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ARCHIVED - RPP 2007-2008
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

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The Honourable Chuck Strahl
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board





Section I: Agency Overview

Section II: Detailed Analysis of Program Activities

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Annexes


Vision:

To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community.

Mission:

Dedicated to safeguarding food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy.

Statement of Values:

Our Values

As employees of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency . . .

  • We value scientific rigour and professional and technical competence. These play a crucial role in our decision making. We do not manipulate science to achieve a desired outcome but acknowledge that other factors must be taken into account in this decision making.
  • The reputation and credibility of the Agency are vital to our ability to deliver our mandate. As such, we behave, internally and externally, in a way that trust is preserved.
  • We are proud of the contributions we make to the quality of life of Canadians. We value dedication and responsiveness from all employees day to day and, particularly, during an emergency.
  • We value competent, qualified and motivated personnel, whose efforts drive the results of the Agency.
  • To develop effective policies and strategies, we value the perspectives of the stakeholders who are affected by our decisions.
  • We maintain our regulatory independence from all external stakeholders. We have the courage to make difficult and potentially unpopular decisions and recommendations, free from personal bias.
  • We are committed to our physical and psychological well-being.

 




Section I:Agency Overview

1.1 Minister's Message

I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) Report on Plans and Priorities for 2007-2008. This plan details how the Agency intends to use its resources to deliver its mandate of safeguarding Canada's food supply and protecting the animals and plants upon which safe and high quality food depends.

As Minister of Agriculture and Agri Food, I am proud of our efforts to work together with all stakeholders to secure a bright future for Canada's farm families, the agri-food sector, and to contribute to the health and safety of Canadians. In fact, collaboration is the hallmark of this Portfolio. By our concerted action, we are making great strides in supporting Canada's farmers, while putting the sector on a solid foundation for the long term.

The Agriculture Portfolio includes Agriculture and Agri Food Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the National Farm Products Council, the Canadian Dairy Commission, the Canadian Grain Commission and Farm Credit Canada. While the organizations within the Portfolio have different mandates, they share a common purpose: to make our agriculture and agri food sector stronger, more competitive and sustainable into the future.

Over the next years, the development and implementation of the next generation of agriculture and agri-food policy will be key to the sector's success. Our producers need continuously updated policies and programs from governments to help them thrive in the rapidly-evolving economy and manage the inherent risks of the business. I am counting on the energy and expertise of the agriculture and agri-food portfolio to translate these new policy directions into a prosperous reality in Canadian agriculture.

This year will mark a milestone for the Agency — it will be one of reflection as the Agency celebrates its tenth anniversary and ten years of accomplishments. It will also be a year in which the future is the focus as a new Corporate Business Plan is developed to replace the current one which covers the period 2003-2008.

As we focus on the future and plan ahead, we continue to support, through our actions and priorities, the Government of Canada's agenda. The health of Canadians is a top priority for the government. The CFIA will work collaboratively with its portfolio partners to ensure the health, safety and security of Canadians. The Agency will continue to play a significant role in maintaining the safety of Canada's food supply by improving regulatory compliance and reaching out to Canadians to communicate about food safety risks. In addition, the CFIA will continue to demonstrate excellence in its work aimed at safeguarding Canada's animal and plant resource base — its crops, forests and livestock — from pests and diseases.

Innovation, competitiveness and productivity form a cornerstone for improving the economic well being of Canada's agri-food sector. The Agency will continue to implement and maintain programs, regulations and policies aimed at providing opportunities for economic development, effectively responding to threats in our environment, and ensuring that regulations are fair and applied consistently.

The CFIA remains committed to working with stakeholders to adopt risk-based control measures using sound science and considering socio-economic realities, and to provide effective, rapid emergency response.

The CFIA will report on the progress against this plan in the Agency's 2007-2008 Departmental Performance Report.

The Honourable Chuck Strahl
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

 

1.2 Management Representation Statement

I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2007-2008 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide for the Preparation of Part III of the 2007-2008 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

  • It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat guidance;
  • It is based on the Agency's Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture that were approved by the Treasury Board;
  • It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
  • It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities entrusted to it; and
  • It reports finances based on approved planned spending numbers from the Treasury Board Secretariat.

Fran├žois Guimont
President
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

March 2007

 

1.3 Plans and Priorities Overview 2007-2008


CFIA'S MANDATE

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is mandated to safeguard Canada's food supply and the plants and animals upon which safe and high-quality food depends.

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA OUTCOMES

Healthy Canadians

A fair and secure marketplace

Strong economic growth

A strong mutually beneficial North American Partnership

CFIA'S CONTRIBUTION

OUR STRATEGIC OUTCOMES

Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets

A sustainable plant and animal resource base

Security from deliberate threats to Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base

PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

Food Safety and Public Health

Science and Regulation

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

Public Security

Governance and Management

SUB-ACTIVITIES

• Managing food safety risks

• Controlling the transmission of animal diseases to humans

• Regulatory research — Food safety, nutrition and public health

• Promoting science-based regulation

• Maintaining an effective regulatory framework

• Protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices

• Certifying exports

• Regulatory research — Exports and unfair practices

• Protecting Canada's crops and forests

• Protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals

• Assessing agricultural products

• Regulatory research — Animal and plant resource protection

• Preparing for emergencies

• Enhancing capacity to respond to emergencies

• Regulatory research — Public security

• Finance and administration

• Human resource management

• Information management

• Corporate communication

• Corporate governance, planning, accountability and stewardship

• Legal services

2007-2008 PLANNED SPENDING ($MILLIONS)

352.4

93.7

111.7

81.6

n/a*

CFIA'S FOUNDATION

Sound science • An effective regulatory base • Effective inspection delivery • Strong partnerships


* Resources attributable to "Governance and Management" have been allocated to the four Strategic Outcomes that comprise the CFIA's Program Activity Architecture on a pro-rata basis.


Agency Budget

Financial and Human Resources

Financial Resources
($ millions)

2007-2008

2008-20091

2009-20102

Gross Planned Spending

694.4

663.5

620.6

Less: Respendable Revenue

55.0

55.0

55.0

Net Planned Spending

639.4

608.5

565.6

Human Resources (FTEs)

6,464

6,256

6,125


1 Changes in resource levels from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009: The decrease in financial resources of approximately $30.9 million is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for both Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) ($23.3 million) as it relates to "Specified Risk Materials Removal from Food and Re-Entering Export Markets" and "Ensuring the future of the Canadian Beef Industry", and the Agricultural Policy Framework ($5.3 million).

2 Changes in resource levels from 2008-2009 to 2009-2010: The decrease in financial resources of approximately $42.9 million is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for BSE ($16.7 million) as it relates to "Repositioning the Canadian Beef and Cattle Industry" and "Measures to address the BSE Recovery Program by Facilitating the Transition for the Cattle and other Ruminant Industries", and the Organic Agriculture Products Regime ($2.6 million), which was implemented to maintain the credibility of the Canadian organic industry and to achieve an equivalency status to maintain European Union market access. It is also related to the sunsetting of Major Capital resources for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness ($20.0 million) which were received for 2008-2009 only, and to decreased funding for the Plum Pox Eradication efforts ($2.0 million).


Agency Priorities

Priority

Type

1. Improving regulatory compliance

Ongoing

2. Supporting the agenda for innovation competitiveness and productivity

Ongoing

3. Moving forward on major regulatory initiatives

Ongoing

4. Continuing with the CFIA's high state of preparedness and response for avian influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

Ongoing

5. Continued management of the CFIA corporate agenda

Ongoing



Summary of Priorities by Strategic Outcome 2007-2008

PROGRAM ACTIVITY BY STRATEGIC OUTCOME

PLANNED SPENDING
($ MILLIONS)

CONTRIBUTES TO THE FOLLOWING PRIORITY (S)

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

Strategic outcome: Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Program Activity: Food Safety and Public Health

Expected results:
• Food leaving federally registered establishments for inter-provincial and export trade or being imported into Canada is safe and wholesome.
• Food safety incidents in non-federally registered facilities and food products produced in them are addressed.
• Food safety recalls and incidents are contained in a timely and appropriate manner.
• Animal diseases that are transmissible to humans are effectively controlled within animal populations.
• Decision making related to food safety, nutrition and public health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

352.4

307.3

290.6

Improving regulatory compliance

and

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of preparedness and response for avian influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

Strategic Outcome: Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal, and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets

Program Activity: Science and Regulation

Expected results:
• The Agency contributes to the development and implementation of international rules, standards and agreements through international negotiations.
• The Agency applies sound and current science to the development of national standards, operational methods and procedures.
• Transparent, outcome-based and science-based domestic regulatory framework is maintained.
• Deceptive and unfair market practices are deterred.
• Other governments' import requirements are met.
• Decision making related to regulatory development and review, deterring unfair practices, and export is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

93.7

118.2

115.6

Supporting the Agenda for innovation competitiveness and productivity

and

Moving forward on major regulatory initiatives

Strategic Outcome: A sustainable plant and animal resource base

Program Activity: Animal and Plant Resource Protection

Expected results:
• Entry and domestic spread of regulated plant diseases and pests are controlled.
• Industry complies with federal acts and regulations concerning Canada's crops and forests.
• Entry and domestic spread of regulated animal diseases are controlled.
• Industry complies with federal acts and regulations for livestock.
• Agricultural products meet the requirements of federal acts and regulations.
• Decision making (including regulation) in regards to animal and plant health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

111.7

105.0

103.3

Improving regulatory compliance

and

Supporting the Agenda for innovation competitiveness and productivity

and

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of preparedness and response for avian influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests.

Strategic Outcome: Security from deliberate threats to Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base

Program Activity: Public Security

Expected Results:
• The Agency is in a state of readiness for an effective rapid response to emergencies.
• The Agency has the capacity to respond to emergencies.
• Decision making related to public security is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

81.6

78.0

56.1

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of preparedness and response for avian influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests.

Outcome: Sound Agency Management

Program Activity: Governance and Management

Expected Results: Based on assessment against management accountability framework (MAF) indicators and measures of management practice.

n/a*

n/a*

n/a*

Continued management of the CFIA Corporate agenda


* Resources attributable to "Governance and Management" have been allocated to the four Strategic Outcomes that comprise the CFIA's Program Activity Architecture on a pro-rata basis.

 

1.4 Introduction to the Agency

The CFIA is the largest science-based regulatory agency in Canada responsible for delivery of all federally mandated food inspection, plant protection and animal health programs, and consumer protection as it relates to food. More than 6 100 professionals are working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in the four operational areas representing the Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and the West. Four interrelated components or elements are key to the CFIA's success — sound science, an effective regulatory base, effective inspections and strong partnerships.

Sound science

The CFIA relies on science as the basis for designing and delivering its programs and as an essential component of its regulatory decision making. Scientific research contributes to the sound science foundation that underpins the Agency's policy development and decision-making processes. Science is an important tool for dealing with emerging issues such as the safety assessment of new biotechnology-derived products and issues related to avian influenza and BSE. The specific activities for which the CFIA needs and uses science to support its daily work include laboratory science, risk assessment, surveillance, research and technology development. The Agency also analyses scientific research data and other information in order to provide scientific advice and intelligence that enables the CFIA officials to identify and prepare for emerging issues. The CFIA's scientific expertise makes an integral contribution to regulatory policy development not only in Canada, but worldwide, and provides the foundation through safe food, healthy plants and animals for the economic opportunities derived from domestic and international market confidence.

An effective regulatory base

For a regulatory regime to be effective, the legislative authorities must be consistent with the organization's mandate and sufficiently comprehensive to enable the full suite of responsibilities that the mandate represents. In addition, regulations must be clear, enforceable, fair and consistently applied. The CFIA is continually reviewing its legislative authorities and updating its regulatory base in order to strengthen its capacity to contribute to public policy objectives, taking into account the domestic and international environment in which the Agency undertakes its responsibilities. Consistent with this, the CFIA supports the government-wide smart regulation initiative aimed at improving Canada's regulatory system.

The CFIA represents Canada at international standard-setting bodies for food safety, animal health and plant health issues. The Agency is responsible for regulating both imported and exported products, and our actions are disciplined by international obligations, primarily through the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO). CFIA will update the International Plan to better promote Agency/Canadian priorities through the development and operation of the International Regulatory Framework; Bilateral Relations and Agreements; Technical Assistance, and Foreign Doctors of Veterinary Medicine postings.

Effective inspections

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and/or enforcing 13 federal statutes and their respective regulations. Sectors that the Agency regulates include agriculture, agri-food, fish, seafood, horticulture and forestry. Products that may be subject to inspection or certification by the CFIA range from agricultural inputs, such as seeds, feeds and fertilizers, to fresh foods — including meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, fruit and vegetables — and prepared and packaged foods. The Agency establishes compliance and enforcement priorities based on scientifically established risk-based strategies. Compliance with applicable acts and regulations is assessed through inspections, audits, product sampling and verifications. To facilitate compliance, the CFIA carries out education and awareness activities that are intended to clarify and increase regulated parties' understanding of statutory requirements and standards. Where significant non-compliance is identified, the CFIA uses a broad range of enforcement approaches from verbal and written warnings to Administrative Monetary Penalties and prosecution. Critical to effectively fulfilling the CFIA's mandate is the ongoing design, development and review of inspection-related tools and processes.

Strong Partnerships

The CFIA delivers its mandate mostly in areas of shared jurisdiction and responsibility. Strong partnerships with other federal government departments, as well as provincial, territorial and municipal governments are imperative to the Agency's success. Since 2005, the CFIA, through the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Regulatory Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers has provided the leadership and strategic advice required to develop and implement coordinated F/P/T regulatory and program initiatives. The F/P/T Committee will focus on issues related to: food (such as meat inspection reform), animals (such as avian influenza preparedness and an integrated national animal health strategy), plant (such as an integrated national plant biosecurity strategy), as well as, other issues which may impact on the Canadian food inspection system.


THE CFIA'S LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administration Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
  • Feeds Act
  • Fertilizers Act
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Meat Inspection Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act

Within the agriculture portfolio, the CFIA has significant bilateral relationships with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC). One key area of partnership with AAFC is the implementation of the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF). Initiatives funded under the APF, and which the CFIA is implementing, include developing and implementing regulations to control the manufacture of medicated feeds, and, with the provinces, implementing the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program. As the current APF agreements will expire in 2008, F/P/T ministers of agriculture have committed to work towards the next generation of agriculture and agri-food policy to ensure a more stable, predictable and profitable sector. The CFIA is contributing, along with Agriculture and Agri-food Portfolio partners, to the development of the next generation of agriculture and agri-food policy.

With regard to the safety of Canada's food supply, federal legislative responsibility is shared. Health Canada is responsible for establishing policies and standards relating to the safety and nutritional quality of food sold in Canada and for the assessment of the effectiveness of the CFIA's programs in achieving compliance with prescribed standards. The CFIA is responsible for the design and delivery of food inspection compliance and enforcement activities. The CFIA is also responsible for developing regulations and policies related to non-health and safety-related food labelling and compositional standards. With respect to animal health, plant health and food safety activity at Canada's borders and other points of entry, the CFIA establishes policies and standards and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) enforces them. The CFIA's relationship with the CBSA is key to the effort to keep invasive species out of Canada. Finally, and in light of the threat to human health from zoonotic diseases and the need to protect Canadians from threats to our security, both deliberate and unintentional, the CFIA has developed strong collaborative relationships with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC).


THE CFIA'S KEY FEDERAL PARTNERS:

  • Health Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

Scientific research is complex and requires strong linkages with other organizations with similar interests and responsibilities in order to maximize benefits. The Agency maintains research linkages with other federal organizations such as Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Forest Service and where appropriate, collaborations extend to provinces, universities and the private sector. Due to the global nature of the many issues within its mandate, the Agency also maintains links with the international research community. Extending and enhancing these collaborations is a priority for the Agency. The Agency regularly obtains input from scientific experts when developing regulations and policies, designing programs, methods and procedures for inspections, and testing and responding to emergencies. In doing so, the CFIA also recognizes the critical importance of working closely with its broad range of stakeholders. These stakeholders include those whom the CFIA regulates, such as registered establishments and importers, farmers, as well as associations representing consumers, public health, animal welfare and environmental interests.

In the global context, the CFIA strives to promote an international regulatory framework, as it relates to the Agency's mandate that is transparent, rules and science-based. The CFIA also leads or participates in a number of international and bilateral agreements and arrangements, in support of Canada's regulatory objectives. Consistent with its international regulatory cooperation framework, the CFIA maintains close relations with key foreign regulatory counterparts.

 

1.5 Key Strategic Challenges and Risks

The Agency's capacity to achieve its strategic outcomes is influenced by its ability to recognize, assess and manage risk.

In accordance with the Agency's commitment to risk-based planning and the integration of risk management into decision-making processes, the Agency completed an intensive process of risk identification and assessment which identified ten key strategic challenges and risks. Each requires management on a priority basis. Accordingly, included in the plans for each of the CFIA's priorities for 2007-2008 are specific activities directly aimed at mitigating these challenges and risks. The CFIA will conduct an in depth review of its key strategic risks and challenges in 2007-2008, in conjunction with the development of the CFIA's long-term strategic plan.

The following provides a description of each of the CFIA's strategic challenges and risks and identifies the 2007-2008 priority that will address the risk. The detailed risk mitigation strategies can be found in Section II of this document.


KEY STRATEGIC RISKS AND CHALLENGES

RELATED 2007-2008 PRIORITY/STRATEGIES

Foodborne illness

Canadians have access to a food supply that is safe and nutritious. The CFIA and its regulatory partners, industry and consumer groups have worked to significantly reduce the threat of foodborne illness in Canada; however, the risk that such illness will arise always remains. The Agency has two specific concerns. The first relates to the non-federally registered sector — a sector that encompasses a large number of food manufacturing and distributing establishments. While the products of the sector are subject to regulation, non-federally registered establishments are not subject to federal registration requirements which include more comprehensive, preventative approaches to food safety issues. The second concern relates to the increasing volume and diversity of imported food products. Changing consumption and trade patterns have the potential to introduce new risks related to foodborne illness. Responsibility for this sector is shared with the provinces.

Improving Regulatory Compliance

For detailed plan see section: 2.1a

Emergence and/or spread of animal diseases that affect humans (zoonoses)

Animals, both domestic and wild, can transmit disease-causing agents to humans. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), avian influenza, the spread of West Nile virus and the detection of new strains of rabies are examples of the potential for diseases of animal origin to affect public health. Incomplete scientific knowledge around the nature and transmission of new and emerging diseases and inadequate animal and veterinary public health infrastructure in many countries adds to the complexity of managing them. The CFIA protects Canadians from these types of diseases by working in close partnership with the animal health community, livestock producers, provinces, and the international community in promoting early detection, reporting, and control of disease.

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of Preparedness and response for Avian Influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

For detailed plan see section: 2.1b, 2.4a

International regulatory framework

Retaining, strengthening and reinforcing rules- and science-based approaches within the international regulatory framework will help to achieve Canada's regulatory objectives and security and protect Canadian exporters from discriminatory and unnecessary barriers. The Agency must continue to work through international institutions to help develop and operationalize international rules and in other international fora to promote the development of international standards and policies that are based on sound science to ensure that human, animal, ecosystem or plant life or health are protected in a world where trade is expanding.

Supporting the Agenda for innovation competitiveness and productivity

Moving forward on major regulatory initiatives

For detailed plan see sections: 2.2a, 2.2b, 3.3

Domestic legislative framework

Outdated statutes and/or insufficient authority could impede the CFIA's ability to fully and effectively carry out its mandate. The CFIA will continue to pursue mechanisms to update and modernize its legislative framework.

Supporting the Agenda for innovation competitiveness and productivity

Moving forward on major regulatory initiatives

For detailed plan see sections: 2.2b, 3.3

Entry and/or spread of regulated plant and animal pests and diseases that affect the resource base

A healthy and sustainable plant and animal resource base in Canada is critical to the environment, social objectives and the economy. The CFIA, along with its partners, utilizes numerous measures to identify and reduce threats to the animal and plant resource base, ranging from surveys and movement control to eradication and emergency response. The numerous possible pathways for entry of plant and animal diseases into Canada, together with the potential environmental impact, and to some degree social and/or economic impact of a major animal disease outbreak or the spread of a plant pest, make this a significant challenge that must continue to be actively addressed by the CFIA.

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of Preparedness and response for Avian Influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

For detailed plan see sections: 2.3a, 2.3b

Emergency preparedness and response

An effective emergency management system and the capacity to prevent, detect, and respond are crucial to maintaining Canada's public safety and security in the face of increasing threat pressure. The challenge is to maintain well-planned and exercised emergency response procedures to protect food, animals and plants from accidental or intentional events. The CFIA must also be able to act rapidly and effectively in response to civil or national emergencies. The CFIA recognizes that strong cooperative relationships with its regulatory partners, including other countries, are critical to the success of its security measures.

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of Preparedness and response for Avian Influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

For detailed plan see sections: 2.4a, 2.4b

Demand for new/enhanced services

Increased demand from producers and consumers for new or enhanced services are expected to place additional pressure on resources. For example, the CFIA must be able to respond to the growth in domestic industries, such as the opening of new meat establishments and more requests for inspection and certification of products. The CFIA must also be able to respond to increasing consumer concerns and needs, such as demands for better information on nutrient content and methods of production (e.g., organic, grain-fed) for food products.

Continued management of the CFIA corporate agenda

Supporting agenda for innovation, competitiveness and productivity

For detailed plan see sections: 2.2b, 2.5, 3.3

Performance information

Improved performance information is needed to better support day-to-day and strategic decision-making and the ability to report results to the Canadian public. Additionally, the potential for losing electronic data that forms the basis for developing performance information must be addressed.

Continued management of the CFIA corporate agenda

For detailed plan see section: 2.5

Financial and human resources

The CFIA constantly faces the challenge of managing resources so that it can meet ongoing activities, make strategic investments in program redesign and cope with animal and plant health emergencies. With specific regard to human resources, staff with appropriate skills, knowledge and abilities must be developed and be available to manage and fully carry out regulatory duties in the face of new risks and technologies. This requires appropriate and effective recruitment, retention and training.

Continued management of the CFIA corporate agenda

For detailed plan see sections: 2.5

Program design

Technological and scientific advancements result in the creation of products that are new to the Canadian environment and agricultural systems. In addition, advancements in science often bring with them a requirement for new methods of detection, testing and surveillance. The CFIA recognizes the need for ongoing review of program design in light of technological and scientific advancements.

Moving forward on major regulatory initiatives

For detailed plan see sections: 2.2b, 3.3


The CFIA recognizes that some of these risks, such as foodborne illness, zoonoses, and the entry and spread of plant and animal diseases will likely always exist. Accordingly, the Agency's goal is to reduce both the likelihood that these hazards will occur and the consequences should they occur by improving our capacity to manage them. The remaining risks should be fully managed over time with careful planning and implementation of the plans that follow. Key risk mitigation strategies have been identified throughout this document with the following symbol "maple leaf symbol."

 

1.6 CFIA's Priorities 2007-2008

Improving regulatory compliance

Link to Government of Canada Outcomes:

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong economic growth

The Agency strives to protect Canadians from preventable health risks related to food as well as those associated with animal diseases that are transmissible to humans. Threats to the food supply reflect a number of factors such as consumer and demographic trends, evolving food processing and industrial practice and evolving farming practices. More and more consumers are choosing more varied foods, and healthier foods such as more fruits and vegetables. Convenience remains a high priority with consumers as products such as bagged salads are becoming increasingly popular. In addition, an increased sensitivity to allergens and an aging population create an environment where threats related to food are on the rise.

As a regulatory agency, the principal means by which the CFIA carries out its mandate is assessing industry compliance with Canadian food, animal and plant regulatory requirements. Compliance rates, are a measure of industry conformity to standards and regulations as well as indicators of the extent to which the CFIA's program design and inspection activities have contributed to improving industry compliance with acts and regulations. This year, the CFIA will focus on areas of past lower compliance, as well as maintaining good performance on well performing areas.

Reporting against specific targets was an enhanced feature of the Agency's 2005-2006 Performance Report (DPR) and represented a transition from previous approaches to performance reporting. The Agency strives to promote improved industry compliance on a year-to-year basis and has a compliance and enforcement strategy to appropriately address instances of non-compliance. In 2006, the Agency created an action plan to address the variance between targets and results achieved and reported in its 2005-2006 DPR and to facilitate the promotion of improved compliance. The plan is currently being implemented and will continue in 2007.

Food safety inspection is a shared jurisdiction in Canada. The sector that falls solely under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) — with provisions that apply to all foods sold in Canada — is often referred to as the "non-federally registered" sector. This sector covers a wide range of products (domestic and imported), including infant formula, bread, snack foods and alcoholic beverages. It represents a significant portion of retail spending on food and has a history of non-compliance. A number of food recalls are attributed to this sector. Recent incidents of foodborne illness from products in this sector include botulism in refrigerated U.S. carrot juice (fall 2006), E-coli in U.S. spinach (fall 2006) and salmonella entritidis associated with sprouts (winter 2005).

The CFIA recognizes the challenges associated with managing this sector, and is currently developing multi-year strategies for a more comprehensive and risk-based approach to addressing these challenges. The CFIA will develop a tiered approach in cooperation with federal, provincial and territorial partners to enhance inspection coverage and compliance in this sector beginning with:

  • Augmenting front-line capacity (for food safety, investigation and recall, import inspection, domestic high risk establishments)
  • Initiation of baseline data gathering (hazards, food types, establishment types, countries, etc.)
  • Development of tools (import tracking system, risk pathway model) and;
  • Strategic engagement of Provinces, Territories and leaders from industry and consumer groups.

Enhancing inspection strategies in this area of shared jurisdiction demonstrates the CFIA's pro-active commitment to food safety, and partnerships that will maintain critical consumer confidence both in Canada and abroad.

The CFIA recognizes the importance of strong risk communication and consumer education in addressing the challenges of food-borne illness. The Agency will increase public outreach regarding Canada's food safety system in order to raise awareness of the roles and responsibilities of governments, retailers and consumers for food safety.

Continuing with the CFIA's high state of preparedness and response for avian influenza (AI) and other zoonotic and plant diseases and pests

Link to Government of Canada Outcomes:

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong economic growth
  • A strong and mutually beneficial North American Partnership

The CFIA's state of preparedness to address animals diseases with potential to affect humans (such as avian influenza) and plant health diseases (such as plum pox virus), is key to the ability to deliver its mandate. The Agency strives to continuously improve and enhance its state of preparedness and ability to respond to outbreaks and cases of animal and plant health issues.

Avian influenza poses a threat not only to industry but also potentially to human health. Given the potential threat, the Government of Canada has committed $195 million to advance the CFIA's AI strategy based on five pillars: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery and communication.

The CFIA will continue to focus on avian influenza preparedness with the implementation of the Comprehensive AI Preparedness and Response Strategy. The AI preparedness strategy includes an on-farm bio-security initiative, on-going surveillance of commercial and wild bird populations, enhanced capacity for critical science, laboratory and research activities and enhanced response plans which will continue to be exercised across the country together with the establishment of a national veterinary reserve to assist in the event of an animal health emergency. Work will continue with domestic and international partners to enhance communications, and our collective state of preparedness.

The CFIA is continuing its work to enhance and revise BSE program elements to meet domestic and international expectations. This will include continued surveillance testing for BSE, addressing risks in animal feed, enhancing export certification and implementing revised import requirements.

Working with partners, the CFIA is advancing its objectives in support of the National Traceability System. Traceability is built on the three core elements of product/animal identification, premises identification and product/animal movement and is an important information tool in support of emergency planning, response and recovery. Federal, provincial and territorial ministers of agriculture recognize the significant input industry has provided for a national traceability system. They committed to further industry consultation as part of the implementation process.

Plant pests and diseases have the potential to pose a significant threat to Canada's environmental as well as economic and social values. The CFIA is leading the development of a National Plant Health Strategy intended to deal with increasing pressure on Canada's plant health status from technical phytosanitary requirements and from a rapidly expanding trade pattern. This strategy will be based on a national vision for plant health and will ensure a coordinated approach to protecting Canada's resource base and the environment from the impact of new plant pests and new invasive species.

The government has committed $303 million over the next two years to provide secure and efficient border crossing for low-risk travellers. Internationally, Canada is working with the United States and Mexico on the regulatory aspects of the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) of North America to eliminate redundant testing and certification requirements when it is beneficial to Canada. The CFIA co-leads with Health Canada, Canada's participation in the SPP initiatives for food and agriculture regulation and protection. Through the SPP, the CFIA is pursuing common approaches to better protect North America from offshore and domestic risks to food safety and animal and plant health. Under the SPP's Bio-Protection Agenda, the CFIA will work with the US and Mexico to share threat and vulnerability assessment information and develop a coordinated approach to identify and manage threats to animals, plants and humans. Canada is writing the animal health chapter of the SPP AI Preparedness Manual.

Supporting the agenda for innovation, competitiveness and productivity

Link to Government of Canada Outcomes:

  • A fair and secure marketplace
  • Strong economic growth

Working to achieve a better life for Canadians is the highest priority of the government. Long-term prosperity requires increased productivity and competitiveness which means making sure Canadians can compete in a global economy by creating a stronger economic union, reducing red tape and making sure borders stay open for business.

The CFIA's Meat Inspection Reform will aim to reform Canada's meat inspection system in order to have clearer industry accountability through HACCP, more objective science-based performance measures, and redesigned government oversight/inspection procedures. The key objectives of the reform include: enhancing the safety and sustainability of Canadian meat and meat products, sustaining consumer confidence and market access (internal trade and exports), providing a sound regulatory base for industry, and delivering meat inspection programs in the most efficient and effective manner possible.

One facet of this reform is the implementation of the Canada-Ontario agreement that includes the agreement on a Canada-Ontario integrated meat inspection system. Under this agreement, the Governments of Ontario and Canada are collaborating to explore joint public service delivery with respect to meat inspection, with the objective of improving provincial slaughterhouse inspection and infrastructure, harmonizing federal and provincial inspection regimes and allowing expanded inter-provincial trade. As a part of this effort, the CFIA working with Ontario is drafting a new Canadian Meat Hygiene Standard. This standard will serve as a framework for government to more effectively verify that safe meat products are produced while allowing industry to do this in more outcome based, flexible and efficient ways.

The maintenance of the health of aquatic animals is important to national and provincial economies. Canada exports over 75 per cent of its fish and seafood products, which amounted to $4.3 billion in 2005. The National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP) is a science-based regulatory program for reportable aquatic animal diseases such as viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) a disease of fish which has potential to impact on trade and the health of fish stocks. Led jointly by the CFIA and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the NAAHP will safeguard this important resource and provide economic development through the maintenance and expansion of export markets abroad.

The CFIA has initiated the elaboration of a National Animal Health Strategy in order to face the global animal health challenges. Threats arise from the convergence of a number of factors, including globalization, animal production and husbandry practices, microbial adaptation, climate change, social value changes, and changes to human and animal population demographics. Increasing transboundary movement of people and trade contributes to disease emergencies and movement around the world. Canada needs a new framework to face the global animal health challenges that will integrate and align principles and policies, and guide governments and industry's decisions as they relate to animal health risk management activities. The strategy is intended to optimize animal and public health protection from preventable risks; maintain confidence in the integrity of Canada's inspection system; reduce economic and social consequences of disease detection; and provide industry with greater market access security, predictability and competitiveness. The strategy will focus on inclusive approaches to governance, accountability and investment on the part of federal, provincial and private sector stakeholders. Animal welfare, biosecurity and traceability are all components of this strategy.

Moving forward on key regulatory initiatives

Link to Government of Canada Outcome:

  • A fair and secure marketplace

Safeguarding Canada's food supply, and the plant and animals on which safe and high-quality food depends, requires clear, effective and enforceable regulations that are fair and applied consistently. The CFIA works to continually improve regulation and at the international level, to promote science-based standards for world trade in food, animals and plants.

Regulation is an important tool for protecting the health and safety of Canadians, preserving the environment and securing conditions for an innovative and prosperous economy. Strong and effective regulations protect people and enhance our quality of life, while minimizing regulations that are unnecessary or that put Canada at a significant disadvantage. In support of the government-wide Smart Regulation initiative aimed at improving the Government of Canada's regulatory system, the CFIA continues its work on three pilot projects and is revising its own regulatory development process to keep pace with today's realities and evolving needs.

Canada's Organic Regime is a key regulatory initiative for the CFIA. This initiative, responds to consumer and industry concerns and international trade requirements for trade in organic products, including negotiations with the European Union (EU) for equivalency. The CFIA is working with industry stakeholders and provincial partners towards the implementation of a fair and effective organic regime with the key objectives of consumer protection, and establishing a framework to permit industry to respond to new and niche markets.

The CFIA will move forward on a priority basis on several key regulatory initiatives in support of key policy directions. These include amendments to the Health of Animals Act and Regulations to enhance the humane transport of animals, support the aquatic animal health program by including fish, and control the manufacture of medicated feeds; amendments to the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations in support of the National Meat Inspection System; and several amendments to the Canada Agricultural Products Act, Seeds Regulations and Fertilizer Regulations, which can be found in Section 3.3 of this report.

Continued management of the CFIA corporate agenda

Link to Government of Canada Outcome:

  • Government Affairs/Accountability

Accountability remains a key priority for government. The Treasury Board Secretariats' Management Accountability Framework (MAF) continues to evolve as an instrument of accountability and a tool for analysis and will provide continuing support to the government's management improvement agenda. The CFIA will continue to focus on improving the management of its corporate agenda by demonstrating a strong commitment to accountability. Effective, cost efficient and risk-based management is key to effective program delivery and a well-managed administration. Over the next 12 months, the CFIA's priorities which are consistent with the Government of Canada's MAF, will focus on enhanced reporting to Canadians and supporting key objectives such as employment equity, official languages, information management and technology, external service delivery, internal audit function, and a sustainable workforce, including succession planning and stewardship of financial and human resources. As well, given that the CFIA Corporate Business Plan will be updated in 2008, the Agency will initiate discussions with key stakeholders on issues related to the plan.

 




Section II: Detailed Analysis of Program Activities

Section II provides more detailed information about the Agency's program activities and sub-activities. This information is organized according to strategic outcome. For each strategic outcome, this RPP includes details on what the Agency is doing and plans to do to meet its priorities and move toward achieving its strategic outcomes and, ultimately, fulfilling its mandate.

This section presents the Agency's ongoing work — such as inspection, monitoring, compliance and enforcement activities — together with a number of special initiatives. Special initiatives will generally be completed within one to three years. Progress will be reported in the 2007-2008 Departmental Performance Report.

Performance Information

Performance indicators and targets found in the CFIA's RPP establish performance measures and should be viewed as evolutionary as they will continue to be refined and developed in future years. In this year's report, performance measures have been refined and new measures developed. Changes reflect the results of work on CFIA's action plan to address the variance between targets and results achieved as reported in its 2005-2006 DPR. A summary of changes may be found in Annex Section 4.1

Measures of performance such as compliance rates, are a measure of industry conformity to standards and regulations as well as indicators of the extent to which the CFIA's program design and inspection activities have contributed to improving industry compliance with Acts and regulations. Targets are based on historical averages of actual performance or on expected results of effective programming (e.g. compliance rate for industry conformity to regulatory standards, control of entry and spread of animal and plant diseases). Industry compliance rates of less than 100% are representative of the Agency's risk based inspection approach which targets areas of high-risk and past non-compliance. The Agency strives to promote improved industry compliance on a year to year basis and has a compliance and enforcement strategy to address all instances of non-compliance.

The following Exhibit provides a "roadmap" to Section II and reflects the CFIA's Program Activity Architecture (PAA). The PAA defines the relationship between the CFIA's strategic outcomes and the program activities and sub-activities that flow from them.


RPP Section

Our Strategic Outcomes

Program Activities

Sub-Activities

2.1

Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Food Safety and Public Health

2.1a Managing food safety risks

2.1b Controlling the transmission of animal diseases to humans

2.1c Regulatory research — Food safety, nutrition and public health

2.2

Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets

Science and Regulation

2.2a Promoting science-based regulation

2.2b Maintaining an effective regulatory framework

2.2c Protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices

2.2d Certifying exports

2.2e Regulatory research — Exports and unfair practices

2.3

A sustainable plant and animal resource base

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

2.3a Protecting Canada's crops and forests

2.3b Protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals

2.3c Assessing agricultural products

2.3d Regulatory research — Animal and plant resource protection

2.4

Security from deliberate threats to Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base

Public Security

2.4a Preparing for emergencies

2.4b Enhancing capacity to respond to emergencies

2.4c Regulatory research — Public security

2.5

Providing sound Agency management

Governance and Management

2.5a Risk management, accountability and governance and strategic directions and results and performance

2.5b People, values and learning

2.5c Policy, programs and client-focussed service

2.5d Stewardship


The Results Map shown below displays the expected results associated with each of our five Program Activities.


Results Map

Program Activity

Expected Results

Food Safety and Public Health

• Food leaving federally registered establishments for inter-provincial and export trade or being imported into Canada is safe and wholesome.

• Food safety incidents in non-federally registered facilities and food products produced in them are addressed.

• Food safety recalls and incidents are contained in a timely and appropriate manner.

• Animal diseases that are transmissible to humans are effectively controlled within animal populations.

• Decision making related to food safety, nutrition and public health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Science and Regulation

• The Agency contributes to the development and implementation of international rules, standards and agreements through international negotiations.

• The Agency applies sound and current science to the development of national standards, operational methods and procedures.

• Transparent, outcome-based and science-based domestic regulatory framework is maintained.

• Deceptive and unfair market practices are deterred.

• Other governments' import requirements are met.

• Decision making related to regulatory development and review, deterring unfair practices, and export is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

• Entry and domestic spread of regulated plant diseases and pests are controlled.

• Industry complies with federal acts and regulations concerning Canada's crops and forests.

• Entry and domestic spread of regulated animal diseases are controlled.

• Industry complies with federal acts and regulations for livestock.

• Agricultural products meet the requirements of federal acts and regulations.

• Decision making (including regulation) in regards to animal and plant health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Public Security

• The Agency is in a state of readiness for an effective rapid response to emergencies.

• The Agency has the capacity to respond to emergencies.

• Decision making related to public security is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Governance and Management

• Expected results based on Management Accountability Framework (MAF) indicators and measures, as set by Treasury Board Secretariat.


 

Plans and Priorities — Details

2.1 Protecting Canadians from preventable health risks

Protecting human health is the highest priority for the CFIA. As a key contributor to the Government's integrated approach to population health, the Agency, in partnership with others, protects Canadians from preventable health risks related to unsafe food, such as pathogens and undeclared allergens, chemical residues, as well as the risks posed by animal diseases that have the potential to be transmissible to humans, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and avian influenza (AI). Additionally, the Agency contributes to population health by ensuring that consumers have appropriate information on which to make safe and healthy food choices.


STRATEGIC OUTCOME
2.1 Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans
PROGRAM ACTIVITY & DESCRIPTION
Food Safety and Public Health
The CFIA, along with many federal, provincial and municipal organizations, is working to improve the overall health of Canadians. The CFIA's primary contribution to this effort is in helping to ensure that food is safe, consumers have appropriate information on which to base healthy food choices, and the transmission of animal diseases to humans is prevented.
PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITIES
2.1a Managing food safety risks
2.1b Controlling the transmission of animal diseases to humans
2.1c Regulatory research — Food safety, nutrition and public health
EXPECTED RESULTS
• Food leaving federally registered establishments for inter-provincial and export trade or being imported into Canada is safe and wholesome.
• Food safety incidents in non-federally registered facilities and food products produced in them are addressed.
• Food safety recalls and incidents are contained in a timely and appropriate manner.
• Animal diseases that are transmissible to humans are effectively controlled within animal populations.
• Decision making related to food safety, nutrition and public health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.
RESOURCE ALLOCATION
  Planned Spending
2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Net Planned Spending
($ millions)
352.4 307.3 290.6
Full Time Equivalents 3,616 3,425 3,335

2.1a Managing food safety risks

Ongoing activities:

Risks to food safety are diverse and complex. Significant hazards that can affect human health may be introduced at any point along the food continuum — from production to processing, to transportation and the practices that consumers follow in handling and preparing food.

The safety of Canada's food supply begins on the farm. Producing safe agricultural products and protecting them from on-farm hazards is the primary focus of industry-developed on-farm food safety (OFFS) programs. The CFIA is working with the provinces and territories on the OFFS Recognition Program, which formally recognizes national producer food safety programs.

