Floor, 222 Nepean St.
Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 0R5

Telephone: 613-952-3261



Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Internal audits

The Report on Plans and Priorities includes internal audits that are currently underway or planned for 2015­–16. Additions and adjustments to the internal audits listed below may occur in order to address emerging risks and priorities of the Secretariat.

Internal Audit Title Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Audit of Information Technology Security (coordinated audit with Shared Services Canada) Information Technology In progress 2015–16
Audit of Contracting and Procurement Within the Secretariat Financial Management; Acquired Services Planned 2015–16

The requirement to remain responsive and flexible to the Secretariat's evolving needs limits the audit function's ability to forecast plans beyond the 2015–16 timeframe. As part of future risk-based audit planning exercises, projects for 2016–17 and 2017–18 will be determined based on risk assessments, departmental priorities and resource capacity closer to those fiscal years.

B. Evaluations

The following evaluations are planned over the next three fiscal years. Additions or adjustments will be made to address emerging priorities.

Link to the Program Alignment Architecture Evaluation Title Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Deputy Head Approval Date
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program1.2.1: Financial Management Policy Evaluation of the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board January 2015 December 2015
Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership Evaluation of Human Resources Services Modernization April 2015 March 2016
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.3: Information Management and Information Technology Policy Horizontal Evaluation of Canada's Cyber Security Strategy (with Public Safety) April 2015 June 2016
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.5: Organizational Management Policy Evaluation of the Management Accountability Framework January 2015 December 2016
Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership Evaluation of the Web Renewal Initiative January 2016 December 2016
Program 1.5: Internal Services; Sub-Program 1.5.6: Information Management Services; Sub-Program 1.5.7: Information Technology Services; and Sub-Program 1.5.8: Real Property Services Evaluation of the Workplace Renewal Initiative January 2016 December 2016
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy Evaluation of the Public Service Employee Survey April 2016 December 2016
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy Evaluation of the Classification Program April 2016 March 2017
Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.1: Pensions and Benefits Evaluation of the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy April 2016 March 2017
  • Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.3: Information Management and Information Technology Policy
  • Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership
Evaluation of Access to Information and Privacy Modernization July 2017 March 2018
Program 1.5: Internal Services; Sub-Program 1.5.1: Management and Oversight Services Evaluation of Values and Ethics July 2017 July 2018
Date modified: