As an indeterminate or term federal public servant, you have many avenues open to you for career advancement. Keep checking the Public Service staffing advertisements and notifications or sign up with Career Watch to receive e-mail notices about the latest job opportunities.

If you are to be tested as part of an appointment process, the Public Service Commission offers information about various tests and tips for candidates along with sample questions in some cases.

Take learning very seriously and focus on strengthening your learning plan. Consider learning activities beyond traditional classroom training to help you to meet your career development objectives.

You might, for instance, consider looking for a mentor and establishing a supportive learning relationship. The mentor shares knowledge and professional experience while providing advice and guidance. Another option would be to work with a coach.

Develop your skills on-the-job

In working with a coach, you will need to trust the coach enough to be open and honest, as well as be willing to question the way you do things. Being coached means making changes in how you see yourself, other people, and situations. It may mean changes in how you do things or changes in the outcomes of your actions, even changes in how other people experience you.

Being honest about your level of commitment and where you need help shapes the focus and success of your work with a coach. While many coaches have great credentials, there has to be a good “fit” between the learner and the coach.

The one-on-one relationship between the coach and the individual is an essential ingredient for success. Coaching should be a two-way conversation that helps overcome problems, generates creative ideas and solutions, develops knowledge or skills and improves performance.

How will you and your coach relate to each other?

After your first meeting, ask yourself these questions.

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