On an ongoing basis, the CFIA continues to expand and integrate the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach. This system is designed to help processors meet food safety standards by implementing processing controls throughout production; thus preventing food safety hazards from occurring.

The CFIA continues to promote the acceptance and implementation of Good Importing Practices with industry. The CFIA will also focus on developing a strategy and implementation plan based on the pilot projects for an electronic submission for custom clearance; furthering the implementation of the Import Retrieval System.

The CFIA has adopted a science-based risk management approach to establishing policy, setting food-safety priorities, and identifying the most appropriate ways to manage food-related risk. Using this approach as its foundation, the CFIA's inspection and testing programs are designed to take the degree of risk associated with a particular sector into account and to concentrate resources where risk is greatest.


KEY ELEMENTS OF MANAGING FOOD-SAFETY RISKS

  • Inspection and monitoring activities
  • Compliance and enforcement activities
  • Registrations and approvals
  • Food safety recalls and emergency response
  • Food safety and nutrition education, awareness and outreach
  • Implementation of On-Farm Food Safety (OFFS) Recognition Program
  • Program design/re-design

On an ongoing basis, the Agency carries out inspections to verify that regulated food manufacturers, importers and distributors comply with all relevant legislation and regulations. The CFIA promotes compliance through education, inspection and responsible enforcement. When compliance is not achieved, the Agency has at its disposal a number of options including the imposition of administrative monetary penalties, the initiation of prosecutions and the suspension and or the cancellation of certificates of registration. For the purposes of preserving evidence in cases where a prosecution may be initiated, the CFIA may seize and detain any product or thing believed to have been used in the commission of an offence and a convicting court may impose a fine or, where permitted under applicable legislation, a term of imprisonment. Initiating prosecution is not always necessary where compliance has been achieved through alternative means.

The CFIA is implementing recommendations of a recent review of the Food Safety System. This review was aimed at strengthening the alignment of the Canadian medical/public health communities and the food regulatory organizations of the U.S., and raising awareness of the roles and responsibilities of governments, industry and consumers for food safety.

The Agency develops and implements programs and services to ensure that food-safety emergencies are effectively managed. Food recall, an important component of the CFIA's food emergency response, is aimed at removing from sale and distribution foods that may pose an unacceptable health risk to consumers.3

The Agency, through its communication and outreach programs, works with its partners, to assist in the promotion of healthy living by increasing consumer awareness of food safety risks, nutrition and their role in the safe handling of food. The Agency recognizes that more and more consumers are using food labelling as a source of information when making healthy food choices. The CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada on developing policies and regulations governing nutritional and other claims on labels.

Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada are the CFIA's key federal partners in managing food safety risks. Health Canada is responsible for food safety policy and standards. The Public Health Agency of Canada is the focal point for federal leadership and accountability in investigating food-borne illness and managing public health emergencies. The CFIA also works closely with provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal governments, and industry and consumer groups to manage food safety risks.

Special initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Improve inspection coverage of the 'non-federally registered' food sector: The non-federally registered food sector covers a wide range of products, including infant foods, alcoholic beverages, bakery products, snacks, and confectionary. These foods may be traded intra-provincially, inter-provincially, or imported. The jurisdiction for inspection of non-federally registered food establishments is shared between the CFIA and provincial/territorial governments. The CFIA manages this sector using a risk-based management model, prioritizing compliance activities in areas of high risk, taking enforcement actions in areas of low compliance and gathering intelligence related to contraventions. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will work through the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Regulatory Affairs Committee to develop and implement enhanced inspection strategies for this sector. (Key partners — HC and Provinces and Territories)
  • maple leaf symbol Food Safety Outreach: Communicating food safety risks is a complex and growing challenge. Food safety issues are continuing to evolve and expand giving rise to the need for increased communications and broader outreach. As such, the Agency is developing additional outreach activities which build on existing communications programs. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will focus on improving food safety outreach activities including food recalls, allergy alerts and health advisories. (Key partners — PHAC, AAFC and HC)

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

3 For more information on the CFIA Food Recalls and Allergy Alerts, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/recaltoce.shtml



Table 2.1a Expected results and related indicators for managing food safety risks

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets4

Food leaving federally registered establishments for inter-provincial and export trade or being imported into Canada is safe and wholesome.

Extent to which federally-registered establishments inspected comply with federal food safety requirements.

≥98% compliance

Extent to which domestic and imported food products comply with each test criterion for federal chemical residue requirements.

≥95% compliance

Food safety recalls and incidents are contained in a timely and appropriate manner.

Time taken to issue Class I recall public warnings.

100% are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision.

Food safety incidents in non-federally registered facilities and food products produced in them are addressed.

Extent to which projects are developed to address major health risks identified through the science committee process in the area of chemical, microbiological, allergen and nutritional hazards.

Inspection strategies are developed to address 100% of major health risks identified through the science committees.


4 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.1b Controlling the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Ongoing activities:

The close relationship between animal and human health (e.g. BSE, avian influenza) is becoming more evident. Trends in animal disease appear to indicate that new diseases are emerging at an accelerated pace and more virulent forms of existing diseases, such as tuberculosis, are on the increase. Biosecurity at the farm level has gained the attention of regulators based on increasing evidence of the link between intensive animal production practices and zoonotic disease, and the potential to minimize the economic consequences of disease detections.

The CFIA's programs are designed and re-designed to address the threat of transboundary animal diseases such as avian influenza and BSE. CFIA inspectors, animal health experts and industry stakeholders form the first line of defence in addressing zoonotic diseases. The CFIA's programs focus on early prevention, detection, rapid response and strong domestic and international coordination. For example, the CFIA has implemented and continues to pursue specific activities related to the control and management of BSE and ensuring continued market access. (See detailed plan on the pages that follow).

The CFIA undertakes activities designed to detect and control reportable animal diseases, including responding to emergencies and outbreaks, by using proven science-based processes and enforcing applicable legislation and regulations. When a reportable disease is confirmed, the Agency minimizes the spread of infection by implementing disease specific biocontainment measures including quarantine and movement controls. When eradication activities are necessary, the CFIA ensures humane destruction and appropriate disposal of affected animals, thereby ensuring that other susceptible livestock are not exposed to potential sources of infection. The Agency also addresses the potential for disease-causing agents to remain on infected farms by directing proper sanitation of contaminated premises and disposal of contaminated materials. Working with industry and other partners on policies and practices to enhance biosecurity on farm, the CFIA encourages a comprehensive approach to managing both zoonotic and non-zoonotic reportable diseases.

Surveillance programs are risk-based in their design and reflective of international science-based standards. By focussing on those animal populations at greatest risk of being affected by a particular disease, Canada's surveillance programs provide an opportunity for early detection of emerging diseases and early recognition of changes in the status of a particular disease (e.g. BSE and avian influenza). The CFIA laboratories play an integral part in providing diagnostic services and research support of surveillance activities.


KEY ELEMENTS OF CONTROLLING THE TRANSMISSION OF ANIMAL DISEASES TO HUMANS

  • Disease surveillance activities
  • Inspection and monitoring activities
  • Compliance and enforcement activities
  • Emergency response to disease outbreaks
  • Eradication activities
  • Program design/re-design

Special initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Contribute to an integrated Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Strategy: The CFIA, HC and PHAC are working together on an integrated Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Strategy, making Canada a global leader on animal and public health issues. Investments focus on collaborative surveillance design for early detection of avian influenza through migratory birds assessments and targeted sampling of domestic populations. (Key partners — PHAC, HC, AAFC, PSEPC) (See detailed plan on the pages that follow).
  • maple leaf symbol Contribute to the implementation of the National Wildlife Disease Strategy: Diseases originating or reservoired in wild animals, such as avian influenza, chronic wasting disease (CWD), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), tuberculosis and lyme disease are having an increasingly serious impact on biodiversity, human health, agricultural production and economies worldwide. The CFIA will continue to contribute to a multi-departmental initiative to develop a National Wildlife Disease Strategy. The strategy will establish a coordinated national policy, disease response and management framework to minimize the impacts of animal diseases originating in wildlife. (Key partners — EC, including CWS, Provinces and Territories)

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


ENHANCED BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY (BSE) PROGRAMMING

In May 2003, the first case of BSE was confirmed in an animal born and raised in Canada. Since then seven additional cases of BSE have been confirmed in animals born and raised in Canada. These events necessitated enhancements and revisions to the existing BSE program elements in order to meet domestic and international expectations, as outlined below.

BSE surveillance testing — The enhanced surveillance program for BSE testing will continue in 2007-2008. The program targets high-risk categories of mature cattle, those most likely to be affected with the disease, for testing. The CFIA has established a minimum of 30,000 samples per year and in 2006 evaluated over 50,000 samples. An analysis is planned for 2007-2008 to determine Canada's achievement of recommended surveillance objectives as established by the World Organization for Animal Health and assess the opportunity to move to a monitoring level to evaluate progression to eradication.

Removal of specified risk material (SRM) from food for human consumption — The removal of SRM from the human food supply is recognized internationally as the most effective food safety measure protecting human health from exposure to the agent of BSE. The CFIA verifies the removal of SRM from cattle slaughtered for human consumption in all federally registered establishments. Through the integrated implementation of federal and provincial/territorial meat inspection systems, an equivalent level of protection with respect to cattle slaughtered in facilities that are not federally registered is also achieved.

Addressing risk in animal feed — In June, 2006, in Canada Gazette Part II, the CFIA published regulatory amendments to enhance the feed ban by prohibiting SRM in fertilizer and in any animal feed, including pet food. These regulations are scheduled to enter into force in July 2007. At that time all SRM from cattle will be moved by permit, issued by the CFIA, to an approved destruction or containment site. A task force has been struck to facilitate and coordinate with our provincial partners and industry the phased-in implementation of the enhanced feed ban.

Enhanced export certification — The CFIA has established a corps of veterinary officers to provide ongoing technical support to Canada's key missions abroad in ensuring that the export requirements of individual trading partners are consistently met. Veterinary officers have been deployed to Beijing, Tokyo, Mexico City and Brussels.

New BSE import policy — Canada is continuing to implement its revised import policy and regulation to enhance both animal and public health protection. The CFIA is currently developing administrative procedures and regulatory amendments necessary for full implementation of a revised import policy that will be consistent with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and include US imports in a permitting structure.

Enhanced tracking and tracing — The CFIA continues to provide program oversight and compliance verification of the regulatory requirements of the national cattle identification program. In 2007-2008, there will be an increased emphasis in tracing as provincial and federal governments look at providing a single entry point for information.

International Engagement — The CFIA remains committed to playing an active and participatory role at the international level. In addition to contributing to and influencing international science based disease control standards for BSE which provide for the protection of animal, human and eco-system health and food safety, which is a critical component of the foundation for safe trade and the maintenance of international market confidence, the CFIA continues to strategically engage other countries in validating the effectiveness of its measures. On a bilateral basis this involves the invitation to trading partners for incoming technical missions to confirm first hand the integrity and implementation of Canada's inspection controls. At the multilateral level, the CFIA is pursuing official designation as a BSE Controlled Risk country through the evaluation process of the 167 member country World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).

For more information on BSE, including for information on OIE country categorization, please visit the CFIA's Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca



Table 2.1b Expected results and related indicators for controlling the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets5

Animal diseases that are transmissible to humans are controlled within animal populations*

BSE sample collection

In full accordance with the guidelines recommended by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

# of BSE disease incidents

No known cases of BSE that fall outside accepted parameters.

Extent to which products of federally-registered plants comply with SRM removal-related laws and regulations.

97% compliance6

Extent to which cattle tagging is compliant with the regulations for animal identification.

≥97% compliance

*See Section 2.3b for additional indicators for control and eradication of known animal diseases


5 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

6 The performance target for SRM removal is based on a two-year average compliance rate for federally registered plants for three key tasks related to SRM removal. Of 12,406 ratings of tasks, 350 incidents of non-compliance were identified — 248 of which were considered to be minor infractions. The major infractions related to health are corrected immediately on site.


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CFIA'S AVIAN INFLUENZA PREPAREDNESS STRATEGY

Since the 2004 avian influenza outbreak in British Columbia, much progress has been made in enhancing Canada's avian influenza (AI) preparedness strategy, which is based on five main pillars: Prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, emergency response, recovery and communications. The CFIA is focused on continuing progress including:

  • Continued work on an H5/H7 prevalence survey in domestic and wild poultry, which could form the basis for ongoing surveillance, as required by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The protocol for the survey was developed and included data gathering from multiple sources and consensus building among affected industry and provincial stakeholders. The survey will be conducted when industry demographic information is available, and samples may be obtained from poultry at federally registered processing facilities or on farms.
  • Implementing a strategy that allows for submission of AI suspect samples to local laboratories. The CFIA staff are trained to respond rapidly in the event of an avian influenza virus of concern being isolated from a poultry premises. This strategy will address the need for regional laboratories for early detection and surge capacity if large or multiple animal disease outbreaks were to occur.
  • Addressing the concerns of Canadians regarding the possibility of an avian influenza epidemic, in partnership with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada.
  • Identifying and exercising the roles and responsibilities of all partners in the event of a zoonotic disease outbreak.
  • Working closely with provincial, territorial and municipal officials in the event of an avian influenza outbreak to allow for swift depopulation and disposal of potential sources of infection for other poultry or humans.
  • Providing technical support to the poultry industry as they implement effective, verifiable biosecurity controls.
  • Reviewing proposals that will ensure on-farm bio-security is enhanced through regulatory measures.
  • Providing leadership at the national and international level in the development and adoption of biosecurity standards to mitigate the economic consequences of disease detections.
  • In 2007-2008 the focus will continue to be:
    • Biosecurity awareness and adjustments to husbandry and management practices by industry
    • Shared vaccine bank strategies to the hemispheric level for emergency response
    • Disease modelling and mapping integration between the CFIA and PHAC
    • Shared simulation and preparedness exercise, including many animal health and public health first responders
  • Elaboration of a business continuity plan for the CFIA to provide critical services over the course of a significant pandemic occurrence

For more information on avian influenza, please visit the CFIA's Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca


2.1c Regulatory Research — Food safety, nutrition and public health

Increased public awareness of food safety and nutrition along with the advancement of science globally have led to increased public focus on the safety and nutritional value of food. The scientific capacity to respond to new and emerging food safety and nutritional concerns is an important component of the Agency's inspection activities. Newer and faster methods of analysis suited for the specific circumstances at hand are needed to enhance the Agency's capability to respond to food safety concerns. Methods are also required to determine the accuracy of nutritional labelling of food. These methods must provide defensible laboratory test results which will withstand legal and international scrutiny are key elements in the enforcement of food safety and nutrition compliance.

The Agency has created the Food Research Steering Committee to develop an overall research strategy for the food sector. The steering committee is supported by three working groups with specialized expertise in such areas as food borne pathogens, chemical contaminants and drug residues, toxins, allergens, labelling and nutrition. The steering committee, assisted by the working groups, will identify and prioritize food research needs for the Agency. With input from other federal organizations, working groups will contribute to a more collaborative approach to the identification and prioritization of these needs and, ultimately, food research across government.

Zoonotic diseases also have the potential to threaten public health. Some zoonotic diseases such as brucellosis, rabies, and bovine tuberculosis occur at a low level in Canada, especially in wildlife. Other zoonotic diseases such as BSE and avian influenza have emerged in recent years to threaten Canada's agricultural economy, human and animal health and trade. Research to improve testing methodology contributes to reliable and accurate testing and facilitates disease control and early intervention should the disease appear in animals.

Basic research provides an increased understanding of the biology of these diseases, where they originate, and how they are transmitted. This information is critical to the development of effective response and control programs. More information on regulatory research related to zoonotic diseases can be found in Section 2.3d.

Participating in collaborative research serves to enhance the CFIA's research output. The CFIA participates in collaborative research thus benefiting from knowledge transfer and accessing expertise from other research institutions such as the Public Health Agency of Canada.


KEY ELEMENT OF REGULATORY RESEARCH — FOOD SAFETY, NUTRITION AND PUBLIC HEALTH

  • Conduct regulatory research in support of food safety, nutrition and public health

Current research initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Enhance capability to detect a broader range of chemical compounds and organisms in a wider range of foods and food inputs: Expand detection capabilities in the areas of allergens, nutrition, veterinary drug residues and pesticide residues, contaminants, viruses and parasites in a wide variety of foods and food inputs.
  • maple leaf symbol Assess newer technology and/or methodology to improve the CFIA's service delivery and/or capacity: Assess alternatives to culture-based methods for the detection of pathogens in food. Assess and further develop rapid detection technologies for testing of animals for zoonotic diseases.
  • maple leaf symbol Assess newer platform technology for applicability in regulatory compliance:Assess biosensor-based technology for the detection of veterinary drug residues in food.
  • Development of a web-based reporting and communications network: In collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada, development of a web-based reporting and communications network with provincial and veterinary diagnostic laboratories in Canada to support surveillance for animal diseases such as avian influenza and BSE. (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Radio-nuclear Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI). Information regarding other CRTI initiatives may be found in section 2.4c)
  • maple leaf symbol Evaluation of more efficient test methods for TSE's: Develop and evaluate new rapid diagnostic tests for TSE's to maximize testing efficiency.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.1c Expected result and related indicators for regulatory research — food safety, nutrition and public health

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets

Decision making related to food safety, nutrition and public health is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Indicators are currently under development.7

TBD


7 The CFIA through its Performance management framework is embarking on a process for the development of performance measures for regulatory research over the course of the coming year.

 

2.2 Protecting consumers through a fair and effective regulatory regime

A fair and secure marketplace is one which is able to "maintain and enhance consumer confidence and give businesses an optimal environment for competitiveness."8 The CFIA is committed to ensuring that its legislative and regulatory base related to its mandate not only protects consumers' and producers' rights as well as the natural environment, but supports high standards for a safe, fair and secure trading system. The Agency promotes strong, coherent and science-based regulation, both domestically and internationally. A strong export certification program for food, animals and plants maintains and enhances consumer confidence abroad, which contributes directly to economic growth in Canada. The Agency is also committed to actively protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices, such as inaccurate food labelling and misrepresentation of products, and conducts research that will enhance the CFIA's capacity to address these issues.

8 Canada's Performance 2006, p. 24


STRATEGIC OUTCOME
2.2 Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets
PROGRAM ACTIVITY & DESCRIPTION
Science and Regulation
Providing a fair and effective regulatory regime for food, animals and plants that protects Consumers and supports competitive domestic and international markets. Maintaining the integrity of CFIA's regulatory policy, inspection and certification activities.
PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITIES
2.2a Promoting science-based regulation
2.2b Maintaining an effective regulatory framework
2.2c Protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices
2.2d Certifying exports
2.2e Regulatory Research- Exports and unfair practices
EXPECTED RESULTS
• The Agency contributes to the development and implementation of international rules, standards and agreements through international negotiations.
• The Agency applies sound and current science to the development of national standards, operational methods and procedures.
• Transparent, outcome-based and science-based domestic regulatory framework is maintained.
• Deceptive and unfair market practices are deterred.
• Other governments' import requirements are met.
• Decision making related to regulatory development and review, deterring unfair practices and export is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.
RESOURCE ALLOCATION
  Planned Spending
2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Net Planned Spending
($ millions)
93.7 118.2 115.6
Full Time Equivalents 1,336 1,336 1,317

2.2a Promoting science-based regulation

Ongoing activities:

A strong, coherent and science-based health and safety regulatory framework will help Canadian consumers enjoy a wide variety of safe, high-quality products; that the environment is protected; and that market access is science-based.

As the largest science-based regulatory agency in Canada, the CFIA promotes the development and implementation of both domestic and international science-based regulation related to its mandate and statutory responsibilities. It provides scientific information to other federal partners with unique and complementary roles and responsibilities, such as Health Canada, which sets food safety standards. The Agency also works closely with other science-based departments and agencies such as the Public Health Agency of Canada to advance integration on initiatives that touch multiple government mandates, such as addressing issues related to zoonotic diseases and public security.


KEY ELEMENTS OF PROMOTING SCIENCE-BASED REGULATION

  • Provide science-based policy advice for standard setting
  • Update tools and technology to support science activities
  • Build science base through recruitment and training
  • Retain and strengthen the scientific basis for international agreements and arrangements
  • Advance science based decisions, policies and standards in relevant international fora


Contributing to Government's science innovation and excellence initiative: The Government of Canada is committed to enhancing science innovation and excellence across government. The CFIA is one of several science-based departments and agencies within the federal science and technology community that is contributing to the development of a common vision and implementation plan to address science and innovation within the federal government. The focus of the CFIA's activities in this area include:

  • Taking a lead role in monitoring the implementation of recommendations for overcoming barriers to Science and Technology (S&T) collaboration, identified in an interdepartmental review led by the CFIA and identified in the report, Overcoming Barriers to S&T Collaboration
  • Participating in the Entreprise initiative to develop a federal perspective on the S&T needed to address national priorities and a new strategic vision for federal engagement in the national S&T enterprise
  • Contributing to the Industry Canada led development of a federal strategy for S&T, working to incorporate key elements required for the best use of federal S&T capacity in support of the public good.

International rules and standards form the basis for regulating imports and exports of products that could pose a risk to food safety, animals and plants. The CFIA promotes the Canadian experience, objectives and use of the best available scientific knowledge in the development of international agreements, arrangements and standards, and continues to make gains for Canada in the resolution of phytosanitary technical market access issues on exports. At the same time, it ensures that international agreements, arrangements and standards are reflected in standards here in Canada. In order to ensure the CFIA's strength and viability as a science-based organization, it continues to focus on building its science capacity through recruitment, training and integrating competencies from academics, provincial and private sector.

While international standards facilitate the science-based technical dialogue with Canada`s trading partners, the CFIA expends considerable resources to resolve issues of new market access, as well as retention and expansion of existing market access in various bilateral fora. For example, the CFIA — plant health officials have succeeded in retaining market access for pulses and wheat to India.

The CFIA leads Canadian participation in the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Agreement and with federal, provincial and regional bodies, as well as leads Canadian participation in the WTO, SPS committee. The Agency also leads Canada's participation in a number of international regulatory fora such as the International Plant Protection Convention and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); it co-leads, with Health Canada, the government's participation in the Codex Alimentarius Commission; and it actively participates in a variety of other international fora dealing with regulatory issues.


Table 2.2a Expected results and related indicators for promoting science-based regulation

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets9

The Agency contributes to the development and implementation of international rules, standards and agreements and arrangements through international negotiations.

 

Extent to which the international regulatory framework reflects Agency and stakeholders' priorities and needs.

100% of newly concluded international SPS-related agreements for which the CFIA is the lead for Canada are coherent and science-based.

100% of the international plant health standards adopted this fiscal year underwent consultation and feedback was provided to the relevant standard-setting organization.

The Agency applies sound and current science to the development of national standards, operational methods and procedures.

Extent to which the Agency's standards, operational methods and procedures reflect sound and current science.

100% of newly completed SPS-related standards, operational methods, policies, guidelines, handbooks and procedures reflect sound and coherent science.

National standards setting, program and policy design/redesign, and risk mitigation strategies are informed by sound and current science.


9 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.2b Maintaining an effective regulatory framework

Ongoing activities:

The Government of Canada is committed to continuous improvement of the federal regulatory system — making it more transparent, accountable and adaptable to new technologies, emerging threats and changing public priorities. Regulatory departments and agencies have been challenged to seek ways to use their regulatory frameworks to contribute to public health, sustainability, innovation and economic growth, while at the same time reducing the regulatory burden on businesses. This is known as the Smart Regulation Strategy. The CFIA is an active participant in the Smart Regulation initiative. (See detailed plan on the pages that follows.)

The CFIA legislation is reviewed on an ongoing basis to verify that it is current, relevant and consistent with the Government of Canada's Federal Regulatory Policy. For example, the CFIA conducted a review of compensation policies under the Health of Animals Act, and in consultation with AAFC, the CFIA continues to frame approaches to addressing compensation issues. The Federal Regulatory Policy sets out rigorous and detailed processes to ensure regulation reflects and is responsive to the needs of Canadians.

The complex jurisdictional context within which the Agency operates involves federal, provincial, territorial and in some cases municipal authorities. Coordination and collaboration between various levels of government are needed for Canada's food, animal and plant inspection system to function harmoniously. Under the authority of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, the Agency enters into bilateral and multilateral agreements with others. The CFIA continues to implement initiatives under the SPP, which are aimed at a more effective North American food and agriculture regulatory system.


KEY ELEMENTS OF MAINTAINING AN EFFECTIVE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

  • Develop/update Acts and regulations
  • Negotiate domestic arrangements and agreements
  • Cultivate collaborative relationships with relevant stakeholders including provincial agencies, industry groups, consumer groups and universities
  • Maintain, apply and enhance the CFIA policy on dispute resolution
  • Apply a rigorous and disciplined approach to risk analysis and program design

This will reinforce the security of North America while eliminating unnecessary impediments to trade, thereby promoting economic well-being. (See detailed plan on the pages that follows.)

In addition, the CFIA works closely with other jurisdictions through its participation on federal, provincial, and territorial (F/P/T) committees. For example, since 2005 F/P/T Regulatory Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee, co-chaired by the CFIA, has provided strategic advice to federal, provincial and territorial governments in order to facilitate the development and implementation of coordinated F/P/T regulatory and program initiatives.

The financial and time costs of addressing disputes between the CFIA and regulated parties, or those with whom the Agency has contractual obligations, continue to rise. The CFIA has incorporated a dispute resolution approach as an integral part of the Agency's current and future obligations. In the twelve-month period between October 2005 and September 2006, the CFIA resolved a total of fourteen litigation claims, which resulted in a savings of fixed legal costs of approximately $2.65 million.

Special Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Meat Inspection Reform: The Government of Canada's Meat Inspection Reform (MIR) initiative was launched in 2005. This initiative is intended to enhance the safety and suitability of Canadian meat regardless of where it is produced, sustain consumer confidence, secure market access, facilitate inter-provincial trade in meat, foster economic development, provide a sound regulatory base for industry and deliver meat inspection programs in the most efficient and effective manner possible across Canada. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will focus on the development and implementation of a new "Canadian Meat Hygiene Standard" together with complementary Technical Guidance Documents. In addition, the CFIA will improve inspection programs under the compliance verification system including development of and improvements to poultry and hog slaughter inspection programs (ie Poultry Rejection Project, HACCP-based inspection programs for Hogs).
  • maple leaf symbol Canada-Ontario integrated meat inspection system: Work under this initiative is a key element of Meat Inspection Reform. Under this agreement, the Governments of Ontario and Canada are collaborating to explore joint public service delivery, with respect to meat inspection. The goal of this agreement will be to improve the province's slaughterhouse inspection and infrastructure, to harmonize federal and provincial inspection regimes, and to allow for expanded interprovincial trade. This work incorporates the following elements and accelerated partnerships: a Canadian Standard; an integrated delivery system, and; increased industry responsibility. In 2007-2008, work on MIR to finalize the "Canadian Meat Hygiene Standard" will be an integral part of enabling this initiative to move forward. In addition, a complete and detailed analysis of inspection delivery options for Ontario will be developed together with a common training program for federal/provincial meat inspectors and industry (Certificate in Meat Food Safety). (Key partners — Provinces, territories and industry)
  • maple leaf symbol Implement the Organic Regulations: Canada's national organic regime will facilitate international market access, provide protection to consumers against deceptive and misleading labelling practices and support the further development of the domestic market. Regulations have been published that will establish third party certification and adherence to the requirements of the Organic Regulations for all products with organic claims moving interprovincially or internationally, and carrying the Canada Organic Legend. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will work with the provincial and private sector certification bodies to implement the regime, and negotiate international accreditation/recognition and acceptance for Canada's organic products. Full implementation of the regime is expected for December 2009. (Key partners — Provinces, territories, AAFC and DFAIT)

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.2b Expected result and related indicators for maintaining an effective regulatory framework

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets10

Transparent, outcome-based and science-based domestic regulatory framework is maintained.

Extent to which the CFIA's mandate and activities are supported by Acts and regulations that reflect priorities and requirements of the Agency and its stakeholders.

100% of newly passed legislation and regulations (SPS-related) are transparent, outcome-based, science-based and are deemed to have responded to new technologies, emerging threats and public priorities.


10 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.


CFIA'S SMART REGULATION INITIATIVES
The Government of Canada, through its Smart Regulation Initiative, has challenged regulatory departments and agencies to seek ways to use their regulatory frameworks to contribute to public health, sustainability, innovation and economic growth, while at the same time reducing the regulatory burden on businesses. The CFIA is an active participant in the Smart Regulation Initiative. In addition to ongoing work with Treasury Board Secretariat on three regulatory review pilot projects (Fair and Ethical Trading of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Fertilizer Program Modernization, Seed Program Modernization), the CFIA is revising its own regulatory development process to respond to Smart Regulation direction. For example, to modernize and strengthen its regulatory framework the CFIA has implemented a new issue streaming process which includes a thorough assessment of instrument options and early and ongoing consultation with stakeholders and partners.
Summary of Regulatory Review Projects:
Fair and Ethical Trading of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
A review of the regulatory framework for the Fresh Fruit &Vegetable (FF&V) Program is being conducted. Based on improvements identified during stakeholder discussions, Licensing and Arbitration Regulations amendments have been proposed. The FF&V Program has also made progress in the harmonization of the Canada-US grade standards. Four products have been identified to be deregulated as these products are not traded in large volume on the interprovincial market. To address industry needs in a rapidly changing environment, the CFIA has redesigned the destination inspection component of the FF&V Program, to provide more efficient, consistent and flexible service to the industry. In 2007, the CFIA is instituting regulatory amendments to facilitate initiation of the new program's 3-year implementation period.
  WHY IS IT SMART? WHO BENEFITS?  
This program will strengthen regulatory cooperation among NAFTA partners, and federal departments and agencies. Result in more efficient regulatory management and change, as well as enhanced transparency and accountability of the regulatory system. This program will benefit producers and shippers, wholesalers and retailers of fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as consumers.

Fertilizer Program Modernization
The objective of the Fertilizer Program Modernization Initiative is to build stakeholder support for and implement a Strategic Action Plan that addresses outstanding and emerging issues. The initiative includes a range of capacity building activities and program review and redesign initiatives focused on achieving improved program capacity and performance including:

- Strengthening the biosolid regulatory program, enhanced product safety and product efficacy evaluation capacity; product registration service standards; a lengthened product registration renewal cycle; and the development of quality management systems-based third party oversight models to support existing market monitoring programs for compost and bulk fertilizer blends.

- Development of a strengthened and permanent consultative framework. The recent establishment of the stakeholder-led Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum and related issue specific working groups represent an important milestone in this regard.

  WHY IS IT SMART? WHO BENEFITS?  
Reduced regulatory compliance burden and facilitation of a more rapid and efficient regulatory process. Improved international and federal-provincial regulatory co-operation; and the establishment of a permanent consultative framework to strengthen interdepartmental coordination. Increased transparency and improved stakeholder engagement. Agricultural producers, the fertilizer and supplement industry and the general public.
Seed Program Modernization:The objective of the Seed Program Modernization Initiative is to reduce barriers to innovation and agriculture sector competitiveness while ensuring continued producer and consumer confidence in the seed regulatory framework. The first phase of this initiative is focused on the development of a strengthened permanent consultative framework to facilitate ongoing dialogue among stakeholders, and between stakeholders and government; the identification of priority issues; and modifications to the variety registration system. Related regulatory amendments are planned for introduction in early 2007. The second phase of this initiative is focused on Seed Program review and design and the development of a strategic action plan for the Seed Program by 2008. Findings from public consultation on the first phase of this initiative (due to be completed in early 2007) will be combined with the CFIA assessments to identify areas for priority improvement in the Seed Program.
  WHY IS IT SMART? WHO BENEFITS?  
This program will improve international and federal-provincial regulatory cooperation. Enhance participation in a faster more efficient regulatory process with enhanced participation by stakeholders and citizens. Reduced regulatory compliance burden. This program will benefit agricultural producers, the seed industry, and the public.


CFIA AND THE SECURITY AND PROSPERITY PARTNERSHIP OF NORTH AMERICA

The Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP) announced by Canada, the U.S. and Mexico on March 23, 2005, is a formal mechanism to implement a comprehensive set of initiatives over five years aimed at increasing the security, prosperity and quality of life of the citizens of North America. The CFIA and Health Canada (HC) co-lead Canada's participation in those SPP activities that impact on bio-protection, food and agricultural regulation.

Leaders met in Cancun, Mexico, on March 30-31, 2006, to take stock of progress under the SPP. They agreed to initiatives under five key themes:

  • Strengthening competitiveness in North America;
  • North American smart, secure borders;
  • North American emergency management;
  • Avian and human pandemic influenza; and
  • North American energy security.

Leaders committed to developing a comprehensive, coordinated and science-based North American approach to plan for and manage the threat of avian and pandemic influenza. They agreed to: 1) principles to guide the development of protocols and standard operating procedures; 2) the establishment of a trilateral Coordinating Body (of which the CFIA is a key member) to follow up on the work programs. A key priority for Canada and the CFIA under the Prosperity agenda is the establishment of a North American food safety coordinating mechanism. This includes the establishment of a food safety task force which identified as a first priority the comparison of Good Agricultural Practices for the production of fresh fruits and vegetables in the three countries, with a focus on microbiological contamination.

The North American Plan for Avian and Pandemic Influenza is being co-authored by all of the participating countries. CFIA leads the development of Chapter 4 of the plan devoted to Avian Influenza. Other chapters in the Plan deal with Pandemic Influenza, Emergency Coordination, Borders and Transportation and Critical Infrastructure Protection.

The Prosperity workplan also includes a variety of CFIA-led initiatives, such as:

  • Reviewing and developing North American import/border inspection policies, pest management approaches, and animal health management approaches to accelerate the identification, management and recovery from foodborne and animal and plant disease and pest hazards;
  • Enhancing laboratory coordination through the establishment of plant health and food safety laboratory networks to further communicate and recognize methodology used by the three countries; and
  • Furthering cooperation on biotechnology under the North American Biotechnology Initiative.

The bio-protection initiatives under the Security agenda of the SPP were negotiated as an enhancement of the close bio-security regulatory cooperation which exists between Canada and the US. The objective of the bio-protection component of the SPP is to develop and implement a North American bio-protection strategy to assess, mitigate and respond to intentional threats to public health and the food and agriculture system. Some of the key bio-protection initiatives led by the CFIA include:

  • Working with our US/Mexico counterparts to share threat and vulnerability assessment information;
  • Developing a coordinated approach to identify and manage threats to animals, plants and humans;
  • Developing integrated emergency plans and undertaking joint emergency response drills;
  • Expanding the animal vaccine bank to respond to more animal health diseases; and
  • Jointly responding to and cooperating on enforcement actions.
  • The CFIA is writing the animal health chapter of the SPP AI Preparedness Manual.

2.2c Protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices

Ongoing activities:

The CFIA incorporates activities designed to deter deceptive and unfair market practices in the marketplace. The compliance and enforcement of the consumer protection component of the Food and Drugs Act and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, verification of compliance with the Seeds Act, granting plant breeders' rights, and administering licensing and arbitration for fresh fruit and vegetables have particularly strong linkages to this outcome.

The CFIA enforces the food composition, labelling and net quantity provisions of the Food and Drug Regulations and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations for both domestic and imported food products at the manufacturing import and retail levels of trade. Compliance and enforcement actions are based on a risk management model which prioritizes activities in areas of high risk and low compliance. High-risk products and establishments are subject to targeted inspections, analyses of food products and checks for the accuracy of labels. In addition, the Agency works to improve compliance by developing information materials for industry and taking appropriate enforcement action.


KEY ELEMENTS OF PROTECTING CONSUMERS AND THE MARKETPLACE FROM UNFAIR PRACTICES

  • Set and enforce standards for net quantity, and food composition labelling
  • Verify compliance with Seeds Act
  • Register seed varieties and seed establishments
  • Compliance and enforcement activities
  • Grant plant breeders' rights
  • Administer licensing and arbitration for fresh fruit and vegetables
  • Target high-risk products and establishments
  • Enhance public awareness of product misrepresentation issues
  • Program design/Redesign

The Seeds Act provides the CFIA with the regulatory authority to monitor imported and domestic seed, certify seed, and register seed varieties and seed establishments. The high quality of Canadian pedigreed seed is dependent on the maintenance of systems to manage seed quality in Canada. The CFIA works with the Canadian Seed Institute and the Canadian Seed Growers Association (CSGA) to verify that Canadian seeds meet high standards. The Agency operates two seed laboratories and participates in a program for accreditation of private seed labs; conducts marketplace surveillance, targeting high-risk establishments; and inspects seed crops in support of seed certification. In addition to carrying out audit and verification activities, the CFIA responds to incidents of non-compliance by issuing education/warning letters, detaining product or refusing entry of product into Canada.

The Plant Breeders' Rights Act (1990) and its regulations provide legal protection to plant breeders for their rights to new plant varieties for up to eighteen years. The intent of the legislation is to stimulate plant breeding in Canada, to provide Canadian producers better access to foreign varieties, and to facilitate the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries. The CFIA's Plant Breeders' Rights Office administers the legislation with the support of an Advisory committee.

The CFIA functions to secure the rights of plant breeders by granting protection for their new varieties. The CFIA examines applications to determine whether applicants are entitled to receive a grant of rights. It also publishes and distributes plant breeders' rights information via the Plant Varieties Journal and assists the public in obtaining documentation pertaining to a right that has been published.

Promoting fair trading practices for dealers of fresh fruit and vegetables is integral to providing the best environment possible for competitiveness. The CFIA licences dealers of fresh fruits and vegetables who market their produce inter-provincially and internationally, and responds to requests from industry to inspect at destination loads of imported fresh fruit and vegetables which in the majority of requests have been received in damaged or deteriorated condition. The results of these inspections are used to resolve disputes without having to seek recourse through arbitration.


Table 2.2c Expected result and related indicators for protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets11

Deceptive and unfair market practices are deterred.

Extent to which seed establishments and private labs inspected comply with federal requirements.

≥95% compliance

Extent to which non-pedigreed seed samples comply with CFIA quality standards.

≥85% compliance12

Extent to which pedigreed seed samples comply with CFIA quality standards.

≥95% compliance

Extent to which pedigreed seeds tested comply with standards for varietal purity.

≥99% compliance


11 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

12 Currently, the seed program is undergoing a modernization initiative that will be reviewing our current marketplace monitoring activities to strengthen compliance. As the review is completed in 2007-2008, actions will be implemented to increase compliance rates.

2.2d Certifying exports

Ongoing Activities:

The agriculture and agri-food trade balance accounted for 9.3% of the total Canadian trade balance with all countries in 2005. Agriculture and agri-food imports have been growing at a slower pace than exports resulting in a widening positive trade balance. In 2005, the overall agriculture and agri-food trade surplus was $5.5 billion.13 The estimated value of imported products regulated by the CFIA increased by 40%, from $17.9 billion in 1997 to $25.1 billion in 2005. During this same period, Canada's exports of CFIA regulated products rose by 9.5% from $38.6 billion in 1997 to $42.3 billion in 2005.

The integrity and credibility of the certification process plays an important role in Canada's international trade and helps to protect the excellent international reputation of Canada's exports of food, plants, animals and associated products. It will continue to remain a demanding and important part of the Agency's mandate. The CFIA continues to meet export demands by moving towards system-based certification programs. These programs may include components of industry-led certification initiatives.

The Agency, in partnership with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards, conduct inspections, issue export certificates and accredit third parties to carry out competent testing.


KEY ELEMENTS OF CERTIFYING EXPORTS

  • Conduct export certification activities for food
  • Conduct export certification activities for animals and animal products
  • Conduct export certification activities for plants and plant products

Special Initiative:

  • maple leaf symbol Develop and implement Electronic Export Certificate (E-Cert) Systems: Canadians and our international trading partners are demanding increased security, and more timely, efficient documentation systems to deal with increasing trade volumes. The CFIA is pursuing progression from a paper-based system to electronic certification to certify that Canadian products comply with the importing country's regulatory requirements, verify the regulatory status of shipments, and provide equivalent information to originating countries regarding Canadian imports. Over the next three years, the CFIA will participate in multilateral working groups to develop requirements for government-to-government exchange of certification information, augment existing systems and launch several pilot projects. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will continue to work on several projects including enhancements to the Foreign Plant Quarantine Import Requirements database, to allow electronic exchange and certification information, implement meat, semen and embryo export projects and meat import pilots and web-based import permit applications.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

13 AAFC, 2006


Table 2.2d Expected result and related indicators for certifying exports

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets14

Other governments' import requirements are met.

Extent to which certified food shipments meet the receiving country's import requirements.

≥99% meet requirements

Extent to which plant export shipments meet the receiving country's phytosanitary requirements.

≥99% of plant export shipments meet the import requirements


14 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.2e Regulatory Research — Exports and unfair practices

The CFIA's research supports the delivery of a fair and effective regulatory regime for food, animals and plants through the acquisition of new knowledge and improved methodologies. For example, scientific research contributes to the protection of the consumer and marketplace from unfair practices by facilitating the verification of labelling and other claims to ensure that consumers have accurate information upon which to base purchase decisions. This occurs through the development of laboratory testing methods to support regulatory compliance. Plant health research includes research supporting the development of treatment strategies for products such as wood to ensure they are free of viable pests, thereby facilitating trade, while animal health research is focussed on development and validation of tests to detect foreign animal disease in live animals and germplasm destined for export. CFIA also works with several trading partners on co-operative research initiatives.


KEY ELEMENTS OF REGULATORY RESEARCH — EXPORTS AND UNFAIR PRACTICES

  • Conduct regulatory research in support of regulatory development and review, deterring unfair practices and supporting export certification.

Current research initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Improve Inspection guidelines for trade of wood products: Research to support the development of standards for novel heat treatment kilns to enable export of wood products.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.2e Expected result and related indicators for regulatory research-exports and unfair practices

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets

Decision making related to regulatory development and review, deterring unfair practices and export is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Indicators are currently under development.15

TBD


15 The CFIA through its Performance management framework is embarking on a process for the development of performance measures for regulatory research over the course of the coming year.

 

2.3 Sustaining the plant and animal resource base

Increasingly, governments recognize that our economic and social well-being are contingent on the health and sustainability of our natural resources — including water, forestry, fisheries and agriculture. The Government of Canada's commitment to sustainable economic growth recognizes that "Canada's traditional industries such as forestry and agriculture, have long been anchors of the nation's economy. Natural resources based industries provide jobs to hundreds of thousands of Canadians and support hundreds of communities across the country."16

The CFIA's contribution to this government priority is focussed on the promotion of a sustainable plant and animal resource base. This involves protecting Canada's crops, forests, livestock and aquatic animals from regulated pests and diseases, and assessing the environmental sustainability of new products derived through enabling technologies, such as biotechnology.

16 Canada's Performance 2006, p. 15.


STRATEGIC OUTCOME
2.3 A sustainable plant and animal resource base
PROGRAM ACTIVITY & DESCRIPTION
Animal and Plant Resource Protection    
Activities related to protecting Canada's livestock, crops and forests from regulated pests and diseases including invasive species; and regulation of agricultural products, including products of biotechnology.
PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITIES
2.3a Protecting Canada's crops and forests
2.3b Protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals
2.3c Assessing agricultural products
2.3d Regulatory Research — Animal and plant resource protection
EXPECTED RESULTS
• Entry and domestic spread of regulated plant diseases and pests are controlled.
• Industry complies with federal acts and regulations regarding Canada's crops, forests and livestock.
• Entry and domestic spread of regulated animal diseases are controlled.
• Agricultural products meet the requirements of federal acts and regulations.
• Decision making, including regulation, in regards to animal and plant health are supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.
RESOURCE ALLOCATION
  Planned Spending
2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Net Planned Spending
($ millions)
111.7 105.0 103.3
Full Time Equivalents 1,147 1,138 1,118

2.3a Protecting Canada's crops and forests

Ongoing activities:

The CFIA's role in protecting the plant resource base involves preventing the entry, establishment and domestic spread of plant diseases and pests as well as the regulation of fertilizers and plant supplements.

The entry and establishment of plant diseases and pests that originate in other countries can be devastating. For example, a forest pest called the Asian Long Horned Beetle was detected in Ontario in September of 2003. This pest has resulted in the destruction of several thousand host trees, including Maple trees. The CFIA's continued surveillance efforts show progress towards eradicating this pest in Canada.

Plum pox virus is a serious plant disease that was found in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. This virus infects stone fruit species of the genus Prunus including peaches, nectarines, plums, apricots, almonds and ornamental varieties and reduces yield and fruit quality. While progress has been made towards eradicating Plum Pox Virus, consultation with stakeholders and scientific experts on eradication plans and extensive eradication, inspection, surveys and removal (including tree removal), are still required in order to make eradication attainable while maintaining industry viability.

In order to prevent the entry and establishment of plant diseases and pests, the CFIA conducts risk assessments, and develops and implements regulations, policies and programs to identify and manage pest risks associated with imported plants, plant products, wood packaging and soil. For example on July 5, 2006 non-compliant wood packaging began to be refused entry into Canada. This represents the final phase of the new wood packaging import requirements being implemented in Canada, Mexico and the United States in accordance with the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures.


KEY ELEMENTS OF PROTECTING CANADA'S CROPS AND FORESTS

  • Inspection and monitoring activities for plants, plant products, high-risk plant imports, and fertilizers
  • Compliance and enforcement activities
  • Movement control and eradication activities
  • Surveys
  • Risk assessments
  • Plant protection compensation
  • Emergency response
  • Education, awareness and outreach
  • Program design/re-design

Regulations and policies are implemented through a comprehensive risk-based inspection program for imports that is delivered in partnership with the Canada Border Services Agency at ports of entry. It also includes activities such as conducting pre-clearance inspections of products and reviewing certification programs of foreign countries, issuing import permits and monitoring or surveying for the entry of plant diseases and pests.

Controlling the spread of plant pests and diseases that are already established in Canada is another key aspect of the CFIA's role in protecting Canada's crops and forests. For example, Golden Nematode, a pest having existing quarantine zones in Newfoundland and in Vancouver Island, BC, was subsequently detected in potato fields in Quebec during August of 2006. Timely quarantine actions on the part of the CFIA, supported by the Province of Quebec, resulted in the containment of this new pest find to a relatively small area within Quebec. Due to these timely actions, the CFIA has been able to restore many of the market access conditions for the exports of commodities initially affected by broad-based phytosanitary measures established by US Department of Agriculture restricting shipments from Canada to the USA.

These types of strict quarantine measures are designed to prevent the movement of this disease to other parts of Canada. The Agency monitors established pests to determine their spread and provide supporting data to fulfill requirements for determining regulated areas. This is accomplished by conducting surveys; inspecting and auditing establishments; and sampling and testing Canadian plants, plant products and soil.

Canada's crops and forests are also protected by the CFIA's ongoing efforts related to the regulation of plant supplements and fertilizers. The CFIA conducts product inspections at blending and manufacturing plants, retail outlets and warehouses. The Agency also routinely assesses and samples fertilizers and supplements to verify that they meet Canada's standards for safety. The samples are tested for contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides and pathogens such as salmonella. When necessary, the CFIA undertakes compliance and enforcement activities.

The Agency also designs and delivers education, awareness and outreach activities and products aimed at Canadians about the role we all play in protecting Canada's crops and forests.

Special Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol National Plant Health Strategy: (Key partners —NRCAN, Federal/Provincial/Territorial) (See detailed plan on the page that follows)
  • Finalize standards for plant pest containment: Strict and clear physical and operational practices for handling invasive alien plant pests in Canadian facilities, including laboratories, are necessary to prevent their escape into the environment. Potential importers of plant pests will need to meet the containment requirements deemed appropriate by the CFIA for the pests they wish to import before import permits will be granted. The CFIA will be finalizing containment standards in 2007, these standards will serve as a clear documented basis for the CFIA approval of medium to high-risk containment facilities working with these plant pests. After a transition period, the standards will become effective on January 1, 2009.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


NATIONAL PLANT HEALTH STRATEGY

The CFIA is leading the development of a National Plant Health Strategy. Growing pressures on Canada's plant health status from the increasing number of technical phytosanitary requirements and rapidly expanding trade patterns have created the need for a comprehensive and integrated federal/provincial plant health strategy for Canada. This strategy will be based on a national vision for plant health and will ensure a coordinated approach to protecting Canada's resource base and environment from the impact of new plant pests and new invasive plants. The strategy will also protect and better attest to our current plant health status to ensure future economic growth in Canada's agriculture and forestry sectors. The development of a National Plant Health Strategy envisioned to include existing plant pest strategies from the individual agricultural and forestry disciplines to form an overall transition model and build on recent initiatives.

The National Plant Health Strategy will outline a comprehensive approach in Canada to eradication, control and management of critical plant pests which includes:

  • Interdepartmental and intergovernmental agreements and
  • Specific critical plant pest action plans.

The strategy encompasses the entire terrestrial plant pest spectrum (from pests not yet present in Canada to those pests fully established), including those considered alien/domestic/native in origin. In addition, it is envisioned to include:

  • The entire pest management continuum of prevention, early detection, rapid response, management/control and recovery.
  • Good governance mechanisms so as to provide the roadmap to achieve the integration of government programs and to ensure complementarity of federal and provincial plant health activities.
  • Clarified roles and responsibilities between the various levels of government and industry through articulation of national goals, the scope of plant health activities, and the integration of provincial and federal plant health strategies.

Partners in this strategy will be the government departments with mandated plant pest responsibilities: federal/provincial/municipal; Agriculture/Forestry/Environment. There would also be involvement of impacted parties, including Industry sectors and First Nations, rural communities and NGOs. The CFIA will continue to scope out the components for the Strategy during 2007-2008, working closely with the F/P/T Regulatory ADM's Committee.

The Invasive Alien Species Strategy is an example of a longer and broader action plan for terrestrial plant pests and invasive plants. The strategy provides a framework for intergovernmental collaboration to prevent new introductions of harmful plants and plant pests, to detect new incursions early, respond rapidly and effectively manage those species which become established. Budget 2005 included $85 million over five years for implementation of some key elements of the Strategy by the CFIA, and its key federal partners. The framework provided by the NPHS will be essential to adequately support eradication, control and management activities in the long run.



Table 2.3a Expected results and related indicators for protecting Canada's crops and forests

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets17

Entry and domestic spread of regulated plant diseases and pests are controlled.

Extent to which Agency data indicates the entry of new regulated diseases and pests into Canada (Listed diseases/pests in the Regulated Pest List for Canada).

Preventing the entry of new regulated diseases and pests into Canada through regulated pathways is effectively managed based on risk.

Change in the presence of plant diseases or pests beyond the regulated areas.

Preventing the spread of regulated plant diseases and pests in Canada is effectively managed based on risk.

Extent to which annual planned pest surveys are completed in accordance with CFIA pest specific detection protocols.

100% of the overall annual planned pest surveys are completed/deemed acceptable per CFIA pest specific detection protocols.

Industry complies with federal acts and regulations concerning Canada's crops and forests.

Extent to which bulk-blend fertilizers comply with efficacy standards and fertilizer-pesticide samples tested comply with safety standards (non-biotechnology product).

≥95% compliance rate for bulk blend fertilizer samples tested, based on efficacy standards (non-biotechnology product).

≥95% compliance rate for fertilizer-pesticide samples tested, based on safety and efficacy standards (non-biotechnology product).

Extent to which fertilizers and supplement sample tests (heavy metal, pathogen, and pesticide contamination) comply with safety standards.

95% compliance rate for fertilizer and supplement samples tested (heavy metal, pathogen, and pesticide contamination) based on safety standards.


17 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.3b Protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals

Ongoing activities:

Canada's ability to market animals, animal products and by-products as well as livestock feed is dependent upon its freedom from the serious epizootic diseases and the confidence of consumers and international officials, in Canada's commitment to the protection of animal, human and ecosystem health.

The CFIA conducts disease surveillance as part of the Canadian Animal Health Network, a nationwide network of veterinarians, and provincial and university diagnostic laboratories. Disease intelligence is exchanged on a regular basis as the CFIA works with other nations and international organizations to establish collaborative approaches to common challenges.

Under the authority of the Health of Animals Act and its regulations, animal owners, veterinarians and laboratories are required to immediately report to the CFIA the presence of an animal that is affected by or suspected of being infected with a reportable disease. These diseases are outlined in the Health of Animals Act and Regulations and are generally of significant importance to human or animal health or to the Canadian economy.

The Agency regularly monitors, tests, inspects and orders quarantines so that regulated animal diseases can be prevented, controlled or eradicated. To encourage the early reporting of suspected diseases, the CFIA administers a compensation program for animals ordered destroyed or treated, and for the costs of disposal. In addition, the CFIA's Disposal Working Group is developing protocols and testing a number of disposal strategies including composting, rendering, burial, incineration and new technologies. Work will continue in 2007-2008 to develop SOP's for other methods of disposal.


KEY ELEMENTS OF PROTECTING CANADA'S LIVESTOCK AND AQUATIC ANIMALS

  • Inspection activities for animals, animal products, and feed
  • Compliance and enforcement activities
  • Movement control and eradication activities
  • Conduct surveys
  • Deliver animal health compensation
  • Emergency response
  • Education, awareness and outreach
  • Program design/redesign

Scientific risk evaluations and science-based international standards guide the Agency's import policies. The CFIA administers and enforces regulations governing the entry of all imported animals and animal products into Canada. Inspections target high-risk animals that show visible signs of disease. Higher risk shipments may be subject to quarantine, import permits, and testing before entering Canada.

The Agency administers a national livestock feed program to verify that livestock feeds manufactured and sold in Canada or imported into Canada are safe, effective and labelled appropriately. The principal thrust of the national feed program is safety. The CFIA inspects feed mills and rendering facilities, monitors feeds for level of medication or contaminants, conducts investigations in response to complaints on detection of food contamination, reviews labels and evaluates and approves ingredients.

Since 2005, the CFIA together with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) have designed and implemented a National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This program is a science-based regulatory program for aquatic animal diseases which have been designated reportable or notifiable in Canada because of their potential impact on trade and our economy. The program meets international standards and consists of measures needed to prevent, control and/or eradicate aquatic animal diseases of concern.

The Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP) is a federal program jointly delivered by CFIA, DFO and EC, to provide reasonable assurances for the safe harvesting and consumption of molluscan shellfish. This program is currently under review with a view towards strengthening its delivery, governance and policy framework.

Special Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Lead the development of the Integrated National Animal Health Strategy (NAHS): The CFIA is leading the development of an Integrated National Animal Health Strategy. An Integrated Strategy will help to ensure comprehensive public and animal health protection, and contribute to a competitive economy characterized by domestic and international confidence and minimal market access restrictions. The strategy will focus on inclusive approaches to governance, accountability and investment on the part of federal, provincial and private sector stakeholders. It will also reflect advances in production systems and disease control approaches and address environmental sustainability issues such as animal disposal and disease impacts on the ecosystem.

    In conjunction with the development of the Integrated National Animal Health Strategy, the Agency is also developing an Animal Health Science Strategy that is national in scope and effect. In 2007, this strategy will continue to be developed in a collaborative manner with an aim to better align animal health sciences across governments, industry, academia and other domestic and international organizations. A functional, aligned strategy will enable all parties to better respond proactively and in a positive fashion to the rapidly changing environment of the 21st century. (Key partners — Other Federal Government Departments, Provinces and Territories, academia, Industry).
  • maple leaf symbol Advance CFIA's objectives within a National Livestock Traceability System: The CFIA is actively participating with other federal, provincial and territorial partners to establish a National Livestock Traceability Policy as part of the National Agriculture and Food Traceability system. In support of this initiative, and in partnership with groups such as the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA), the CFIA will continue to develop and implement a national movement strategy for cattle identification, an age verification database for cattle, and a quality assurance program to ensure accuracy of age verification data. (Key partners — CCIA, Provinces, Territories).
  • maple leaf symbol Contribute to the implementation of a National Wildlife Disease Strategy: (Key partners — EC, including CWS) (Details presented in Section 2.1b.)

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.3b Expected results and related indicators for protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets18

Entry and domestic spread of regulated animal diseases are controlled.

Extent to which Agency data indicates the entry of new regulated animal diseases into Canada (Listed diseases in OIE).

No evidence of entry of new regulated animal diseases into Canada through regulated pathways.

Change of animals (domestic) with regulated animal disease found in Canadian herds/flocks.

Preventing the spread of regulated animal diseases identified in Canada is effectively managed based on risk.

Industry complies with federal acts and regulations for livestock.

Extent to which feed mills inspected comply with the Feeds Act including the feed ban (under the Health of Animals Regulations)

≥92%

Extent to which renderers inspected comply with the Feeds Act including the feed ban (under the Health of Animals Regulations)

≥90% compliance

Extent to which feed mills inspected are without any major deviations, with the Feeds Act including the feed ban (under the Health of Animals Regulations)

95% Compliance

Extent to which renderers inspected are without any major deviations, with the Feeds Act including the feed ban (under the Health of Animals Regulations)

93% Compliance


18 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.3c Assessing agricultural products

Ongoing activities:

Livestock feeds, fertilizers, supplements and veterinary biologics that are effective and safe, contribute to efficient production and the maintenance of healthy livestock and crops. The CFIA assesses feed, fertilizers and supplements for their safety, efficacy and proper labelling before they can be registered for sale in Canada. Fertilizer and supplement products that are exempt from registration and do not require pre-market assessment are still monitored for compliance with prescribed standards.

The CFIA's licensing program for veterinary biologics is central to Canada's national animal health program. The program's objective is to protect the health of Canadians, their domestic pets, and animals used for food. Licences are issued based on the CFIA's evaluation of the purity, potency, safety and effectiveness of veterinary biologics. In addition, the CFIA issues import permits and export certificates for these products; investigates consumer complaints regarding suspected adverse reactions to them; inspects and monitors manufacturers and importers; and, monitors quality assurance.

Classes of agricultural products that are derived from biotechnology, such as plants with novel traits (PNTs), novel fertilizer supplements and novel feeds, are also regulated. The CFIA assesses novel products for environmental, animal and human safety and implements appropriate risk management measures prior to authorizing their release into the Canadian environment.


KEY ELEMENTS OF ASSESSING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS

  • Assess the efficacy and/or safety (environmental, plant, animal, and/or human) of agricultural products such as feeds and fertilizers and fertilizer supplements
  • Regulate plants with novel traits, novel supplements, novel livestock feeds and veterinary biologics

With the increasing cultivation of biotechnology-derived plant commodities and the variety of these products being imported, the CFIA must review the current commodity specific import requirements. This review will result in an effective and integrated approach to PNT import regulations across different commodity programs within the Agency. Canada is also facing ongoing challenges regarding imports and exports of trace levels of unintentionally present, biotechnology-derived material (adventitious presence — AP) in seeds, grains/oilseeds, livestock feed and food, including material that is not approved. AP can result in returned seed, destroyed fields, recalled food products, and shiploads of grain refused entry by some countries.

The next generation of biotechnology-derived agricultural products include plant molecular farming and transgenic animals. Plant molecular farming is the growing of plants to produce pharmaceutical or industrial compounds, instead of its traditional uses of food, feed or fibre. The CFIA recognizes that additional rules and requirements are needed to address human, livestock health and/or environmental concerns associated with these products. Transgenic animals, currently at the research stage, could contribute to the production of pharmaceuticals or more environmentally-friendly livestock.

These challenges raise economic, marketing and social questions, some of which are outside the mandate of CFIA. The Agency, is reviewing current legislative regime and capacity, and consulting with other governments, departments and stakeholders to develop Government of Canada policy for AP/unapproved events, plant molecular farming, and transgenic animals (and cloned animals).

Whether a product has been produced by conventional methods or by biotechnology, the general information requirements are the same. The Agency will continue to work to ensure that regulatory requirements for information are consistent with those of recognized international scientific groups and other national governments. This will help to maintain the quality and safety of agricultural inputs that are traded internationally.

Public outreach and awareness are integral to the maintenance of public trust and confidence in the regulatory system. The CFIA is committed to providing information to the public about its regulatory role in biotechnology. In addition on an ongoing basis, the CFIA works in concert with other federal regulatory departments in order to identify and address emerging horizontal regulatory issues.


Table 2.3c Expected result and related indicators for assessing agricultural products

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets19

Agricultural products meet the requirements of federal acts and regulations.

Extent to which confined field trials of PNTs comply with CFIA requirements.

≥90% compliance20

Extent to which fertilizer and supplement sample tests comply with efficacy standards (novel supplements).

≥95% compliance


19 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

20 Compliance rates at time of first inspection only, prior to corrective actions. Some level of non-compliance will always exist due to biological and environmental unpredictability. Both CFIA inspectors and regulated parties are alerted to these potential issues and respond quickly when they occur. Corrective actions are required for all instances of non-compliance with potential environmental and safety implications. Historically, 100% of corrective action requests have been satisfactorily carried out.

2.3d Regulatory Research — Animal and plant resource protection

The CFIA's research supports the protection of Canada's animal and plant resource base through the acquisition of new knowledge and improved technologies and methodologies for the prevention, detection, surveillance and management of animal diseases of significance to the health of humans, livestock and wildlife.

Two transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and scrapie, are present in Canadian livestock. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) another TSE, is present in wildlife or game-farmed animals. Research is conducted to increase knowledge of these diseases in order to improve their control, to protect animal and human health and to maintain trade. Research is focused on better ways to detect TSEs in live animals before signs of disease are readily apparent.

Exotic animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and classical swine fever could devastate animal health and trade in animals, if they were introduced into Canada. Research on these diseases is aimed at developing and improving tests that would enable early detection and rapid response in the event of an outbreak.

Plant based research supports the identification and control of regulated quarantine and non-quarantine plant pests and the harmonization of laboratory methods with trading partners.


KEY ELEMENT OF REGULATORY RESEARCH — ANIMAL AND PLANT RESOURCE PROTECTION

  • Conduct regulatory research in support of animal and plant resource protection

Plant pests continue to threaten the Canadian plant resource base. For the forestry industry examples include the bark beetles (Asian Longhorned Beetle, Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle and Emerald Ash Borer) and for the plant production system infestations of the potato cyst nematode, Swede Midge in canola and Hessian Fly in hay. Investigations include both improved pest detection technologies and pest control strategies. Efforts have been collaborative with both industry and other federal agencies including the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) and AAFC.

The research supported by the CFIA remains flexible and responsive to emerging issues. For example, a recent outbreak of the potato cyst nematode in Quebec has stimulated research into developing rapid molecular methods for strain identifications and confirmatory tests. Similarly, research to support the phytosanitary certification system will include investigations on appropriate disinfections for slime build up in the potato industry as well as work on establishing the presence of P. ramorum (the cause of Sudden Oak Death which continues to threaten both forestry resources and horticultural crops) in wood products destined for export. Research into the introduction of weeds through various pathways will also be supported through collaborations with our AAFC partners.

The CFIA and the CFS have integrated their efforts to address forest pests through the development of a five-year research plan. The plan promotes collaboration between the CFIA and the CFS by providing a flexible framework to identify, prioritize and structure research needs for specific forest pests. Research will focus on enhancing knowledge of forest pests, improving pest management practices, and dealing with emerging issues related to the regulation of forest pests and the prevention of new infestations. The plan will also address capacity building in support of forest pest research. Similar research plans will be developed for the other plant protection and production sectors.

Current research initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Research to develop new, rapid or improved methods to enable new or improved pest detection, to treat commodities which harbour pests and control the pests themselves: Priority is given to gaps in detecting and managing the highest risk pests.
  • maple leaf symbol Research on TSEs: The CFIA will conduct research to achieve a better understanding of the mechanism by which chronic wasting disease (CWD) causes disease in animals; determine disease markers and undertake genetic studies of scrapie in sheep to facilitate the development of better tests; and to undertake strain typing of CWD and scrapie.
  • maple leaf symbol Research on Avian Influenza (AI): The CFIA will focus on understanding the ecology, pathogenicity and transmission of viruses and the development of rapid diagnostic tests, vaccines and antivirals.
  • maple leaf symbol Research on high threat animal diseases: The CFIA will conduct research to improve testing methods for high threat animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and classical swine fever.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.3d Expected result and related indicators for regulatory research-animal and plant resource protection

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets

Decision making (including regulation) in regards to animal and plant health are supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Indicators are currently under development.21

TBD


21 The CFIA through its Performance management framework is embarking on a process for the development of performance measures for regulatory research over the course of the coming year.

 

2.4 Promoting the security of Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base

The Government of Canada is committed to protecting Canadians from deliberate threats to their safety. In April 2004, the Government issued the National Security Policy, which included the creation of the Public Health Agency of Canada, the launch of the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America, and the creation of a Government Operations Centre to provide around-the-clock coordination and support across government in the event of a national emergency. Each of these initiatives has had a direct impact on the programs and operation of the CFIA.

Under the Emergency Preparedness Act, the CFIA is mandated to prepare for, and respond to, emergencies involving food safety, animal health, plant health and any other situation related to the Agency's programs. The CFIA's emergency preparedness program focuses on activities that help the Agency and its partners reach a state of readiness to ensure an effective and rapid response to a food safety, animal disease or plant pest emergency.

In addition, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has developed the National Disaster Assistance Framework (NDAF). This is a policy and emergency planning framework to link AAFC Branches and Portfolio Partners, with the federal, provincial/territorial and private sectors to better manage and coordinate response to emergencies affecting the agri-food sector. As an AAFC Portfolio Partner, the CFIA would take the lead in situations involving the safety of food or food establishments, and the health and safety of animals and crops.


STRATEGIC OUTCOME
2.4 Security from deliberate threats to Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base
PROGRAM ACTIVITY & DESCRIPTION
Public Security (PSAT-related activities)22
Activities related to contributing to public security and agri-food security
PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITIES
2.4a Preparing for emergencies
2.4b Enhancing capacity to respond to emergencies
2.4c Regulatory research — Public security (including CRTI initiatives)
EXPECTED RESULTS
• The Agency is in a state of readiness for an effective rapid response to emergencies.
• The Agency has the capacity to respond to emergencies.
• Decision making related to public security is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.
RESOURCE ALLOCATION
  Planned Spending
2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Net Planned Spending
($ millions)
81.6 78.0 56.1
Full Time Equivalents 365 357 355

22 The 2001 Federal Budget allocated funds to be spent on public security and anti-terrorism (PSAT) activities to enhance security for Canadians.

2.4a Preparing for emergencies

Ongoing activities:

Emergency response is a challenging, shared responsibility that can involve numerous federal departments, provinces and territories, the US and other countries. Key elements of effective emergency response include appropriate policies, plans and procedures for dealing with emergencies, along with emergency exercises and training.

The Agency's emergency preparedness program focuses on activities that enable the CFIA and its partners to remain ready to respond quickly and effectively to an emergency involving food safety, an animal disease or a plant pest. The CFIA's integrated response for food safety and agricultural emergencies is based on establishing effective emergency inter-organizational links with partners and developing plans for effective emergency response. For example, under the Health of Animals Act, the CFIA is responsible for responding to foreign animal diseases (FAD) outbreaks in Canada. Given that some FAD outbreaks have the capability to spread rapidly and that some have the potential to be transmissible to humans, effective control and eradication could require the provision of extraordinary resources from a broad spectrum of stakeholders, such as the provinces/territories. The FADES plans were developed to detail the collaborative FAD emergency response activity between the CFIA and individual provinces and territories. On an ongoing basis, the CFIA conducts simulated emergency exercises which provide opportunities for emergency responders and their organizations to perform emergency duties and to build competencies.

Post-emergency situation reviews and assessments of emergency events are critical to assessing how effectively the CFIA manages emergencies. These reviews identify issues and lessons learned. They often result in recommendations related to capacity, leadership, intelligence and information management, processes and protocols, communications and linkages among partners.

The capacity to gather and critically analyse information related to potential threats to the food supply and agricultural resource base is essential to Canada's long-term security. The CFIA gathers and analyses information for decision making on an ongoing basis. This is supported by links that are maintained internally and externally with other Canadian government departments and agencies, industry, foreign governments and international bodies.


KEY ELEMENTS OF PREPARING FOR EMERGENCIES

  • Establish effective emergency inter-governmental links, including plans for emergency partner interaction and decision making
  • Develop and update emergency plans and procedures
  • Design, coordinate, conduct and participate in emergency exercises
  • Conduct situation assessments on emergency events and share lessons learned
  • Enhance the emergency operations centres with new technologies as required, and as technologies advance
  • Provide advance warning and intelligence products

Special Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Establish a Canadian veterinary reserve: Recruitment for the Canadian Veterinary Reserve (CVR) began in 2006 in order to assist governments in responding to animal health emergencies such as disease outbreaks or natural disasters. A reserve of 100 to 150 personnel is the initial target with numbers increasing over subsequent years to a final reserve population of 300 to 500 personnel. Additional capacity will also serve to augment Canada's ability to collaborate at the international level to address emerging risks at their source, without compromising its operational and business continuity obligations domestically. In 2007, orientation and training of the initial reservists will begin. (Key partners — Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), Provinces, Provincial Veterinary Associations and Registrars, PHAC, PSEPC).

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.4a Expected result and related indicators for preparing for emergencies

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets23

The Agency is in a state of readiness for an effective rapid response to emergencies.

Extent to which CFIA has implemented aspects of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada's (PSEPC) National Emergency Response System (NERS).

100% implementation.


23 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.4b Enhancing capacity to respond to emergencies

Ongoing activities:

The 2001 Federal Budget allocated funds to be spent on public security and anti-terrorism (PSAT) activities to improve security for Canadians. The CFIA has been allocated approximately $30 million per year on an ongoing basis, to increase its capacity to respond to emergencies. This includes strengthening surveillance and detection, science and laboratory capacity, and border controls.

The CFIA conducts surveillance and information sharing on an ongoing basis in order to anticipate potential deliberate threats and prepare accordingly. PSAT funding for surveillance and early-detection activities supplements the Agency's regular funding for monitoring food, animal and plant commodities.

The CFIA's laboratories provide testing services in support of food safety security and threats to the animal and plant resource base, and surveillance activities. In particular, laboratories must be capable of detecting potential high-threat agents in food and potentially harmful plant pests and foreign animal diseases. The CFIA continues to work on developing better methods and procedures for detecting pathogens such as viruses, parasites and bacteria in food, and for detecting zoonotic and foreign animal diseases. Further, the security of laboratories themselves is continuously reviewed and enhanced as necessary.

The CFIA maintains important linkages with its partners in order to respond effectively in emergency situations, and works closely with the Canada Border Services Agency in support of controls at border points.


KEY ELEMENTS OF ENHANCING CAPACITY TO RESPOND TO EMERGENCIES

  • Enhance surveillance capacity
  • Enhance effective internal mechanisms/processes to address agro-terrorism threats
  • Enhance laboratory capacity for addressing deliberate threats to the food supply and animal and plant resource base
  • Enhance laboratory bio-security


Table 2.4b Expected result and related indicators for enhancing capacity to respond to emergencies

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets24

The Agency has the capacity to respond to emergencies.

Extent to which CFIA has implemented aspects of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada's (PSEPC) National Emergency Response System (NERS).

100% implementation.


24 For more information on CFIA's performance measurement, please see Section II: Performance Information.

2.4c Regulatory research —Public security (including CRTI initiatives)

The capability to respond to new and emerging threats to our food supply is an integral component of the Agency's food safety program and enables the Agency to be a key contributor to a broad collaborative network of partners involved in efforts to strengthen Canada's preparedness for and response to potential terrorist threats. Research is undertaken to develop methodologies to detect potential contamination of the food supply which would not normally be expected to be found in food. Examples include methodologies to detect Yersinia pestis (plague) and ricin (a toxin that has potential to be used as an agent of biological warfare) in the food supply. Having the detection methodology allows the Agency to be prepared to respond to deliberate threats to our food supply.

The Agency conducts research to better protect, detect and respond to intentional and non-intentional incursions of high threat diseases. Outbreaks of contagious animal diseases, such a highly pathogenic avian influenza, foot-and-mouth disease, and classical swine fever, have the potential to devastate Canada's animal resource base and cause significant economic loss. Costs to the Agency for response to and recovery from a disease incursion would be extremely high. Although not contagious from animal to animal or spread through the food supply, anthrax could also have a significant impact. Threats posed by such diseases highlight the need for the Agency to be well-prepared and able to manage outbreaks rapidly and effectively.

The Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) represents the federal science community's response and commitment to providing scientific solutions to issues of counter terrorism and national security. Through the creation of laboratory networks across the federal government that collaborate with industry, academia and first responder communities, and through key research and technology development initiatives, the CFIA will provide new knowledge, technology, and capacity necessary for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) prevention preparedness and response. The CFIA will continue to co-chair the Biological cluster of federal laboratories with the Public Health Agency of Canada.


KEY ELEMENT OF REGULATORY RESEARCH — PUBLIC SECURITY

• Conduct regulatory research in support of public security


Current Research Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Detection of and diagnosis and outbreak analysis for specific pathogens: The CFIA will continue to validate and implement both screening and confirmation methodology for detection of level 3 pathogens such as Yersinia pestis.
  • maple leaf symbol Development of rapid field test kits: In response to outbreaks of anthrax in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in 2006, research over the next two years will focus on the development of rapid field test kits for diagnosis, predictive modeling for occurrence and spatio-temporal analysis of outbreaks.

For more information on current CRTI-related Research Initiatives see Section 3.4 Horizontal Initiatives.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy


Table 2.4c Expected result and related indicators for regulatory research — public security

Expected Results

Indicators

Performance Targets

Decision making related to public security is supported by sound, sufficient and current Agency regulatory research.

Indicators are currently under development.25

TBD


25 The CFIA through its Performance management framework is embarking on a process for the development of performance measures for regulatory research over the course of the coming year.

 

2.5 Providing sound Agency management

Accountability is the foundation on which Canada's regulatory system of responsible government rests. A strong accountability regime assures the efficient and effective use of public resources. Through the Federal Accountability Act, the Government of Canada has changed the current system of oversight and management by strengthening the rules and institutions that ensure transparency and accountability to Canadians.26

Originally created in 2003, the Management Accountability Framework (MAF) forms an integral component of the government's commitment to continuous management improvement. Since that time, the MAF has been refined to assess departmental management capacity and MAF assessments have been linked to assessments of deputy ministerial performance.

The 10 elements of the MAF collectively define management and establish the expectations for sound management of a department or agency. The CFIA continues to share the Government agenda of Management Excellence by promoting the MAF as the instrument for its own management framework.

Over the next years the CFIA will continue to implement the overall modern management principles within the MAF elements and the MAF Awareness and Excellence in Management Strategy. The CFIAs' MAF implementation will also focus on improving the management of its corporate agenda in order to clearly demonstrate a commitment to accountability. Details of the CFIA MAF III 2005-2006 action plan can be found on the internet at: http://10.130.3.204:81/english/agen/mafcrg/2005-06e.shtml. The longer term goal of the Agency is to use the MAF to routinely assess the strength of management practices. More information on the MAF can be found at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/maf-crg.

26 Federal Accountability Action Plan, April 2006


STRATEGIC OUTCOME
2.5 Providing Sound Agency Management
PROGRAM ACTIVITY
Governance and Management
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY FRAMEWORK ELEMENTS
2.5a Risk Management, Accountability, Governance and Strategic Directions, and Results and Performance
2.5b People, Values and Learning
2.5c Policy, Programs and Citizen-focussed Service
2.5d Stewardship
RESOURCE ALLOCATION
Resources attributable to "Governance and Management" have been allocated to the four other strategic outcomes of the Agency on a pro-rata share

2.5a Risk Management, Accountability, Governance and Strategic Directions, and Results and Performance


MAF ELEMENTS

INDICATORS

Risk Management

Effectiveness of Corporate Risk Management

Accountability

Alignment of Accountability Instruments

Governance and Strategic Directions

Utility of the Corporate Performance Framework

Integrity of the Corporate Management Structure

Effectiveness of Extra-organizational Contribution

Results and Performance

Quality and Use of Evaluation

Integration, Use and Reporting of Performance Information


In 2007-2008, the CFIA will complete its 2008-2013 Corporate Business Plan. This Plan will set the strategic direction for the Agency for the next five years. The process of development will be collaborative and inclusive and will forge the future direction of the Agency through internal consultation as well as external consultation with the CFIA's key stakeholders. In addition, the CFIA's Corporate Risk Profile will undergo an in depth review and update in order to better guide the Agency's priorities over the next five years.

Key Management Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Setting targets and performance reporting: The CFIA has implemented a results-oriented performance management framework (PMF) designed to improve data collection, management and performance reporting. More recently, the PMF was re-aligned to ensure consistency with the Management, Resources and Results Structure. The 2005-2006 DPR included, for the first time, reporting on measurable targets and expectations. In 2007-2008, unmet targets as well as recommendations from the OAG response to the 2005-2006 DPR will be addressed through an action plan. In addition, an ongoing working group has also been created to review, analyze and validate the 120 indicators related to the CFIA's Program Activity Architecture (PAA).

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

2.5b People, Values and Learning


MAF ELEMENTS

INDICATORS

People

Extent to which the workplace is fair, enabling, healthy and safe;

Extent to which the workforce is productive, principled, sustainable and adaptable

Public service values

Values-based Leadership and Organizational Culture

Learning, innovation and Change Management

Managing Organizational Change


In 2007-2008, the CFIA will continue to support a number of ongoing management initiatives. In 2007-2008, the CFIA's Values and Ethic Program will build on the successes of the previous year by updating the CFIA's vision, mission and values and the establishment of an Integrity Office. Focus will be on the development and implementation of a formal Values and Ethics Program.

The CFIA will also continue to pursue progress towards a workforce that reflects the diversity of the Canadian population. Goals will be monitored and reviewed on a regular basis to ensure they remain attainable.

Supporting the Official Languages program by implementing a monitoring program and raising awareness of Agency's obligations under Part VII of the Act remain a priority for the Agency and will help to ensure that official languages obligations with respect to language of work are met.

In support of the Agency's work force renewal efforts, effective Human Resources Planning including succession planning activities will continue to take place in the coming year. This includes implementation of the succession planning gap analysis designed to clearly identify priorities for action, recommended approaches and timelines.

Key Management Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Implement recruitment strategies to support current and future needs of the Agency: The Agency faces many workforce challenges such as: intense national and global competition to attract talented and knowledgeable workers, forecasted retirements of experienced staff, the need to be representative of an increasingly diverse Canadian society, and ongoing competitive challenges of recruitment in the scientific and technical field. This reality has made workforce renewal a top priority. In response to these challenges, the Agency developed a comprehensive recruitment strategy aimed at improving the Agency's corporate branding, focussing its recruitment efforts, investing in current employees and targeting key groups through specific recruitment plans. In 2007-2008, the Agency will begin implementing a workforce renewal strategy comprising four pillars — employee engagement, recruitment, training and development and innovative HR tools to expand the work underway.
  • maple leaf symbol Continue to focus on learning, including pre-requisite training for managers, support for emergency preparedness/response and additional e-learning products: The CFIA is committed to providing all employees with training and tools they need to do their jobs and support them with career-long learning and development opportunities. The CFIA has a learning policy that provides direction to managers and employees on the management of learning and encourages the development of a strong culture of continuous learning. As a learning organization, the CFIA will be able to continuously improve through new ideas, knowledge, and insights, which it will use to find new and better ways to fulfill its mission. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will endeavour to enhance the use of individual learning plans for Agency employees, complete training for all existing managers with delegated authorities, continue training new managers with delegated authorities, launch a mandatory orientation program, initiate its five year e-learning strategy, and augment measurement and evaluation processes for learning activities. The update of meat hygiene modules will be 75% complete and reflect program changes. AI preparedness modules will be implemented in operational areas. The Development Fund, which supports succession planning, has increased to approximately $2 million.
  • Implement action plans in response to issues raised in second Agency-wide employee survey: In 2003, a CFIA employee survey was conducted to gather baseline information on key workplace issues. An action plan was developed to deal with issues raised as part of this process. In September 2006, the CFIA re-surveyed its employees to assess the effectiveness of these plans and gather new information. The survey provided the CFIA employees with an opportunity to express their opinions on work-related issues (ie. staffing, communication, career, service to clients, the organization, harassment and discrimination, and labour management relations). Action plans in response to issues raised in the 2006 survey will be implemented in 2007-2008.
  • maple leaf symbol Support leadership development: The CFIA has launched a Leadership Competency Development Strategy designed to allow Branch Heads to set targets for learning that will support their mandate. Costed learning plans developed through the strategy, draw on courses offered by experts such as the Canada School of the Public Service, and integrate them with workplace activities such as mentoring, action learning groups, assignments, and e-learning opportunities. Within this strategy, the CFIA will continue to participate in public service programs geared towards leadership development (such as Interchange Canada, the Career Assignment Program, and Scientists as Leaders Development Program), University courses (degree, diploma, and certificate) and leadership development programs offered by the private sector.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

2.5c Policy, Programs and Citizen-Focussed Service


MAF ELEMENTS

INDICATORS

Policy and Programs

Quality of Program and Policy Analysis

Client-Focussed Service

Agency knowledge and response to citizens'/clients' needs and expectations


Management Initiatives:

  • Develop a Corporate Communication Strategy: During the last few years, the CFIA has faced many demands which have significantly impacted the Agency's communications operating environment. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will develop a multi-year corporate communications strategy to renew and strengthen communications across the CFIA.
  • maple leaf symbol Continued implementation of the program delivery consistency initiative: Since September 2003, the CFIA has taken steps to improve the consistency of operational delivery of the Agency's services across the country. A key component is the implementation of a quality management system which applies to three broad areas of activity: inspection, cost recovery and investigation. Implementation of consistency initiatives will continue for all program sectors in 2007 including the application of QMS to all core operations branch activities.
  • Ensure that obligations with respect to Official languages for external service delivery are met: In accordance with Part IV of the Official Languages Act, the Agency is required to have bilingual capacity in all offices designated bilingual for service to the public. Temporary administrative measures have been put in place for all offices that do not have bilingual capacity. In 2007-2008, the CFIA will continue to implement the long-term action plan developed in 2006-2007 to address this issue. The Agency aims to improve its capacity to provide services in both official languages by 10% each year during the period 2006-2007 to 2008-2009.
  • Create a consultation office and policy/framework: the Government of Canada in its policy on consulting and engaging Canadians, states that "developing new and more effective mechanisms for engaging citizens in governance is critical to the legitimacy of public institutions, the quality of public policy, and the responsiveness of public services". In 2007-2008, the CFIA will complete the development of a consultation policy/framework which supports the Agency in maintaining strategic, effective and well-managed processes for consulting and engaging its stakeholders in the development, implementation and review of its policies, programs, services and initiatives.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

2.5d Stewardship


MAF ELEMENTS

INDICATORS

Stewardship

Effectiveness of asset management

Procurement and contract management

Financial analysis

Project management

Information and IT management

Quality of TB submissions

Internal audit function

Real property

Management of transfer payments

Treasury Board conditions

Material management


On April 1 2006, Treasury Board's revised Internal Audit Policy came into effect. The objective of the policy is to strengthen public sector accountability, risk management, resource stewardship and good governance through a renewal of the internal audit function, government-wide. In addition to strengthening the role of the Chief Audit Executive, increasing oversight through the establishment of audit committees that include external membership, the revised Internal Audit Policy includes new monitoring and reporting activities for internal audit and a commitment to fostering adequately resourced and trained internal audit functions. The CFIA has adopted a proactive approach to implementation of the revised policy. A business case which addresses the requirements and implications of the revised policy was approved in 2006. An implementation plan which identifies key activities towards full implementation of the revised Internal Audit Policy in advance of the 2009 date set forth by the Treasury Board, has been completed. The CFIA will continue to work towards implementing all the elements of the revised Policy.

Key Management Initiatives:

  • maple leaf symbol Develop an Integrated Asset Management Framework: Keeping the Agency's asset base updated and in a state of readiness are critical to maintaining the capacity to respond to threats to the security of the food supply and to requirements of domestic and international standards. In April 2005, the Agency's Long Term Capital Plan (LTCP) for 2005-2006 to 2009-2010 was completed and approved by the Treasury Board, with the condition to develop an asset management framework to appropriately reflect capital investments. Over the next three years, the development of the CFIA's Integrated Asset Management Framework will ensure sound management and safe guarding of real property and moveable assets (critical information technology infrastructure, fleet vehicles, and capital equipment) and include a good governance regime for asset management strategies, integrated capital investment planning, and process improvements for life-cycle management practices. This initiative represents a major step forward in effective management of the Agency's capital investments.
  • Procurement and contract management: The CFIA delegation of Financial Signing Authorities provides managers with Spending Authority but restricts all Contracting Authority above $10K to Finance, Administration and Information Technology Branch employees within the National Procurement and Contracting Services (NPCSC) and the National Asset and Fleet Management Services Center. Contracting delegations are linked to the senior contracting positions within the NPCSC, ensuring all complex and high dollar value transactions are reviewed by the most experienced and knowledgeable contracting officials in the Agency to ensure capacity and knowledge within the NPCSC. In conjunction with the official launch of the Treasury Board Professional Development and Certification Program, in April 2006 the training plan for staff of the NPCSC will be in line with the program. In light of the GOC "Way Forward" Procurement Reform initiative, the current organizational structure and mandate of the NPCSC is under review in order to shift the organization from transactional to providing strategic procurement planning and sourcing advisory services. Under the Acquisition Card program, the NPCSC is looking at ways to increase the use of this efficient procurement tool. The NPCSC is reviewing the policy to increase from $5K to $10K the acquisition card per transaction limit. The NPCSC is also reviewing the Emergency Contracting Policy and Procedures with the view that goods and services required for emergency response be delivered in a timely fashion without compromising on financial controls.
  • Implement an Environmental Management Program: The CFIA is committed to the continued development and ongoing management of its environmental management program. A Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework has been developed as a foundation for the Agency's environmental management program, whereby outlining roles and responsibilities at the branch level for environmental management, expected program key results and a roadmap for ongoing performance measurement and reporting. This year will see the implementation of the three-year work plan, including implementation of the performance measurement framework. (targets, performance measures for each environmental aspect)
  • Sustainable Development Strategy: In 2007, the CFIA will develop a strategic plan for integrating sustainable development into the Agency, looking at economic, social and environmental drivers of success. The plan will take into account the CFIAs context, current policies, the motivation for taking this path and the risks associated with adopting an additional step in decision-making so as to devise the best approach to implementing sustainable development.

maple leaf symbol Indicates a key strategic risk mitigation strategy

 




Section III: Supplementary Information

3.1 Organizational Information

The CFIA is headed by a President, who reports to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. The following organizational chart depicts the reporting structure within the CFIA.

The CFIA has an integrated governance structure whereby all Vice Presidents and Executive Directors have specific accountabilities that contribute to the achievement of each of the CFIA's strategic objectives.

CFIA Organizational Chart

 

3.2 Financial Tables


Agency links to the Government of Canada Outcome areas ($ millions)

2007-2008

Program Activity

Operating

Capital

Contributions and
Other Transfer Payments

Gross

Respendable Revenue

Total
Main Estimates

Adjustments (Planned Spending not in Main Estimates)

Total
Planned Spending

Strategic Outcome: Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans

Food Safety and Public Health

330.8

1.0

0.1

331.9

31.3

300.6

51.8

352.4

Strategic Outcome: Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets

Science and Regulation

99.2

7.0

0.0

106.2

12.6

93.6

0.1

93.7

Strategic Outcome: A sustainable plant and animal resource base

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

119.2

1.7

1.6

122.5

10.9

111.6

0.1

111.7

Strategic Outcome: Security from deliberate threats to Canada's food supply and agricultural resource base

Public Security

71.8

10.0

0.0

81.8

0.2

81.6

0.0

81.6

Total

621.0

19.7

1.7

642.4

55.0

587.4

52.0

639.4

• Food Safety and Public Health contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's "Healthy Canadians" outcome area.
• Science and Regulation contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's "A fair and secure marketplace" outcome area.
• Animal and Plant Resource Protection contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's "Strong Economic growth" outcome area.
• Public Security contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's "A strong mutually beneficial North American Partnership" outcome area.



Table 1: Agency Planned Spending ($ millions) and Full Time Equivalents (FTEs)

($ millions)

Forecast Spending
2006-2007

Planned Spending
2007-2008

Planned Spending 2008-2009

Planned Spending 2009-2010

Food Safety and Public Health

350.1

331.9

287.5

270.8

Science and Regulation

132.0

106.2

131.1

128.5

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

117.5

122.5

116.2

114.5

Public Security

26.9

81.8

78.4

56.5

Budgetary Main Estimates (gross)

626.5

642.4

613.2

570.3

Less: Respendable revenue

55.0

55.0

55.0

55.0

Total Main Estimates

571.5

587.4

558.2

515.3

Adjustments:27

Supplementary Estimates:

Operating budget carry forward
(horizontal item)

62.9

0

0

0

Funding to improve the capacity to detect and the readiness to respond to a potential avian or pandemic influenza outbreak including emergency preparedness, research, antiviral stockpiling and rapid vaccine development technology (horizontal item)

28.8

0

0

0

Funding related to government advertising programs (horizontal item)

2.0

0

0

0

Transfer from Canada Border Services Agency — To realign funding related to the creation of the Canada Border Services Agency

1.7

0

0

0

Transfer from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada — Related to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) for the implementation of a national livestock traceability system to strengthen Canada's negotiating position in international markets

0.5

0

0

0

Transfer from Industry Canada — To undertake projects related to the development and application of biotechnology (Canadian Biotechnology Strategy)

0.4

0

0

0

Transfer to Foreign Affairs and International Trade (Foreign Affairs) — To provide administrative support to Canadian Food Inspection Agency staff located at missions abroad

(1.0)

0

0

0

Transfer to Foreign Affairs and International Trade (Foreign Affairs) — To provide support to Canadian Food Inspection Agency staff located at missions abroad

(0.1)

     

2005 Expenditure Review Committee Savings — Procurement

(1.9)

0

0

0

2006 Expenditure Restraint

(2.0)

 

0

0

Other:

Capacity to enhance Canada's Feed Ban and Mitigate Public Risks associated with BSE

0

26.6

26.6

26.6

Slaughterhouse inspection

0

25.0

25.0

25.0

Treasury Board Vote 15 (Collective Bargaining)

4.3

0

0

0

Internal Audit — Treasury Board Vote 10

0

0.4

0

0

Action Plan for the Agricultural Sector: Part II — Investments in Competitiveness (National Wine Standards)

0

0

0.3

0.3

Skyline — Repayment towards client costs

0

0

(1.6)

(1.6)

Total Adjustments

95.6

52.0

50.3

50.3

Total Planned Spending28

667.1

639.4

608.5

565.6

 

Total Planned Spending

667.1

639.4

608.5

565.6

Less: Non-respendable revenue

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

Plus: Cost of services received without charge

55.0

52.7

52.4

49.3

Net Cost of Agency

721.0

691.0

659.8

613.8

 

Full Time Equivalents

6,490

6,464

6,256

6,125


Notes:

27 The adjustments above do not include the impact of Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) charges in 2006-2007. The adjustments for the 2007-2008 and future years do include EBP charges.

28 Planned Spending changes from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009
The Planned Spending decrease of approximately $30.9 million is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for both Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) ($23.3 million) as it relates to "Specified Risk Materials Removal from Food and Re-Entering Export Markets" and "Ensuring the future of the Canadian Beef Industry", and the Agricultural Policy Framework ($5.3 million).
Planned Spending changes from 2008-2009 to 2009-2010
The Planned Spending decrease of approximately $42.9 million is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for both BSE ($16.7 million) as it relates to "Repositioning the Canadian Beef and Cattle Industry" and "Measures to address the BSE Recovery Program by Facilitating the Transition for the Cattle and Other Ruminant Industries", and the Organic Agriculture Products Regime ($2.6 million) which was implemented to maintain the credibility of the Canadian organic industry and to achieve an equivalency status to maintain European Union market access. It is also related to the sunsetting of Major Capital resources for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness ($20.0 million) which were received for 2008-2009 only, and to decreased funding for the Plum Pox Eradication efforts ($2.0 million).


Table 2: Voted and Statutory Items ($ millions)

2007-2008

Vote or Statutory
Item

Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording

Current
Main Estimates

Previous
Main Estimates

30

Operating Expenditures and Contributions

495.1

482.4

35

Capital Expenditures

19.7

14.7

(S)

Compensation Payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act

1.5

1.5

(S)

Contributions to employee benefit plans

71.1

72.9

Total Agency

587.4

571.5



Table 3: Services Received Without Charge ($ millions)

2007-2008

Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), border crossings, airports and other government departments (OGD)

24.5

Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (excluding revolving funds) Employer's contribution to employees' insured benefits plans and expenditures paid by TBS

26.9

Worker's compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada*

0.0

Office of the Auditor General — Estimated cost for the audit

0.2

Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by the Department of Justice Canada

1.1

2007-2008 Services received without charge

52.7

*Amount is less than $50K, therefore is not shown on this table.



Table 4: Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)

Forecast
Spending
2006-2007

Planned
Spending
2007-2008

Planned
Spending
2008-2009

Planned
Spending
2009-2010

Food Safety and Public Health

4.6

1.0

1.0

1.0

Science and Regulation

7.7

7.0

7.0

7.0

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

4.2

1.7

1.5

1.5

Public Security

11.7

10.0

25.2

5.1

Total

28.2

19.7

34.7

14.6

Note: the fluctuation in Capital Spending is due primarily to resources received in 2006-2007 through 2008-2009 related to Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and for resources received in 2006-2007 related to the 2005-2006 carry forward.



Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue ($ millions)

Respendable Revenue

Forecast
Revenue
2006-2007

Planned
Revenue
2007-2008

Planned
Revenue
2008-2009

Planned
Revenue
2009-2010

Food Safety and Public Health
Vote-netted Revenue

31.3

31.3

31.3

31.3

Science and RegulationVote-netted Revenue

12.6

12.6

12.6

12.6

Animal and Plant Resource Protection
Vote-netted Revenue

10.9

10.9

10.9

10.9

Public Security
Vote-netted Revenue

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Total Respendable Revenue

55.0

55.0

55.0

55.0

 
Non-Respendable Revenue
 

Forecast
Revenue
2006-2007

Planned
Revenue
2007-2008

Planned
Revenue
2008-2009

Planned
Revenue
2009-2010

Food Safety and Public Health

       

Administrative Monetary Penalties

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

Interest on Overdue Accounts Receivable

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Proceeds from sale of Crown Assets

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

Science and Regulation

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Animal and Plant Resource Protection

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Public Security

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Total Non-Respendable Revenue

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

 

Total Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

56.1

56.1

56.1

56.1



Table 6: Resource Requirement by Branch ($ millions)

2007-2008

Food Safety and
Public Health

Science
and
Regulation

Animal and
Plant Resource Protection

Public
Security

Total
Planned Spending

Operations

206.1

31.2

37.6

17.4

292.3

Programs

29.6

14.1

20.0

9.2

72.9

Science

49.8

17.7

28.1

21.5

117.1

Corporate Branches

54.4

24.2

19.9

19.0

117.5

Subtotal Operating

339.9

87.2

105.6

67.1

599.8

Capital

1.0

7.0

1.7

10.0

19.7

EBP

42.8

12.1

13.8

4.7

73.4

Statutory

0.0

0.0

1.5

0.0

1.5

Gross Planned Spending

383.7

106.3

122.6

81.8

694.4

Less: Respendable Revenue

31.3

12.6

10.9

0.2

55.0

Total

352.4

93.7

111.7

81.6

639.4



Table 7: Details on Project Spending
Over the next three years, the following projects, which have either already received Effective Project Approval (EPA) or will require Effective Project Approval, have or are expected to exceed their original delegated project approval level:
Headquarters complex for the Agriculture Portfolio - Ottawa, ON
Saskatoon Laboratory, mid-life retrofit - Saskatoon, SK
Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), mid-life retrofit - Ottawa, ON
Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), Level 3 Animal Wing, construction - Ottawa, ON
Lethbridge Laboratory, structural building reinforcement - Lethbridge, AB
Lethbridge Laboratory, mid-life retrofit - Lethbridge, AB
Burnaby Laboratory, mid-life retrofit - Burnaby, BC
St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, mid-life retrofit - St-Hyacinthe, PQ
For further information on the above-mentioned projects see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp


Details on Project Spending
($ millions) Current Estimated Total Cost Forecast Spending to March 31, 2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Planned Spending 2008-2009 Planned Spending 2009-2010 Future
Years' Spending Requirement
Food Safety and Public Health

Headquarters complex for the Agriculture Portfolio – Ottawa, ON

2.4 0.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Saskatoon Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Saskatoon, SK

6.1 0.1 0.8 0.2 2.0 0.2

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), mid-life retrofit – Ottawa, ON

9.0 0.0 0.4 0.4 1.3 5.8

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), Level 3 Animal Wing, construction – Ottawa, ON

5.2 0.0 1.1 1.6 1.4 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, structural building reinforcement – Lethbridge, AB

2.1 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Lethbridge, AB

4.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 3.3

Burnaby Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Burnaby, BC

9.0 0.2 1.8 2.3 1.0 3.1

St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, mid-life retrofit, St-Hyacinthe, PQ

5.5 0.1 1.0 1.8 1.8 0.0
Science and Regulation

Headquarters complex for the Agriculture Portfolio – Ottawa, ON

2.4 0.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Saskatoon Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Saskatoon, SK

2.4 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.8 0.2

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), mid-life retrofit – Ottawa, ON

13.4 0.1 0.7 0.6 2.0 8.8

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), Level 3 Animal Wing, construction – Ottawa, ON

6.2 0.0 1.3 1.9 1.6 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, structural building reinforcement – Lethbridge, AB

2.1 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Lethbridge, AB

4.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 3.3

Burnaby Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Burnaby, BC

2.6 0.0 0.5 0.6 0.3 0.8

St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, mid-life retrofit, St-Hyacinthe, PQ

2.2 0.0 0.4 0.7 0.7 0.0
Animal and Plant Resource Protection

Headquarters complex for the Agriculture Portfolio – Ottawa, ON

2.4 0.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Saskatoon Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Saskatoon, SK

2.4 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.8 0.2

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), mid-life retrofit – Ottawa, ON

13.4 0.1 0.7 0.6 2.0 8.8

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), Level 3 Animal Wing, construction – Ottawa, ON

6.2 0.0 1.3 1.9 1.6 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, structural building reinforcement – Lethbridge, AB

5.2 0.6 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Lethbridge, AB

10.4 0.0 0.2 0.3 1.8 8.1

Burnaby Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Burnaby, BC

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, mid-life retrofit, St-Hyacinthe, PQ

2.2 0.0 0.4 0.7 0.7 0.0
Public Security

Headquarters complex for the Agriculture Portfolio – Ottawa, ON

2.4 0.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Saskatoon Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Saskatoon, SK

1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.4 0.1

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), mid-life retrofit – Ottawa, ON

9.0 0.0 0.4 0.4 1.3 5.8

Ottawa Laboratory (Fallowfield), Level 3 Animal Wing, construction – Ottawa, ON

3.1 0.0 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, structural building reinforcement – Lethbridge, AB

1.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0

Lethbridge Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Lethbridge, AB

2.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.6

Burnaby Laboratory, mid-life retrofit – Burnaby, BC

1.3 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.1 0.4

St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, mid-life retrofit, St-Hyacinthe, PQ

1.1 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.0

 

3.3 Agency Regulatory Plan

The CFIA enforces 42 sets of regulations related to the 13 Acts that form the Agency's legislative mandate. There are 11 high and medium impact regulatory initiatives that are ongoing. When significant regulatory initiatives are proposed, a major cost-benefit analysis is completed. Proposed major regulatory initiatives are listed below.


Regulatory Initiatives 2007-200829

Medicated Feeds Regulations
(Health of Animals Act)

New regulations are being developed under the Health of Animals Act that will regulate how feeds are manufactured and will implement manufacturing to ensure that finished products meet regulatory standards. These regulations will apply to both commercial and non-commercial manufacturing operations that wish to manufacture any kind of medicated feed on their premises.

Humane Transport of Animals
(Health of Animals Regulations)

The purpose of Part XII of the Health of Animals Regulations is to regulate animal transportation in Canada by setting reasonable standards of care that address the welfare of animals in transit. The regulations require strengthening and clarification. This regulatory proposal requires that carriers involved in the transport of live animals have knowledge of the species being transported. It identifies animal transportation risk factors, and requires that these be assessed prior to transport, and that remedial action be taken to address any factors which may result in injury, suffering or death to the animals. The internet is being used as a major avenue for consultation in preparation for the publication of Gazette I.

Meat Inspection Regulations — Re-write
(Meat Inspection Act)

The purpose of the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations is to regulate the import, export and inter-provincial trade in meat products, the registration of establishments, the inspection of animals and meat products in registered establishments and the standards for animals slaughtered and for meat products prepared in those establishments. It is proposed that the Meat Inspection Regulations be re-written to support a National Meat Inspection System. This would allow for a two-tier meat inspection system where both Tiers would require QA/HACCP system in place.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations/Licensing and Arbitration Regulations — Regulatory Review
(Canada Agricultural Products Act)

 

The fresh fruit and vegetable industry is becoming increasingly concerned about a possible erosion of confidence in the fresh fruit and vegetable industry due to a number of factors including:

i. Unethical business practices

ii. Grade standards for fresh fruits and vegetables which do not reflect current market practices

iii. Lack of timely delivery of CFIA destination inspection services.

A review of the Licensing and Arbitration Regulations as well as the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Regulations will be undertaken in consultation with Canadian stakeholders and foreign partners. This initiative is intended to enhance the current Canadian regulatory regime governing product grade and trading standards, dispute resolution and deceptive practices.

Aquatic Animal Health
(Health of Animals Act)

The objective of this amendment is to bring fish under the authority of the Health of Animals Regulations thereby making fish subject to disease requirements and also qualify when appropriate for compensation.

In order to prevent the importation of animals constituting a high risk for carrying VHS, a specific amendment would prevent the importation of live fish of species that are susceptible to VHS from the States in which it has been detected (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).

Seed Streamlining and Variety Registration

Amendment
(Seeds Regulations)

Under authority of the Seeds Act, a proposed regulatory amendment is designed to increase the ability of the variety registration system to respond to evolving agri-food sector needs. This initiative is also designed to strengthen the regulatory framework and facilitate the modernization of regulations, programs and associated consultative processes governing, in particular, the production, import and sale of seed. One of the outcomes will be changes to the variety registration system which are targeted for 2007.

Enhanced Regulation of Fertilizers and Supplements
(Fertilizers Regulations)

The purpose of this regulatory initiative is to modernize the regulatory framework for fertilizer and supplement products in Canada.

This initiative will strengthen the CFIA's ability to ensure that fertilizers and supplement products offered for sale in Canada are safe and efficacious and properly labelled while ensuring a timely product assessment and approval process.

Toxic Substances Regulations
(Health of Animals Act)

The CFIA would like to enhance its ability to take regulatory action in instances where animals are suspected of being, or are known to have been, contaminated by toxic substances. The contamination of animals by chemicals or toxins has the potential to affect animal health, and public health via the human food chain. The 1990 revision to the Health of Animals Act introduced provisions to control toxic substances. While the Act currently provides the authority to prescribe (toxic substances), none are presently prescribed. The Act further specifies the way in which (toxic substances) can be prescribed. The addition of a list of toxic substances to the federal Health of Animals Regulations is therefore being proposed.

Hog Identification
(Health of Animals Act)

Because of greater risks in animal health and food safety issues due to increased human and animal movements worldwide, high dependency on exports, and increased expectations from consumers in industrialized countries, it is important to develop a national traceability program from the birth to the slaughter of pigs. The main objective of the national program is to help minimize the impacts of a foreign animal disease outbreak or a food safety crisis by a) Identifying correctly the source of the disease or contamination, and to establish correctly the control area; b) Reducing the response time; c) Helping to zone Canada in addressing the guidelines of the World Animal Health Organization, and meeting trading partners' expectations; and d) Ensuring that the national traceability system is compatible with systems developed by other Canadian livestock sectors and packers.

Plant Health Compensation Framework
(Plant Protection Act)
The CFIA, in consultation with its partners, is developing a generic regulatory framework which would be used for all compensation matters in cases where plant quarantine actions are taken for a specified pest. The key objectives of the regulatory framework are to reduce the wait time in providing compensation, to improve the consistency in application, and to clarify the circumstances under which compensation is granted, thus encouraging reporting and compliance.
Dairy Products Regulations — Update (Canada Agricultural Products Act) Food and Drug Regulations (Food and Drug Act) This amendment will be based on a recommendation emanating from the moderator of a working group made up of representatives of the dairy processor and producer industries. It will revise compositional standards for cheese, outlining the ingredients permitted for use.
For more information, visit the CFIA's Web site at: www.inspection.gc.ca/english/reg/rege.shtml

29 Treasury Board defines a high impact regulatory initiative as one that imposes present value of total direct gross costs or savings of more than $100 million (above $10 million annually) to government, industry, consumers and others and/or imposes very high impact on environment, economy, government, society and ethics, security, human health and safety, international affairs, regions of Canada, controversy or opposition. Medium impact initiatives impose present value of total direct gross cost savings of between $10 and $100 million.($1 million to $10 million annually).

 

3.4 Horizontal Initiatives

As per TBS guidelines, a horizontal initiative, for the purposes of this table, is an initiative in which partners from two or more organizations have received program funding and have formally agreed (e.g. Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions, and federal/provincial agreements) to work together to achieve shared outcomes. The following table outlines the CFIA's horizontal initiatives for 2007-2008.


Initiative

Profile

Partners

Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products (BPC)

This initiative incorporates efforts of six federal government partners to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the pesticide regulatory system, to protect health and environment and to increase the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors. The CFIA is delivering on two of the 13 programs:

• Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in foods and feed (Chemical Residues, Food Safety);

• Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residues in fertilizers and pesticide guarantee verification in fertilizer-pesticide combinations (Fertilizer Section, Plant Products Directorate).

A total amount of $5.1 million was allocated to the CFIA to cover these two programs over a seven-year period, starting in 2002-2003 and ending in 2008-2009.

A formative evaluation was conducted in 2005-2006 to assess strengths and weaknesses of the initiative and identify adjustments required to achieve the planned outcomes. A summative evaluation will be conducted in 2007-2008 to examine progress toward achievement of expected outcomes.

Lead: Health Canada (PMRA)

• Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

• Department of Fisheries and Ocean

• Environment Canada

• Natural Resources Canada

Public Security and Anti-terrorism (PSAT) Initiative

In the 2001 Budget, the government allocated $7.7 billion in new funds to be spent over the next five years on the PSAT initiative to enhance security for Canadians. As a contributing Agency, the CFIA will:

• deliver all federal food inspection, animal health, and plant protection measures; and,

• respond to outbreaks of pests and diseases in plants and animals.

More information on this initiative can be found in Section 2.4.

Lead: PSEPC

• Provinces/ Territories

• Canada Border Service Agency

Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: Focus on Animal and Human Health Issues

Canada is facing two major, inter-related animal and public health threats: the potential spread of avian influenza virus (H5N1) to wild birds and domestic fowl in Canada and the potential for a human-adapted strain to arise, resulting in human-to-human transmission, potentially triggering a human influenza pandemic. A coordinated and comprehensive plan to address both avian and pandemic influenza is required.

Under the umbrella of "Preparing for Emergencies", in 2006 the CFIA obtained $195M to be spent over five years to enhance Canada's state of AI preparedness. Canada's Avian Influenza Working Group was established in 2006 to update policies, protocols, operating procedures, and systems to enhance Canada's state of preparedness — through collaborations and partnership — in five pillars of strategies and processes for prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, emergency response, recovery, and communications.

Lead: Public Health Agency of Canada

• Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

• Health Canada

• Environment Canada

• Provinces/Territories

• Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

Chemical, Biological Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN)

Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI)

The events of September 11, 2001 moved the issues of counter terrorism and national security to the forefront of the nation's concerns. CRTI represents the federal science community's response and commitment to providing science solutions to these issues. Through the creation of laboratory networks across the federal government that collaborate with industry, academia and first responder communities, and through key research and technology development initiatives, the CFIA will provide new knowledge, technology, and capacity necessary for CBRN prevention preparedness and response.

As well, the CFIA will continue to co-chair the biological cluster of federal laboratories with the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Current CRTI -related research initiatives include:

•   Develop more effective rapid detection tests; including those that use high throughput techniques and nanotechnology for sensitive and more efficient detection.

•   Continue to develop surveillance and communication networks; with provincial partners in order to improve early detection of high threat animal diseases and improve linkages, with the National US Animal Health Laboratory Network.

Lead: DND

• Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

• Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

• Canadian Security and Intelligence Service

• Defence Research and Development Canada

• Fisheries and Oceans Canada

• Environment Canada

• Health Canada

• Public Health Agency of Canada

• National Research Council

• Natural Resources Canada

• Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

• Royal Canadian Mounted Police

• Transport Canada

Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology

The Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology (CRSB) aims to develop an efficient, credible and well-respected regulatory system that safeguards the health of all Canadians and the environment and permits safe and effective products. It does this by enhancing human resource capacity, improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the regulatory system improving transparency and public awareness and increasing knowledge to improve decision making. The CRSB will also continue to provide a bridge to adapt to emerging novel applications of biotechnology, as guided by Smart Regulation principles and by a strengthened horizontal governance mechanism for shared regulatory policy development and decision making.

The CRSB departments and agencies will be implementing the results of a summative evaluation which identified that expected results are being achieved.

Lead: Rotating

• Health Canada

• Environment Canada

• Industry Canada

• Fisheries and Oceans Canada

• Natural Resources Canada

AAFC-CFIA MOU on the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF)

On December 2, 2003, the President of the CFIA and the Deputy Minister of AAFC signed a Memorandum of Understanding between the CFIA and AAFC on the APF.

The MOU sets out general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management of the following initiatives funded under the APF and implemented by the CFIA: Medicated Feed Regulations; and On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program.

A total amount of $27.0 million is provided to the CFIA under the APF to cover the two initiatives over a five-year period, starting on April 1, 2003.

• Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

More information on horizontal initiatives can be found at:
www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/profil-eng.asp

 

3.5 Internal Audits and Evaluations


Name of
Internal Audit
or Evaluation

Audit Type or Evaluation Type

Status

Expected completion date

Audit

Imports — All Sectors Management Control Framework Audit

Management Control Framework

planned

2007-2008

Plant Protection — Management Control Framework Audit

Management Control Framework

planned

2007-2008

Food Safety
(Non-federally registered sector) — Management Control Framework Audit

Management Control Framework

planned

2007-2008

Audit of the Food Safety Enhancement Program (FSEP)30

Performance/
Management Control Framework

ongoing

2007-2008

Audit of Human Resources Function

Performance

ongoing

2007-2008

Follow-up Audit to Food Emergency Response Review

Follow-up

planned

2007-2008

Audit of the Accredited Veterinarian Program

Compliance

completed

2006-2007

Audit of Physical Security

Compliance/
Management Control Framework

ongoing

2006-2007

Follow-up Audits of Previous Audits

Follow-up

completed

2006-2007

Mapping of Various Financial and Human Resources Processes

Assurance Engagement

completed

2006-2007

Evaluation

Evaluation of the Meat Inspection Program

Formative

planned

2007-2008

Evaluation of the Dairy Program

Formative

completed

2006-2007

Evaluation of the Accredited Veterinary Program

Formative

completed

2006-2007

Evaluation of the Canadian Regulatory Strategy for Biotechnology (interdepartmental)

Summative

ongoing

2006-2007

Evaluation of the Feed Program31

Formative

ongoing

2006-2007

Evaluation of the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program

Formative

ongoing

2006-2007

Evaluation of the Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative

Formative

ongoing

2006-2007

Evaluation the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Program

Formative

ongoing

2006-2007


Executive Summaries of completed audits, reviews, and evaluations can be referenced at the following link: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/audit/audit/audite.shtml

The Internal Audit Plan and the Evaluation Plan is available at the following link: http://www.inspection.gc.ca

Other audits will be undertaken in 2007-2008 following an update of the CFIA's risk-based audit plan and further direction from the Office of the Comptroller General for government-wide internal audits. The CFIA will also continue to work on the implementation of all elements of the revised Policy on Internal Audit. Other evaluations will be undertaken following the review of the annual evaluation plan.

30 Identified as the Audit of CFIA's Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HAACP) Program in the 2006-2007 RPP.

31 Identified as the Audit of Feed Program in the 2006-2007 RPP.

 




Section IV: Annexes

4.1 Summary of changes to performance measures


STRATEGIC OUTCOME: Protection from preventable health risks related to food safety or the transmission of animal diseases to humans

PROGRAM ACTIVITY: Food Safety and Public Health

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.1a Managing food safety risks

EXPECTED RESULT: Food safety incidents in non-federally registered facilities and food products produced in them are addressed.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which projects are developed to address major health risks identified through the science committee process in the area of chemical, microbiological, allergen and nutritional hazards.

Inspection strategies are developed to address 100% of major health risks identified through the science committees.

Refined indicator and target



STRATEGIC OUTCOME: Protection of consumers through a fair and effective food, animal and plant regulatory regime that supports competitive domestic and international markets

PROGRAM ACTIVITY: Science and Regulation

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.2a Promoting science-based regulation

EXPECTED RESULT: The Agency contributes to the development and implementation of international rules, standards and agreements and arrangements through international negotiations.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which the international regulatory framework reflects Agency and stakeholders' priorities and needs.

100% of newly concluded international SPS-related agreements for which the CFIA is the lead for Canada are coherent and science-based.

New 2007-2008

100% of the international plant health standards adopted this fiscal year underwent consultation and feedback was provided to the relevant standard-setting organization.

New 2007-2008

EXPECTED RESULT: The Agency applies sound and current science to the development of national standards, operational methods and procedures.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which the Agency's standards, operational methods and procedures reflect sound and current science.

100% of newly completed SPS-related standards, operational methods, policies, guidelines, handbooks and procedures reflect sound and coherent science.

New 2007-2008

National standard setting, program and policy design/redesign, and risk mitigation strategies are informed by sound and current science.

New 2007-2008

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.2b Maintaining an effective regulatory framework

EXPECTED RESULT: Transparent, outcome-based and science-based domestic regulatory framework is maintained

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which the CFIA's mandate and activities are supported by Acts and regulations that reflect priorities and requirements of the Agency and its stakeholders.

100% of newly passed legislation and regulations (SPS-related) are transparent, outcome-based, science-based and are deemed to have responded to new technologies, emerging threats and public priorities.

New 2007-2008

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.2c Protecting consumers and the marketplace from unfair practices

EXPECTED RESULT: Deceptive and unfair market practices are deterred.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which non-pedigreed seed samples comply with CFIA quality standards.

≥85% compliance

Refined indicator

Extent to which pedigreed seed samples comply with CFIA quality standards.

≥95% compliance

Refined indicator

Extent to which pedigreed seeds tested comply with standards for varietal purity.

≥99% compliance

Refined indicator

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.2d Certifying exports

EXPECTED RESULT: Other governments' import requirements are met.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change 2007-2008

Extent to which plant export shipments meet the receiving country's phytosanitary requirements.

≥99% of plant export shipments meet the import requirements.

New 2007-2008



STRATEGIC OUTCOME: A sustainable plant and animal resource base

PROGRAM ACTIVITY: Animal and Plant Resource Protection

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.3a Protecting Canada's crops and forests

EXPECTED RESULT: Entry and domestic spread of regulated plant diseases and pests are controlled.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change
2007-2008

Extent to which Agency data indicates the entry of new regulated diseases and pests into Canada (Listed diseases/pests in the Regulated Pest List for Canada).

Preventing the entry of new regulated diseases and pests into Canada through regulated pathways is effectively managed based on risk.

Refined target

Change in the presence of plant diseases or pests beyond the regulated areas.

Preventing the spread of regulated plant diseases and pests in Canada is effectively managed based on risk.

Refined target

Extent to which annual planned pest surveys are completed in accordance with CFIA pest specific detection protocols.

100% of the overall annual planned pest surveys are completed / deemed acceptable per CFIA pest specific detection protocols.

Refined indicator

EXPECTED RESULTS: Industry complies with federal acts and regulations concerning Canada's crops and forests.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change
2007-2008

Extent to which bulk-blend fertilizers comply with efficacy standards and fertilizer-pesticide samples tested, comply with safety standards (non-biotechnology product).

≥95% compliance rate for bulk blend fertilizer samples tested, based on efficacy standards (non-biotechnology product).

Refined indicator and target

≥95% compliance rate for fertilizer-pesticide samples tested, based on safety and efficacy standards (non-biotechnology product).

Extent to which fertilizers and supplement sample tests (heavy metal, pathogen, and pesticide contamination) comply with safety standards.

95% compliance rate for fertilizer and supplement samples tested (heavy metal, pathogen, and pesticide contamination) based on safety standards.

Refined indicator and target

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.3b Protecting Canada's livestock and aquatic animals

EXPECTED RESULT: Entry and domestic spread of regulated animal diseases are controlled.

Indicator

Performance Target

Change
2007-2008

Extent to which Agency data indicates the entry of new regulated animal diseases into Canada (Listed diseases in OIE).

No evidence of entry of new regulated animal diseases into Canada through regulated pathways.

Refined target

Change of animals (domestic) with regulated animal disease found in Canadian herds/flocks.

Preventing the spread of regulated animal diseases identified in Canada is effectively managed based on risk.

Refined target

PROGRAM SUB-ACTIVITY: 2.3c Assessing agricultural products

EXPECTED RESULT: Agricultural products meet the requirements of federal acts and regulations

Indicator

Performance Target

Change
2007-2008

Extent to which supplement sample tests comply with efficacy standards (novel supplements).

≥95% compliance

Refined indicator


29 The Feed Program is in a state of transition with several regulatory amendments in progress during 2007-2008 (Feed Ban Enhancements, Medicated Feed Regulations and Toxic Substance Regulations). These regulatory amendments will impact feed program targets and indicators during this interval. Performance indicator adjustments and/or new program design elements will be built in for the required performance reporting in the coming year.

 

4.2 Acronyms


AAFC Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
AI Avian Influenza
AP Adventitious presence
APF Agricultural Policy Framework
BCP Business Continuity Planning Program
BSE Bovine spongiform encephalopathy
CBRN Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear
CBSA Canada Border Services Agency
CCIA Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
CFIA Canadian Food Inspection Agency
CFS Canadian Forest Service
CGC Canadian Grain Commission
CODEX Codex Alimentarius Commission
CRSB Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology
CRTI Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Radio-Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative
CSGA Canadian Seed Growers Association
CVMA Canadian Veterinary Medical Association
CWD Chronic Wasting Disease
CWS Canadian Wildlife Service
DFO Fisheries and Oceans Canada
EC Environment Canada
EU European Union
F/P/T Federal/provincial/territorial
FAA Federal Accountability Act
FAD Foreign Animal Disease
FADES Foreign Animal Disease Emergency Support
FF&V Fresh fruits and vegetables
FTEs Full-time equivalent
HACCP Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point
HC Health Canada
HR Human Resources
IAS Invasive Alien Species
IC Industry Canada
IM/IT Information Management/Information Technology
LTCP Long-term Capital Plan
MAF Management Accountability Framework
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
MRRS Management, Resources and Results Structure
NAAHP National Aquatic Animal Health Program
NCE Network of Centres of Excellence
NPCSC National Procurement and Contracting Services
NRCAN Natural Resources Canada
OFFS On-Farm Food Safety
OIE World Organisation for Animal Health
OTF Organic Production System Task Force
PAA Program Activity Architecture
PHAC Public Health Agency of Canada
PMF Performance Management Framework
PNTs Plants with novel traits
PSAT Public Security and Anti-Terrorism
PSEPC Public Security and Emergency Preparedness Canada
QA Quality Assurance
RPP Report on Plans and Priorities
SARS Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
SOP Standard Operating Procedure
SPP Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America
SPS Sanitary and Phytosanitary
SRM Specified risk material
S&T Science and technology
TBS Treasury Board Secretariat
TSEs Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies
WTO World Trade Organization

 

4.3 Web Links


Canadian Food Inspection Agency www.inspection.gc.ca
Animals www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/animae.shtml
Avian Influenza www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/avflu/avflue.shtml
Regulating agricultural biotechnology www.inspection.gc.ca/english/sci/biotech/bioteche.shtml
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/bseesbfse.shtml
Corporate Business Plan www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/busplan/2003-2008/indexe.shtml
Livestock feeds www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/feebet/feebete.shtml
Food Recalls and Allergy Alerts www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/recaltoce.shtml
Food www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/fssae.shtml
Food Safety Web Wheel www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/educ/gamejeu/wheeroue.shtml
Invasive Alien Species www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/invenv/invenve.shtml
Aquatic Animals www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/aqua/aquae.shtml
Plants www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/plavege.shtml
Prosecution Bulletins www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/projud/projude.shtml
Rabies www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/rabrag/rabrage.shtml